landscaping with light
         louis poulsen lighting
2
       landscaping with light




    Louis Poulsen Lighting has many years of
    experience in external lighting exper...
3




   function                                                  comfort                                                ...
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    function




               f
5




          During daylight hours the landscape is a play of colour, form
          and texture. The smooth contours o...
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       light source




       light fixture                                                                            ...
7




Compact fluorescent                                                                                                 ...
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        positioning




    Having chosen the fixture and light source, many designers underestimate the importance of po...
9




                                                                                                 spotlight


       ...
10
         designing a lighting scheme

                                                                                 ...
11




         Many aspects have to be considered when planning an outdoor lighting scheme.
         Our aim is to guide ...
12
        applications




     Think hard to exhaust the lighting possibilities available in your scheme.
     Our aim a...
driveway
                                                                                             13




             ...
14
         applications




                                                                       entrance




         ...
15




                                                                    steps                                          ...
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         application map

     The following plans highlight stereo typical features found within urban and residential...
17




residential

                                    Wood           Trees




                                         ...
18
     comfort




               c
19




         It is important to consider the lighting requirements for
         the space and scenario you are designin...
20
         the purpose of light


     When designing a lighting scheme, both functional and decorative elements have to ...
21




residentialp

                                Wood           Trees




                                            ...
22
        lighting consideration




        lighting consideration
     It is important to remember that good lighting d...
23




      dark sky
Organisations like Dark Sky participate in the lighting debate, casting stringent views on what they...
24
     ambience




                am
25




         It is important to think carefully about the mood you
         intend to create and how you wish the user ...
26
        lighting technique




     Light fixtures can be used in different ways to create mood. This is often suggested...
27




Low-level wash/Path lighting
Predominantly, this entails illuminating of a horizontal plain along which we walk. It...
28
        ambience concept & lighting tools



     The following plans give an indication of where the lighting techniqu...
29




Products                Driveway/   Forecourt/ Garage   Main       Building   Terrace/     Pool   General    Trees ...
30
        ambience concept & lighting tools


     The wide range of Louis Poulsen Lighting products make it possible to ...
31




Products                Driveway/   Forecourt/ Garage   Main       Building   Terrace/     Pool   General    Trees ...
32
     ambience
Photo: Kaslov Studio, Image Design, Hugh Palmer, Steve Hinds, Frank Domin, Terry A. Renna Photography, Peter Grant, Mandy ...
34
        product families

     The Louis Poulsen Lighting product programme includes a trademark design concept called ...
35
products

inground/recessed                                                      IPR10 & IPR12 available spring 2007




L...
inground/recessed




Dex




wall



PH 3-2½ Wall      PH Wall        Homann M2   Dock Wall   Dex   WeeBee Wall   Nimbus ...
Louis Poulsen Lighting         Germany                        Sweden




                                                 ...
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Landscaping With Light

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Livro sobre projeto de iluminação de paisagismo e jardim.
Autoria do fabricante Louis Poulsen.

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Landscaping With Light

  1. 1. landscaping with light louis poulsen lighting
  2. 2. 2 landscaping with light Louis Poulsen Lighting has many years of experience in external lighting experience, this brochure is designed as a guide for people who want to consider making the night a more com- fortable and atmospheric setting. Our aim is to lead you through the landscape lighting princip- les, which can be easily applied to both urban and residential projects. Should you not feel confident in the area of landscape lighting design, please contact Louis Poulsen Lighting directly for a design advisory service to optimize your project.
  3. 3. 3 function comfort ambience page 4 page 18 page 24 the Louis Poulsen Lighting FCA™ philosophy Good lighting design is achieved through a number of choices and considerations. Louis Poulsen Lighting develops its luminaries adhering to a lighting philosophy of Function, Comfort and Ambience (FCA™). This FCA™ philosophy also applies to scheme design, which in turn strives to balance the technical and human elements of any project. A balanced FCA™ philosophy ensures the best lighting solution for your landscaped space. Functional aspects are addressed by selecting a suitable light fixture, choosing a complimentary lamp package and positioning it for optimum performance. Comfort aspects are addressed by considering the scenario and examining the lighting requirements. Ambience is addressed by thinking about the mood and experience you wish to create. This enables the designer (through choice of the most appropriate light fitting, weighing up intensity positioning and colour rendition) to create a unified specification that is sensitive to requirements while enhancing the landscape form.
  4. 4. 4 function f
  5. 5. 5 During daylight hours the landscape is a play of colour, form and texture. The smooth contours of the lawn, shapely trees and brightly coloured flowers are all illuminated by the sun with everything on show. unction By contrast, the night sky shrouds the landscape with an air of mystery. With only the moon-light and selected artificial lighting, the picture becomes a play of dramatic light and shadow, revealing some objects and hiding others. With this in mind, the first task is to define the parameters for the project and what you wish to achieve. Remember, simplicity is the key.
  6. 6. 6 light source light fixture Daylight As designer you will need to select a suitable light fixture for each application. The versatility and simplicity of the Louis Poulsen Lighting Colour spectrum product range will allow you to address issues of size, type, material Incandescent and halogen light sources have a continuous and finish/colour. spectrum, representing all the colours of the rainbow, with a smooth transition between each. For example, recessed inground up-lighters are discreet and invisible by day while spike mounted fixtures allow for repositioning Fluorescent light sources have a linear spectrum. They do not as required and also help prevent plant growth over the light source. necessarily have all the colours of the rainbow and of those that do To help a lighting scheme to ‘flow’, many of our fixtures appear in are each, separated by a black area. ‘families’. For example, a wall fixture, bollard and post top. The ‘family’ concept allows a ‘common’ design theme across a scheme. Colour Rendering Index (CRI) CRI indicates how well a light source reproduces true colours. light source The CRI is divided into values from 0-100. Daylight CRI 100. You must consider the appropriate light source. In particular, a Incandescent and low voltage lamps share a CRI of over 90. complementary light source, suitable wattage intensity and beam High pressure sodium CRI 20-35. angle. Other factors such as lamp life and surface temperature may Metal halide CRI 80-90. also play a part depending on the project parameters. Compact fluorescent CRI 80-98. Mercury CRI 40-65. Remember, natural daylight is the ‘benchmark’ and it is therefore N.B. Light sources can hold the same CRI, but do not have the abi- important to respect the colours of nature in your lamp choice. lity to render the same colour correctly. This depends on the colour spectrum of the light source. Colour temperature Daylight • higher than 6,000 K The colour temperature of a light source is measured in degrees 8000K Neutral • 3,000 - 4,000 K Kelvin (K), and can be defined as warm, neutral or cool light. Warm white • lower than 3,000 K 4000K 1000K
  7. 7. 7 Compact fluorescent High pressure sodium Compact fluorescent LED (Light Emitting Diode) High pressure sodium Although many use this for its long LEDs offer a wide choice of colours - standard white, Today high pressure sodium is often life quality in or around buildings, blue, red, green, amber and RGB colour change perceived unfashionable, but it has compact fluorescent is not a light versions (through DMX control). They have its place and should not be ruled out. source strongly recommended for exceptionally long life, are cool to the touch and It is particularly complimentary to the landscape environment. It does have low running costs. However a word of warning, reds and yellows, for example copper not possess the colour rendering in isolation standard white LEDs appear white but beech and prunus trees (both red leaf), qualities of halogen or metal halide. when placed next to or near warmer sources, such as sandstone and traditional brickwork However, it is an alternative indicator in halogen, they can appear more blue. This can feel can benefit from sodium lighting. recessed products when the budget ‘cold and ghostly’. It is therefore recommended that However, due to its colour spectrum, will not stretch to LEDs. a pale yellow filter is added to correct the colour. sodium does not compliment blue Alternatively seek advice on using a ‘warm white’ coloured surfaces. LED. Halogen Metal halide Mercury Halogen Metal halide Mercury This source creates a warm This is probably the best ‘all rounder’. With its Mercury compliments blue and atmosphere and is associated most good lamp life and light spectrum resembling green coloured surfaces very well. strongly with the natural environment. natural daylight, this light source favours the For example cedars and pine Despite its lower life, it is the best commercial lighting scheme and is also a good trees. Stainless steel also illuminates choice for illuminating domestic plants option to illuminate objects in their true colours. well. and foliage in their true colours. N.B. Discharge light sources (metal halide/sodium/mercury) are not suitable for security lighting linked to a movement sensor, as they take a period of time to reach their optimal colour/intensity of light, can rarely be dimmed and offer no instant light.
  8. 8. 8 positioning Having chosen the fixture and light source, many designers underestimate the importance of positioning. Specifying the position of a fixture will maximise the desired effect and avoid issues of unnecessary glare, cut-off shadows and light pollution. spacing set back At Jumeriah Beach Hotel in Dubai, the gentle scalloping effect of the light (pattern of light/dark areas on the wall) is governed by how close the fixtures are placed together.
  9. 9. 9 spotlight spotlight setback When light is cast on statues and sculptures, it is important to position the light fixtures correctly to avoid shadowing and ‘cut-off’. The importance is displayed above, where the statue of a man appears to float due to the lack of light on his lower legs. Spacing and setback play a large role in accentuating texture to the finished picture. At Stirling Castle (above, left) just outside Edinburgh in Scotland, the light fixtures have been placed close to the wall. This accentuates the architectural form with shadow. Had the fixtures been placed further from the wall the building would have had less shadows and appeared flatter in contrast. Illuminating the subject in this way contributes to the myth and mystery associated with a castle.
  10. 10. 10 designing a lighting scheme after A good landscape lighting design can in general only really be achieved through experience. When illuminating commercial areas or public realm are light levels (lux) need to be adhered to. These are recognised standards to create a safe environment. However, when illuminating landscape features such as trees, foliage and focal points of interest, there are no hard-line rules. Without such recommendations, many designers shy away from landscape lighting, and valuable design potential can be lost. With years of experience, Louis Poulsen Lighting can help you achieve a safe and ‘complimentary’ lighting solution, drawing out the best features in the scheme, whilst leaving the undesirable in the dark. before The difference in quality of light plays an important role in how the user feels when moving within a space. The small image below and on the left demonstrates how glare from a light fixture can ‘hide’ a person. By minimising glare, as shown in the image on the right, you can help the user feel safe and enjoy the experience of the space after dark.
  11. 11. 11 Many aspects have to be considered when planning an outdoor lighting scheme. Our aim is to guide you through the outdoor area and offer suggestions based on our many years of experience. The products of Louis Poulsen Lighting are designed as lighting tools to fit discretely into the surroundings and offer a unique lighting experience. Lighting urban spaces is not solely a matter of decoration; creating a safe environment is as important. It has been proven that the introduction of lighting has contributed to falling crime rates in many urban spaces.
  12. 12. 12 applications Think hard to exhaust the lighting possibilities available in your scheme. Our aim at Louis Poulsen Lighting is to make you aware of the potential pitfalls and to help you see all the possible design options. The garage or carport - you may use different types of light fixture for this purpose, but the avoidance of glare to the driver is very important. A path from the parking point to the main entrance door requires ample light for frequent use. It is important to suggest the direction one should take. garage
  13. 13. driveway 13 driveway driveway It is important to illuminate the route from the main entrance to the main door of the house or building, both for car and pedestrian access. For driveways, bollards or small post tops/lanterns seem the obvious solution. However, should the drive be tree lined, ‘moonlighting’ is an option. This will offer a beautiful picture by night and an uncluttered landscape by day.
  14. 14. 14 applications entrance doorway A wall fixture is the obvious solution by a doorway, however concealing the light source in the eaves may be another option, particularly on an existing building where concealing cable may be difficult.
  15. 15. 15 steps Special care should be given to illuminating steps and level changes, as undefined edges could make dangerous trip hazards. path Path lighting is designed to provide orientation and make the user feel safe and comfortable when moving around within a space after dark. The entrance point to a building should be obvious at night. If the building itself is up-lit, we suggest the entrance has a form of downward light, delineating it as the entrance. If there is neither a porch nor overhead canopy to mount an overhead fixture, wall fixtures mounted at ¾ of the height of the door or above the door will frame the entrance. House names and numbers should be clearly illuminated for visitors, taxis and in some cases the emergency services.
  16. 16. 16 application map The following plans highlight stereo typical features found within urban and residential schemes. The matrix below offers suggested product groups for the key areas marked. urban Road Sitting area Trees/ General planting Walkway Parking Steps Building fascia Sculpture Main entrance Plan by Akers Coyle Driveway/ Forecourt/ Garage Main Building Terrace/ Pool area General Trees Sculpture Paths/ Steps Road Parking entrance fascia Sitting area planting Walkways Product section Inground/Recessed • • • • • • • • • • • • Onground • • • • • Surface mounted • • • • • • • • • Wall • • • • • • • Bollard • • • • • • Post tops • • • • • •
  17. 17. 17 residential Wood Trees Pool area Grass verge Forecourt/ Driveway Path Parking way Swimming pool Lawn Steps Main entrance Garage House West terrace Conser- vatory South terrace Lake Dry garden Wood General planting Lawn Hornbeam Walk Wood Path way Trees Sculpture Plan by Timothy Garden Design Driveway/ Forecourt/ Garage Main Building Terrace/ Pool area General Trees Sculpture Paths/ Steps Road Parking entrance fascia Sitting area planting Walkways Product section Onground/Recessed • • • • • • • • • • • Onground • • • • • Surface mounted • • • • • • • • • • Wall • • • • • • • Bollard Post tops • • • • • •
  18. 18. 18 comfort c
  19. 19. 19 It is important to consider the lighting requirements for the space and scenario you are designing. For example, a greater intensity of light is required to feel safe in a park, omfort than in the confines of your own garden. Once the gene- ral lighting requirements have been decided, you can then look to create a sense of depth to the scheme by drawing out focal points of interest. Avoid ‘over lighting’, which can lead to the final picture appearing flat and lacking contrast. Remember, the darkness is as important as the light.
  20. 20. 20 the purpose of light When designing a lighting scheme, both functional and decorative elements have to be considered. Urban and residential schemes both require a level of functional light to navigate by. However, gardens play more on aesthetics, while urban spaces are generally more about experiencing the architecture. To explain the difference the plans have been separated into two colours. The functional zones are illustrated in blue, while the more decorative and ambient areas appear in red. urbanap Road Sitting area Trees/ General planting Walkway Parking Steps Building fascia Sculpture Main entrance Plan by Akers Coyle
  21. 21. 21 residentialp Wood Trees Pool area Grass verge Forecourt/ Driveway Path Parking way Swimming pool Lawn Steps Main entrance Garage House West terrace Conser- vatory South terrace Lake Dry garden Wood General planting Lawn Hornbeam Walk Wood Path way Trees Sculpture Plan by Timothy Garden Design
  22. 22. 22 lighting consideration lighting consideration It is important to remember that good lighting design will not only provide safety and aesthetical value, but also give the daily user an experience to remember. Although some people would rather see the night remain night, i.e. dark, Louis Poulsen Lighting products are designed and tested to perform in a precise manor. Getting the light to where it is needed, avoiding spill and unnecessary light pollution are of utmost importance to us. In order to respect both the user and the environment, Louis Poulsen Lighting bases its lighting solutions on the philosophy of: function, comfort and ambience - FCA™. We consider it paramount that our fixtures unite with the architecture and the surroundings. The light has to become a natural element. We recommend where possible a lighting scheme that combines fixtures at varying heights. The highest fixtures set the upper limit against the night sky while the lower fixtures secure the best recognition and navigation for people in the dark.
  23. 23. 23 dark sky Organisations like Dark Sky participate in the lighting debate, casting stringent views on what they consider light pollution and how to avoid it. Dark Sky works with the terms full cut-off, cut-off and semi cut-off. These terms are defined by the values indicated below. During the planning and design stages, the character of an area determines which fixture will be the most suitable. Note: a full cut-off is not particularly appropriate in an area where parameters like ambience or comfort are important. Full cut-off Cut-off Semi cut-off Max. 0% light above 90° Max. 2.5% light above 90° Max. 5% light above 90° Max. 10% light above 80° Max. 10% light above 80° Max. 20% light above 80° Internal honeycomb louver Internal concentric louvre External crossblade louvre 45° prismatic wash lens Cowl visor Barn-doors Anti-glare/Pollution Landscape lighting is about ‘painting’ the finished picture, the emphasis being on the effect and not where it is coming from. Louis Poulsen Lighting fixtures offer a wide range of accessories for optimizing light performance and minimising light pollution.
  24. 24. 24 ambience am
  25. 25. 25 It is important to think carefully about the mood you intend to create and how you wish the user to feel within the space. Through your choice of light source, you have the ability to affect the user both emotionally and physically i.e. making them feel warm or cold, excited or relaxed, secure or bience uncomfortable. Lighting is not just a question of placing a few light fixtures in a space to see by. It is about creating an ambience with deep respect for the darkness and the surroundings. When designing, think of your self as an artist painting with light. As far as possible, you want to see the effect and not where it is coming from.
  26. 26. 26 lighting technique Light fixtures can be used in different ways to create mood. This is often suggested by the contours of the landscape. Here are a few common techniques: Down-lighting Although a general term encompassing many of the lighting techniques, down-lighting is the most natural technique as this is the way we perceive light i.e. sunlight. Good examples of down-lighting include security and path lighting which cover functional aspects, while moonlighting and spotlighting offer a more aesthetic approach. Aesthetical down-lighting is especially effective in structures such as pergolas, gazebos or recreational areas. Up-lighting Up-lighting is a very simple yet dramatic lighting form where a fixture is placed under an object such as tree or sculpture. Being a manmade distribution of light and therefore unnatural to the human visual perception, it attracts immediate attention. Recessed up-light fixtures are discreet and invisible by day, while spike-mounted fixtures although visible in daylight, can be repositioned easily and prevent plant growth over the light source. Spot-lighting This is a very direct technique used to illuminate important features and focal points e.g. statuary. The use of narrow-beam light sources often allows the fixture to be placed some distance from the subject. This technique is essentially for aesthetical purposes and directing attention in a particular direction. However, it should be used in moderation as overuse may be confusing to the eye, drawing it in many directions.
  27. 27. 27 Low-level wash/Path lighting Predominantly, this entails illuminating of a horizontal plain along which we walk. It gives direction, providing ample illumination to see level changes and avoid hazards such as steps or water. This light can come from a number of different light fixtures depending on the environment. 1. Post top fixtures where light is projected downwards from approximately 3m or more. 2. Bollards available in various heights traditionally providing illumination from a lower height. 3. Wall mounted light fixtures, mounted at varying heights. 4. Inground, semi-recessed light fixtures casting local but limited light. N.B. This technique is designed to make the user feel safe and comfortable moving around within a space. Silhouetting and wall washing This is most commonly seen in nature at sunset when an object is caught between the viewer and the setting sun, creating a dramatic silhouette. This effect can be reproduced after dark using wide-beam light sources placed behind planting or objects. Doing this will often mean washing a vertical surface behind the chosen subject, for example a fence or wall. While this is generally seen as purely adding aesthetical interest, throwing light on the area behind adds a sense of depth to the area. Moon-lighting An ally to down-light, this is one of the most effective and natural looking lighting techniques simulating the soft diffuse light of the moon. For best results, it relies on suitably mature trees. With light fixtures positioned correctly, light passes through the canopy casting graceful shadows at ground level. The fixtures must be located high up (15m approx), to prevent glare. Fixtures mounted too low generally need to be angled out, often creating glare. Moon-lighting is often used as infill light between two brighter areas. Mirror-lighting Mirror-lighting utilises the reflective quality of a pool, pond or a lake’s surface. By leaving the water in darkness and illuminating objects such as trees, planting or structures on the far side of the water, a magical mirrored reflection can be achieved. Viewing it in situ really is like looking into an underworld! N.B. Small ponds and water features lack the surface area for reflection; however, many gardens and parcs have moving water that can be illuminated. Here we suggest that you position the fixtures just under the surface, allowing the water to fall directly onto them, creating moving shadows that ‘dance’ on the neighbouring surfaces.
  28. 28. 28 ambience concept & lighting tools The following plans give an indication of where the lighting technique may be best used. The matrix to the right indicates suitable products for specific areas. urbanap Raod Sitting area Trees/ General planting Walkway Parking Steps Building fascia Plan by Akers Coyle Sculpture Main entrance Down-lighting Silhouetting Up-lighting Path lighting Spot-lighting
  29. 29. 29 Products Driveway/ Forecourt/ Garage Main Building Terrace/ Pool General Trees Sculpture Paths/ Steps Road Parking entrance Fascia Sitting area area planting Walkways Inground/recessed IPR10 IPR12 IPR14 Nimbus Nimbus LED WeeBee LED LytLed Dex Onground Dome Tripos Tripos Mini Pagoda Volcano LP Knap Surface SPR10 SPR12 SPR14 WeeBee Spot Wall Toldbod Wall Nyhavn Wall Homann M2 Orbiter Wall PH Wall PH 3- 2½ Wall Kipp Wall Dex Nimbus Wall Dock Wall Skot Wall Skot Maxi Wall WeeBee Wall Bollards Bysted Toldbod Ø 155 Bollard Kipp Bollard Orbiter Bollard Sentry Skot Bollard Dock Bollard PH 3 - 2½ Bollard Waterfront Planet Bollard Poles Nyhavn Boulevard Post Patina Kastrup Kipp Post Orbiter Post Terminal Toldbod Post
  30. 30. 30 ambience concept & lighting tools The wide range of Louis Poulsen Lighting products make it possible to create a unique project. The plan below shows examples where the lighting techniques can be applied, the matrix explains which product may be most suitable. residentialp Wood Trees Pool area Grass verge Forecourt/ Driveway Path Parking way Swimming pool Lawn Steps Main entrance Garage House West terrace Conser- vatory South terrace Lake Dry garden Wood General planting Lawn Plan by Timothy Garden Design Hornbeam Walk Path Wood way Trees Sculpture Mirror-lighting Down-lighting Path lighting Silhouetting Spot-lighting Up-lighting Moon-lighting
  31. 31. 31 Products Driveway/ Forecourt/ Garage Main Building Terrace/ Pool General Trees Sculpture Paths/ Steps Road Parking entrance Fascia Sitting area area planting Walkways Inground/recessed IPR10 IPR12 IPR14 Nimbus Nimbus LED WeeBee LED LytLed Dex Onground Dome Tripos Tripos Mini Pagoda Volcano LP Knap Surface SPR10 SPR12 SPR14 WeeBee Spot Wall Toldbod Wall Nyhavn Wall Homann M2 Orbiter Wall PH Wall PH 3- 2½ Wall Kipp Wall Dex Nimbus Wall Dock Wall Skot Wall Skot Maxi Wall WeeBee Wall Bollards Bysted Toldbod Ø 155 Bollard Kipp Bollard Orbiter Bollard Sentry Skot Bollard Dock Bollard PH 3 - 2½ Bollard Waterfront Planet Bollard Poles Nyhavn Boulevard Post Patina Kastrup Kipp Post Orbiter Post Terminal Toldbod Post
  32. 32. 32 ambience
  33. 33. Photo: Kaslov Studio, Image Design, Hugh Palmer, Steve Hinds, Frank Domin, Terry A. Renna Photography, Peter Grant, Mandy Reynolds Photoforum, Günther Lehnert, Anders Sune Berg, Chelsea Garden/Garden designer: Fiona Lawren- son. Chelsea Garden/Architect: Marcus Barnett & Philip Nixon. Chelsea Garden/Architect: Scape Design. Harrods Place/Architect: Macfarlane Wilder. ABC Holiday Extras/Architect: Walker & Martin (WAM). Stirling Castle/Lighting designer: Northern Light. GlaxoSmithKline/Architect: Swanke Hayden Connell Architects. Jumeriah Beach Hotel/Lighting designer: SAMA. Palm Desert Visitor Centre/Architect: Interactive Design Corporation. Downham Market/Architect: Sheils Flynn Architects. The Ministry of Defence/Architect: Wohlert Architects. Garden/Garden designer: Cherry Mills. 82 Ringford Road/Designer: Tony Craddock. Van Wall House/Architect: Christodoulou Marshall Architects. PF Chang’s China Bistro/Architect: MBH Architects. Old House Farm/Garden designer: Knoble Landscapes. Fulwood Walk/Architect: Bowles & Wyer. Bar XV Ranch/Architect: Barber Architecture. Campbell Square, Liverpool/architect: Andy Thomson BCA Landscape. 33
  34. 34. 34 product families The Louis Poulsen Lighting product programme includes a trademark design concept called product families. This unique concept is based on our close relationship with architects and their desire to equip an entire building using the same family of products, both on the outside and the inside. For example, Toldbod Pendant, Toldbod Wall, Toldbod Bollard and Toldbod Post. Designing in this way allows architectural adaptability while creating a common ideom between buildings and landscape. Toldbod Toldbod Wall Toldbod Ø 155 Toldbod Ø 155 Toldbod Post Toldbod 155/220 Toldbod 120 Wall Bollard Glass Pendant Metal Pendant Kipp Kipp Wall Kipp Bollard Kipp Post Nyhavn Nyhavn Wall Nyhavn Maxi Wall Nyhavn Boulevard Nyhavn Pendant Nyhavn Maxi Pendant Orbiter Orbiter Wall Orbiter Bollard Orbiter Mini Post Orbiter Maxi Post Orbiter Micro Orbiter Pendant Pendant
  35. 35. 35
  36. 36. products inground/recessed IPR10 & IPR12 available spring 2007 LytLED WeeBee LED Nimbus Nimbus LED IPR10 IPR12 IPR14 onground Tripos Mini Tripos LP Knap Dome Volcano Pagoda surface WeeBee Spot SPR10 SPR12 SPR14 wall Toldbod Wall Toldbod Ø 155 Wall Kipp Wall Orbiter Wall Nyhavn Wall Skot Wall Skot Maxi Wall bollards Toldbod 155 Bollard Waterfront Kipp Bollard Orbiter Bollard Sentry Skot Bollard Bysted poles Toldbod Post Terminal Kipp Post Orbiter Post Nyhavn Boulevard Patina Kastrup Post
  37. 37. inground/recessed Dex wall PH 3-2½ Wall PH Wall Homann M2 Dock Wall Dex WeeBee Wall Nimbus Wall bollards PH 3-2½ Bollard Dock Bollard
  38. 38. Louis Poulsen Lighting Germany Sweden Design: Louis Poulsen Lighting A/S - IMD 2007.01. Lithography: Garn Grafisk ApS. Print: Rosendahls Bogtrykkeri AS. Item no.: 57 01 024 500. Louis Poulsen Lighting A/S Louis Poulsen & Co. GmbH Louis Poulsen Lighting AB Gammel Strand 28 Westring 13 Gävlegatan 12 A, 7tr DK-1202 Copenhagen K D-40721 Hilden Box 23013 Tel. +45 70 33 14 14 Postfach 10 07 50 S-104 35 Stockholm Fax +45 33 29 86 36 D-40707 Hilden Tel. +46 8 446 48 00 info@lpmail.com Tel. +49 2103 940 0 Fax +46 8 446 48 28 www.louis-poulsen.dk Fax +49 2103 940 290 + 291 louis.poulsen.se@lpmail.com lp-germany@lpmail.com www.louis-poulsen.se International www.louis-poulsen.de Louis Poulsen Lighting A/S Switzerland Gammel Strand 28 Japan Louis Poulsen AG DK-1202 Copenhagen K Louis Poulsen Japan Co. Ltd. Haldenstrasse 5 Tel. +45 70 33 14 14 AXIS Building 3 Fl CH-6340 Baar Fax +45 33 29 86 46 5-17-1 Roppongi Tel. +41 41 768 5252 lpl_international@lpmail.com Minato-ku Fax +41 41 768 5253 www.louis-poulsen.com Tokyo 106-0032 louis-poulsen-ch@lpmail.com Tel. +81 3 3586 5341 www.louis-poulsen.ch Finland Fax +81 3 3586 0478 Louis Poulsen Lighting Oy lys@louis-poulsen.co.jp United Kingdom Hämeentie 135 A www.louis-poulsen.com Louis Poulsen UK Ltd. FIN-00560 Helsinki Unit C 44 Tel. +358 9 6226 760 Netherlands Barwell Business Park Fax +358 9 6226 7650 Louis Poulsen Lighting B.V. Leatherhead Road info.fi@louis-poulsen.fi Parellaan 26 Chessington www.louis-poulsen.fi NL-2132 WS Hoofddorp Surrey KT9 2NY Tel. +31 23 56 50 030 Tel. +44 208 397 4400 France Fax +31 23 56 52 284 Fax +44 208 397 4455 Louis Poulsen & Cie. S.A.R.L info@louis-poulsen.nl louis.poulsen.uk@lpmail.com Parc Mure www.louis-poulsen.nl www.louis-poulsen.co.uk Module 2.8 128 bis, avenue Jean Jaurès Norway USA F-94851 Ivry Sur Seine Cedex Louis Poulsen Lighting AS Louis Poulsen Lighting, Inc. Tel. +33 1 49 59 68 68 Lilleakerveien 2, Bygn. E2 3260 Meridian Parkway Fax +33 1 49 59 68 69 N-0283 Oslo Fort Lauderdale, FL 33331 louis.poulsen@wanadoo.fr Tel. +47 22 50 20 20 Tel. +1 954 349 2525 www.louis-poulsen.fr Fax +47 22 52 47 05 Fax +1 954 349 2550 louis-poulsen-no@lpmail.com www.louis-poulsen.no

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