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2010 GateHouse Media Newsroom Handbook

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GateHouse Media’s newsroom handbook, a development project I have coordinated, which the help of other News & Interactive directors.

GateHouse Media’s newsroom handbook, a development project I have coordinated, which the help of other News & Interactive directors.

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  • 1. GateHouse MediaNewsroom Handbook 2010
  • 2. Newsroom Handbook 2010GateHouse Media Table of contents I ABOUT THE BOOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 II SUPPORT AND COMMUNICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 GateHouse News Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 GHNewsroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 ZenDesk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 III THE CONTENT CUBE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Culture Cube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Management development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 • Leadership styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 • SMART writing goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 • Effective feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Personnel development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 • Alternative story formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 • Breakout boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 • Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Product development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 • Newsroom incubator program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 News Cube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Public service journalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 • Story templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Community partner journalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 • Profile templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Staff blogging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Community blogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Web Cube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Constant local updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 • The three layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 • Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 • Photo galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Reader involvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 • Polls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 • Reader callouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 • General recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 • 2010 reader callout calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 • Reader advisory board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 • Social networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 • Other recommendations (linking, maps, live chats) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 • What content goes online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 • Story comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 2
  • 3. GATEHOUSE MEDIA NEWSROOM HANDBOOK | TABLE OF CONTENTS Video style guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 • Shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 • Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 • Additional video resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 • Equipment recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 IV ZOPE PUBLISHING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Content guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Maximizing your templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 • Top navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 • Secondary navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 • Hot links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 • News Now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 • Top stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 • Promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 • Carousel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 • Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 • Bottom sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Site services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Marketplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Community information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Homepage sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Zope publishing how-to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Building your templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 • About your Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 • Vertical ad positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 • Add a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 • Create a sidebar for a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 • Add external links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 • Upload stories to Zope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 • Add links within a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 • Add links to related stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 • Bold and italicize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 • Update, revise and correct a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 • Add video to a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 • Publish content to a carousel, highlights or News Now . . . . . . . . . . 94 • Add a big package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 • Set your navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 • Create hot links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 • Post breaking news . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 • Create promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 • Create a photo gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 • Create a video gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 • Add a poll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 3
  • 4. GATEHOUSE MEDIA NEWSROOM HANDBOOK | TABLE OF CONTENTS • Create homepage sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 • Set up site services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 • Create a contact page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 • Reposition ads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 • Schedule a story for future publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 • Retract/delete a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 • Copy a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 • Manage, moderate comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 • Manage, moderate registered users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 • Give levels of privilege . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 • Manage Zope users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 V ADDENDUMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Addendum 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Holiday/event callouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Addendum 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Online glossary terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Addendum 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Online content: What goes and what doesn’t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Breaking news . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Police blotter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Courts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Public record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Meeting stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • General news stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Elections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 • Lifestyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 • Society and celebrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 • Sports games and other sports content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Addendum 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 GateHouse Media vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 • Online vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 • Print vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Addendum 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Google Analytics guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 • Accessing the data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 • Analyzing the data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 • Advertising analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 • Newsroom analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 • Newsroom resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 • Glossary terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 4
  • 5. Newsroom Handbook 2010 GateHouse Media About the book THE GATEHOUSE NEWS & INTERACTIVE DIVISION’S NEWSROOM HANDBOOK is intended to provide newsrooms of all sizes clear definition on a variety of key print and online strategies. In this handbook you will find detailed information on the company’s Web and print strategy, recommended productivity benchmarks and resources to accomplish the guidelines. } You also will find information on: • New details on support and communication resources.This contentis new to the • A detailed daily and weekly schedule for posting Web updates, photo galleries and polls.Newsroom • How best to use social media tools to increase traffic and not duplicate content already on your site.Handbook • New guidelines and production benchmarks for staff and community bloggers. • How to involve readers through 48 callouts for submissions this year. • New guidelines for alternative story formats. • New breakout box guidelines. • Guidelines to determine what should and should not go online. • Guidelines for managing comments and forums. • New guidelines for producing consistently formatted video. Every print and online situation you come across on a daily basis is not necessarily documented in this guide, but today’s most pressing issues and topics are. You are encouraged to use the support and communication page in the back of this handbook to contact corporate staff for topics addressed here that you want more clarity on or for topics you do not find here. We hope this handbook provides clarity on the challenges you face in managing your newsrooms. BRAD DENNISON Vice President, News & Interactive Division DAVID ARKIN Executive Director, News & Interactive Division 5
  • 6. Newsroom Handbook 2010 GateHouse Media Support and communication } GATEHOUSE NEWS SERVICE (www.gatehousenewsservice.com) The news service offers a variety of lifestyle, opinion and niche content to GateHouse newspapers.All contenton this page Here’s what you can find every week on GateHouse News Service:is new to the MONDAY Health Watch, a weekly health rail; a health column; a health centerpiece; and a health page.Newsroom You’ll also find Shoestring Living, our weekly frugal column. In season, our NASCAR page posts on Monday.Handbook TUESDAY Food for Thought, a weekly food rail; a food column; a food centerpiece; and our food page. WEDNESDAY Family Time, a weekly family rail; Home Help, a weekly home rail; a home and garden centerpiece; a column; and our home page. In season, you’ll find our Pro Football Weekly pages. THURSDAY Religion News, a weekly religion rail; and Biz Bits, a weekly business rail. Also, our Go Green page posts. FRIDAY Our NIE KidzBuzz page posts for the following week. Special sections | GateHouse News Service produces dozens of special sections every year. Some of our more popular sections include Family (monthly), Bride (twice a year), Healthy Living (quarterly) and Boomers (quarterly). You’ll also find other tabs and pages in our niche section. Here is a link to the Niche 2010 schedule: www.ghnewsroom.com/article/gatehouse-2010-niche-schedule. How to submit content | If you have content you think would be of interest to newspapers outside of your area, you can submit it for consideration to GateHouse News Service. When you are publishing a story to your own Web site, you can click on the area that says: “Submit content to GateHouse News Service.” The content will come to an area for news service staff to review. We will edit and republish shareable con- tent to the news service in the appropriate categories. What kind of content should be submitted to the news service | When considering submitting a story to the news service first ask yourself if it is of universal interest outside of your community. If it is, below are recommendations on what to submit. These recommendations are based on analysis of the type of content most newspapers use from the news service. • Lifestyles: Fitness tips based on interviews with personal trainers at a new workout place in your town (the focus has to be on the fitness tips); food stories, especially recipes; home improvement stories; gardening tips. • Opinions: National editorials, general-interest columns and editorial cartoons. • Entertainment: Movie, CD and book reviews, especially if they’re about widely distributed items (self-published books aren’t great because you can’t find them in a local bookstore). • What not to submit: Don’t submit any AP content because we can’t include that on the news service. Also, only sports stories of national interest should be submitted. Please do not submit high school sports stories. How to use syndications on your Web site | GateHouse News Service content can flow onto your Web site in certain areas to offer your Web viewers even more to read and look at each day. Here are some recommended categories for syndication to your Web site: movie reviews, music, health, food, home and cartoons. News service syndications are best used as subsections. How to set up syndicated content in five simple steps: 1. In your Zope site, go to “Choose Section” in the top navigation bar and click on the section you want the content to flow into. For example, if you want to subscribe to the news service Health section and have that content flow into your sites Lifestyle section, click on your Lifestyle section in the “Choose Section” dropdown menu. 2. Click on “Subscriptions” in orange navigation bar. 3. Click on the domain you want to subscribe from the “Available Domains” list. 4. Click on the right-facing arrow so the category shows up in the “Subscription” list. 5. Click “Apply.” The content of that domain will flow onto your site when updated and into the section you selected in step 3. CONTACT If you have questions about GateHouse News Service and Niche, contact Jean Hodges, national news service editor, at jhodges@gatehousemedia.com. 6
  • 7. GATEHOUSE MEDIA NEWSROOM HANDBOOK | SUPPORT & COMMUNICATION GHNEWSROOM.COM GHNewsroom is your one-stop shop for all company online news, tips and resources. Youll find a wealth of how-to videos on the basics of posting and managing content in Zope and editing tips and tricks that will help you produce great video reports. You will find our weekly online update and other online development news on the site, along with } columns and blogs from the companys Web content team. Get answers to your online training and development questions by visiting our training section:This content www.ghnewsroom.com/category/training.is new to theNewsroom What you can find every week on GHNewsroom:Handbook MONDAY News & Interactive Division video update: Find out what training is planned for the week, along with other important news within the division. TUESDAY Best Photos of the Week: A gallery of some of the best photos GateHouse Media photographers captured the previous week. WEDNESDAY Poll idea: Receive details on a national poll question you could post on your Web site. THURSDAY Video of the Week: This highlights the best video produced every week, with tips from the producer on how they shot and edited the video. FRIDAY Web Cube Moments of the Week: Highlights of how GateHouse Media newspapers are practicing the Web Cube strategy. Every day on GHNewsroom • A gallery of GateHouse Media front pages • The best front page of the day How to submit Send a pdf of your front page every day to frontpages@gatehousemedia.com to have your page featured in our gallery. CONTACT Have something innovative in print or online your newspaper has recently done? Send in- formation about it to darkin@gatehousemedia.com. ZENDESK (gatehouse.zendesk.com) If you have technical problems or questions with your Web site, use the ZenDesk for immediate support. Support for more content-related items can be directed to personnel on the next page. Here are a few examples of technical needs and questions that the ZenDesk is set up for: classified } (jobs, real estate and auto), video tributes, domain requests and Zope user-management questions. Use our support ticket system to get issues for your Web site resolved.This contentis new to the Here’s how your ticket will be addressed once the support staff receives it:Newsroom • Those who submit a ticket should expect to learn within an hour who is handling their ticket.Handbook • Tickets are handled by News & Interactive personnel in an effort to get tickets in the hands of content and technical experts who can address your specific needs. Many of those experts will be calling to dis- cuss your ticket when the topic is more content- or strategy-related and not a technical request. • Once a ticket is submitted, if training materials are available, such as informational sheets or how-to videos, staff will provide those documents when it’s noted who will be handling the ticket. • In an effort to continue to improve the ticket system, once a ticket is resolved, each submitter can take a five-question survey at the bottom of the ticket that will provide useful feedback. 7
  • 8. GATEHOUSE MEDIA NEWSROOM HANDBOOK | SUPPORT AND COMMUNICATION PERSONNEL } Brad Dennison | Vice President/News & Interactive DivisionThis content bdennison@gatehousemedia.com | 585-802-3688is new to theNewsroom • General local strategy questionsHandbook • Development requests • Vendor requests and issues • Ethical questions and issues David Arkin | Executive Director/News & Interactive Division darkin@gatehousemedia.com | 630-936-6070 • General online content questions and support • Overall online training coordination • Content implementation questions and support • Content questions, direction for new online features • Archive transition questions and support Chris Biondi | Coordinator of Online Content/News & Interactive Division cbiondi@gatehousemedia.com | 585-802-9538 • Analytics questions (technical and strategic) • Blogging platform and development questions and training • Social networking strategy • Story comments and forums Tom Sudore | Coordinator of Multimedia Development/News & Interactive Division tsudore@gatehousemedia.com | 585-200-4058 • Video questions, support, training and equipment needs • Zope content support and training • Syndication questions and support 8
  • 9. Newsroom Handbook 2010GateHouse Media The Content Cube3 TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 CULTURE CUBE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Management development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 • Leadership styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 • SMART writing goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 • Effective feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Personnel development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 • Alternative story formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 • Breakout boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 • Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Product development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 • Newsroom incubator program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 NEWS CUBE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Public service journalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 • Story templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Community partner journalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 • Profile templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Staff blogging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Community blogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 WEB CUBE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Constant local updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 • The three layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 • Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 • Photo galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Reader involvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 • Polls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 • Reader callouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 • General recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 • 2010 reader callout calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 • Reader advisory board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 • Social networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 • Other recommendations (linking, maps, live chats) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 • What content goes online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 • Story comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Video style guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 • Shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 • Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 • Additional video resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 • Equipment recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 9
  • 10. GateHouse Media The Content Cube 3 | Overview THIS HANDBOOK documents GateHouse Media’s Web online and print strategy as explained through the Content Cube3. The Content Cube3 focuses on a few significant areas: training, print and online development, and reader and community involvement. The different “cubes” connect with one another from a content and development standpoint. 3 CULTURE CUBE The Culture Cube3 is a mix of our training and development programs that helps newsrooms grow and develop. Management development | The GateHouse Newsroom Leadership Series provides an intense two- day training program for editors at all levels on the key areas of newsroom management, with a specific focus on new media development. Personnel development | Our regional training series offers a variety of hands-on teaching in focused regions on topics such as new story formats, editing, reporting, photo toning and design. Product development | The Newsroom Incubator program helps newspapers restructure their organizations, content and, in the end, the presentation of their products. 3 NEWS CUBE The News Cube3 program serves as a simple way to increase local news while saving time through new formats and more reader involvement in your print product. Reader involvement | This portion focuses on how to get readers engaged with your site by involving them with staff and community blogs, polls and social networking. Community partnership journalism | This program focuses on utilizing community organizations to help supply static content throughout the newspaper. Public service journalism | Through alternative story formats, public service journalism can help cre- ate positive change in communities and keep readers in the loop concerning how their tax dollars are being spent. 3 WEB CUBE The Web Cube3 helps increase unique online content throughout the day, while seeking avenues to en- gage readers in local sites. Constant updating | This portion focuses on driving local updates throughout the day through con- tent newspapers are covering and content that’s coming in to their newsroom. Multimedia | This portion focuses on developing consistent photo galleries and video for local sites. Reader Involvement | This program helps newsrooms seek reader photos and stories dozens of times throughout the year, with a significant promotion resource offered. 3 THE CONTENT CUBE Comprehensive, cohesive training and implementation for print and digital publishing. 3 Culture Cube 3 News Cube Web Cube 3 Management development Reader involvement Constant updating Newsroom Leadership Series User-generated content News Now Personnel development Community involvement Multimedia Regional training series Indentify partners Video and photo galleries Product development Public service journalism Reader involvement Newsroom incubator program Keep readers informed Engagement and callouts 10
  • 11. GateHouse Media The Content Cube 3 | Culture 3 CULTURE CUBE The Culture Cube is a mix of training and development that helps newsroom staff learn and grow. MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT The GateHouse Newsroom Leadership Series is an intensive training program for editors at all levels on the key areas of newsroom management, with a specific focus on new-media development. }NOTABLESHere’s some A variety of management topics are addressed during the training session, including managementinformation that styles, goal-setting and effective feedback.editors areprovided duringthe training 1. LEADERSHIP STYLESprepared by Every editor has to find the management style that best fits him or her. During the training, editors aretrainer Elaine provided a variety of styles to consider and the impacts of that style.Kramer. DANIEL GOLEMAN’S SIX LEADERSHIP STYLES From his “Primal Leadership” book Underlying When the Long-term The emotional style overall impact approach intelligence works best on climate component Transparency, When changes Moves people self-confidence, require a new vision Most strongly VISIONARY/ toward a vision or self-awareness, or when a clear positive AUTHORITATIVE shared dream. empathy, change direction is needed. catalyst. To help an Develops people Developing others, employee improve for the future empathy and Highly COACHING performance or through learning rapport, positive develop long-term and growth. self-awareness. strengths. To heal rifts in a Promotes Empathy, team or harmony and building AFFILIATIVE to motivate people Positive builds emotional relationships, during stressful bonds. communication. circumstances. To build buy-in Forges Collaboration, or consensus, consensus DEMOCRATIC team leadership, or to get input Positive through communication. from valuable participation. employees. Sets high To get immediate Often highly standards for Conscientiousness, results from a negative, because PACESETTING/ performance drive to achieve, highly motivated too frequently is DRIVING and drives initiative. and competent poorly executed the work hard. team. Highly negative, Drive to In a crisis, to kick- Demands because achieve, initiative, start a turnaround, COMMANDING immediate action, so often is emotional or with problem compliance. misused self-control. employees. 11
  • 12. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE 2. WRITING SMART GOALS Creating and writing goals for staff members for their overall expectations or a specific project is key to making sure the employee understands what’s expected and how to achieve the task. SMART goals (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-based) are a simple and effective way to commu- nicate clear expectations. Here are details on the five areas: Specific | Goals must be clear and well-defined, or the person won’t understand the expectations. • Not specific: Improve your communication. • Specific: Initiate a conversation with your editor first thing in the day about the day’s anticipated sto- ries and story forms. Measurable | Goals must have milestones that show whether the goals have been achieved or partly achieved. • Not measurable: Produce content for the Web. • Measurable: Submit content for the Web site first for every story. News briefs on routine stories should be posted within 30 minutes. Attainable | Goals must be realistic or the person will feel discouraged, bored or set up for failure. • Not attainable: Produce 10 or more multi-day investigative reports this year. • Attainable: Produce two enterprise stories off your beat each week. Relevant | An individual’s goals must align with your company’s or your newsroom’s goals for progress to occur. • Not relevant: As a supervisor, provide training for staff photographer to become proficient at wildlife photography. • Relevant: As a supervisor, provide training for staff photographer to become proficient at producing journalistically effective slide-shows. Time-based | Goals must have stages and end points so that they actually get done during the time available or at the time the work is needed. • Not time-based: Improve your headlines. • Time-based: Improve headlines within three months by concentrating on and adding a new skill each month. SPECIFIC MEASURABLE ATTAINABLE RELEVANT TIME-BASED 12
  • 13. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE 3. EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK Employees often say they want more feedback. Here are some tips to make feedback effective in your newsroom: • Make tear-sheets while you read the paper in the morning or afternoon. Write a note in marker to the writer, designer, photographer, headline writer or editor responsible for the good thing. If you have a big newsroom goal, be conscious of the goal while you read the paper so you can mention items that hit the mark. • Make every work-related conversation a feedback conversation by tying the topic to a newsroom goal or a personal goal for the individual, and making it future-oriented. • Send each staff member a brief hand-written note during the week of their birthday or hiring anniver- sary, telling them something you appreciate about their work. • Make a computer file for each direct report and copy/paste items into the file each time you see something you want to remember. Do it right then because you probably won’t get back to it. If you keep paper files, print out the example, highlight it and stuff it in the file. • If you want to have a formal talk with each direct report twice a year, put the meetings on your calen- dar and the other person’s at the beginning of the year, and make sure you also enter a reminder the week before the meeting to reconfirm. • If you want to take one staff member to lunch every other week, commit to the day and time, and never book over that slot. • Pick one day a week to be a meeting-less day for yourself, your staff or your newsroom, so you have time to talk to staffs or individuals about their work. • Offer coffee every first Thursday from 3 to 3:30 p.m. for anyone who wants to meet to share ideas for how the newsroom could do something better. Ask the group one specific question, and then listen more than you talk. •If you walk to the soda machines or to get coffee, watch for someone going the same way, so you can chat for three minutes. Ask a question about his/her work. • Walk through the newsroom a different way each time you go anywhere so you can see people and say hi to them. 13
  • 14. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT Through a variety of regional training programs, newsrooms are provided hands-on training on topics such as new story formats, breakout boxes, planning and design. } Regional training is offered in small groups (normally 10 newspapers or fewer) throughout the year and coordinated with publishers and editors.NOTABLESSee the next page Here’s a look at some of the key strategy points of the 2010 regional training program:for more infor-mation on 1. ALTERNATIVE STORY FORMATSutilizing ASFs. New story formats are a good tool to use to inform readers about stories you may traditionally cover but that offer newsrooms the opportunity to present the content in easier-to-digest formats. What stories are ASFs best used with? Stories that you report on year after year, such as festivals or annual events. ASFs also are a good fit for process-oriented stories, such as the opening of a business or a new facility. When should ASFs not be used? If you are reporting an issue for the first time and it’s a significant story, don’t use an ASF. Readers will be left with a lack of depth. An ASF is a good choice for an update on a story that you have already reported to explore a specific topic in greater detail. For example, if you’ve published a story on the fact that your city council is considering discontinuing curbside recy- cling, a follow-up to that story could be a Q&A answering questions readers might have about the im- pact that eliminating the service would have and what they would have to do with their recycling. A Q&A is an excellent example of an alternative story format. How many alternative story formats should be in your newspaper? There should be a mix of ASFs and narrative reporting in your newspaper every day or week. Good decisions should be made concern- ing which format is most appropriate for individual stories, but narrative reporting is likely to be used more than ASFs. Find anchored places in your newspaper to offer ASFs, such as a Q&A on the bottom of your front page with a newsmaker on Mondays or a Volunteer of the Week on Tuesdays on your com- munity page. 14
  • 15. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE Here are several recommended uses for ASFs: • 5 THINGS When to use it | This is intended to be a standalone package to inform readers about a single topic, issue or event. Examples include previewing a festival, renovations at a facility or a high school game or season, and a list of things to do for the weekend or a holiday. How to use it | The way to gauge whether this package can be used is if five uniquely informative elements can be written about the topic. The length of each item can differ slightly, but consistent lengths for each item are en- couraged. The package can be modified to accommodate odd ad stacks and vertical photos. 15
  • 16. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE • MEETING COVERAGE When to use it | This format should be used when covering a city council meeting where multiple issues are on the agenda that don’t require full sto- ries. Use this format for more process-oriented stories. How to use it | Simply answer these questions: 1. Whats the issue? A concise sentence, perhaps two at the most, explaining the issue being addressed at the meeting. 2. What do we know? Depending on the issue, this section could have the most content, but brevity is important when using ASF templates. 3. Whats next? This could be the date when the issue will come to a vote, when a project will begin or when the next action will be taken. 16
  • 17. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE NEW COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY NOW OPEN • EVENT OPENING When to use it | This format is ideal for covering the opening of a new business or a renovation to a facility. How to use it | Because of the number of places to place text on this for- mat, the reporter and photographer need to know in advance what content is expected to fill this package. The three main parts of this package include: 1. INTRO. The main paragraph narrative should be quick and con- cise and should explain the event in three to four sentences. This is basically your nut graph. 2. REACTION. Three sets of mugs and quotes from officials and resi- dents who attended the event. 3. PHOTOS: The highlights of the facility should be showcased in this area. A photo should accompany each highlight. 17
  • 18. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE • Q&A WITH A NEWSMAKER When to use it | This is a question-and-answer interview with a relevant official or community leader. How to use it | The format offers ample space for an introduction and five questions and responses. A dominant photo should capture the subject in his or her environment. 18
  • 19. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE 2A. BREAKOUT BOXES They are an important tool that pairs with a story and helps readers get basic information thats related to the story. Here are guidelines for breakout boxes: • All bylined stories should carry some form of breakout box • Should be short, 3 inches or less (unless a timeline) • Need to have entry points and not be a full paragraph in a box • Content can be duplicated from a story in a breakout box if that content is a logical guide in a box for the reader • Should be planned as part of story assignments } What they’re Timeline What they meanWHEN TO USE THISControversial storieswhere there are dif- saying The newspaper industry: ABSOLUTE HUMIDITY Aferent views on an 59 B.C. Acta Diurna, the first type of humidity that consid- “Quote text from someone ers the mass of water vaporissue or for a festival goes here.” — Attribution newspaper, is published instory that has lots of Rome. present per unit volume of goes here space.community voices. 1556 First monthly newspa- “Quote text from someone per, Notizie Scritte, published ABSOLUTE INSTABILITY goes here.” — Attribution in Venice. When the lapse rate of a col- goes here umn of air is greater than the 1605 First printed newspa- dry adiabatic lapse rate. The “Quote text from someone per published weekly in term absolute is used be- goes here.” — Attribution Antwerp called Relation. cause this applies. goes here ABSOLUTE TEMPERATURE SCALE A temperature scale } with a freezing point ofWHEN TO USE THIS } +273°K (Kelvin) and a boilingFor stories where For and against point of +373°K.politicians from two WHEN TO USE THIS Anythingparties have different FOR A paragraph explaining that has a historical hook to it or }viewpoints on an the stance of someone who is has had a series of events asso-issue or two city for the issue. ciated with it. Court cases,council members AGAINST A paragraph ex- development projects. WHEN TO USE THIS Glossarydisagree on a topic. plaining the stance of some- terms are good to use when you one who is against the issue. are handling complex issues If you go such as weather stories, health WHAT Name of event gets topics or budget issues.WHEN TO USE THIS } typed in here.Great to pull numbers By the numbers WHEN Time and date ofof employment event go here. Meeting glancestories, city councilbudget stories, sports 10Percentage thatgo up are expected to next year. taxes DETAILS A few quick details Here are the top three thingsstories and more. about the event go here, this can be anything, cost, etc. that came out of last night’s 10Percentage thatgo up are expected to next year. taxes MORE INFO Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx council meeting: 1 Taxes will go up by 3 per- cent starting next year. 2 A decision was made to } table purchasing a new truckWHEN TO USE THIS } for the city.This is great for Follow-up WHEN TO USE THIS Perfect 3 A decision was made tostories that you are table purchasing a new truck WHAT WE KNEW Frances for anything you are advancing,following, such as for the city. Choy was accused of killing city council meeting, event ingovernment develop- her parents when she was 17. town, game.ments, crime news }and more. THE LATEST A jury is delib- erating her fate. WHAT’S NEXT She could WHEN TO USE THIS Great to face up to 30 years in prison use for all meeting stories, cap- if convicted. ping the highlights from the meeting for the busy reader. 19
  • 20. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE 2B. ONLINE PROMOTIONS Breakout boxes can be used to tease different online features. The teasers below are available in green, blue, or black and white. Find the print logos for online content here: www.gatehousenewsservice.com/ghns_pages/x949369614/Online-logos-for-print-productsJOIN THE CHAT PHOTO GALLERYUse to invite readersto talk about a con-troversial story that’sappearing in yournewspaper. } JOIN THE CHAT SHARE YOUR COMMENTS www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com PHOTOS ONLINE CHECK OUT THE GALLERY AT www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com { Invite readers to see more photos from a photo page or coverage from an event. JOIN THE CHAT PHOTOS ONLINE SHARE YOUR CHECK OUT COMMENTS THE GALLERY AT www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com JOIN THE CHAT PHOTOS ONLINE SHARE YOUR CHECK OUT COMMENTS THE GALLERY AT www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.comVIDEO ONLINE MORE ONLINEIf your newspaperhas a video that’srelated to a story orfrom another source,use this promotion todirect readers to your } VIDEO ONLINE CHECK OUT THE LATEST VIDEO AT www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com MORE ONLINE FIND RELATED STORIES www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com { Tease Web sites, documents or other content that’s related to a story.site to view it. VIDEO ONLINE MORE ONLINE CHECK OUT THE FIND RELATED LATEST VIDEO AT STORIES www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com VIDEO ONLINE MORE ONLINE CHECK OUT THE FIND RELATED LATEST VIDEO AT STORIES www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com www.xxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxx.com 20
  • 21. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE 3. PLANNING Managing content such as alternative story formats and unique content on the Web takes planning. Should we hold a weekly planning meeting? Yes. The News & Interactive Division recommends every newspaper conduct a weekly meeting when centerpieces for the next week are planned. This kind of meeting should be conducted for every section of a newspaper. What are centerpieces? Centerpieces are defined as the main featured photo and story in the middle of your front page or section front. The centerpiece is not necessarily the top news story in your paper on most days. How far in advance should we plan our centerpieces? Newspapers should know what their center- piece is at least seven days in advance. To accomplish this goal, your centerpiece should be issue-ori- ented or a billboard to other content in your newspaper. For example, instead of making your centerpiece day-old news, use it to examine issues that your local government is debating or consider- ing, topics that impact the quality of life of your readers. This kind of content is easy to find. Follow-ups from council meetings turn into great centerpieces when you explain to readers the impact of a story or talk to residents about what the decision means for them. Sports content can often find a place in your centerpiece, for a big Friday night high school football game, playoff contest or the kickoff of Little League baseball. It’s OK to put events in your centerpiece, but they should offer unique content teasers to the Web and be more than a standalone photo. They should be packages and not just regurgitated old news or a single photo of an event with no Web elements. Remember, centerpieces are a chance to display a strong visual element as main art. The main art for a horizontal centerpiece should be four columns, and a vertical centerpiece should be three columns. Does this mean that breaking news can’t be our centerpiece? No. If big news breaks, make it your centerpiece – especially if you have a strong main photo or several elements you can tease to inside your paper and on the Web – and ship your planned centerpiece inside the paper or move it to another day. Planning centerpieces provides your newspaper with a safety net. Are there mandatory elements every centerpiece should have? Yes. Centerpieces need a headline, subhead, story, strong photo or numerous photos, a breakout box and some kind of online feature. How should we plan the centerpieces? Based on the number of people in your newsroom, have each staff member handle a specific number of centerpieces each week. During a planning meeting, have each } staff member bring a certain number of ideas to the table and use the below planner as a tool to help plan the centerpieces. Keep this document in your system and update it each week as stories change.NOTABLESRepeat for eachday of the week. • YOUR NEWSPAPER CENTERPIECE PLANNER For week of Monday, July 6, to Sunday, July 12 FOR XXXDAY, XXXXX, X Reporter: Headline: Nut graph: Art [photos, illustration, map]: Breakout boxes [who wins-who loses, whats at stake, what happens next, key players, key issues, for more information, timeline, bio box, excerpt, glossary, Q&A, reader quiz, quote-a-rama, where to go]: Web element [poll, photo gallery, video, photo or story callout]: Deadline for story: Deadline for art: Notes: 21
  • 22. THE CONTENT CUBE | CULTURE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 1. NEWSROOM INCUBATOR PROGRAM The program helps newspapers restructure their organizations, content and the presentation of their products with a redesign. Who can receive the program? Any GateHouse Media publication. Dailies, weeklies, special sections, magazines, TMCs and shoppers are all eligible. How does the program work? A publisher or editor at the publication contacts the News & Interactive Division (bdennison@gatehousemedia.com). We’ll learn about your project and your newspaper through conference calls and a possible site visit and discuss a timeline for your project. We’ll learn about your community, demographics, goals, staff, news-gathering methods and structure. Conversa- tion on those topics will help drive the focus of your redesign. What’s the process of the redesign? After initial conversations on the above items, we’ll work with your staff to develop a content plan. The content plan establishes what content will appear on specific templates for your newspaper. How does a newspaper’s content change through this process? Newsrooms receive training in areas such as planning, new story formats and breakout boxes as part of the program, all of which have a big part in the development of the content plan. For example, many newspapers select specific alter- native story formats featured in their content plan that will appear on their templates after receiving the training. Does the nameplate change? As part of the process, newspapers decide if they want to make adjust- ments to their nameplate. If they choose to change, each paper is provided several dozen typography choices to pick from. The newspaper selects examples of what they like, and their nameplate is cus- tomized. Do we get prototypes? Yes. For every template that you currently have, you will receive a prototype, based on the content plan that’s established. What kind of technical support do we receive? The News & Interactive Division handles all heavy lifting through the process, including building all templates and delivering and helping install fonts. Are there promotions? Yes. Each newspaper will receive promotions to run in advance letting readers know about the change. Is there design training? Each newspaper receives a design training guide, along with a design train- ing session, through a Webinar. There is design training also available after the launch. How much notice do we have to give? The process takes about three months to execute, so let the News & Interactive Division know as soon as possible so that we can work your newspaper into our schedule. How many newspapers have gone through the incubator program? During the past 2 ½ years, }NOTABLES more than 70 GateHouse Media newspapers — of all sizes — have participated.Front pages fromThe Lake SunLeader (Lake Sun, 6 DAYS UNTIL THE LOSS ENDS WHY HE 5 THINGS: Weekends, Kurt BULLDOGS’ SEASON WON’T CUT LD ‹‹ SPORTS, A9 HIS GRASSMo.) before and COUNTY SO . CHEER- 9TH PUB CRAWL HIS QUIRKY REASON PASSES MAY SURPRISE YOU PARK PLAN ‹‹ HOME & GARDEN, A9 SPORTS, A9 me JANUARY 30-31 FRIDAY & Warner, Jay Nixon, SATURDAY r Ho0 Days .” LAUNCH OF THE 2009 Serving the Lake of the Ozarks Region since 1879 LEADERS Volume 112, Issue 27 “ You MISSOURI WATER QUALITY Second of two parts Best in U.S. 2 D THINGS in 1 NTEE u TO DO THIS WEEKEND CAMDENTON Monkey around primate house groundhogs, and Optimists LAKE SUN REDESIGN MAKE THEIR The Camdenton Zoo is hosting “Meet the Monkeys,” a behind-the-scenes program that lets visitors see first-hand what goes on behind walls of one of the U.P.’s greatest attractions. The program is free but space is limited. Register at (555) 555-1234. WEEKENDafter they entered RA ble to f! BAGNELL yo See ‘Winterfest’ ice sculptures The Camdenton Zoo is hosting “Meet the Monkeys,” a behind-the-scenes program that lets visitors see GUA ice accepta Mysel first-hand what goes on behind walls of one of the U.P.’s greatest attractions. The program is free but space is limited. Register at (555) 555-1234. FORGET THE WINTER NEONGWAH CASE ‘Race for a Cure’ on Sunday The Camdenton Zoo is hosting “Meet the Monkeys,” a behind-the-scenes program that lets visitors see first-hand what goes on behind walls of one of the U.P.’s greatest attractions. The program is free but space is limited. Register at (555) 555-1234. pr it y WEEKEND PLANNER at a l Bu or I’l ... recorded urs. BLUES AND ENJOY ‹‹ SPORTS, 16Athe newsroom 40 ID# nteedL Guara ho FREE age 24 4-3620 mess1-800-64 at Dial 00 or akeSale.i nfo N’AWLINS’ MARDI GRAS FESTIVITIES HERE E-BOARD TACKLESincubator program. W.A.C. . Costs to solicit If Eligible intended buyers - Not solicit Not intended to ns apply. listed propertie currently details. Call for for sale. s currently agency. and conditio under buyers ‹‹ ENTERTAINMENT, 1B TCLA HIKE OPINION, 4A Vol.130, No. 025 • Saturday, January 31, 2009 © 2009 LAKE SUN $1.00 Serving the Lake of the Ozarks Region since 1879 $1.00 NOTED LAKE AREA, Mid-County Fire Protection District to voters: FEBRUARY 6-7 MISSOURI RETAIL $1 FRIDAY & ‘There’s no option’ DEVELOPER SATURDAY Raul 2009 Serving the Lake of the Ozarks Region since 1879 First in a series By Charis Patires In order to maintain the level of service Walters charis.patires@lakesunonline.com offered by the lake area’s largest fire pro- Volume 130, Issue 30 tection district, Chief Scott Frandsen says CAMDEN COUNTY - The Mid- the “worst economic downturn in 70 they need to increase revenue. County Fire Protection District chief says years” was not an easy decision. But he Voters will be asked to pass a 30-cent MILLER COUNTY dies asking voters for a levy increase during did not have an option. See Tax plan, page 2  By Joyce L. Miller joyce.miller@lakesunonline.com Have a super time THINGS TO DO THIS WEEKEND TIP LEADS COPS TO DEAD BABY OSAGE BEACH - Well known de- LAKE OZARK veloper Raul Walters apparently Our favorite 5 passed away earlier this week. Wal- Showcase auditions Sunday ters had a number of development in- Auditions for the Showcase of Performing Arts will terests in the lake area including the Super Bowl be held in the Lake Arts Council office at 748 “D” former Wal-Mart sites in Osage Road in Lake Ozark, on Feb. 7 from 10 a.m.- until Beach and Camdenton. noon. Participants must be 18 years old and not Just two weeks ago, the Osage currently in high school. Beach Board of Aldermen approved a $5 million tax increment financing district for the High Pointe Center, commercials FOUR SEASONS BODY FOUND DURING SEARCH 13th annual Winterfest fun one of Walter’s properties. Lake Ozark Daybreak Rotary Club’s 13th Annual Walters was the original developer By Deanna Wheeler Winterfest Event is Saturday night! The big event of High Pointe that had, in recent deanna.wheeler@lakesunonline.com includes dinner, live music by Jake Simpson, silent See Walters page 5  and live auction, and many door prizes. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. at Lodge of Four Seasons Exhibit Hall. COKE – “MEAN JOE GREENE” (1980) The theme this year is Saturday Night Fever so Technically this commercial debuted be- Two arrests, fore just before the start of the Super Bowl, but we had to add it to the list any- wear your 70’s dancing shoes and apparel! LAKE OF THE OZARKS STATE PARK three pounds ways because of its iconic status. After a tough game, Greene comes limping into the stadium tunnel. He meets a kid. The Bonk Hard Chill The adventure in the heart of winter challenges participants for up to 12 hours of continuous of marijuana kid offers Greene his Coke. Greene gulps it down before tossing the kid his jersey. The commercial has been remade several mountain biking, canoe paddling and running through a course using only a map and compass as a guide. Linn Creek men different times with different sports, none can compare to the original 22
  • 23. GateHouse Media The Content Cube 3 | News 3 NEWS CUBE THE NEWS CUBE PROGRAM To be implemented at all GateHouse Media newspapers in 2010, News Cube3 builds more local content for newspapers’ print products and Web sites through an aggressive implementation of consistent pub- lic service journalism formats, more local profiles, staff and community blogging, and more reader in- volvement. Here are the five major goals of the 2010 News Cube program: Public service journalism | Drive improvements in our communities through a weekly alternative story format. Community partner journalism | Implement alternative story formats in which community leaders and residents fill out print and online forms for anchored newsmaker and event advance features on a host of themes. Staff bloggers | Produce local blogs on a host of topics that staff are experts on. Community bloggers | Build a community of local bloggers on sites, recruiting those who may already have blogs and setting up others with strong local ties and expertise. User-generated content | Ask readers to submit their news in a new weekly schedule by using reader-involvement callouts. 1. PUBLIC SERVICE JOURNALISM What is public service journalism? Public service journalism is more than reporting what has hap- pened or will happen — it also highlights specific issues and provides readers with information and tools to spur measurable community involvement and action. While much of the local government and issues reporting that newspapers produce serves the public at different levels each day, News Cube aims to take it a step further and turn community concerns into action. What are the News Cube goals with public service journalism? Consistent public service reporting is at the center of the 2010 News Cube goals, and the News & Interactive Division has prepared tem- plates to use to offer formatted public service stories to readers. Providing readers avenues to digest, in a quick format, news that showcases how government is spending their dollars and how they can have their questions concerning quality of life issues answered are goals of the public service portion of the News Cube program. What are the formats? Five alternative story formats will be available. 1. What’s Your Problem? Reporting on a problem in your community that can and should be fixed by local government. Readers are asked to send in their problems to the paper. 2. What’s Going on Here? When readers see things occurring around town, such as a new development on a downtown street, they can find out what’s occurring by sending the question to the newspaper’s “What is it?” feature. 3. Budget Breakdown: Helps readers understand how governments are spending local tax dollars, with a focus on specific budget lines. 4. Your Question Answered: A Q&A column from a staff member explaining reader concerns on com- munity issues or how the newspaper handles issues. 5. Two Views: An opinion page feature where two people debate an issue. How often should these features run? Newspapers should run one of the five features once a week and run the others as content calls for it. The features are best used on the front page or an inside news or opinion page. Is there more with public service journalism we can do? These templates offer a way to consis- tently offer public service journalism content, and this approach in some cases could even lead to larger public service print and Web investigative projects or could help build on your own public service journalism initiatives. 23
  • 24. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLESWe recommend • WHAT’S YOUR PROBLEM TEMPLATEthat you run thisfeature in yourpaper weekly atthe bottom of thefront page. What is it? Whats Your Problem is a feature that documents ongoing structural problems in a com- munity that haven’t been fixed, such as pot holes, broken stop signs and broken stoplights. Problems that are documented should be things that can be fixed in a timely fashion and not issues that are tied to major finances, such as the demolition of eyesore buildings. Why should we do this feature? Newsrooms often get calls from readers complaining about issues that are impacting safety and quality of life. The What’s Your Problem feature allows newsrooms a con- sistent place to anchor these stories. How do we get the feature going? Brainstorm with your staff on issues that readers have called in with or topics that residents have raised during meetings as needing to be fixed. Consider creating pro- motional ads as well, asking readers to send in problems they want to see fixed. The content: • Highlighting the issue or problem. • Status of the issue or problem. • Who is responsible for the problem at the local government level. 24
  • 25. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLES • WHAT’S GOING ON HERE TEMPLATEWe recommendthat you run thisfeature in yourpaper weekly onthe front page ora local news page. What is it? Reporters aren’t the only curious residents in town. Readers are, too. The What’s Going on Here feature helps explain in an alternative story format why theres a “For Sale” sign in front of a his- toric building, why theres a detour around an old bridge or why theres a pile of dirt next to the ballfield. How is it used? Come up with a list of three or four possible What’s Going on Here topics and start re- porting. The template has an area for readers to contact the paper if they want their questions an- swered. In addition, reporters and editors should document when readers ask them questions in their reporting and through phone calls that could fit into the future. The content: • The question. • The answer. • What it means to you. 25
  • 26. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS } • BUDGET BREAKDOWN TEMPLATENOTABLESIt is recommendedthat you run thisfeature during thebudget season. What is it? Budget Breakdown zeroes in on one particular number within a multi-million-dollar town or city budget and explains exactly what the money is being spent on, according to the city leader in charge of the budget. The feature puts the number into the context of the overall budget and the indi- vidual department budget. Why should we do this feature? Often city budgets can be difficult for the average reader to under- stand. Breaking down the budget into individual budget lines or by department will help readers better understand how their tax dollars are being spent. How is it used? Look through the city budget to find individual line items of interest. For example, a newspaper might find a miscellaneous supplies line that is greater than other individual lines in the sec- tion of a department budget. This feature would allow the newspaper to explain that budget line. Or this feature could be used to explain the amount of money a department is budgeted to use in a given year and how that money is spent. The content: • The number of the line item or budget. • Funding figure last year. • Total city budget. • Percent of total city budget. • Total department budget. • Percent of department budget. • Explanation about the line item or the department’s budget. • More information about the city budget can be found at the following links. 26
  • 27. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS } • YOUR QUESTION ANSWERED TEMPLATENOTABLESWe recommendthat you run thisfeature weekly onthe opinion pageor on a news page. What is it? Your Question Answered is a public service journalism column presented in Q&A format by an editor or a reporter. The column could address a single reader concern relevant to a wider reader- ship or a series of short questions and answers. What kind of content would go in the column? A reader may want to know what city hall is doing to conserve energy or what the police department pays per gallon for gasoline. Or they may be curious how their tax bill stacks up against someone in a similar home in the next town. Why should we do this feature? Readers aren’t just looking for a digest of news, sports and features. They want to be educated in fun and informative formats on topics that have puzzled them. The Your Questions Answered format accomplishes those goals. How is it used? Come up with a list of three or four possible topics based on questions residents have asked at meetings or recent topics that are being discussed in the commenting area of your Web site. Use those topics to get the feature going. There’s a callout in the template of the feature inviting read- ers to submit their questions to the writer of the column. The content: • A breakout box addressing the following: — The question — The answer — What it means to you • A Q&A answering the question in depth. 27
  • 28. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLES • TWO VIEWS TEMPLATEWe recommendthat you run thisweekly as a featureon the opinionpage. This is agood format touse duringelections as well,showcasingcandidates’stances on issues. What is it? Two Views is an opinion page feature that highlights an issue in the news and presents in brief format the issue and arguments or views from two people supporting either side of the issue. Why should we do this feature? Allowing officials to explain their stance in their own words can offer more clarification for readers. And when that explanation is paired next to a different view, readers are offered the opportunity to make an educated decision on that topic. How is it used? Build a list of issues and solicit people in the community engaged in the issue to write a brief argument for or against. Provide those writing a word count — likely fewer than 100 words — and a deadline. Have a mug shot of each writer. The content: • The issue. • Argument for and argument against. • Short bio on the two arguing the issue. 28
  • 29. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS 2. COMMUNITY PARTNER JOURNALISM What is Community Partner Journalism? The goal of News Cube 2010 is to generate more local con- tent for our newspapers and Web sites. A simple avenue to accomplish that goal is by establishing more ways for our readers to submit news about themselves, their families and their organizations. Commu- }NOTABLES nity Partner Journalism encourages newspapers to reach out to organizations that supply content andWe recommend create more consistent, formatted profile offerings that those organizations can submit to get theirthat you run the news in the paper and online.CPJs on the bot-tom of the front How does the CPJ program work? The program is aimed at partnering with groups such as hospitalspage or local and churches and chambers of commerce (groups that are always trying to get into the newspaper),front, on page 2A providing those groups a form that they can fill out on a weekly basis that they send back to youror on a feature,sports or commu- newsroom and that is anchored in a formatted position in your paper and on your site.nity page. What’s the best way to get groups on board with this kind of project? It’s important for your newsroom to decide which of the CPJ possibilities (listed below) you want to offer in your newspaper. Once decided, customize the letter (featured in this section) and send it to the organization that you want to partner with, along with the prototype you will receive from the News & Interactive Division that showcases what the feature will look like. It’s important to agree to a consistent day and time that the form will be due and when and where it will run in your newspaper. What are the newsroom expectations of CPJs? Daily newspapers will be expected to run a daily CPJ feature, and weekly publications — at a minimum — should run one a week. What could a typical daily or weekly lineup look like? MONDAY Newsmaker of the week profile on page A1, keyed to a local news event and generated by questions e-mailed to the newsmaker. TUESDAY Volunteer of the week on page A3. WEDNESDAY Health care profile of the week on page A3. THURSDAY Business or businessperson profile of the week on page A3 or the business page. FRIDAY Church or religious leader profile of the week on page A3 or the religion page. Weeklies could settle on one or two of these features or rotate several throughout the month. What are the CPJ options? Here is a list of the dozen templates available: • Teacher or professor profile • Public safety official profile • Student profile • Athlete profile • Coach profile • Event advance • Event report • Church profile • Religious leader profile • Health care worker profile • Businessperson profile • Meet your neighbor profile 29
  • 30. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLESWe recommend • TEACHER OR PROFESSOR PROFILEthat you run thisweekly on theeducation orcommunity page. What is it? A template to profile teachers, college professors and other educators. Why should we do this? Parents are interested to learn about their child’s current teachers and those who could educate them in the future. How do we use it? Send a letter to principals or public relations directors seeking their involvement in the feature. In the letter, ask to have the form filled out and mailed or e-mailed back to the newspaper by a certain date with a photo. Include a PDF of the prototype included on this page so the official un- derstands what the feature looks like. The content: • Biographical information: Name, age, hometown, education, background, family, interests and hobbies. Q&A: Here are five questions to ask and run the best three responses. • How they ended up being an educator and why. • A teacher or professor who inspired them and how. • Someone in history or current events who inspires them and why. • The greatest challenges in education today. • Advice for someone who wants to go into education. 30
  • 31. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Teacher or professor profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers with a true reflec- tion of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people in our community and would like the XXXXXXXXXXX School to take part. Every week, we would like to feature a local teacher in our new “Teacher of the Week” feature. We’ll fea- ture teachers who play a part in making your school a great success. Below is a form we would like you to fill out and send back to us every XXXXX by X p.m., along with a photo. The “Teacher of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. You can drop off this form at our newspaper or e-mail it to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to talk about how we can work together to be sure you and your organi- zation are included in our community partner program. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Teacher of the week form: Name: Position, subject you teach: School: Age: Experience: Hometown: Education: Family: Interests and hobbies: In several sentences explain how and why you decided to become an educator. Who is a teacher or professor who inspired you and how? Who is someone in current events who you admire and why? What are the greatest challenges in education today? What advice can you offer for someone who wants to go into education? What teaching moment is most memorable? 31
  • 32. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLESWe recommend • PUBLIC SAFETY PROFILEthat you run thisweekly and place iton the front page,a community pageor in lifestyle. What is it? A template to profile police officers, firefighters and other public safety officials. Why should we do this? This format allows readers to learn more about those who serve and protect the community. How do we use it? Send a letter to police and fire department chiefs or any other public safety depart- ment in your community. In the letter, ask the organization to be part of your public safety weekly feature. In the letter ask the chief to fill out the form. Request that the chief send a photo of the employee and re- turn the form as soon as possible. Include a PDF of the prototype included on this page so the chief under- stands what the feature looks like. The content: • Biographical information including: Name, age, hometown, education, background, family, interests and hobbies. Q&A: Here are five questions to ask and run the best three responses. • In several sentences explain how the person being profiled ended up in public safety and why. • Someone who inspired them and why. • Greatest challenges in their field. • Advice for someone who wants to become an officer or firefighter. • Something about the line of work that most people dont know. 32
  • 33. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Public safety person of the week profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers with a true reflec- tion of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people in our community and would like the XXXXXXXXXXX Police Department to take part in the new feature. Every week, we would like to feature a local fireman or police officer as our “Public Safety Person of the Week.” We’ll feature police officers, front office workers and anyone in your department who plays a part in making public safety a success. Below is a form we would like you to fill out and send back to us every XXXXX by X p.m., along with a photo. The “Public Safety Person of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. You can drop it off at our newspaper or e-mail it to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to talk about how we can work together to be sure you and your organi- zation are included in our community partner program. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Public safety person of the week form: Name: Age: Position: Hometown: Education and experience: Family: In several sentences explain why you decided to get involved with public safety. Who inspired you and how? What are the greatest challenges in your field? What advice can you offer for someone who wants to go into public safety? What’s something about your line of work that most people don’t know? What is a memorable moment in your career and why? 33
  • 34. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLESWe recommend • STUDENT PROFILEthat you run thisweekly. Place it ona community oreducation page. What is it? A template to profile high school and college students. Why should we do this feature? Many schools provide newspapers information on students of the week or month information, but often the information is buried on a community or education page and looks like any other submitted piece of content. Finding an anchored place for this kind of content to live and having it appear on a regular and consistent basis will create more participation for this kind of content. How do we use it and manage it? Based on the number of schools you have in your area, create a ro- tation for this feature. Send a letter to each principal and explain the feature and seek their participa- tion. Provide a date when you would like to have the form and photo submitted each week or month. The content: • Biographical information: Students name, age, hometown, grade, GPA, background, family, interests and hobbies. Q&A: Here are five questions to ask and run the best three responses. • Favorite courses of study and why. • A teacher or professor who inspires the student and how. • History or current events that inspires them and why. • Greatest challenges balancing academics, home life, social life and other activities. • Plans beyond school. 34
  • 35. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Student of the week profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers with a true reflec- tion of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people in our community and would like your school to take part in the new feature. Every week, we would like to feature local schoolchildren in our new “Student of the Week” feature. We’ll feature local students who are succeeding in the classroom, who have received honors or have an inter- esting story. Below is a form we would you like to fill out and send back to us every XXXXX by X p.m., along with a photo. The “Student of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. You can drop this form off at our newspaper or e-mail it to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to talk about how we can work together to be sure you and your organi- zation are included in our community partner program. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Student of the week profile form: Name: Age: Class: GPA: School: Grade: Family: Hometown: Extracurricular: Interests: What’s your favorite course of study and why? Who is a teacher or professor who inspires you and why? Is there a current event that inspires you and why? What’s the greatest challenge of balancing academics, home life, social life and other activities? What are your plans after graduation and why? 35
  • 36. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLESWe recommend • ATHLETE PROFILEthat you run thisweekly on sportsfront pages or in-side pages. What is it? A template to be used to profile high school and college athletes. Why should we do this feature? Sports content is extremely popular in all GateHouse Media commu- nities. Finding avenues to include more local faces in the paper in a consistent format will help increase local news and capture the excited base of high school sports fans. How do we use it and manage it? Work with athletic directors, principals and public information di- rectors to select candidates and distribute and collect the Q&A forms and photos of the athletes. Send a letter to each athletic director, principal or public information director, to explain the feature and your expectation. Set up a date when the forms are due. If you have numerous high schools in your coverage area, consider creating a rotation of high schools, providing each school with a date when their Q&A is due each month. Are we picking an athlete of the week? Since some newspapers may have concerns about singling out specific athletes each week, you could call the feature Sports Spotlight. The content: Bio information, including: Name, age, team, hometown, education, background, family, interests and hobbies and a variety of favorites. Q&A: Here are five questions to ask and run the best three responses. • In three sentences, what do you enjoy most about your sport and athletics? • What two memories from your time in sports stick with you most? • Tell us about someone who inspires you in sports and why. • What are the greatest challenges balancing academics and sports? • What are your plans beyond school? 36
  • 37. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Athlete of the week profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers with a true reflec- tion of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people in our community and would like the XXXXXXXXXXX School to take part. Every week, we would like to feature a local athlete in our new “Athlete of the Week” feature. This is an opportunity for readers to meet local athletes and provide recognition for those teenagers who are suc- ceeding. Below is a form we would like you to fill out every week and send to us, along with a photo of your se- lected athlete. The “Athlete of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. Please submit the form and photo to us every XXXXday by XX p.m. You can drop the forms off at our newspa- per or e-mail them to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to talk about how we can work together to be sure you and your organi- zation are included in our community partner program. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Athlete of the week profile form: Name: Age: Team, name of school: Position: My favorites Pro athlete: Pro team: Class: Movie: TV show: Actor: Song: Band/musician: In three sentences, explain what you enjoy most about your sport and athletics. What is one of your more memorable moments as an athlete? Tell us about someone who inspires you in sports and why: What are the greatest challenges balancing academics and sports? What are your plans after graduating from school? 37
  • 38. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLES • COACH PROFILEWe recommendthat you run thisweekly on thesports front indailies andweeklies. What is it? A template to be used to profile high school, college and youth league coaches. Why should we do this feature? Coaches — at all levels — are major personalities and figures in com- munities. Learning about their background and their coaching style is of interest to a wide range of readers. How do we use it and manage it? Send a letter to athletic directors that would request they work with their coaches to have the forms filled out and returned with a photo. Send the request two weeks before the start of the season and request they are all sent back within a reasonable timeframe. The content: • Biographical information including: Coachs name, age, team, occupation, hometown, education, background, family, interests and hobbies. Q&A: Here are four questions to ask and run the best three responses. • Three sentences explaining his or her coaching philosophy. • Two memories that stick out the most from their coaching career. • Three pieces of advice for staying fit. • The three greatest challenges in coaching. 38
  • 39. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Coach profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers with a true reflec- tion of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people in our community and would like the XXXXXXXXXXX School to take part in the new fea- ture. Every week, we would like to feature a local coach as our new “Coach of the Week.” This is an opportu- nity for readers to learn about the coaches who are teaching the community’s children how to perform on the playing field. Below is a form we would like you to fill out for every coach and send back to us, along with a photo. The “Coach of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. You can drop off the forms at our newspaper or e-mail them to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to talk about how we can work together to be sure you and your organi- zation are included in our community partner program. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Coach profile letter form: Name: Age: Team, position, school: Subject you teach: Education: Family: How would you explain your coaching philosophy? What are two memories from your career that stick with you the most? What are three pieces of advice you have for staying fit? What are the three greatest challenges in coaching? 39
  • 40. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLES • EVENT ADVANCEWe recommendthat you run thisas a regularweekly featureleading into theweekend. What is it? A template to be used to advance community events. How do we use it? There are two approaches. 1. Send organizations an event advance form that pro- files an upcoming event. Send the form at least two weeks before the event. 2. Have the form available for organizers of events who call asking for coverage. Why should we do this feature? Often, advances for upcoming festivals don’t change much from year to year, but the content is something readers expect. This feature allows a newspaper to get the story into the paper without having to utilize newsroom resources. Where should it be featured? At the bottom of the front page or on an entertainment page. The content: • If you go information including: Name of event, time, location, cost for event and details. • Three highlights of the event. • Why you should attend, with a quote or two from the organizer. • A file photo from last year’s event, either from the newspaper’s files or the event organizer. 40
  • 41. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Event advance letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, Next weekend is the XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX, and we need your help to make sure that readers know about the event in the XXXXXXXXX and XXXXXXXXXX.com. We’re starting a new feature, which will allow organizers to provide basic information and file photos for upcoming events to be featured in your hometown newspaper. At least a week before an event, like this weekend’s XXXXXXXXXXX, we’ll notify you and ask that you fill out the form below. We would like the form sent back to us at least four days before the event. This is a great opportunity to get events you’re in charge of featured prominently. I will follow up with a phone call to answer any questions that you might have about this opportunity. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Event advance form: Name of event: Time of event: Location: Cost and how to get tickets: How to find out more information: What are three highlights of the event? Why you think someone should attend the event? Your name and hometown 41
  • 42. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLES • EVENT REPORTWe recommendthat you run thisas a regularfeature as needed. What is it? A template to allow organizers to report on their community events. Why should we do this? There are many events happening in your community, and it’s difficult to be at all of them, but reporting on them is a big part of your role as the paper of record in your community. This format allows you to get this information in the paper through using community partners in an or- ganized format. How do we use it? If your newsroom isn’t able to cover a community event, send a form to the organ- izer of the event and ask them to fill it out and send it back to the newspaper with photos on a certain day. Provide the organizer of the event at least a week’s advance notice. Timeliness of the event is im- portant to keep in mind, so make sure the event organizer understands what day the form needs to be submitted. The content: • Name and date of event. • Three highlights of the event with description provided by organizer. • A list of winners if a contest or competition was held. • Three quotes from the organizer or attendees on how the event went. 42
  • 43. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Event report letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, There’s a lot that happens in our community, and we want to make sure that it’s all represented in the pages of our newspaper and on our Web site. And we need your help. For events that our newspaper isn’t able to cover, we would love your assistance. We’re starting a new feature called “Event Report,” which is an easy format to tell readers about events that occurred in our community. Next weekend is the XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX, and we would like you to fill out this form when the event is over and send it back to us, along with a photo. Please e-mail the form to me on XXXday by XX p.m. to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to answer any questions that you might have about this opportunity. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Event coverage form: Name of the event: Date of the event: Provide three highlights of the event: Provide a list of winners if a contest or a competition is going to be held: Tell us why you think the event was a success: 43
  • 44. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS }NOTABLES • CHURCH PROFILEWe recommendthat if you cur-rently run a reli-gion page withservice listings,run it on that pageor on a half pagenext to it. What is it? A template to be used to profile churches. Why should we do this feature? Faith is a big part of many communities, and readers will be inter- ested to see their church featured and read about other churches in their community. How do we use it? Send a letter to local churches asking them to be part of your new “church of the week” feature. In the letter, ask the church leader to fill out the form (see form example on next page). Request that the church send a photo of the outside of the building and return the form as soon as pos- sible. Include a PDF of the prototype included on this page so the church understands what the feature looks like. The content: • A breakout box should include the following information: Church name Denomination Address Number of members Days and times of services • Information on the following: Church history Church activities How to get involved Volunteer opportunities and how to get involved Fundraisers 44
  • 45. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Church of the week profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers a true reflection of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people and organizations in our community. As part of this effort, we would like to feature a local church in our new “Church of the Week” feature, and we would like the XXXXXXXXXXX Church to take part. The feature is an opportunity to showcase local churches, learn about their history and their programs. Below is a form we would like you to fill out and send back to us, along with a photo. The “Church of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. You can drop this form off at our newspaper or e-mail it to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Church of the week profile form: Name of church: Year built and brief church history: Denomination: Number of members: Pastor’s name: Volunteer opportunities and how to get involved: Fundraisers: Days and times of services: Bible study: Address: Info (phone number and Web address): 45
  • 46. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS } • RELIGIOUS LEADER PROFILENOTABLESWe recommendthat you run thisfeature weekly. What is it? A template to be used to profile religious leaders. Why should we do this? In many communities, church leaders are significant public figures, but they aren’t featured prominently enough in local newspapers. This feature would raise their profile and also allow readers to learn more about these leaders. How do we use it? Send a letter to local churches asking them to be part of your new “church leaders of the week” feature. In the letter, ask the church leader to fill out the form. Request that the church leader send a photo of himself or herself to the newspaper. The content: • Biographical information: Name, faith/denomination, church/synagogue/other, age, hometown, edu- cation, background, family, interests and hobbies. Q&A: Here are four questions to ask and run the best three responses. • What do you like most about your work, and what do you like least? • What two memories from your work stick with you most? • What motivated you to get into this line of work? • Tell us something about your work most people may not be aware of. 46
  • 47. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Church leader profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers with a true reflec- tion of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people in our community and would like your church to take part in the new feature. Every week, we would like to feature local church leaders in our new “Religious Leader of the Week” fea- ture. We’ll feature religious leaders who play a part in making local faith such a huge part of our com- munity. Below is a form we would like you to fill out and send back to us every XXXXX by X p.m., along with a photo. The “Religious Leader of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. You can drop this form off at our newspaper or e-mail it to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to talk about how we can work together to be sure you and your organi- zation are included in our community partner program. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Church leader profile form: Name: Age: Faith: Church: Education: Hometown: Family: Hobbies: What do you like most about your work, and what do you like least? Tell us something about your work most people may not be aware of: What two memories from your work stick with you most? What motivated you to get into this line of work? 47
  • 48. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS } • HEALTH CARE WORKER PROFILENOTABLESWe recommendthat you run thisfeature on a weeklyhealth page, thebottom of the frontpage or on acommunity page. What is it? A template to be used to profile health care workers, including doctors, nurses, administra- tors and pharmacists. Why should we do it? Health services and changes in technology impact readers of all ages, and finding avenues to introduce those in the health care field provides useful and relevant information to readers. How do we use it? Contact your hospital or private practices through a letter asking them to fill out a form profiling one of their employees. What kind of guidelines should we establish? Encourage the hospital to select employees who are tied to something newsworthy at the hospital, such as someone who is leading a new health class. This is a good avenue to get news like that in the paper without just running a press release on the new class. Make sure the hospital understands that this not an ad for the hospital but a way for the commu- nity to learn about services and the people who make the hospital tick. The same guidelines should be followed if you seek those who run private practices. The content: • Biographical information: Name, occupation, age, hometown, education, background, family, inter- ests and hobbies. Q&A: Here are four questions to ask and run the best three responses. • What they like most about their work, and least. • Two memories from their career that stick with them the most. • Three pieces of advice for living a healthy life. • Three pieces of advice for someone considering a career in the field. 48
  • 49. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Health care worker profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers with a true reflec- tion of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people in our community and would like the XXXXXXXXXXX Hospital to take part in the new fea- ture. Every week, we would like to feature a local health care worker in our new “Health Care Person of the Week” feature. We want to feature doctors, nurses, technicians, front-office workers and others who make your hospital such an important part of our community. Below is a form we would like you to fill out and send back to us every XXXXX by X p.m., along with a photo. The “Health Care Person of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. You can drop it off at our newspaper or e-mail it to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to talk about how we can work together to be sure you and your organi- zation are included in our community partner program. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Health care worker profile form: Name: Age: Occupation: Hometown: Family: Interests and hobbies: What do you most like about your work; what do you like least? What are two memories from your career that stick with you the most? What are three pieces of advice you have for living a healthy life? What are three pieces of advice you have for someone considering a career in this field? 49
  • 50. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS } • BUSINESSPERSON PROFILENOTABLESWe recommendthat you run thisfeature on aweekly businesspage, the bottomof the front page,page 2A or 3A. What is it? A template to be used to profile businesspeople from Main Street business owners and en- trepreneurs to movers and shakers in locally based companies. Why should we do this feature? Local business is the heartbeat of communities, and showcasing how businesses started, and what makes them tick and the services they offer is relevant local content. How do we use it? Contact local or regional chambers of commerce, public relations offices of local companies and contact Main Street business owners directly. If you work through the local chamber or a public relations office, provide them a form that you would like them to fill out for all profiles (see form example in this section). Request a mug shot of the business owner or a photo of the outside of the business. What kind of guidelines should we establish? Since this is business content, it’s important to make sure the chamber understands the mission of the feature: to meet local businesses and understand their history and industry. This format is not a place for advertorial content. The content: • Biographical information on the business and the owner. • Three sentences that explain how the business owner ended up in the line of work. • What the business owner likes most and least about their work. • Two memories from their work experience that stick with them most. 50
  • 51. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Businessperson profile letter: Date: Dear Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx, The goal of XXXXXXXXXXXX and www.ournewspaper.com is to provide our readers with a true reflec- tion of life in our community, and we need your help. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be launching new features in our newspaper that will profile a variety of local people in our community and would like the XXXXXXXXXXX Chamber of Commerce to take part in the new feature. Every week, we would like to feature a local business owner in our new “Business Person of the Week” feature. We want to feature local owners who have interesting backgrounds, businesses and personali- ties. Below is a form we would like you to fill out and send back to us every XXXXX by X p.m., along with a photo. The “Business Person of the Week” feature will appear every XXXday in our newspaper. You can drop it off at our newspaper or e-mail it to xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.com. I will follow up with a phone call to talk about how we can work together to be sure you and your organi- zation are included in our community partner program. Thank you, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Businessperson profile form: Name: Age: Years in business: Hometown: Family: Hobbies: Name of business: Address of business: Phone number of business: Web site: In three sentences, tell us how you ended up in this line of work. What are two memories from your career that stick with you the most? What you most like and least like about your work? What makes your business unusual? What advice do you have for someone who wants to open a business? 51
  • 52. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS } • MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR PROFILENOTABLESWe recommendthat you run thisfeature weekly oras news warrants. What is it? A generic profile template to be used for features that do not fit into any of the other set categories and highlight average residents. Why should we do this? The pages of our newspapers are about more than city officials and meet- ings. Showcasing how average residents live and learning about their background, their careers and their families is what makes local newspapers such valuable products to consumers. How do we use it? Put the form in your newspaper and online and ask residents to fill it out and send it to the newspaper with a photograph to have their family and friends featured in the paper. In addition, the form can be used when readers call in with story ideas, such as a teenager who recently has be- come an Eagle Scout or other general recognitions. The content: • Biographical information: Name, age, hometown, background, family, accomplishments, interests and hobbies. 52
  • 53. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS 3. STAFF BLOGGING What are blogs? A blog is a way for editors and reporters to engage readers in a less formal, more interac- tive way than they do with traditional news and feature reporting. They are short posts that are topical. Why is blogging important? Blogs offer newspapers different formats to provide readers content and can help staffs give readers more behind-the-scenes information from their beats. Content that fills a reporter’s notebook — like a funny moment at a council meeting or an exchange between a player and his coach after the game — that doesn’t seem to have an appropriate place in print is a great example of how blogs can offer additional and useful content for newspapers. Blogs also provide newspapers an } avenue to pose questions to readers in an effort to find sources or find answers to questions. They also play an important role in getting information to readers that your newspaper didn’t produce, such asNOTABLES links to state or national news stories that carry a local impact.We recommendthat each blog What makes a good blog? A reporter’s interest in a topic is not a good reason to write a blog. A blog ispost should be merited if the reporter understands the beat or topic better than anyone else. Blogs should be dailyrelatively short; destinations for readers who are hungry to find information on a specific topic they know they cannotfewer than 300 find anywhere else and from a source they recognize can provide insight that is accurate. Good blogswords. are written in a way that creates a relationship between the writer and the audience. The posts can be casual – a quick snapshot of a quirky scene you came across while covering a story or a recommenda- tion on a good lunch spot. Blogs are as much about conversing as relaying information. What kind of content should go into a blog? Blogs shouldn’t mirror exact content that’s already on your site, but they should be new content or a different format for content that’s currently posted. Blogs should reveal the personality of the writer and help put the reader in the same location that the writer was at when the blogger reported. To do this effectively, it is important to share specific details and emotion. Is linking in a blog post important? Extremely. While the amount of linking really depends on the kind of content in the post, opportunities abound to link to businesses, organizations, Web sites and other relevant destinations. A heavy dose of linking helps your blog post get recognized by online search engines. What should we name our blog? The topic of the blog should be clear to the reader through its name. This means that clever names for blogs sometimes don’t work if the reader has to scan through post- ings to understand what the blog topic is about. How should we promote our blogs? It is recommended that every newspaper have a consistent posi- tion in their paper daily (like the front-page rail or on page 2) where the Web site is being teased. Blogs could be teased in this area. They also should be promoted within individual stories, such as teasing to an opinion writer’s blog in their weekly column. What kind of headlines should we write? Since many blogs are — or will be — teased on the home- page of your Web site, it is important to write specific headlines on your topic. The headline writer should assume that the reader doesn’t know the topic that the blogger writes about on a regular basis. For example, if you write a political blog, do not write a headline that says “Trouble around the corner.” While inviting, the reader doesn’t understand the context of the headline if it is teased on the home- page under a blogs section. 53
  • 54. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS Can a reporter with a blog engage in opinion and commentary? No. But that’s not to say that blogs cannot be written with more creative license than a regular news story. For example, you could report in a news story about a testy exchange between two city councilors, and in a blog post note that after the meeting you observed that one councilor packed up his papers and brushed by his sparring partner without saying a word. You could use language in this post that might capture more of the exchange than you would be able to in a standard news story. What are some possible topics for blogs? As stated earlier, blog topics should not be driven by a hobby but because an individual is an expert in a particular area. That does not mean that a hobby topic cannot be a blog, but the writer should be the go-to source on the topic in your community, and it should be locally relevant. This means you should not do a blog on fishing if you’re not discussing the local scene. Here are topics to consider: news, crime, politics, sports, entertainment, photography and specific niches. Experts in a niche of any of these areas, such as a reporter who covers youth sports or local courts, would make for potential bloggers. A small newsroom (a staff of 10 or fewer) could create a city blog where a variety of staff members contribute to the blog with insights from their specific beats. How many blogs should your newsroom produce? • 20 staff members and larger: 10 staff blogs • Six to 19 staff members: Two to five staff blogs • One to five staff members: at minimum, one blog How often should a blogger post content? Every blog, no matter newspaper size, should be up- dated with a new post every day. A post does not always have to be a 300-word, well-thought-out piece. A link to an article that is locally relevant from other sources is fine on some days. How do we go about getting a blog launched on our site? If you currently have a blog platform on your site, add to your current lineup. However, if you do not have a blog and are ready to launch one or numerous blogs, submit a support ticket (gatehouse.zendesk.com) and the following information below in our new blog request form. If you do not submit the information, it will be requested when your ticket is received. What will our blogs look like? We do not yet have a blog platform within Zope, so all blogs are pub- lished in Drupal. See this Web page for an example of how your blogs would look: blogs.mpnnow.com. This will change when we have a blog platform within Zope. New blog request: • Newspaper: • Submitter: • Name of blog: • Focus of blog: • Why is the blog good for your community? 54
  • 55. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS • STAFF BLOGS: HOW A REPORTER CAN BE A BLOGGER, TOO }NOTABLES Blogging for reporters doesn’t mean hours of extra work each week. From a single event, a reporterHere is an example should decide what best fits specific platforms to make the work of producing consistent blogs aof how a reporter doable — and time-efficient — endeavor.can cover a newsevent and present The story | A reporter covers the opening of a new cancer center wing at a local hospital. The reporterhis or her report in gets the general information she normally would during her reporting: She talks to city officials, hospi-three formats – tal workers and patients who normally attend this kind of function. She gets costs for the wing, how ita News Now post,a blog post and was funded and what services it will provide, along with general timeline information about the project.an alternative During the reporting, the mayor shares a personal story about how cancer has impacted nearly everystory format for member of his immediate family.the next daysnewspaper. When the reporter gets back to the newsroom: 1. Write and post a News Now brief on the nuts and bolts of the story, perhaps with a photo gallery from the event. 2. Write and post a blog entry titled “Cancer wing touches mayor’s life.” The blog entry notes the best of what the mayor said at the event, a quote-of-notes package from him with links to previous coverage. 3. Writes for the next day’s paper an alternative story format called “5 things you didn’t know about the cancer center.” This format works well because, in print, this is a traditional process and record story on the opening, and the facts in the five things provide the reader information such as services, hours and other operational details. One of the things you didn’t know is a quote or two from the mayor on how cancer impacted his life. Recommendations | It’s important through planning tools to consider blogging topics before a re- porter attends the event, but being flexible is key as well. The reporter may find a gem, like the mayor’s personal story, which made for a nice blog. The five or seven quotes of note that are featured in the re- porter’s blog wouldn’t have all fit into the print story, making it valuable and unique online content. 55
  • 56. THE CONTENT CUBE | NEWS 4. COMMUNITY BLOGS What are community blogs? Community blogs are blogs that members of the community — not your staff — are writing and posting on your Web site. They can be blogs that are currently being pro- duced in your community that you link to on your Web site or blogs that leaders or members of your community write specifically for your Web site. }NOTABLES Why are community blogs important? Community blogs add a unique voice that your staff blogsSome of the don’t. When you pick the right bloggers or content, you add to a portfolio of local experts who cancommunity leaders speak on relevant issues, furthering your site as a destination for your community to visit.you connect with aspart of the Commu- Who are potential community bloggers? There are many opportunities, and the list varies based onnity Partner Jour-nalism program your community.(see page 29) could • An artist on the local arts and theater scene.be candidates for • A first-year teacher on his or her new experiences.blogging. • A local soldier deployed overseas or his or her family member on life on the homefront. • A commercial fisherman on the ins and outs of the business. Will we have to pay the bloggers? This will be a local decision, but we encourage newsrooms to work with bloggers and potential bloggers who simply want exposure for themselves or their organizations – those who want to share their news and thoughts on the most relevant local news and information site in their community. Should we provide guidelines for community bloggers? Yes. Before setting up a community blog- ger, each would agree to consistent posts — at least three posts a week. Community bloggers posts will be brief observations on community issues and events. Will newsrooms clear the posts? There may be cases — a young student blogger, for example — in which an editor will want to review posts before they go live. In such cases, the blogger would e-mail the editor or designated staffer the contributions on specific days for you to review and then post. But in al- most all cases, bloggers you choose would be cleared to post directly to their blogs. 56
  • 57. GateHouse Media The Content Cube 3 | Web 3 THE WEB CUBE THE OVERVIEW GateHouse Media’s Web strategy follows a three-pronged approach: • Constant updates throughout the day • Multimedia • Reader involvement The strategy is focused on creating realistic expectations based on staff size, circulation and market ex- pectations, and it takes full advantage of syndication domains and provides training and development that allows all newsrooms to manage Web sites that thrive in all functions of the company strategy. OVERARCHING STRATEGY There are three major components to the strategy: 1. CONSTANT LOCAL UPDATES The goal | News that happens throughout the day should be published to different sections throughout local sites. Updates are in addition to the print content destined for online, and in many cases updates could also go into print. How do we achieve constant updates on a consistent basis? A flow of consistent updates through- out the day is key to driving traffic on our Web sites. To achieve this goal while following the GateHouse Web and print content strategy, it is helpful to think of three layers of content — scheduled, News Now and print to Web — to organize the flow of content onto our Web sites. } Where some newsrooms may use too much print-to-Web content as the foundation of their Web updates, layer organization flips this on its head. Each of these layers builds upon the next to provide fresh content throughout the day.This contentis new to the • THE THREE LAYERSNewsroomHandbook Scheduled content | The layer of scheduled content utilizes a calendar posted in your newsroom or on your server listing specific pieces of Web content to be published on specific days every week by specific staff members. The goal with scheduled content isn’t to take a news story reported the night before and have it appear the next day, but to find content that has a “today feel” to readers that can be set the night before. Much of this content can be set up in advance to publish at set times. Scheduled content could in- clude Morning Minutes (produced by GateHouse News Service), polls, photo galleries, This Day in History, todays weather and more. See the sample schedule on the next page to guide you in setting up a schedule for your newsroom. News Now | With the new template, content in the News Now bucket should cycle through at least once a day. As the name implies, News Now is news posted to your Web site as it comes into your newsroom. • Posts could include newsy press releases, weather alerts, city announcements, brief advances and agenda items for a government meeting that night, police briefs and more. These items should be three to four paragraphs and, when appropriate, can be timed to publish throughout the day. News items – hiring announcements, road closings, alerts – should be posted immediately. Some calendar items – a flu clinic or blood drive two weeks out, for example – could be set to publish within a day, but no longer. • Some scheduled content can be published in the News Now bucket as well, including Morning Minutes, Today in History, sports results and schedules, and an event of the day. 57
  • 58. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEBThis contentis new to theNewsroomHandbook } • Here is an example of what a weeklong layer of scheduled content could look like, combined with News Now posts, to produce a consistent flow of content throughout the day. Breaking news, print-to- Web content and other updates would fill out the schedule: One week of scheduled and News Now content: 7 a.m. 7:30 a.m. 8 a.m. MONDAY Today’s weather Morning Minutes News Now update TUESDAY Today’s weather Morning Minutes News Now update WEDNESDAY Today’s weather Morning Minutes News Now update THURSDAY Today’s weather Morning Minutes News Now update FRIDAY Today’s weather Morning Minutes News Now update 9 a.m. Event of the day Event of the day Event of the day Event of the day Event of the day 9:30 a.m. News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update 10 a.m. New daily poll New daily poll New daily poll New daily poll New daily poll 11 a.m. Sports results/sked Sports results/sked Sports results/sked Sports results/sked Sports results/sked Noon News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update 1:30 p.m. News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update 2:30 p.m. Today in History Today in History Today in History Today in History Today in History 3 p.m. Weekend photo Reader-submitted News event This week in This week in our gallery photo gallery photo gallery sports gallery city photo gallery 4 p.m. News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update } 5 p.m. News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now update News Now updateThis contentis new to the Print to Web | The final layer of content, on top of scheduled and News Now, is print-to-Web content fol-Newsroom lowing the GateHouse strategy (see chart on page 73 and addendum on page 115). Print-to-Web contentHandbook does not have to be published in a single dump. Consider each piece and decide two things: Does it fit the strategy? And what is the best time to publish it to the Web? News items should be posted promptly. News features and other appropriate content could be timed to contribute to consistent updates through the day. What’s an update? Anything that is happening throughout the day. Based on the market, the definition of an update could change drastically. For larger newspapers, hard news and breaking news should flow throughout the day, but in smaller markets, simple press releases, police briefs and other community an- nouncements make up updates. 58
  • 59. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB What are examples of updates? Start by posting press releases and other easy-to-collect information, and over time move into posting short write-ups from coverage. Here are some specific examples: • Breaking news | When you are covering a breaking-news event, consider posting several paragraphs on the nuts and bolts of the coverage when you get to your newsroom or call it in to the newsroom when possible. • Events and meetings | Anything that a reporter is attending that is happening during the day can be turned into an update. After attending a morning or afternoon meeting or event, post three or four para- graphs of the biggest news to come out of the event. • Police briefs | Checking in with local police in the morning or after a morning deadline can make for great update content. Pull items out of your police blotter — the longer items — and post them as updates. • Courts | Any press release you get announcing a development in an ongoing court case makes for a great update. • Obituaries | These remain one of the most viewed items on your site, so post obituaries as you get them to your homepage as individual stories. See “What goes online and what doesn’t” section for more specific recommendations. • Press releases | Any release that makes an announcement can qualify as an update, such as an- nouncements of upcoming events, appointments and public service notices. • Sports | Post announcements on clinics and camps as you get them. Every night before your sports edi- tor leaves, have that editor post a schedule of games and scores from that night to appear the next morning. • Weather | Post weather watches and alerts as you get them. Sign up for alerts from the National Weather Service. Get information here on how to sign up for the alerts: } www.ghnewsroom.com/article/make-it-easy-get-weather-information-sign-local-alerts. • School closings and traffic reports | Post school closings as updates in a document of all closings.This content Any release from the city or state on traffic should be posted.is new to the How many updates should we post? Expectations change by newspaper size. Reporters and writingNewsroom editors should post at least two updates a day. Here are some basic guidelines, but customized expecta-Handbook tions are established for individual newsrooms: • 20 staff members and larger: 15 to 20 local updates a day • Six to 19 staff members: 10 to 15 local updates a day • One to five staff members: Five to 10 local updates a day When should updates be posted? They need to occur throughout the day, so posting sports scores to release in the morning helps. Individual reporters and writing editors typically should post an update be- fore noon and one after noon. Posts should primarily go up between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. You can post items to release at specific times in Zope. If a staff member is working a later shift, that staffer should post an item to release in the morning. Who should post the update and edit it? If updates are press releases or announcements, the re- porter or editor of that item should post the content, but if it is of a more serious nature, the item should be edited but can still be posted by reporters. How should headlines for updates and the Web be written? Web headlines are very different than print headlines. It is important that you include many specific details in headlines. While headlines should be fewer than 10 words for the most part, many times, a good print subhead makes a great Web headline. A headline and short story should be filled out for all stories. Short stories should not be the first paragraph of your story, but more like a subhead. 59
  • 60. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB } How can my stories get picked up by Google? Many factors contribute to search engine optimization (stories ranking high in Google or showing up in a Google alert). Below are the most important things that — if done correctly — can help your stories rank higher in Google:This contentis new to the To have your story appear at the top of a Google search list, make sure that specific names of organiza-Newsroom tions, teams and businesses are used in several areas in your story. The key words that someone wouldHandbook search for need to be displayed in the following priority list: 1. Headline 2. First graph of the story 3. Beginning of a paragraph 4. Photo file names in Zope 5. Photo captions For example, a story on the death of a local track star should be handled in the following way: • Headline | Joe Smith, high school track star, dies in Normalville car crash • Lede | NORMALVILLE — Joe Smith, a 2008 Normalville Regional High School graduate, was killed in a car crash Sunday night. Feature headlines that appear in print should never be used online as the only information in the headline. For example, for the story above a print headline may be “Remembering a star.” That works in print be- cause you likely have a subhead appearing, maybe a photo and other layered information that helps the reader understand what the the story is about. However on the Web, often the only thing the reader sees is the headline. A possible headline: “Remembering a star: Joe Smith, Normalville high school track star, dies in car crash.” 60
  • 61. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB 2. MULTIMEDIA There are two major focuses to the multimedia strategy: video and photo galleries. Expectations | Decisions on which multimedia to use should be based on the content. Here are some production recommendations: • 20 staff members or more: Five to seven staff-produced photo galleries or videos a week. • Six to 19 staff members: Three to five staff-produced photo galleries or videos a week. • Fewer than five staff members: Two to five staff-produced photo galleries or videos a week. How many photo galleries or videos should individual staff members produce every week? 1. Reporters should produce one video or photo gallery a week (if appropriate equipment is available). 2. Photographers should produce two photo galleries or videos a week. • VIDEO What kind of content makes good video? Not all stories are good for video. Here are recommendations on topics that work: Breaking news }NOTABLES • FireExamples of • Weatherevents: festivals,county fairs, • Accidentsreunions, school Eventsevents andsignificant sports 1. Focus on one part of the event.events. 2. Don’t try to capture everything. 3. Pick a person or group to follow. 4. Tell one short story, not the story of the whole event.This contentis new to theNewsroomHandbook } There are several video formats that could be done consistently that have the opportunity to create a positive relationship between on-air personalities and viewers. Instead of having reporters shooting random video attached to stories that often don’t work, based on the quality of the video or the con- tent, these formats create consistency, are easy to do and offer the viewer content they can actually use. Weekend planner | A templated video that showcases the best of weekend activities and information, with anchored spots for weather forecast, local events, sporting events and tips around the house. This week in town | A preview video that is similar to the weekend preview but looks to the week that’s coming up with standard formatting, such as weather this week, meetings on tap, big events this week, what we’re covering and following, etc. How it impacts you | Taking stories such as a piece on fireplace safety and offering readers a how-to on protecting yourself from this happening to you. Or a niche story on winterizing your car, with a how- to video. How we covered the story | Talking to a reporter before and after the story on how they covered it, the stuff that doesn’t fall into a story and behind-the-scenes goodies. Find more | There is more specific information about video in our video style guide featured later in this handbook. 61
  • 62. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB • PHOTO GALLERIES } Is there a consistent schedule of photo galleries we should follow each week? While consistentThis content photo galleries from events and reader involvement callouts (such as Halloween photos) have great page-view potential, newspapers can find consistency through a variety of themed galleries.is new to theNewsroom MONDAY Best photos from weekend news and sporting eventsHandbook TUESDAY Best reader-submitted photos of the week (check-passing, education and other submitted photos) WEDNESDAY Photos from one event covered Monday or Tuesday THURSDAY Best sports photos of the week FRIDAY Best news photos of the week How many photos should be in each photo gallery? There should be a minimum of five photos. There is no maximum, but make sure you do not duplicate. Go to this page to find out how to post photo galleries: www.ghnewsroom.com/article/screencast-add-photo-gallery-your-news-site Do all photographs need cutlines? Yes. And all cutlines should be full sentences. Full names and ti- tles should be included in cutlines. } Where should photo galleries go? There should be a tab or section on your homepage where all photo galleries can be found. All photo galleries should be published on the new template to the newThis content photo gallery section.is new to the How can we sell our photographs? All newspapers should have a My Capture account. When news-Newsroom papers are on the new template, there is a function that will allow all photos published in Zope to in-Handbook clude a “Purchase this photo” link that allows users to buy the photo through My Capture. Submit a ticket to ZenDesk if My Capture isn’t set up on your site. Reader-submitted photos should not be sold through My Capture. 62
  • 63. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB 3. READER INVOLVEMENT } This section focuses on a variety of ways newspapers can get readers involved with their Web sites, from polls to Facebook.This contentis new to the • POLLSNewsroom How many polls should we do every week? A fresh poll should be published daily as an importantHandbook part of the scheduled layer of content for your Web site (see page 57). Is there a schedule of daily polls we should follow? While polls on local issues are what distinguish our Web sites from others, here are some ideas for regular topics, day by day through the week: MONDAYS Question on a national news event from the weekend, question on big game from the week- end, question on a movie that opened over the weekend, question on a big local event that happened over the weekend or a forward-looking question on something on the agenda this week in the city – ei- ther an event or a government meeting. TUESDAYS Question on a state issue. WEDNESDAYS Local sports question, national sports question, pop culture question. THURSDAYS Looking ahead to the weekend, a question on a big movie opening or local event. FRIDAYS Local poll question looking back on the news of the week in your community. Could ask what was the top story of the week or publish a poll about a single story. What kind of choices for answers should we provide? Polls are more interesting and engaging when you offer more variety of possible answers than simple “Yes,” “No” and “Maybe” or “I dont know.” Also, avoid “I dont care,” which is a throwaway response. Offer enough variety of responses to engage almost any reader. }NOTABLESThis poll from theHornell (N.Y.)Evening Tribunedrew more than1,000 votes byoffering aninteresting varietyof responses. 63
  • 64. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB How do I get polls on my site? When your newspaper is on the new template, you will no longer have to use Poll Daddy to post your poll, as Zope will have functionality to publish polls. (See page 102 in the training guide on how to publish polls to Zope.) For the papers that have not transferred onto the new templates follow this link to learn how to set up an online poll: www.ghnewsroom.com/article/creating-online-polls- your-Web-site-using-polldaddycom { How should I promote polls in my newspaper? Anchor the question on your front page (in your rail), page 3 or the opinion page. Also, the question should go on your site. There’s an editable graphic available you can use to promote the poll in print. www.ghnewsroom.com/article/how-use-web-poll-graph- ics-template 64
  • 65. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB }NOTABLESFind a full listcalled • READER CALLOUTS“Holiday/events Reader callouts are a great way to unite your community. You ask readers to submit content –callouts” on page photos or thoughts – and publish responses online and in print.67 that detailstimes throughout All publications should build a highly visible program in print and online to solicit content from readers.the year to seekreader involve- Every week newspapers should be seeking stories and photos from readers on holidays, life-ment. changing events or special community events, such as: • Asking readers to write in for Valentine’s Day about how they fell in love with their partner. • Seeking photographs of a child’s Easter egg hunt or photos of kids dressed in their Sunday best. • Seeking photographs of teenagers dressed up for prom. On page 67 you will find an abridged calendar of weekly callouts throughout the year when newspapers should seek reader stories and photos. The calendar notes when a newspaper should seek submis- sions in print and online and when they should run the content. More details on that list can be found in an addendum in the back of this guide. The GateHouse News & Interactive Division will develop weekly promotional ads in three sizes that you can use anywhere in your newspaper to generate interest. Also, an image will be posted on GateHouse News Service with the callout promotions that newspapers can place in their promotional scroll on their site and use to seek submissions online. In addition to the weekly promotions for 2010, look for local opportunities, such as major community events and happenings. Here are some ideas: Sports | If you have a professional team nearby, ask readers to submit photos of themselves at the ballpark. If you have a local team that’s setting a record, ask readers for their memories of the team. Businesses closing or reopening | Ask readers to submit their memories of the business, whether it’s a favorite restaurant, watering hole or store. Local events | When you have parades, fairs, carnivals, car shows or other events in town where peo- ple are gathering, ask readers to send photos of themselves and their families. It’s simple to pair this callout with your coverage of that event. Upcoming events or shows | Ask people who are planning to attend to say what they’re excited to see and what they think about the show. 65
  • 66. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB • GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS Seeking photos | Place a promotion on your front page or run house ads throughout your newspaper at least one week before the event asking readers to send photos to the paper. Run that promotion daily. Seeking stories | Place a promotion on your front page and anchor house ads at least two weeks be- fore the holiday asking for readers’ thoughts or stories. Run the promotions daily, or if you’re a weekly, run it for at least two weeks. Provide a deadline for submissions and note when the stories will run. What to run in print and online | Run as many photos as you can in print. Create an online photo gallery with every callout. Start the photo gallery as soon as you have two submissions, encouraging others to submit. Because of the nature of submitted stories, run that submitted content just in print. How to promote it | To encourage submissions, place the promotion in a highly visible location in your newspaper, such as the bottom of your front page or at the top of the folio of a local news or com- munity page. Also, place the promotion in your promotional scroll on your Web site or as a ranked story on your homepage. }NOTABLESHere are someexamples of howto display yourreader callouts invarious places inyour paper. YOUR NEWS READERS’ PHOTOS HOW TO SUBMIT Send your ph contact information to xxxxxxxx QUESTIONS? Contact Editor Dan Marsh at siftingsheraldeditor@yahoo.com or (870) 246-5525 DAILY CALLOUT Send us your child’s letter to Santa Kids’ letters to Santa are so much fun to read each year. Send us your children’s letters to Santa so we can share them with our community. Josie Sampson, left, and Nata old, throw snow at each other How to submit ding hill in Berkley. The two b the snow. PHOTO SUBMITTED BY JA Send letters to xxxxx xxxxxx at xxxxxxxxxxx by Dec. 19 and we’ll run them in our print edition and online at xxxxxxxxxxxx.com. Be sure to include the name, age and hometown of your child, as well as a telephone number for verification. EVENT CALENDAR MONDAY ments will be served. is necessary. Light refresh- ments will be served. Neighborhood watch 7 FRIDAY MADD 7 p.m., First Baptist p.m., First Baptist Church, MADD 7 p.m., First Baptist Church, 591-8900 All are MADD 7 p.m., First Baptist 591-8900 All are welcome to Church, 591-8900 All are welcome to join the club. No Church, 591-8900 All are join the cl b No e perience 66
  • 67. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB • 2010 READER CALLOUT CALENDAR JANUARY New Year’s Eve photos | Seek submissions: Dec. 28-Jan.2 | Run: Jan. 4 Snow photos | Seek submissions: Jan. 4-8 | Run: Jan. 11 Martin Luther King Jr. stories | Seek submissions: Dec. 22-27 | Run: Jan. 18 Super Bowl stories | Seek submissions: Jan. 11-15 | Run: Feb. 6-7 FEBRUARY Boy Scout stories | Seek submissions: Jan. 18-22 | Run: Feb. 2 Valentine’s Day stories | Seek submissions: Jan. 25-29 | Run: Feb. 14 Presidents Day stories | Seek submissions: Feb. 1-5 | Run: Feb. 18 Lent stories | Seek submissions: Feb. 8-12 | Run: Feb. 25 MARCH First day of spring garden tips | Seek submissions: Feb. 15-19 | Run: March 3 St. Patrick’s Day photos | Seek submissions: March 15-19 | Run: March 17-19 March Madness pick the winner submissions | Seek submissions: March 15 Run: March 22 (picks) and April 8 (winners) Easter photos | Seek submissions: March 29-April 2 | Run: April 4-6 APRIL April Fools’ Day stories | Seek submissions: March 22-26 | Run: April 1 Earth Day stories | Seek submissions: March 29-April 2 | Run: April 23 Prom photos | Seek submissions: April 5-9 | Run: April 14 Spring outdoor photos | Seek submissions: April 12-16 | Run: April 28 MAY Cinco de Mayo recipes | Seek submissions: April 19-23 | Run: May 5 Mother’s Day stories | Seek submissions: April 26-30 | Run: May: 9 Best hamburger grilling tips | Seek submissions: May 3-13 | Run: May 19 Memorial Day photos | Seek submissions: May 28-June 1 | Run: June 3 JUNE Favorite flavor of ice cream submissions | Seek submissions: May 17-21 | Run: June 4 High school and college graduation photos | Seek submissions: May 24-June 4 | Run: June 8 Father’s Day look-a-like photos | Seek submissions: June 7-11 | Run: June 19-21 Favorite childhood summer memory submissions | Seek submissions: June 14-18 | Run: June 29 JULY July 4 photos | Seek submissions: July 1-5 | Run: July 6 Little League photos | Seek submissions: June 21-25 | Run: July 12 Cool drink recipes | Seek submissions: July 6-9 | Run: July 21 Summer vacation photos | Seek submissions: July 12-16 | Run: July 28 67
  • 68. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB AUGUST Best lawn pictures | Seek submissions: July 19-23 | Run: Aug. 3 Friday the 13th stories | Seek submissions: July 26-Aug. 4 | Run: Aug. 13 High school football practice and game photos | Seek submissions: Aug. 16-20 | Run: Aug. 30 Back-to-school photos | Aug. 23-27 | Run Sept. 1 SEPTEMBER Labor Day photos | Seek submissions: Sept. 3-6 | Run: Sept. 7 Grandparents photos | Seek submissions: Sept. 7-10 | Run: Sept. 12 Favorite hat photos | Seek submissions: Sept. 13-17 | Run: Sept. 22 Creative mailbox photos | Seek submissions: Sept. 20-24 | Run: Sept. 28 OCTOBER National Newspaper Week stories | Seek submissions: Sept. 27-Oct. 1 | Run: Oct. 10 Breast cancer stories | Seek submissions: Oct. 4-8 | Run: Oct. 14 Pumpkin photos | Seek submissions: Oct. 18-22 | Run: Oct. 28 Halloween costume photos | Seek submissions: Oct. 25-28 | Run: Nov. 2 NOVEMBER Veterans Day stories | Seek submissions: Nov. 1-5 | Run: Nov. 11 Fall foliage photos | Seek submissions: Nov. 8-12 | Run: Nov. 17 Why you’re thankful stories | Seek submissions: Nov. 15-19 | Run: Nov. 25 Thanksgiving photos | Seek submissions: Nov. 22-26 | Run: Dec. 1 DECEMBER Christmas lights and decorations photos | Seek submissions: Nov. 30-Dec. 4 | Run: Dec. 9 Santa letters submission stories | Seek submissions: Dec. 7-11 | Run: Dec. 17 Christmas ornaments photos and short stories | Seek submissions: Dec. 14-18 | Run: Dec. 23 Best of the year submission stories | Seek submissions: Dec. 21-25 | Run: Dec. 31 68
  • 69. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB • READER ADVISORY BOARDS Another great way to engage readers in your newspaper and Web site is to create a reader advisory board. Heres a guide to setting one up: Seek board members | Put a callout for applications on your front page for a few weeks. Explain to readers that you’re starting a reader advisory board and ask those interested in serving on it to send the editor a few paragraphs on why they’re interested in serving. Explain to readers that the newspaper is looking for a diverse board and no city officials will be accepted. Board members should serve six- month terms and meet once a month. Select about a dozen board members. Go over the applications with newspaper leadership and inform the board members they have been selected. Write a column in your newspaper announcing who is on the board. How to run the meeting • The meeting shouldnt last more than one hour. • Bring food in, based on what time you do the meeting. • Consider videotaping the meeting and post pieces of it online. First meeting | Give the board some history of the newspaper, talk about the importance of the board, your expectations of the board and lay down some ground rules. Give the board a tour of your building and your Web site. Take a group photo after the meeting and run it in the newspaper and online. Contact sheet | Have a "how to contact who at the newspaper” sheet built and hand it out to the board. Also, make a "newspaper terminology" sheet so the board will understand your lingo. Steps for the meeting 1. Start the meeting by updating the board on projects your newspaper is working on, a redesign, re- contenting, new features. Dont just tell the group what youre doing, but ask some specific questions about what youre thinking or doing and get their feedback. Dont consume the meeting with this kind of content, maybe two or three things. 2. Bring in a different department head (classified, circulation, advertising, press) each month and have them talk about their area of expertise and give the board a chance to ask questions. Consider having each of those department heads build a FAQ about their department that they can hand out to the board. 3. Do a roundtable discussion. Ask each board member to provide feedback over the last month — sto- ries they have liked, ones they didn’t, thoughts on coverage, ideas for the future, etc. Ask them to bring tearsheets of examples of what worked and what didnt. Encourage the board not to spend so much time rehashing what the paper was, but more about what it is today. 4. Bring a different issue to the table each month for discussion. This will keep the discussion each month on track. Tell the board at the end of each meeting what the discussion topic will be at the next meeting. For example, for the first meeting, the topic could be sports coverage. After the meeting 1.The editor should write a column about the meeting and explain what got discussed and what the paper is going to do about that feedback. 2. If you implement something from a suggestion or conversation from the board, find ways to tell read- ers that the new feature or idea is the result of conversation that came out of a reader board meeting. 3. Send out a thank you e-mail after the first meeting and remind the board when the next meeting will be and what the topic will be. Remind them that they’re a sounding board for the community. Remind them that they don’t have to wait a full month to provide feedback to you. 4. Build a reader advisory board logo and run it with all columns about the board. 69
  • 70. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB • SOCIAL NETWORKING }NOTABLES What social media platforms should we use? Our newsrooms should set up Facebook fan pages first,Much of this then at least one Twitter account. All of our newsrooms soon will have a mobile device platform as well.content is newto the Newsroom How are they different? Facebook’s primary purpose for newsrooms is to drive traffic to our WebHandbook. sites through journalism that creates interaction for the user, such as polls, photo galleries and readerThe goal of all callouts for submissions. Twitter should be used by individual editors, reporters and bloggers to sparksocial media is to and join conversations as well as report ongoing news from the scene. Twitter also can be used to moveinteract with links to breaking news.readers andultimately drive Why should we create a Facebook page? Facebook, the leading social networking site, serves as a greattraffic to our Web way to connect new online readers to your site. It is just another way to drive more page views. GateHousesites. Media sites get more referrals from Facebook to our sites than any other social networking site.Social mediatrends and tech- How do I get a Facebook page set up? You can go to this page to find out how to build a Facebooknology are con- page (though training will be provided on request): www.ghnewsroom.com/article/facebook-your-stantly evolving. newsroom-setting-page-facebook.We will updateour approachand strategy as How should we use Facebook, and how often should we post? The goal is to bring fans fromneeded. Facebook to local sites by posting several times a day to your page. Here are some guidelines on the number of posts per day that newsrooms should follow: • 20-plus staff members: Four to six Facebook posts per day • Six to 19 staff members: Three to four Facebook posts per day • One to five staff members: Two Facebook posts per day Here are several ideas for using Facebook: 1. Post one-sentence intros and link to the most interesting stories on your Web site. The headline on the Facebook page should be more conversational and not a repeat of the headline for the story. • For example: Story headline Smith ousted as city council president Facebook post headline Yet another shakeup at City Hall. Will be interesting to see how new president sets the agenda. Don’t post every news story on your site to your Facebook page. Choose the two or three that are likely to get the most attention. 2. Post a link to a story with a related daily poll. • For example: Headline Check out our daily poll: Have you finished your Christmas shopping? www.link-to- story-here.com. If your poll is only on your homepage, provide a link to your homepage and tell readers where to find it on your site. 3. Post links to your online reader content callouts. Every callout should be linked at least once on Facebook. As you receive submissions from your callouts, post a story in Zope and link it on Facebook. • For example: 10 residents have shared their Halloween photos. Click here to find out how to submit yours. 4. Ask your Facebook fans questions to help generate sources or ideas for stories you are working on. • For example: We’re looking for residents who had family survive the big East Coast storm. Know anyone? Let us know. 5. Post two photos from a photo gallery with a headline that says: Photos from Tuesday night’s high school basketball game, find a dozen more at the link below. 70
  • 71. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB How do we promote our page? Advertise and link to your Facebook page on your Web site, e-mail sig- natures and wherever your paper has a Web presence. Run a house ad in your newspaper letting read- ers know about the page. Consider a promotion in the rail on your newspaper’s front page. How should we use Twitter? Twitter should be used differently than Facebook. Twitter is a way for edi- tors, reporters and bloggers to interact as individuals with followers as opposed to Facebook, where }NOTABLES readers become fans of the newspaper and Web site. Each newspaper should have a Twitter accountWe recommend where breaking news is moved, but individual reporters and editors should also have accounts.that you tweet atleast once each day Here are several ideas for using Twitter:on each Twitter 1. An editor could produce daily tweets of insights or behind-the-scenes activity in the newsroom. Ex-account (no matter amples: tweet a summary of the daily news meeting; tweet followers on decisions you make on whatwhat the newspa- stories to cover; tweet asking for input or advice on how to approach a story; tweet asking for sourcesper size), and more or some direction or insight on a particular local issue you plan to cover; tweet asking followers, “Whatas news merits. are we missing on this story?”; tweet asking followers for reaction to stories; tweet your thoughts and observations on current events and daily life in your community. The goal is to join the conversation as a person, not as the institution you represent. 2. A reporter could tweet updates and observations from breaking news events or big news events such as a highly anticipated government meeting, Election Day or a festival. 3. A sports reporter could tweet updates, observations and insights from big games. 4. Anyone should send tweets with links to breaking news stories. 5. Do not send regular tweets with just a sentence and headline link to stories, unless it is big breaking news. 6. You should not have a Twitter feed bucket on your homepage if you are feeding any of the same headlines into it that are going into your News Now bucket. If tweets from individual reporters and edi- tors are going into that bucket or content from an event is coming in fast (like a high school football game), it serves a different purpose than content already on your homepage. How should we promote Twitter? Use the promotions scroll on the new template to encourage fans and followers to sign up, and include links to each page in the navigation on your homepage. Since indi- vidual staff members are encouraged to have Twitter accounts, tease a reporter’s Twitter account in a story or an opinion writer’s Twitter account in a column. 71
  • 72. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB } • OTHER RECOMMENDATIONS The following recommendations are good additions to sites, and all GateHouse newspapers larger thanThis content 20,000 circulation should participate in all aspects of these recommendations.is new to the Linking | Link journalism is an important strategic function that helps our newspapers become notNewsroom just a Web site that offers stories and photographs of the day’s news, but rather information that takesHandbook readers to more resources and content. Adding links to your stories is also important for search engine optimization. Our Web sites are meant to be informational hubs of the community, and readers will find our sites more useful when information on the site doesn’t just include content produced by the local newspaper but information that’s coming from multiple sources in your community. What kind of content makes for good links? In every story, there are possibilities for linking. Con- sider the number of organizations and businesses mentioned in a 10-inch story and how many of those could become links. • For example, a story on your local city council considering building a new park could have links to: City Hall’s Web site City council Web site Facebook pages for city council members Park district’s Web site How often should we create links? Every story could have a handful of links. Aim for at least three links per story. Are there types of stories that are better than others for linking? Blogs should have a heavy dose of links, as should columns. Should we ever link to our past coverage? Yes. Instead of rehashing the background of a story, cre- ate links to your past coverage. This can be accomplished by creating related content links to that cov- erage or doing a search with a specific key word and posting a link to that search in your story. You can also create links to external sources that are relevant to the story. More information about linking is de- tailed in content guidelines for the new template. Maps | Google maps are a great way to point readers to a specific location of a story, just like you may do in print. Using an embed code from Google, you can easily post maps in stories. • Here are some examples where you could use Google maps as a tool to support a story: Fourth of July events in your area. Location of a new development or business. Stretch of roadwork that’s going to be improved. Location for a weekend festival. • Go to this page for information on how to implement a Google map: www.ghnewsroom.com/article/make-google-map-july-fourth-events-your-region Live chats | Chats are a useful tool to engage audiences at a specific time or about a specific issue. Do your best to let your targeted audience know well in advance about the chat. Good topics include chatting with officials on a controversial topic, introducing a new official and asking experts specific questions on a timely topic. Use Cover It Live for this feature. • Go to this page for more information on using Cover It Live: www.ghnewsroom.com/article/screencast-use-coveritlivecom-embed-live-chat-zope-story 72
  • 73. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB • WHAT CONTENT SHOULD GO ONLINE Many of our Web sites launched with the expectation that everything that ran in print should go online. That is no longer the case. Below are guidelines designed to drive Web traffic and at the same time hold back exclusive content to keep our print products strong. Because our print and online products serve different audiences and goals, the formats and content that go in both should be different. This does not mean creating “Web-only text,” but formatting content differently and making decisions about what is appropriate for the different media. Based on analyses of GateHouse sites — in both small and large markets — we have established a vari- ety of recommendations. Many factors were considered in producing this document, including analysis of content that should be protected in the print product based on its traditional popular value. Not every piece of content that your newspaper produces or every content situation you encounter is accounted for. When you run into content not addressed here, feel free to contact News & Interactive corporate staff to discuss those is- sues. } Through working with News & Interactive corporate staff, local management should decide what should and should not go online, based on local site trends, though this guide should serve as direction.This content Below is an overview of the strategy. More specifics on each piece can be found in addendum 3.is new to the What should not go online:NewsroomHandbook • Full cop or sheriff logs or blotters. • Public record (court proceedings, marriage licenses, birth announcements, etc.). • Long meeting stories (recommend offering seven inches of the biggest issue of the meeting, if not the top story in your paper that day). • Long, in-depth, text-and-photo-only projects (that aren’t breaking ground pieces). • Non-controversial, non-topical letters, columns, editorials, syndicated columns. • Community columns and general topical columns (such as library columns). • Most human-interest stories (unless they have a significant wow factor and would fall into an “I’m going to e-mail this to someone” category). • Feature stories of event coverage (school events, festivals, etc.). Photo galleries are a better fit for this kind of coverage. • Long game stories (similar to meeting stories, post the nuts and bolts of most game stories, unless it’s the big Friday night football game). • Most sports features. } What should go online: • Breaking news.This content • Police briefs (posted as individual headlines).is new to the • Court stories.Newsroom • Short meeting stories (as noted above).Handbook • General news stories. • Politics and election coverage. • Calendar content (as individual announcements where appropriate). • Controversial or highly topical letters, columns, editorials. • Useful features: recipes, tips, how-tos, entertainment, arts and dining. • Engagement, wedding and birth announcements. • Short game stories. • Announcements: sports clinics, sports camps, school closings, upcoming events, PSAs, weather alerts, press releases. 73
  • 74. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB How should we promote Web content in print? A number of ways: } 1. Use breakout boxes in print to direct readers to a related online poll. 2. Use breakout boxes in print to direct readers to more photos, video or other multimedia. Go to thisNearly all page for icons you can use to tease to that content:content on www.gatehousenewsservice.com/ghns_pages/x949369614/Online-logos-for-print-productsthis page 3. Use breakout boxes in print to tell readers to check online for updates on a developing news story.is new to the For example, if you are covering a trial, tell print readers to check online for updates as the trial contin-Newsroom ues today.Handbook 4. Tell online readers that you were first on a story by running a breakout box alerting them to that fact with the story in print. How should we promote print content on the Web? There are many opportunities to promote ex- clusive print content. When you follow the Web and print content guidelines (see page 114), you will be publishing print-only features that are related to content you publish on the Web. Here are three examples: 1. Online you publish an advance of a football game. You also have a print-only Friday feature about how the game is the last for the longtime coach, or a feature on how its the last game for seniors. Promote the print feature in a tagline on the game advance: “See Fridays Your Newspaper or our e-edition [link to the e-edition] for a profile of longtime coach Bob Smith, who is retiring after 20 years.” 2. Online you publish an advance or report of the annual Apple Festival. In print you have a special sec- tion on that event with a map of the festival grounds. Promote the print section — and the fact there’s a big map — in a tagline on the advance or report: “See Mondays Your Newspaper or e-edition [link to e- edition] for a map of the festival grounds.” 3. Online you publish a report that the city council has narrowed the list of potential city managers to three. In the report, you include brief bios of each. You also have print-only profiles of each scheduled for the days leading up to the council vote on the hiring. Promote the print package in a tagline on the report: “See Sundays Your Newspaper or e-edition [link to e-edition] for in-depth profiles of the final three candidates for city manager.” Should we tease readers to find complete versions of stories by buying the newspaper or e-edition? No. There are a number of opportunities in the new template to promote your e-editions and print subscriptions. Do not put taglines on Web versions of stories directing readers to buy the e- edition or newspaper for the “complete” version. This practice frustrates Web readers. What we are of- fering Web readers already is complete, based on the speed and format at which the news is delivered. 74
  • 75. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB • STORY COMMENTS Comments allow readers to respond directly to a specific posted story and to carry on a conversation among others who are also responding to that story. How often should we check comments of a story? Daily, reporters should look at comments made about their stories that have been posted the day before and during the day. Editors should look at comments on the “most popular” stories every day to ensure no inappropriate comments are being made about the top stories on your site. Looking at comments on a daily basis is important because re- porters can get tips and gather reader feedback. It is also important to ensure that comments for sto- ries are not inappropriate. Should I get involved in the conversation? Reporters, using their full identity, should interact with posters commenting on their stories, especially when facts need to be corrected, clarified or explained. }NOTABLES This is not necessary with every story you post, but if there is confusion about an issue, feel free to noteFind out in the who you are and clear up a misconception about a post. Never get involved in the commentary of asupport and com- post.munication areaof this handbook What do I do if the conversation is inappropriate? Every GateHouse newspaper has its own com-who to contact to menting management system, which can be accessed by going to {Your site.com}/comments.get assistancewith managing There are several choices you have:story comments. • You can switch the “commenting status” from on to off for individual posts. You also have the option to turn your commenting off altogether. • For each comment, you have the option to flag it as spam by clicking the “Spam” button. • You also have the option to set up your site to allow an editor to reject comments that you find inap- propriate. • Don’t make any edits to comments, but if it is inappropriate, delete the comment entirely. Before I get to the point of needing to delete a user, what should I do? Based on the severity of the posting, consider telling the poster first that the post is inappropriate and that you are deleting it. If the behavior continues, warn the poster that his or her profile may be deleted. } Are there certain kinds of stories that I should disable comments for? That is a local decision, but have a conversation before a story is posted about the pros and cons of the story comments. Racial is- sues, crime and political stories have typically been the most dangerous concerning story comments.This contentis new to the Can readers flag things they find inappropriate? Yes. A user will have to be registered/logged in toNewsroom use this feature. They will also have to enter an e-mail address and a reason before submitting theHandbook abuse. Once a user submits an abuse, it will come to the e-mail address that currently receives those kind of notices. 75
  • 76. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB VIDEO STYLE GUIDE THE OVERVIEW Included in this video style guide are steps to follow to create a video story. These are simple guidelines. The steps should be applied to both news and feature video reports. They’re designed to help the video producer find a focus for video stories and also provide an outline for newsrooms to follow to bring con- sistency to a papers videos and among all GateHouse Media video reports. It also aims to provide structure to adhere to our targeted goals in our Web Cube program, which out- lines multimedia expectations for newsrooms. THE STRATEGY 1. Length of video Video lengths will vary at times. However, the guidelines here are set for the typical daily video report youll file. If you are working on a larger video project, or these limitations do not work for your report, an editor should be consulted to determine if the video warrants departing from these guidelines. News videos | These should be no longer than two minutes. If a report goes over two minutes, a discussion between an editor and a producer should take place to determine if it needs to get re-edited or it goes long. Feature videos | These should be no longer than three minutes. If a feature video goes over three minutes, a discussion between an editor and a producer should take place to determine if it needs to get re-edited or it goes long. Hint | Typically, to get a two-minute, edited video, you should be shooting about 15 minutes of raw footage, such as interviews and B-Roll footage (supplemental footage); about 15 to 30 minutes of raw footage for a three-minute piece. 2. The focus of your video In order to adhere to the recommended time limits of our videos, like in print stories, the most impor- tant thing to do before shooting is to find the focus of your piece. Every video producer should be able to answer the following two questions before pursuing a video report: What is the story about? Like in print, a producer should be able to explain the story in one sentence before planning a video. Why should this story be a video? Here are some things to ask: • Does the story provide some visual supplemental coverage for your print story? • Does it provide explanatory (how-to) journalism, best shown in video; or, if just a supplement for a print report, does it show something interesting? • Does the story have an emotional topic/subject hook that is best presented in video? • Does the story have an interesting “character” (subject) that is best captured in video? • SHOOTING YOUR VIDEO 1. Shoot to edit At the very least, your video should show something interesting for the viewer if just an accompanying visual for your written report, and/or at least have one source explaining the action of the piece with B- Roll footage for visual interest. • Source tells story, answering the who, what, where, when and why. B-Roll matches or supplements narration for visual interest • Or reporter narrates video (voice-over) B-Roll matches voice-over 76
  • 77. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB 2. Creating an outline Whether it is on paper or just in your head, just like developing a rough outline with print stories, a sim- ple video shot list and outline can help focus the video and save time in the field and back in the office during editing. For example | If there is a car accident you have been sent to cover, figure out the shots you need be- fore getting on scene. • Establishing shot of accident. • Cut to police chief interview (describing the who, what, where, when, how, etc.). • Cut to B-Roll footage of the accident scene over chiefs interview. • Cut to witness interview (with B-Roll over witness interview). 3. Different shots There are three basic shots you should know and incorporate, whenever possible, in your video reports: the wide shot (or establishing shot); the medium shot and the closeup. For example | Wide shot | Most commonly Medium shot | Commonly Closeup | Commonly used to used to establish a scene, good used to bring viewers in closer capture emotional scenes and opening shots to establish the to action. subjects during interviewing scene for a viewer. and for detail-setting shots. }NOTABLES 4. Sources should tell the storyWhen interviewing Be sure to get the source(s) answering the basic questions of the event (who, what, where, when, etc.);for your video let the sources in the video tell the story to eliminate need for a voice-over whenever possible.story, keep in mindthat occasionally 5. Interviewing video tipscameras (andmaybe lights or • Before you start the interview, explain what the interview will be like, and tell your source the processaudio equipment) you will use, for example: You will interview them, take other shots of the scene, edit the needed parts,may make people etc., and ask them if they have concerns or questions.uncomfortable. • Try to keep the interview conversational — but focused — to get the answers you need. • It is OK to go over the ground rules for a video interview, instructing the interviewee when needed. For example, “Don’t look at camera.” ”Just talk to me.” ”Please rephrase the question in the answer.” • Try not to ask questions that prompt an interviewee to answer with a “yes” or “no.” You need the source to tell the story narrative in the video. Keep in mind that questions in video interviews need to adhere to the same standards as print interviews. Don’t coach the subject to give a specific answer. • Use nonverbal cues to communicate during the interview. For example, nodding, smiling, etc. Try to keep quiet when the source is speaking. • Like in all interviews, print or video, remember to ask: “Is there anything I should have asked that maybe I haven’t?” And, remember, our same journalistic standards apply, so get the spelling of names and titles before leaving the interview. 77
  • 78. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB 6. Getting B-Roll footage }NOTABLES B-Roll is TV talk for shots that correspond with what the source is saying during a video report. ThereWhen you get to are several uses for B-Roll footage. For example, it can be used to bridge two different soundbites youyour story, be it might want to use from one source.breaking news ora planned featuredpiece, get your But B-Roll is most useful for showing your viewers what the interviewee is describing and to keep yourinterviews first, piece visually interesting for the viewer.then get the B-Rollfootage you need. Examples of B-Roll in an accident story:That way, youwill be able to get • An establishing shot of the accident scene.matching shots of • Police tape.the items discussed • Broken glass on road.in the interview. • Emergency crews assisting injured or directing traffic. • Reaction shots of witnesses or onlookers. • Shots of your source doing something related to story (assisting injured, directing traffic, etc.). These shots are a good way to introduce interviewees in a video. 7. Extras that help tell video stories Video stories can be helped by using existing content that may be available to you in your archives or through sources in the community. Are there archival video, photos or graphics available? (Example: Photos from the car accident that could be used as B-Roll or archival video footage from an accident at the same intersection a month ago.) Are there other photos or is there other art available? (Example: Do emergency responders have photos from the accident, fire, etc., that you could obtain for the video, crediting the source?) 8. Audio, lighting and framing Audio: • Pay attention to background noise. • Get close to source(s). • Be aware of your own voice. Lighting: Framing: • Avoid background light. • Remember the rule of thirds. • Watch for shadows on faces. • Hold the camera steady. • Look for front-lighting. • Avoid darkness. • Avoid bright sunlight. 78
  • 79. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB 9. Logging your videotape A video log is a transcript of everything on your raw footage videotape or card. Logging is used to or- ganize your raw footage before the editing process to determine the footage youll want in the final video. Some producers only log what they need, noting the timecodes of the footage they want, in order to go to that footage when importing into editing program. But for breaking-news video, you may not have time to log your footage at all. In those times, adhere to the shooting recommendations in this guide: When you get to your story, be it breaking news or a planned featured piece, get your interviews first — then get the B-Roll footage you need. That way, you will be able to get matching shots of the items dis- cussed in the interview. }NOTABLESIf you are using This will, at the least, let you know you have your sources at the beginning of the tape and your B-Rolla voice-over to footage after the interviews.narrate your video,that should be writ- • EDITINGten and recordedbefore the edit Editing is the last step of the production process, whether you are using iMovie, Final Cut Express orprocess, to match Pro, AdobePremiere or some other editing program.your shots with thestory. Editing is where all the pieces of your video, source footage, B-Roll footage, graphics, voice-over, etc., come together to make your final video report. It is also where you will bring continuity in appearance and style to your papers videos and among all GateHouse video. 1. Piecing your video together • Lay your source footage down first in your editing program and edit the soundbites to get the story organized. • Once you have your source footage down, insert your B-Roll footage over the soundbites, matching those shots with your interviewees words as best you can. 2.Transitions Editing programs come with numerous transitions (wipes, etc.). But the three transitions you will want to use most often, if not always, are the straight cut, the dissolve and the fade. Cut | A cut is an instantaneous change from one shot to the beginning of another. (Effective uses: change scenes, points of view, the most clean transition, feels more urgent and more powerful. Effec- tive for almost all straight-forward news pieces. The most seamless transition and most unnoticeable.) Dissolve | A dissolve is a gradual transition in which the ongoing shot fades out at the same time/rate as the incoming shot. (Effective uses: to change time or location or both in a story. Or to soften a piece for emotion. Gentler than a cut.) Fade | A fade (fade-in or fade-out) is a gradual transition from an image to black (or another color), or vice versa. (Effective uses: a feeling that something has ended or started. Should almost always only be used for closings.) 79
  • 80. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB 3. Opening, lower-thirds and endings Here are simple guidelines for standardizing your openings, lower-thirds (or title tags) and endings. Openings | Openings should include your site URL and the title of the video. • Black background / Impact font / White / 36 to 48 points Lower-thirds | Lower-third titles (or title tags) for sources should include your source’s name on top line and additional identifying information on second line. • Impact font / White / Black lower-third matte Endings | Endings should include your site URL, title of video, “GateHouse Media, Inc.” tag, and “Copy- right 2009” tag. • Impact font / 25 point / White / Black background 80
  • 81. THE CONTENT CUBE | WEB • ADDITIONAL VIDEO RESOURCES 1. How to post video on your site (page 93) 2. Basic video online tutorials (training videos and video production examples) ghnewsroom.com/taxonomy/term/126 3. iMovie 6 online tutorials (steps of the editing process, inserting B-Roll) ghnewsroom.com/tags/imovie6training • EQUIPMENT RECOMMENDATIONS Editing equiptment: 1. Mac-based: iMovie (latest edition) / Final Cut Express 2. PC-based: MovieMaker / Premiere Cameras: Nikon D90 | $1,300 (includes body and lens). This is a good camera for a staff photographer who needs to shoot front-page photos and video. Canon HV40 | $850. This is recommended for higher-end video production. Flip Ultra HD Cameras | $150. This is recommended for basic video shooting and is compact and easy to use. Exilim EX-S10 Digital Camera | $199. This is also recommended for basic video shooting and takes photo stills. Contact | Tom Sudore at tsudore@gatehousemedia.com for more information on any of these cameras. 81
  • 82. Newsroom Handbook 2010GateHouse Media Zope Publishing TABLE OF CONTENTS CONTENT GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Maximizing your templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 • Top navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 • Secondary navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 • Hot links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 • News Now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 • Top stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 • Promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 • Carousel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 • Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 • Bottom sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Site services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Marketplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Community information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Two sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 ZOPE PUBLISHING HOW-TO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Building your templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 • About your Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 • Vertical ad positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 • Add a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 • Creating a sidebar for a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 • Add external links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 • Upload photos to Zope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 • Add links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 • Add links to related stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 • Bold and italicize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 • Update, revise and correct a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 • Add video to a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 • Publish content to a carousel, highlights or News Now . . . . . . . . . . 94 • Add a big package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 • Set your navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 • Create hot links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 • Post a breaking news story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 • Create promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 • Create a photo gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 • Create a video gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 • Add a poll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 • Create homepage sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 • Set up site services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 • Create a contact page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 • Reposition ads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 • Schedule a story for a future publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 • Retract/delete a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 • Copy a story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 • Manage, moderate comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 • Manage, moderate registered users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 • Give levels of privilege . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 • Manage Zope users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 82
  • 83. GateHouse Media Zope Publishing | Content Guidelines YOUR NEW WEB SITE is loaded with opportunities to anchor and promote your hyper-local content. This guide supplies newsrooms with the necessary information to maximize your content on these new templates. MAXIMIZING YOUR WEB TEMPLATES Site management | The new template provides newsrooms with many opportunities for customiza- tion. For consistency in content and workflow, we strongly recommend that each site have an internal communication system in place to approve changes in organization or structure of the site. The homepage | The template homepage offers many opportunities to feature stories, photo galleries, promotions and other content. Here’s a breakdown of the kinds of content that should go into each home- page bucket and feature, plus the sections and subsections inside. All content should be published using the Web Cube guidelines for what should and should not go online. TOP NAVIGATION This area should include the top news sections of your site or your most important sections inside, such as photos and video. This area shouldn’t be used for online verticals, as those are promoted directly above the top navigation. Ten is the maximum number of sections you should tease in this area. Recommended sections for all newspapers: NEWS OBITUARIES SPORTS OPINION LIFE PHOTOS SECONDARY NAVIGATION This area is perfect to tease important platforms, services and sections of your site. Recommended subsections: • Facebook (teasing to your page) • Twitter (teasing to your feed) • Calendar • Coupons • Zip2save.com }NOTABLESFor A&E (*) Ap-plies if not a sub- RECOMMENDED NAMES FOR SECTIONS/SUBSECTIONSsection of Life.For sports NEWS LIFE SPORTS * ARTS &Consider specific Police and Fire Health High School ENTERTAINMENTnames of schools/ Education Arts & Entertainment College Eventsteams. Movies Business Food Pros Education Gardening Outdoors Dining Travel Youth Books OPINIONS Theater Green Columnists Music Society Editorials Letters Cartoons OBITUARIES 83
  • 84. ZOPE PUBLISHING | CONTENT GUIDELINES HOT LINKS Three to five links to ongoing stories or topics in the news should go in this area. Links could include a package of high school football preview stories, all content related to an ongoing court case, Thanksgiving or other holiday content, H1N1 content and other themes. The longevity of the links should be based on their usefulness. Some links may need to be taken down in days, while oth- ers can stay up for weeks. Hot links aren’t a mandatory function of the site, and each site can decide if they want it or not. NEWS NOW TOP STORIES The A consistent flow of newsiest story/photo community an- packages of the day, nouncements, newsy which could be pri- press releases, marily a selection of weather alerts, events your strongest print- of the day, Morning to-Web content, Minutes and the like should be published should be populated here. These head- here. Some sites may lines could remain publish obituaries for a day because and other social news they are stories sure to this section. The to drive traffic. You three-to-four para- want these to remain graph news items on the homepage should cycle through and not to cycle as new items are through as quickly as added. News Now content. PROMOTIONS This package, a horizontal carousel that runs beneath the feature carousel and news stories, is the place to feature online verticals, calendar, coupons, contests, reader content callouts, special sections and other special promotions. This area is not a destination for single stories, but rather big packages and platforms. 84
  • 85. ZOPE PUBLISHING | CONTENT GUIDELINES CAROUSEL Newspapers have the opportunity to cycle up to 10 stories in the carousel, though four is recommended as a good number for most sites. Newspapers will also have the option to have a single story/photo package. Use this spot to display story and photo packages from inside sections. Re- member that the homepage is not the front page of your newspaper, but a place to display your best content to drive traffic. The best uses of carousels focus on packages, not necessarily the nice feature story that’s on the front page of your newspaper. Good examples include: • News developments throughout the day (business, city de- velopments). • Breaking news with a developed story and related multime- dia. • Election coverage or preview packages of special races. • Package of the best things to do this weekend, based on stories in your entertainment section. • Package with links to your high school football coverage from a Friday night or previewing Friday night games. • Your big Friday night football game or playoff coverage. • Package of the biggest crime stories in your community on a given week. • Package of the best of your editorials, columns or cartoons from the week. • Variety of individual photo galleries or a collection of your best galleries of the week . • Special sections content. ALSO Links are an extremely important part of making the carousel successful. It’s recommended that every carousel story has links to: • Related stories on that topic. • Related photo galleries. • Related video. • Related polls. • External links associated with that topic. HIGHLIGHTS This feature, which ap- pears below the carousel, allows you to pull out a single story or package for extra attention. This could be a guest column, a home run from a regular columnist, a sports column advancing a big game or any of the packages noted in the carousel. This area could promote a local poll. 85
  • 86. ZOPE PUBLISHING | CONTENT GUIDELINES BOTTOM SECTIONS It’s recommended that at least three sections are featured at the bottom of the site. Newspapers can display two sections in one area or one section with a photo. Here are the rec- ommended sections: Sports, Life, Police and Fire, Opinion SITE SERVICES Links to subscription information, e-editions, how to place advertisements, online news submission forms, rate cards and archives. MARKETPLACE This is meant to promote online verticals. COMMUNITY INFO Links to sites of interest to the community. This could include sites run by local institutions, such as corporations and universities, local government bodies and other promi- nent local organizations. COMMUNITIES Links to subsections of towns that your newspaper covers, sister Web sites in neighboring communities or government bodies of neighboring cities. TWO SECTIONS There’s room for two sections next to communities. Recommendations include sports (listing subsections of high schools, college sports teams, pro sports teams) and Life (sub- sections like home, food and society). 86
  • 87. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO ABOUT YOUR WEB SITE YOUR WEB SITE, just like all GateHouse Media sites, is on the Zope4Media platform. Zope is a corpo- ration based in Fredericksburg, Va., that provides open Web source service through dozens and dozens of companies, including Viacom, Boston.com, AARP, Bell Atlantic Mobile (now Verizon Wireless) and NASA. What benefits does Zope provide our Web site? Zope is a simple but effective tool for publishing content — and sharing content — among our hundreds of Web sites and provides your local newsroom the ability to produce content fast and efficiently. What does Zope do for our Web site? Zope provides the basic functionality for your Web site, such as the content management system that you use to publish content to your site. What does Zope not do? Zope is not in charge of design or development of your Web site. All local de- sign and the work of implementing features that Zope builds resides with the GateHouse Media online development team. What template will we be on? By the summer of 2010, all GateHouse Media newspapers will be on the Deep Dish template. HOW TO CREATE, MOVE ORDER OF VERTICALS 1. When logged into Zope, go to the site whose layout you want to change. 2. In the header bar go to the link that says “Slots” and click on it. 3. On the left hand side of the page, click on the icon with the words “verticals_slot” next to it. 4. Click on “Add Widget.” 5. Click on “verticals_widget.” 6. Fill in the fields. a. Give the widget a title. b. Supply the URL to link to it. c. Select the icon you want to represent the link. 7. Repeat Step 6 as many times as necessary, up to 7 times total. 8. You can change the order in which the verticals are seen by clicking on the white space to the left of the information listed and move it up and down. Note Changes will not be immediately seen on the homepage. You will have to go to “Sections > Homepage > View section” to see the change immediately. 9. Refresh the homepage to view the verticals. (See Image 1) IMAGE 1 87
  • 88. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TONOTABLESHere’s how to }publish a storywithout a photo. HOW TO ADD A STORY 1. Select the “Add” drop-down menu and click “Story.” 2. Add a headline in the “Headline” field. Skip the “Subhead” field. 3. Type or paste a summary of the story in the “Short story” field. Note This is the perfect place for what would typically be a subhead. It’s important to offer specifics of the topics or groups in your stories in an online subhead for search optimization purposes. [See the Google Analytics Guide in Addendum 5 on page 121]. 4. Paste the full text of your story in the “Story” field. It’s recommended that your story is in a .txt or Word file when you paste it into the Zope “Story” field. Note If you dont see any spaces between the paragraphs, add breaks by hitting return or enter at the end of each paragraph. If this creates a space that looks two lines tall instead of one, try shift-return instead. 5. Click “Save Draft” 6. On the top of the right side of the screen, add a few keywords in the “Keywords” field. The words you enter here should be topical and will help Zope and search engines — like Google and Yahoo — know what this story is about. 7. Add a “Dateline” from the drop-down menu or type one in. 8. Add a “Byline” from the drop-down menu or type one in. 9. Add a “Source” from the drop-down menu or type one in. 10. Check the GateHouse Media button under “Copyright” or type in “Associated Press” for AP stories. 11. At the bottom left of the screen, click “Save Changes.” 12. Above the headline, click “Publication.” Check the boxes next to the sections you want to publish this story to. 13. At the bottom of the page, click “Publish.” It’s generally recommended that you publish all stories to your homepage in the appropriate buck- ets. Nearly all stories that are updated throughout the day, whether it’s the announcement of a concert or an obituary, should be published to the News Now section. The bigger stories for the day or the print-to-Web stories should be published to your Latest Stories area. 88
  • 89. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW TO HOW TO CREATE A SIDEBAR FOR A STORY } IN AN ONLINE STORY you can run a column down the side of the page called a sidebar. Like a break-NOTABLES out box found in a print story, this can hold additional information for readers that may not run in theUsing these same story itself.steps you can se-lect photo gal- 1. Go to “Add” in the drop-down menu and select “Sidebar.”leries and polls toadd to stories. 2. Fill in the fields that are empty. Give the sidebar a name such as “By the numbers” or “If you go” and fill in the content box. (See Image 1) 3. When you’re finished, click on “Save Draft.” 4. Find the story you have already written and want to add the sidebar to, or begin to write the story. 5. On the story page, under “Related Content,” click on the blue link that says “Add Related.” 6. Search for the sidebar you just created. Once you’ve found it, click on its name. Then on the next screen, click the “Select” button. Once you are done, you can close this window. 7. Save and publish the story. (See Image 2) IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 89
  • 90. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO }NOTABLESExternal links HOW TO ADD EXTERNAL LINKSare displayedunder the story 1. Add a story as normal.teaser on thehomepage and in 2. Click “Add Related.”the right rail onstory pages. 3. Click “External Resource.” (See Image 1) 4. Add title and URL. (See Image 2) 5. Click “Select” when finished. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 90
  • 91. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO }NOTABLESTo add photosto a story, find HOW TO UPLOAD PHOTOS TO ZOPE“Related con-tent” on the 1. On the drop-down menu at the top of the screen that says “Add,” choose “Photo.”bottom rightside of the page 2. The photo upload page varies depending on your version of Flash. Either click “Browse” under “Photoand click “Add file” or “Add photos.” Select your image(s) from your computer.related.” Note The more detailed you are here, the easier it will be to find the photo later in Zope. It is possible that readers will see these titles in URLs and code on the site; edit accordingly. 3. Add a cutline in the “Caption” field. 4. Add the photographers name in the “Image credits” field. 5. On the right side of the screen, add a few keywords in the “Keywords” field. 6. Add a “Source” from the dropdown menu or type one in. 7. Under “Photo file” click “Browse” and find the image file you want to upload. Note Photos should be 300 dpi resolution and be an 8 x 10 image. Upload RGB images when possible. }NOTABLES 8. Click “Add.”Links are a veryimportant part ofproviding users HOW TO ADD LINKS WITHIN A STORYwith informationthey will find 1. Once you have the copy of your story saved, select the words you want to act as a link.useful, such Example Highlight the words Naperville High School in this sentence “The former studentas links to attended Naperville High School.” When readers click on the words, they will be sent to theorganizations, school’s Web site.businesses and re-lated information 2. Click on the globe image in the tan area.on your site. It’srecommended that 3. In the URL feed, post the URL.nearly all storieshave at least some 4. Publish your story.links. HOW TO ADD LINKS TO RELATED STORIES 1. When youre adding a new story, look for the “Related content” heading on the bottom right of the screen. 2. Click “Add Related.” A pop-up window should appear. Click on the title of the story you want to relate. 3. Use the “Search” feature here to look for stories by keyword, text, headline, or for recently published stories. 4. Click the “Select” button. 5. Re-order the related items by dragging and dropping them in the list. Click on the triangular “han- dles” to drag and drop. 6. Save and publish to sections as usual. The links will show up under a “Related Stories” heading near the bottom of the story. 91
  • 92. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO BOLD AND ITALICIZE 1. Once you have your story saved in Zope, select the word or words you want to make bold or in italics. 2. Click the “B” or “I” buttons to make them the style you wish. 3. Save and Publish your story. HOW TO UPDATE, REVISE AND CORRECT A STORY 1. Click “Content” 2. Click “Published.” 3. Click the title of the story you need to revise. 4. Click “New Draft.” } 5. Edit the story as usual.NOTABLESIf necessary, 6. Click “Save Changes” at the bottom of the screen.you can adjustthe sections 7. Click “Publication.”where a story ispublished. 8. Click the “Replace previous version” button. 92
  • 93. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO ADD VIDEO TO A STORY 1. Sign up your site for a YouTube account if it doesnt have one already. 2. Upload your finished video file to YouTube. Add a “ghsvid” tag to the video to make it easier to find later. 3. If there is a text story that goes with the video, save it to Zope. Copy the code from the “Embed” field on YouTubes page for your video. 4. In the “Story” field in Zope, click the “Source” button on the toolbar. Choose a spot between para- graphs where you want your video to show up. Hit return a few times and paste the embed code from YouTube. 5. At the beginning of the embed code, add <p> immediately before the <object> tag; at the end of the embed code, add </p> immediately after the </object> tag. This will add some space above and below your video. 6. Add something to the headline or short story to let readers know theres video in the story. Headline example: “Video: Sammy the Spartan bids farewell to San Jose State.” Short story example: “Watch video of Sammy the Spartan in action at a football game vs. Hawaii in October 2005.” 7. Add a “video” keyword to the story to make it easier to find later. 8. Save your story and publish it to sections as usual. 93
  • 94. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO PUBLISH CONTENT TO A CAROUSEL, HIGHLIGHTS OR NEWS NOW 1. Publish your story as you usually would, assigning it to the section used to populate the widgets called "Features" for the carousel and/or featured areas, and "Highlights" for the Highlights area. 2. From the “Choose section” drop-down menu at the top of the screen, choose the homepage or sec- }NOTABLES tion to feature a story on.Content ranking:For example, “1st” 3. Click “Content ranking” at the far right.“2nd” etc. can beused to pin a cer- 4. The story will now show up with a large image on the left side of the homepagetain story to a po- where you set it.sition on the rightside of the home- 5. The original choices in the “Content ranking” dropdowns.page or sectionpage of your 6. By default, the most recent story published in Zope will show up first. Other stories will follow in re-choice. verse chronological order, with the latest news listed first. 94
  • 95. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO }NOTABLESWe recommendthat a newspaper HOW TO ADD A BIG PACKAGEdisable the fea-tures, highlights, The big package enables a single story from any section to span across both the featured and newsNews Now and areas at the top of the homepage. This should be used for breaking-news stories, ongoing coverage, orRecent Headlines major packages. (See Image 1)widgets whenthey use this 1. Choose “Slots.”presentation. 2. Locate the “homepage_package” slot and select “homepage_package_widget” from the menu. 3. Configure the widget. There are two options for this widget; “retain origin,” and “section.” (See Image 2) If you ‘pin’ a story in the carousel or the highlights area, click “Content ranking” at the far right. a. Retain origin Note If true is selected the story will link to the site the story originated from. If set to false it will link to the site on which the widget is enabled. b. From the drop-down list, select the section under which you want the big package to display. c. Select add. 4. Rank the story 1st or 2nd, etc. to keep its place and prevent it from being pushed out by newer content. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 95
  • 96. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO SET YOUR NAVIGATION 1. If a section does not exist in Zope, create the section in site properties by selecting: Sections > Add Section. 2. Access the site properties for this site and locate "navigation_nodes." (See Image 1) 3. Select "Section" from drop-down menu and select the section you want to add to navigation. } 4. When youve finished adding sections, click “Save.”NOTABLESWhat are nodesand how to do • In content management systems, nodes are the actual content within a site and can be pages,additional setups. sections, etc. • To add subsections, highlight the main section, then follow step 3 above. • You can also “Add an External URL” (for links to Twitter, Facebook, etc.) for your navigation by select- ing the appropriate node for what you need. (See Images 2 and 3) • At this time, you cannot drag and drop individual nodes to change their order. Nodes must be cre- ated in the order you want them to appear. If at any point you need to change the order, you can either delete all nodes and start from scratch, or edit the individual nodes to reflect the change in order. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 IMAGE 3 96
  • 97. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO CREATE HOT LINKS 1. Go to the link that says “Slots” and click on it. 2. On the left hand side of the page, click on the icon with the words “hot_links” next to it. (See Image 1) 3. At the bottom of the page, click on “Add Widget” and you’ll get two options. 4. “Hot_links_title” is where you put in the naming convention for your hot links. (See Image 2) 5. “Hot_links_url” is where you paste in the link you wish to direct people to. Include both a title for the link and then the url. Example Baseball would lead to http://www.mlb.com (See Image 3) 6. Repeat step six as often as you need to and you’re done; the results will be refreshed on the home- page. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 IMAGE 3 97
  • 98. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO POST A BREAKING NEWS STORY A breaking news story will be a featured story in a section that is available to you. (See Image 1) 1. In the "Slots" panel, select "breaking_news_slot." 2. Select “Add Widget” below. 3. Select “breaking_news_widget.” (See Image 2) 4. Select your “Breaking News” section from the dropdown menu; origin can be set to “false.” (See Image 3) 5. Press "add." } Note there is no save button.NOTABLESHow to get content • Ranking a story to "featured" in your “Breaking News” section causes the widget to appear on the site.to appear in the“Breaking News” • Un-ranking the story will stop the widget from appearing on the site.area. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 IMAGE 3 98
  • 99. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO CREATE PROMOTIONS These can promote either special Web sites, special sections or unique deals. This would be an ideal place to push users to coupons or other significant promotions. (See Image 1) Content will display one image with a headline. 1. The image will need to be uploaded to Zope. Note The image should be no larger than 180 pixels by 150 pixels. 2. Create a story in Zope for each promotion. a. Enter the headline that will appear on the homepage. b. Enter “none” in the “short story” and “story” fields. c. Remaining fields are not used. d. Click “Add Related” and select the image/photo/logo. e. Click “Add Related,” create a new “External Resource.” Notes • Title is not used, but required, so entering “none” in this field is fine. • Caption is not used. • URL should be the URL of the special promotion/section. 3. Once the story is created, it needs to be published to the appropriate section called “Promotions.” Note This is the section assigned to the “content_tease_promo” widget. 4. Since this is a standard section, content can also be ranked. IMAGE 1 99
  • 100. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO CREATE A PHOTO GALLERY 1. Go to the “Add” dropdown menu and select “Photos.” 2. Add the photos from your computer to Zope, and click the “Save to CMS” button to save them to Zope. (See Image 1) 3. Go back to the “Add” dropdown menu, and this time select “Content Set.” 4. Give the content set a name and a short description. (See Image 2) 5. Click on the blue “Add Content” link on the right hand side. 6. Select the photos you wish to use for the photo gallery by selecting the picture and then clicking the “Select” button beneath it. Add as many photos as you have for the gallery here. Note The first photo listed under the “add content” link will be the photo displayed for the gallery on the photo page. It’s recommended not to post a vertical photo as your first photo in the gallery. 7. Click “Save Draft.” 8. Click on “Publication” on the tool bar. } 9. Publish the photo gallery to the “Photos” section.NOTABLES 10. Your homepage will also display the new photo gallery.How to linkgalleries to a story Relate the gallery to a story using the “Add Related” link on the story page, searching for the gallery, and selecting it to relate it to the story. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 100
  • 101. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO CREATE A VIDEO GALLERY 1. Go to site properties, add YouTube user ID to "video_user.” (See Image 1) a. This will create the initial feed for both the landing page and the homepage widget. b. Once set, there is a 15-minute lag from when the feed would become available. c. You can check the status of the feed here — http://manager.ghm.zope.net/development/[SITE_ID]/@@remote/youtube_widget/index.html d. Once you see content in the feed, you will be able to add the widget to the homepage. 2. Create a section in Zope that will serve as the landing page for video. a. Select "Deep Dish: you tube video section" as the view. 3. Add the widget to the homepage. (See Image 2) a. Go to “Slots” and select "homepage_media" slot. b. Add widget “homepage_youtube_origin.” c. In the drop-down menu, select the section you created for video, and that serves as the landing page. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 101
  • 102. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO ADD A POLL 1. Click “Poll” from “Add” drop-down menu in Zope. 2. Add a title, keywords and poll question, and poll options by clicking “Add Options.” (See Image 1) 3. Click “Save Draft.” 4. Click on “Publication.” 5. Publish to the section(s) in which you want the poll to appear. Note You must have added a poll widget IMAGE 1 102
  • 103. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO CREATE HOMEPAGE SECTIONS 1. When logged into Zope, go to the header bar and click “Slots.” 2. On the left hand side of the page, click on the slot “home_supplement.” 3. At the bottom of the page click on “Add Widget.” 4. You will have the option of adding a column or section. A section will be a whole rectangular box dominated by a section. A column allows you to add another section to feed news into the rectangular box. (See Image 2) } 5. In both cases choose the section/sections you want to feature from the drop-down menu. Select the “false” option next to “origin.” (See Image 3) You must have a poll widget added to the section in orderNOTABLES for it to display.What to do ifyou want to relocate 6. Click add, and your section has been created and reflected on the homepage. (See Image 1)supplement sections In the slot area click on the section you want to move and drag and drop it to reflect the order you want the sections to appear. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 IMAGE 3 103
  • 104. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO SET UP SITE SERVICES 1. At the bottom of the homepage there are six spaces for vertical navigation. 2. In Zope, click on the button that says “Slots.” 3. At the bottom of the column on the left, you’ll see several icons named “sitemap_col1-6.” Each of those controls a column with site services. 4. To add a column, click on “Add Widget.” It gives you two options: “sitemap_link” and “sitemap_title.” “sitemap title” will allow you to title the column; for example: Site Services, Community Info., etc. (See Image 1) 5. The “sitemap_link” allows you to add the link you want to connect to and the text you want to appear to connect to the link. }NOTABLES 6. Once you are done, refresh your homepage and the changes should be made.These are therecommendedlinks that should • Site Services Links to subscription information, e-editions, how to place advertisements, online news submission forms, rate cards and archives.be on each site. • Marketplace This is meant to promote online verticals. • Community Info Links to sites of interest to the community. This could include sites run by local in- stitutions, such as corporations and universities, local government bodies and other prominent local organizations. • Communities Links to subsections of towns that your newspaper covers, sister Web sites in neigh- boring communities or links to government bodies of neighboring cities. • Two sections There’s room for two sections next to communities. Recommendations include sports (listing subsections of high schools, college sports teams, pro sports teams) and Life (subsections like home, food and society). IMAGE 1 104
  • 105. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO CREATE A CONTACT PAGE 1. The “contact_us_slot” set can accept any number of contact groups and contacts per group. (See Image 1) a. Widgets include: • contact_about_widget This is a text box that can accept html. You can add your “About Us” information here. • contact_dept_title_widget This is the title of the section that will appear on your contact page above contact information. For example, above the About Us information, you will need to generate a title “About Us” using this widget. Use this widget to create titles for each of your departments prior to adding the department’s staff information. • contact_information_widget Use this widget to add your staffing information, including: Name, title, contact phone, e-mail. 2. You can have an unlimited number of “contact_information_widgets” for each contact under any specific department title. (See Image 2) IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 105
  • 106. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO REPOSITION ADS To change the position of your right or left rail ad spots, including your ads, events calendar, etc. 1. Go to ad_slot_primary or ad_slot_secondary. (See Image 1) 2. Highlight the widget youd like to move up or down. (See Image 2) 3. Drag and drop the widget to change the order of how the widgets will appear on your site. IMAGE 1 IMAGE 2 106
  • 107. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO }NOTABLESThis is ideal forsetting content thatcan update the HOW TO SCHEDULE A STORY FOR A FUTURE PUBLICATIONentire morning(Today’s Weather, 1. Edit and save your story as normal.Morning Minutes,etc.) See the con- 2. Click “Publication.” Select the sections as usual, then click the button next to thestant updates sec- “Effective publication time” field.tion on page 57. 3. Choose a date and time from the calendar. 4. Click the “Publish” button. 5. Keep in mind that you cant rank a story until its live. For example, if you want to post a profile of a }NOTABLES candidate on Friday to go live on Sunday morning as the featured story on the homepage, someone still needs to log in on Sunday morning and rank the story as “Featured.”This is used for ex-treme situationswhere you need tocompletely remove a HOW TO RETRACT/DELETE A STORYstory from the site.In most other cases, 1. Select “Content.”revising a story willwork. 2. Click “Published.” 3. Click the title of the story you need to retract.NOTABLES 4. Click “Publication.” }Syndication 5. Click the “Retract” button.domains are a toolto share contentamong sites. Visitpage 6 for details. HOW TO COPY A STORYSubmit a supportticket to have one There are likely times when you may want to share a story with another GateHouse newspaper.put in place. 1. Find the story you want to copy and click “Copies.” 2. Choose a site to copy the story to. Click the “Make Copy” button. 3. The story will now show up on the other site under Content, Drafts and can be published to sections as usual. 107
  • 108. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO MANAGE/MODERATE COMMENTS 1. Go to [YOUR SITE]/comments. Example http://the-leader.com/comments 2. Adjust the drop-down menus on the top-right of the screen to fit your needs, and bookmark this page, checking it often. 3. Click the “Manage Comments” link next to any headline on this page. 4. Log in using your standard Zope username and password. 5. At the top of the “Comment Moderation” page, you have the option to switch the “Commenting sta- tus” from on to off. 6. For each comment, you have the option to flag it as spam by clicking the “Spam” button. Note For each comment, you have the option to “Approve” or “Reject” the comment. Rejected comments will be hidden from public view. 7. When readers click the “Report Abuse” button next to comments on stories live on your news site, an e-mail is sent to your news editor or another staff member you designate. This e-mail contains the body text of the comment and a link to manage the comments on the story in question. HOW TO MANAGE/MODERATE REGISTERED USERS Readers are now required to register and login at your news site to add their comments to stories. 1. To change a commenter’s privileges, click the “View Users” tab at the top of the “Comment Modera- tion” page. Enter part of the commenter’s name, username, or e-mail address in the “Find User” box. Click on the commenter’s name. 2. Click the “Privilege Level” drop-down menu and set the commenter’s privileges to the desired level. 108
  • 109. ZOPE PUBLISHING | HOW-TO HOW TO GIVE PRIVILEGE LEVELS TO COMMENTORS There are three levels of privileges for commentors on your news site. 1. TRUSTED By default, all new registered users with a valid e-mail address are “Trusted.” Their com- ments show up on stories automatically. You can manage or their comments as usual if they post any- thing inappropriate. 2. MODERATED If you discover a problem user, this option allows site staff to pre-screen every com- ment before it goes live on your site. Click on the “Moderate Comments” tab at the top of the com- menting interface to view comments waiting for approval. Click “Approve” or “Reject” for each comment and it will disappear from the queue. 3. BANNED If a user is a consistent problem 100 percent of the time, the “Banned” privilege level will hide their comments from both the public view and the view of site staff in the commenting interface. You won’t see the user’s comments, and neither will anyone else, although banned users will be able to log in and fill out the comment form. HOW TO MANAGE ZOPE USERS 1. To add a new Zope user: Go to http://gatehouse.zendesk.com 2. Submit a new ticket in the “Zope: User Management” group. 3. Include the site or sites the new user needs to access, the new user’s full name, and the new user’s e- mail address. 4. The new user will get an e-mail message containing a link to set their password. 5. Once they have completed this process, they can log in at http://manager.ghm.zope.net/develop- ment/[YOUR SITE_ID] with their username, formatted as firstname.lastname (all lowercase) and the password they set in the previous step. To recover or reset a user’s Zope password: 1. Go to http://zaam.ghm.zope.net/ 2. Log out if you’re logged in here. 3. Click the “Click here to reset your password” link. 4. Enter the user’s e-mail address in the field and click the “Request” button. 5. The user will get an e-mail message containing a link to reset their password. Once they have com- pleted this process, they can log in at http://manager.ghm.zope.net/development/[YOUR SITE_ID] with their current username and the new password they created in the previous step. 109
  • 110. Newsroom Handbook 2010GateHouse Media Addendums TABLE OF CONTENTS ADDENDUM 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Holiday/event callouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 ADDENDUM 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Online glossary terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 ADDENDUM 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Online content: What goes and what doesn’t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 • Breaking news . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Police blotter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Courts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Public record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • Meeting stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 • General news stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 • Elections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 • Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 • Lifestyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 • Society and celebrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 • Sports games and other sports content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 ADDENDUM 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 GateHouse Media vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 • Online vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 • Print vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 ADDENDUM 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Google Analytics Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 • Accessing the data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 • Analyzing the data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 • Advertising analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 • Newsroom analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 • Newsroom resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 • Glossary terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 110
  • 111. GateHouse Media Addendum 1 | Holiday/event callouts HOLIDAY/EVENT CALLOUTS •JANUARY Week 1 | New Year’s Ask readers to submit photographs of their New Year’s Eve parties or time with their kids celebrating the new year. Week 2 | Snow photos Ask readers to send in photos of kids making snowmen or playing in the snow. Run the promotion seeking the submissions several times throughout the month. Also run this callout when there is a major snowstorm. Week 3 | Martin Luther King Jr. Ask readers to write stories about their memories of Martin Luther King and his legacy in time for MLK Day on Jan. 18. Week 4 | Super Bowl Ask readers to write in about their favorite Super Bowl memories, a memo- rable play, a painful loss or a big win. •FEBRUARY Week 1 | Boy Scout Day Ask readers to submit stories and photographs of their memories from their Scouting days. Week 2 | Valentine’s Day Ask readers to write in about how they fell in love, what they love most about their partner or how long they’ve been together and why. Week 3 | Presidents Day Ask readers to write in about who they think was the best president of all time and why. Week 4 | Lent Ask readers to write in about what they’re giving up for Lent and why. •MARCH Week 1 | First day of spring Ask readers to send in their favorite gardening tip. Week 2 | St. Patrick’s Day Ask readers to send in photos of their St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. Week 3 | March Madness Ask readers to e-mail their pick for who will win the men’s NCAA Basket- ball National Championship. Run everyone’s pick in a listing with their name and their pick. After the championship, run everyone’s name who predicted the winner correctly. Week 4 | Easter Ask readers to send in photos from Easter egg hunts or Easter programs at school and church. 111
  • 112. ADDENDUM 1 | HOLIDAY/EVENT CALLOUTS •APRIL Week 1 | April Fool’s Day Ask readers to submit the funniest pranks they have pulled off for April Fool’s Day. Week 2 | Prom Ask readers to submit photos of their kids all decked out for prom. Week 3 | Earth Day Ask readers for comments on what they’ll do to help the Earth and why: Will they plant a tree? Clean up a park? Try a “green” product at home? Week 4 | Get outside Ask readers to send photos of themselves — and even their pets — being out- side enjoying spring and taking part in youth sports and gardening. •MAY Week 1 | Cinco de Mayo Ask readers to send in their favorite Mexican food or drink recipe. Week 2 | Mother’s Day Ask readers to submit stories about the best lesson their mother taught them. Week 3 | Best hamburgers It’s National Hamburger Month, so ask readers to share tips on how to grill the perfect burger. Week 4 | Memorial Day Ask readers to submit photos showing how they’re starting to enjoy sum- mer, from grilling to water sports. •JUNE Week 1 | National Dairy Month Ask readers to submit their favorite flavor of ice cream and their fa- vorite local place to get ice cream. Week 2 | Graduation Ask readers to submit photos of their kids’ graduation ceremonies and parties. Week 3 | Father’s Day Ask readers to submit photos of father and sons who look alike. Week 4 | First day of summer Ask readers to submit stories about their favorite childhood memory of summer. •JULY Week 1 | July Fourth Ask readers to submit photos of fireworks or Fourth of July celebrations (pa- rades, concerts, community picnics). Week 2 | Little League Ask readers to send in photos of their kids’ summer Little League action. Week 3 | Summer heat Ask readers to send in recipes for their favorite cool drink to help counter the summer heat. Week 4 | Vacations Ask readers to submit photos of summer vacations, especially notable locations like the Grand Canyon and Niagara Falls, or quirky places, such as the world’s largest ball of string. •AUGUST Week 1 | Best lawns Ask readers who take special care of their yard to send in photos of their mani- cured lawns. Week 2 | Friday the 13th Ask readers to send in stories of the scariest thing that happened to them on Friday the 13th. The second week of August is the only Friday the 13th in 2010. Week 3 | High school football Ask readers to submit photos of their kids’ high school football prac- tice and first game photos. Week 4 | Back to school Ask readers to submit photos of kids on their first day of the new school year. 112
  • 113. ADDENDUM 1 | HOLIDAY/EVENT CALLOUTS •SEPTEMBER Week 1 | Labor Day Ask readers to send pictures of their barbecues, picnics or other Labor Day ac- tivities. Week 2 | Grandparents’ Day Ask children to draw pictures of their grandparents for Grandparents’ Day, which is Sept. 12. Week 3 | Fall Hat Month September is Fall Hat Month, so ask readers to send in photos of their fa- vorite hats. Week 4 | Creative mailboxes Ask readers to send in photos of their well-designed mailboxes. •OCTOBER Week 1 | National Newspaper Week Ask local schoolchildren to write in about their favorite thing about local newspapers. Week 2 | Breast Cancer Awareness Ask readers to write in about how breast cancer affected their lives or the lives of their family and friends. Week 3 | Pumpkins Ask readers to submit photos of the scariest, silliest or craziest pumpkins they’ve carved. Week 4 | Halloween Ask for photos of kids or pets dressed up for Halloween, or readers’ houses decked out in Halloween decorations. •NOVEMBER Week 1 | Fall foliage Ask readers to submit photos of their favorite images of fall foliage in their com- munities and their foliage trips. Week 2 | Veterans Day Ask readers to write in about their thanks for veterans and a short story about why. Week 3 | We’re thankful Ask readers to submit stories on what they’re thankful for this year. Week 4 | Thanksgiving photos Ask readers to send in photos of their friends and family at Thanks- giving festivities. •DECEMBER Week 1 | Christmas lights Ask readers to submit photos or addresses of their favorite Christmas decorations and light displays. Week 2 | Santa letters Ask readers to have their kids’ Santa letters submitted to the newspaper. Week 3 | Christmas ornaments Ask readers to send photos and short stories about their favorite Christmas ornaments. Week 4 | Best of the year Ask readers to write in about the stories that had the biggest impact on their lives this year and why. 113
  • 114. GateHouse Media Addendum 2 | Online glossary terms ONLINE GLOSSARY TERMS Blog: A Web site where entries are made in a journal style and displayed in a reverse-chronological order. Daily unique visitors: A visitor’s first visit to your site in a day. While one person may visit your site and view the homepage several times a day, the unique visitor’s report records that person as one “unique visitor” for the time allotted. Drupal: A free framework and content management system that GateHouse uses to build many spe- cialty sites. Embed code: Text that is used to make graphics, audio or video (and other multimedia files) show up on your site. Final Cut: Video-editing software developed by Apple. Google map: A map including several entry points of location made at Google.com; the online version of a map. iMovie: A video-editing software that comes with all Macintosh computers. Multimedia: A method of storytelling that employs more than one medium, such as a story with text, photos and video. News Now: The brand GateHouse newsrooms use for alerting readers to new and updated content on their sites. Page views: Counted every time someone visiting your site loads a page in his or her browser. Ranking: Newsrooms can “rank” a story to make it stay in the same story spot and to prioritize the story. Social networking: A Web site on which a user can share information with others who’ve signed up for that site. Syndication domains: An automated system of customized content streams within Zope that can feed local newspaper Web sites. ZenDesk: Where GateHouse sites can get their Web sites’ technical issues resolved. Zope: The program used to manage content on your Web site. 114
  • 115. GateHouse Media Addendum 3 | Online content WHAT GOES ONLINE, WHAT DOES NOT •BREAKING NEWS What should go online? All breaking news updates and breaking news multimedia, but these should primarily go into your News Now box or most recent stories area. If you are updating the story through- out the day, put the word “Update” before the headline. What should not go online? Nothing. If it is breaking news, post it as soon as you can. Traffic figures at GateHouse sites show repeatedly that breaking news is extremely popular with readers. Should full stories be posted? Only if more details and additional color add to the story. Many times your update will do the job. If a full story is offered, un-publish your update and post your full story to your homepage. •POLICE BLOTTER What should go online? Pull the best items (two to three) for daily papers and (five to seven) from your weekly blotter for non-daily papers and post them as individual stories. Weekly papers should post content from their blotter daily. What should not go online? Don’t post your entire police blotter online as a single story. Why? Crime content has proven to be quite popular on many of our sites. Posting individual stories from your blotter creates the opportunity for more views. When staff members collect the daily police blotter, encourage them to obtain more information for several of the items, which then makes it easier to produce individual story posts from your blotter. Police blotter content in print has proven in most markets to be one of the most popular features. Allowing the full blotter to live in print and the highest potential online interest items to be on the Web allows content to succeed on both platforms. •COURTS What should go online? Any court-related item that is part of your ongoing coverage or releases you receive from local or state court. What should not go online? Nothing. Post as much court-related content as you can. How should I present ongoing courts coverage? If you are covering a key court case, create a new story in Zope and add links to all of your coverage of that case. That story becomes your “landing page,” where readers can find all sorts of information about that case in link form. As part of every story you post on that case, offer a link back to the package. •PUBLIC RECORD What should go online? Do not post public record listings, such as marriage licenses or blotter lists. Why? Record content is a traditional print offering and is often something readers pick the newspaper up for. Long lists are unwieldy for online readers to digest. •MEETING STORIES What should go online? Nearly all government meeting stories should be posted online. Unless it is the most controversial story of the year, post the first few paragraphs of the print story (five or six) and run the “in other business” list at the bottom of the story. What should not go online? If the story is more of a process story and would typically fall inside your newspaper, you may not want to post the story. Why does this format work? Numerous surveys have shown that readers want the details in quick format online, and that is also true for our meeting coverage. This does not mean you have to rewrite the stories, but rather post the most important details and action items. 115
  • 116. ADDENDUM 3 | ONLINE CONTENT: WHAT GOES ONLINE, WHAT DOES NOT •GENERAL NEWS STORIES What should go online? Politics, business, announcements, press conferences and other significant event stories. Should these stories be normal print lengths (15 to 20 inches)? Most announcement and press conference content can go up as brief updates. Use the breaking news rule of additional detail and color to decide if the full “print” stories should go online under these topics. •PROJECTS What should go online? If there is multimedia associated with the reporting, then you should post the content online. Examples would include maps, polls, video and photo galleries. What should not go online? If it is just straight text and photos, do not post it online, as most long, in- depth reading has proven not to engage online. •ELECTIONS What should go online? Full coverage of election news is recommended. This includes advance and night-of coverage. It is recommended that on Election Day, newspapers post results throughout the day and night. What should not go online? Nothing. Post all election-related content. How should content be packaged? Build a “landing” page or a package of links in Zope for all of your election content to live as you preview races. On the night of the election, consider live blogs of cover- age and packaging all of your races in one big story with links to all the races. •CALENDAR What should go online? All content from all of your calendars (including lifestyle and sports) should be offered online on your calendar tab or application. Announcements of new events provide good up- } date content and are good to publish to your News Now or recent update area, as well as having them live in your calendar area.This content How often should the calendar be updated? Update it daily with new submissions.is new to theNewsroom •OBITUARIESHandbook What should go online? For sites that post obituaries in the content management system, obituaries should be posted as soon as they are received and edited. Where should obituaries appear? In the News Now section of your Web site. The style should read like this: Obituary: Person’s name, age and city. If your obits are produced through Legacy.com, you will have a feed for them turned on when you transition to the new template that will automatically feature the names on the homepage of your site in an Obituaries section. Why? Obituaries are a huge traffic driver. If readers know that they might be able to find content throughout the day, they are likely to return to your site throughout the day. Guidelines: If you are running obituaries as print-only content, paid or unpaid, also publish online as individual headlines in News Now and obituaries sections the name, age, hometown, date of death and paragraph announcing the services and where to send donations, if appropriate. 116
  • 117. ADDENDUM 3 | ONLINE CONTENT: WHAT GOES ONLINE, WHAT DOES NOT •OPINION What should go online? Anything controversial or anything generating conversation in your commu- nity. All opinion content can go online, but it should be controversial or concern a significant commu- nity issue to go online. Political cartoons have proven to be popular. Sign up for a feed from the GateHouse News Service for cartoons to automatically post, or post local cartoons if you have them. What should not go online? Thank-you letters, general columns (that are not controversial), editori- als (that are not controversial) and syndicated columns. Should regular columns appear from local writers and staff members? For the most part, they should not appear online. If the columnist has a significant following, consider posting it online, but most general columns are best fit for print. Unlike your print product, online readers are not necessarily looking for the same column on a specific day each week. If the column is controversial, you should post it. Why? Opinion content works online when that content takes strong stances. Lighter content and syn- dicate content has proven to be not as popular with readers, based on average analytics. •LIFESTYLE What should go online? Not everything. Some lifestyle content is useful to post. Those topics would include: food (recipes and tips), home and garden and health (how-to and tip-oriented content), enter- tainment (museums, theater, movies, art shows) and dining (lists, previews, reviews and day trips). What should not go online? Most human interest stories, unless the story is extremely unique, a weird news story or a strong topical story, should not go online. An example of a strong topical story would be a piece on a home or historical renovation project. Most everyday features should not go on- line. Long feature stories on the topics above, such as features on the local hospital’s new piece of tech- nology, should not go online. Coverage of events that is more than a day old should not go online. What should go online from event coverage are photo galleries from those events. Why? Content that is useful and can be used quickly, such as recipes and dining reviews, has proven to be high on page view reports across the company. Long feature stories that don’t fall into this area do not resonate as well. •SOCIETY AND CELEBRATIONS } What should go online? Weddings, engagements, anniversaries and births. Any club photos should be posted in a weekly reader-submitted gallery.This content How should the content be packaged? Post the content as individual stories and create a subsectionis new to the for each of the topics.NewsroomHandbook When should the content be posted? If you are already publishing individual announcements with photos online, continue to do so. If you are not publishing such announcements online but preserving them as unique print content, publish them to the Web within one week after they run in print. This way, you get the print-only benefit but can also generate Web traffic with the same content. 117
  • 118. ADDENDUM 3 | ONLINE CONTENT: WHAT GOES ONLINE, WHAT DOES NOT •SPORTS: GAME STORIES What should go online? Game stories should be posted online. But for regular-season games, don’t post a 20-inch game story. Just like meeting coverage, post the first five paragraphs of the game, along with a box score if you have one. Make sure the paragraphs touch on the leading scorers and score. What should not go online? Post it all, but post short stories. How should I package sports content? Since most of the sports content that is going online has to do with specific teams, consider creating subsections and landing pages for individual schools or team sports. Should we post scores as soon as games are over? For regular-season games (outside of prep foot- ball), the effort and return has proven not to be worth it. Analytics show that readers will go to our sites on Friday night for high school football scores, so post scores as games end in the fall. But the effort is not worth it in the winter and spring. Also, consider posting scores as soon as games end for prep state tournaments, but promote in print the fact that readers can find that content online. •SPORTS: OTHER CONTENT What should go online? Outdoors content should have its own section, depending on your location, and all content, including the calendar, should be online. Sports announcements should fall into the News Now or latest section of your site and should be posted as they are received. Pro sports content in many markets may be a good fit for your sites, based on the popularity. If you decide to post this content, you need to ensure that all relevant wire content is moved on a timely basis. What should not go online? Sports features, for the most part, are a better fit for print, unless the fea- ture is on a local celebrity. 118
  • 119. GateHouse Media Addendum 4 | GateHouse Media vendors VENDORS THE FOLLOWING ARE VENDORS that provide services that are built into your Web site, or are Gate- House Media preferred/endorsed vendors with centrally negotiated contracts and fees. •ONLINE VENDORS Adicio | The exclusive GateHouse provider of a white label, online real estate vertical, with opportunity for local sales. Associated Press | Primarily used online for its News Registry system — or hNews — which tags, tracks and delivers reports on the unauthorized use of your content across the Internet. hNews code is built into story pages Blackbox Media | Used to place advertising into available inventory on GateHouse Media Web sites for a revenue share. Digital Media Communications | This company converts newspaper ads — such as jobs or real es- tate — into an online video commercial that can be placed on GateHouse Media Web sites. Dobie Media | Provides an online community calendar based on user-generated content, as well as a reverse publishing tool. Fees apply to both, as do revenue shares based on advertising sold into the product. Financial Content | Supplies an online stocks and financials widget. Gabriels | The exclusive GateHouse provider of a white label, online auto vertical. Legacy.com | Obituary Web site that is also the exclusive GateHouse provider of white label, online obituaries service. Local.com | Exclusive GateHouse provider of a branded Internet yellow pages directory. NewsBank | Exclusive GateHouse provider of print and online content archives, available via search on all GateHouse news Web sites. News Distribution Network | Exclusive GateHouse provider of an online video player solution that al- lows properties to post local video, syndicate video within the GateHouse and NDN network, as well as to serve local advertising into the player. Remembering When | Exclusive GateHouse provider of a white label, online ads vertical for anniver- saries, birth announcements, engagements, weddings and other celebrations. Second Street Media (MyCapture) | Provide sites with photo reprint services Tecnavia | Preferred GateHouse provider of e-editions. GateHouse clients also receive a free online subscription management system, which allows readers to manage their e-edition or print subscrip- tions, and newspapers can also offer other paid products through the system. Travidia | Preferred GateHouse vendor converts print ads into online ads. Verve Wireless | Exclusive GateHouse provider of SMS text messaging and mobile Web sites. Weather.com | Preferred GateHouse provider of online weather. Yahoo! Hot Jobs | Online recruitment product available for local job listing sales. Zope | Exclusive GateHouse provider of our core online content management system, as well as the provider of the online classified ad system, Z Classified. 119
  • 120. ADDENDUM 4 | GATEHOUSE MEDIA VENDORS •PRINT VENDORS Following are GateHouse Media print preferred/endorsed vendors with rates centrally negotiated by the company. AccuWeather | Preferred GateHouse print vendor for weather. Font Bureau | Preferred GateHouse vendor for fonts. Tribune Media Services | A preferred vendor of comics. More specifically, TMS offers a pre-packaged but customizable comics and puzzles page that is available through GateHouse News Service for a fee. TMS is also a preferred vendor of TV books and listings. United Media | A preferred vendor of comics. United Media also offers a pre-packaged but customiz- able comics and puzzles page that is available through GateHouse News Service for a fee. For more information on any of these vendors or services, please contact Brad Dennison, Vice President of News & Interactive, at bdennison@gatehousemedia.com, or Wendy Barnes, Director of Online Advertising, at wbarnes@gatehousemedia.com. 120
  • 121. GateHouse Media Addendum 5 | Google Analytics Guide GOOGLE ANALYTICS THIS GUIDE EXPLAINS how to access your Web statistics and offers tips for utilizing the information for both newsrooms and advertising staffs. 1. ACCESSING THE DATA How do I log into my account? You have received a Gmail username and password. Go to http://www.google.com/analytics/ and click on the “access analytics” blue tab. Put your username and password into the appropriate fields, and on the next screen select “view report.” What if my newspaper already has a Google account? Fill out a support ticket by going to this link — gatehouse.zendesk.com/tickets/new — and ask that your newspaper’s current username and pass- word override the one we have created. How do I select the dates for my report? In the upper-right corner of the page, click on the dates that are featured. A calendar will pop up, and you can select the dates you want featured. 121
  • 122. ADDENDUM 5 | GOOGLE ANALYTICS GUIDE How do I see how many people visited my site? In the middle of the page, under “site usage,” click on “visits.” How can I see how many page views we’re getting? Under “site usage,” click on “page views.” How can I get more information about who is visiting my site? Under the “dashboard” area on the upper-left side of the site, click on overview, which will provide you information on new visitors, time spent on your site and more. How can I search for the most viewed stories on my site? The “Top Content” report in Google Ana- lytics can tell you the number of page views for each story in a selected date range. You can click on that area in the bottom-right corner of the site. Can I see the most viewed stories by sections? Under the “Top Content” area click on “Event Track- ing” and then click on “Categories.” Select the name of your newspaper. There you can select by topic to see the most viewed stories by section. How far back can I search for results? You can search for content back to Jan. 1, 2009. Can I get automatic reports? Yes. At the top of the page above the “dashboard” header, click on “e- mail.” There you can enter e-mail addresses where you want reports going to and dictate what kind of content you want. You also can create reports on a time schedule. 122
  • 123. ADDENDUM 5 | GOOGLE ANALYTICS GUIDE 2. ANALYZING THE DATA What key numbers will show how my site is doing overall? Tracking page views and daily unique visitors is the best way to see how your site is trending. Steady growth in both is the goal, and compar- ing these numbers month over month and year over year will show if your Web strategy is working. }NOTABLESIt is important to While page views and daily uniques will tell you how your site is doing overall, you can dig a little deeperremember that a for guidance on what action you can take to provide more content visitors want. [More on that below.]goal of GateHouseWeb strategy is to What is the difference between page views and daily uniques? Average daily unique visitor meas-focus newsroom ures the average number of unique browsers accessing your site per 24 hours in the past 30 days.resources on pub- Using daily vs. weekly or monthly unique visitors helps reduce the duplication caused by visitors delet-lishing content we ing cookies or accessing your site through different browsers.know drives trafficand holding back Page views and uniques tell me what is happening to my site. What numbers can tell me whatfor our print read- to do to drive more traffic? Studying your analytics report regularly can help you decide what – anders content that what not – to publish. For example, you may find that because your readership area includes a militaryworks better in our base, military-related stories draw page views, but lifestyle content does not. Therefore, you may con-newspapers. sider publishing more content related to the base and military issues, and less lifestyle content. Study the categories of content in the top 10 list of a given week or month. Likewise, study the bottom 10. Studying this content can help you adjust your newsroom Web strategy. 123
  • 124. ADDENDUM 5 | GOOGLE ANALYTICS GUIDE 3. ADVERTISING ANALYSIS What kind of information is important to get in front of advertisers? In conjunction with the “new visitor” and “returning visitor” reports, you can provide realistic audience reach and loyalty reports to your customers. It’s recommended that you show advertisers these numbers as you experience growth. You can include a copy of the monthly site traffic summary with the advertiser’s 30-day per- formance reports for individual campaigns. When pricing bundles with print and online, your extended reach including print circulation and daily unique visitors can be used to help determine your value proposition. What numbers should local ad staffs look at? Each month, look for changes in page views, daily unique visitors and overall visits. Increases in any of these areas are positive stories to tell advertisers. Traffic will have natural fluctuations daily, weekly and seasonally. Watch for trends and mark milestones in site growth. How will page views impact my rate card? The total number of page views will determine the struc- ture of your rate card, the available impressions and the CPM (cost per 1,000 impressions). What are impressions? They are the number of viewed ads you can deliver on your site. Your average page has five ad positions, or five potential impressions per page view. Ads can run throughout the en- tire site or be targeted to a specific content section relevant to an advertiser’s desired audience. The ratio of impressions guaranteed to the total impressions available determines the advertisers’ “Share of Voice” or the value of the impressions. Sections or sites with fewer impressions can offer a higher “Share of Voice” ratio with fewer page views and receive a higher CPM. Higher trafficked sections or sites will need to deliver more impressions to achieve significant “Share of Voice” and generally offer a lower CPM. 124
  • 125. ADDENDUM 5 | GOOGLE ANALYTICS GUIDE •RATE CARD What should we consider when setting up a rate card? There are three things to focus on: local market and competition, share of voice and resources on the local level. Here are some general guidelines: Small sites (100,000 page views per month) | Are not guaranteed impressions, but the ad posi- tions available are based on a $35 CPM and divide out the average impressions. Price points for pack- ages range from $100 to $300. Some of the small sites are creating bundles with print to build the comfort level of the local sales reps. Midsize sites (100,000 to 1 million page views per month) | Are guaranteed impressions (over de- liver by 25 percent) and targeted by sections. Premium positions and targeted sections are generally $35 CPM. In markets with stronger competition, they are including additional features (SEO, IYP, etc.) instead of lowering CPM. Price points range from $100 to $750. Larger markets (1 million page views and more per month) | The CPMs are lower because of the volume necessary to provide a significant Share of Voice. CPMs range from $8 to $20 (depending on markets). Price points range from $150 to $1,500. Should there be customization to the rate cards? The pricing and CPM are more of a guide to help locations capitalize on their extended reach. Who can help us with our online rate card? Additional training and promotional materials for total audience and the value of the combined print and online reach are available. Contact your regional co- ordinator for more information. 125
  • 126. ADDENDUM 5 | GOOGLE ANALYTICS GUIDE 4. NEWSROOM ANALYSIS What information should we share with our newsrooms? Editors should study Google Analytics weekly and prepare a monthly report to share with the staff. The report should at least include month- over-month page views and unique visitors, plus some notes on the content that is most popular and the content that is not. This will help you focus your resources. • Including a Top 10 list of stories for the month will help hone your Web strategy and could be a fun way to motivate your newsroom to focus more on traffic-driving content. • You can pluck specific numbers from Google Analytics Overview sections, or you can build and save custom reports to automatically generate data to share. • Google offers a “Quick Start Guide for Custom Reporting” here: http://www.google.com/support/analytics/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=98527 You can export your custom report into Excel or set up your own report. What trends should we expect to see as we implement Web Cube? We believe that when you begin to post consistent updates throughout the day and publish regular photo galleries and polls to your homepage, you will see traffic growth of at least 25 percent within six months. What then? Will traffic level off? After six months, refining your Web strategy to publish the specific content visitors want will help maintain steady growth. Growth will vary depending on how much your newsroom has been focused on the Web prior to Web Cube and your market’s potential. Those newsrooms fully up to speed with consistent posts, photo galleries and polls can continue to drive growth with video, social networking (Facebook and Twitter) and building on reader involvement through fea- tures such as interactive maps. When are the best times of the day to post fresh content? Analysis shows that key Web traffic is highest between 8 and 9 a.m., again around noon and then between 5 and 6 p.m. You can study the hourly habits of your visitors in Google Analytics under: Visitors: “Visitor Trending: Visits” and selecting a date range. Then click the Clock icon in the upper right to see an hourly break- down. Publish fresh content during those times when visitors are most likely to be checking in. Doing so will build reader expectations and, ultimately, traffic. 126
  • 127. ADDENDUM 5 | GOOGLE ANALYTICS GUIDE 5. NEWSROOM RESOURCES What other analysis can I use for our strategy? Google Insights for Search can tell you what Web users in your city or region are searching for in Google within selected time ranges. Study the results and see if there is any way you can offer logical local content to satisfy those searches. For example, “Swine Flu” was a popular news search in many regions in the past 90 days. Were there news stories and hospital-related press releases you could have offered during that news period to sat- isfy the demand? Here’s a link to Insights: http://www.google.com/insights/search/# Also consider: http://www.google.com/trends for real time searches terms. New vs. returning data in the “Visitors section” is also helpful. If you are drawing new visitors, your traffic-driving efforts are paying off. Engaging new visitors with a steady flow of content will turn them into returning visitors. Average page views in the “Visitors section” under “Visitor Trending” can show you how engaged visi- tors are once they land on your site. Are they looking at one page and moving on, or is there other con- tent to generate several page views for each visit? Content by Title analytics can tell you how specific sections of your Web site are performing. Will regu- lar scores and updates drive more traffic to Sports? Will recipe callouts or restaurant photo galleries drive more traffic to Food? Searching for specific stories in Google Analytics and how they performed online can also help edu- cate you and the newsroom about what plays well with your Web audience. 127
  • 128. ADDENDUM 5 | GOOGLE ANALYTICS GUIDE 6. GLOSSARY TERMS Here are some terms to know that will help you navigate and use Google Analytics: Average page views: The average number of pages viewed per visit. A high average page views num- ber suggests that visitors interact extensively with your site. Bounce rate: Bounce rate is the percentage of single-page visits (i.e. visits in which the person left your site from the entrance page). Bounce rate is a measure of relevance and quality of content to your audience. CPM: CPM cost per 1,000 impressions. Ad campaigns are priced and sold based on the number of times the ad will be delivered. Package prices can be customized by setting a standard price for num- ber of ads delivered in units of 1,000 and adjusting impressions guaranteed based on advertiser budget or goals. Depth of visit (visitor behavior): A large number of high page views per visit suggests easy navigation and relevant content to your visitors. Length of visit (visitor behavior): A large number of lengthy visits suggests that visitors interact more extensively with your site. Loyalty (visitor behavior): Loyal visitors are frequently highly engaged with your brand, and a high number of multiple visits indicate good customer/visitor retention. New vs. returning: A high number of new visitors suggests that you are successful at driving traffic to your site, while a high number of return visitors suggests that the site content is engaging enough to keep visitors coming back. New visitor: Google Analytics records a visitor as “new’” when any page on your site has been ac- cessed for the first time by a Web browser. Page view: An instance of a page being loaded by a browser. Google Analytics logs a page view each time the tracking code is executed. Returning visitor: Google Analytics records a visitor as “returning” when the cookie for your domain exists on the browser accessing your site. Time on site: Time on site is one way of measuring visit quality. If visitors spend a long time visiting your site, they may be interacting extensively with it. Unique visitors (or absolute unique visitors): Represents the number of unduplicated (counted only once) visitors to your Web site over the course of a specified time period. Our standard time period for measure is daily unique visitors. This provides easier comparison to print circulation as well as setting realistic expectations for advertisers regarding your reach. Visit or session: The number of visits your site receives is the most basic measure of how effectively you promote your site. 128

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