10 November 2011HIGHLIGHTS • The Euro zone debt crisis influenced market sentiment in October and   early  November  altho...
10 November 2011   OMR PUBLISHING SCHEDULE – 2012  Please find below the 2012 release dates for the Oil Market Report:    ...
TABLE OF CONTENTSHIGHLIGHTS .................................................................................................
M ARKET  O VERVIEW                                                       I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M A...
I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT                                                            ...
D EMAND                                                                                                I NTERNATIONAL  E N...
I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT                                                            ...
D EMAND                                                                          I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O...
I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT                                                            ...
D EMAND                                                                               I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐...
I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT                                                            ...
D EMAND                                                                                I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ...
I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT                                                            ...
D EMAND                                                                                  I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY ...
I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT                                                            ...
S UPPLY                                                                    I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY  ‐   O IL  M A...
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011

1,265

Published on

In-depth report on the mid-term global oil market scenario, published November 2011

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,265
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Oil Market Report - IEA - November 2011

  1. 1. 10 November 2011HIGHLIGHTS • The Euro zone debt crisis influenced market sentiment in October and  early  November  although  ultimately  fundamentals  reasserted  themselves.  Futures  prices  for  benchmark  crudes  diverged  in  October,  with  WTI  on  a  solid  upward  trend  while  Brent  eased.  At  writing,  Brent  traded around $114/bbl, with WTI at $96/bbl.  • Forecast global oil demand is revised down by 70 kb/d for 2011 and by  20 kb/d  for  2012,  with  lower‐than‐expected  3Q11  readings  in  the  US,  China  and  Japan.  Gasoil  continues  to  provide  the  greatest  impetus  for  demand  growth.  Global  oil  demand  is  expected  to  rise  to  89.2 mb/d  in  2011 (+0.9 mb/d y‐o‐y) and reach 90.5 mb/d (+1.3 mb/d) in 2012.  • Global  oil  supply  rose  by  1.0  mb/d  to  89.3  mb/d  in  October  from  September, driven by recovering non‐OPEC output. A yearly comparison  shows  similar  growth,  with  OPEC  supplies  well  above  year‐ago  levels.  Non‐OPEC  supply  growth  averages  0.1  mb/d  in  2011  but  rebounds  to  1.1 mb/d in 2012, with strong gains from the Americas.  • OPEC  supply  rose  by  95  kb/d  to  30.01  mb/d  in  October,  with  higher  output  from  Libya,  Saudi  Arabia  and  Angola,  partially  offset  by  lower  output from other members. The ‘call on OPEC crude and stock change’  for  2011  is  largely  unchanged  at  30.5  mb/d,  while  higher  non‐OPEC  supply leads to a 0.2 mb/d downward adjustment for 2012 to 30.4 mb/d.  • Global refinery crude throughputs fell sharply in September, as planned  and  unplanned  shutdowns  amplified  the  normal  seasonal  downturn.  Following significant refinery outages and apparent delays in starting up  new  capacity  in  Asia,  3Q11  global  runs  have  been  lowered  by  30  kb/d,  to 75.5 mb/d, while 4Q11 runs are revised down 260 kb/d, to 75.1 mb/d.  • OECD  industry  oil  stocks  declined  by  11.8 mb  to  2 684 mb  in  September, led lower by crude, plus lesser declines in middle distillates  and  fuel  oil.  Inventories  stood  below  the  five‐year  average  for  a  third  consecutive month, a first since 2004. September forward demand cover  dropped  to  57.9 days,  from  58.6 days  in  August.  October  preliminary  data point to a 34.3 mb draw in OECD industry stocks. 
  2. 2. 10 November 2011   OMR PUBLISHING SCHEDULE – 2012  Please find below the 2012 release dates for the Oil Market Report:  Wednesday 18 January  Friday 10 February  Wednesday 14 March  Thursday 12 April  Friday 11 May  Wednesday 13 June   Thursday 12 July*  Friday 10 August  Wednesday 12 September  Friday 12 October**  Tuesday 13 November  Wednesday 12 December  This information is also available at:  oilmarketreport.org/schedule and omrpublic.iea.org/schedule.  *The OMR of 12 July will contain projections through end‐2013.  **The  2012  Edition  of  the  Medium‐Term  Oil  Market  Report  (MTOMR)  will  be released on the same date as the OMR of 12 October 2012. The OMR of this date will  comprise  the  usual  data  and  projections  through  end‐2013,  but  with  heavily abridged text.    
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTSHIGHLIGHTS ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1DISTILLATES, DERIVATIVES & DOWNSIDE RISK ............................................................................................................................................ 4DEMAND ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Summary ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Global Overview ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 OECD ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 7 North America................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Europe.................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 The Winter That Cries Wolf for Heating Oil .......................................................................................................................................... 10 Pacific.................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 11 Non-OECD ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 12 China .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 13 Other Non-OECD .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 14SUPPLY ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 16 Summary ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 16 OPEC Crude Oil Supply ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Libyan Production Outpaces Forecast ....................................................................................................................................................... 19 Non-OPEC Overview .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 21 OECD ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 21 North America................................................................................................................................................................................................. 21 Eagle Ford and Bakken Bonanza to Transform US Oil Production Outlook ............................................................................. 22 North Sea .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 23 Revisions to IEA’s Norway Field Level Data Allow for Better Forecasting ................................................................................ 24 Non-OECD ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 25 Asia ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Middle East ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 26 Former Soviet Union (FSU) .......................................................................................................................................................................... 26 Africa .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 27 Latin America ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 27OECD STOCKS ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28 Summary ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 28 OECD Inventories at End-September and Revisions to Preliminary Data .................................................................................... 28 Analysis of Recent OECD Industry Stock Changes ...................................................................................................................................... 30 OECD North America................................................................................................................................................................................... 30 OECD Europe .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 31 OECD Pacific.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 31 Recent Developments in China and Singapore Stocks ................................................................................................................................. 32PRICES .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34 Summary ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 34 Market Overview .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 34 Futures Markets .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 Rescuing Commodities from Speculators? ................................................................................................................................................ 39 Spot Crude Oil Prices .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Spot Product Prices .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 42 Refining Margins .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 43 End-User Product Prices in October ............................................................................................................................................................... 45 Freight ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 45REFINING .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 47 Summary ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 47 Global Refinery Throughput ............................................................................................................................................................................... 47 OECD Refinery Throughput .............................................................................................................................................................................. 48 Non-OECD Refinery Throughput .................................................................................................................................................................... 51 OECD Refinery Yields ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 54TABLES ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 55
  4. 4. M ARKET  O VERVIEW   I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT  DISTILLATES, DERIVATIVES & DOWNSIDE RISK October  was  a  better  month  for  beleaguered  OECD  refiners,  largely  due  to  stronger  diesel  cracks.  As noted before, clean middle distillate markets will remain a driver of crude and product prices in future too.  In  the  mature  OECD  markets,  jet  fuel  and  diesel  represent  the  only  durable  source  of  demand growth, albeit driven in Europe by preferential diesel taxes. This month’s report also suggests that rising light tight oil supply and logistical bottlenecks around Cushing are, at the margin, boosting road and rail shipments and thus US diesel demand. Impending changes in bunker quality will generate a new market for  middle  distillates  at  fuel  oil’s  expense.  In  the  emerging  economies,  rising  personal  mobility  and growing  freight  traffic  are  largely  fuelled  by  diesel.  And,  as  seen  last  winter,  when  non‐oil  fired  power generation bottlenecks emerge in China and elsewhere, industrial and domestic consumers turn to diesel generators to fill the gap. Short‐term demand surges of several hundred thousand b/d can result.   When products, and clean middle distillates in particular, are in tight supply, crude prices can be driven sharply  higher.  Part  of  the  2007/early‐2008  crude  price  surge  resulted  from  tightness  in  clean  diesel supplies.  With  over  50%  of  future  demand  growth  deriving  from  middle  distillates,  refinery  supply  of these products may be as important as OPEC quotas or upstream investment in setting market dynamics.    OECD Middle Distillate Stocks Middle Distillates Driving Demand Trends days Global Y-o-Y Demand Growth Days of Forward Demand kb/d 40 3000 38 2000 36 1000 34 32 0 30 -1000 28 Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Jan -2000 Range 2006-2010 Avg 2006-2010 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 Mid Dist Other oil         Middle distillates may be pervasive in the market right now, but middle ground among policy makers in Washington  rather  less  so.  Upcoming  decisions  affecting  new  pipeline  capacity  to  the  Gulf  Coast  are likely to be contentious, while October also saw a split vote among CFTC Commissioners narrowly favour the adoption of further position limits for commodity derivatives. It remains difficult to tread the fine line between  ensuring  market  diversity,  preventing  manipulation  and  minimising  systemic  risk  on  the  one hand,  while  sustaining  economic  hedging  opportunities,  preserving  market  liquidity  and  preventing unintended  outcomes  for  price  volatility  on  the  other.  The  debate  on  market  regulation  will  continue, and a joint IEA‐IEF‐OPEC Vienna workshop on 29 November will again examine some of the issues.       To end on market fundamentals, this month’s report sees an underlying ‘call on OPEC crude and stock change’ averaging 30.4 mb/d for the rest of 2011 and 2012, just above recent OPEC output. Considering this  and  tightening  OECD  stocks,  a  fundamentals  underpinning  for  stubbornly  high  prices  is  clear.  And although  demand  estimates  are  shrouded  in  economic  uncertainty  for  2012,  so  perennial  supply  risks also need acknowledging. The combination of Libya and extensive non‐OPEC supply outages may make 2011  an  outlier.  Resurgent,  +1  mb/d  non‐OPEC  supply  and  over  400  kb/d  of  extra  OPEC  NGLs  should cover  demand  growth  in  2012.  But  don’t  forget  that  the  US  Gulf  largely  avoided  hurricane  outages  in 2011,  that  the  Arab  winter  could  well  prove  as  turbulent  as  the  Arab  spring  and,  not  least,  that  the Iranian nuclear issue is again rising among market concerns. Single‐point projections are invaluable, but only with the caveats that are provided by recognising the more extreme supply and demand side risks. 4  10 N OVEMBER  2011 
  5. 5. I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT   D EMAND  DEMAND Summary• Forecast global oil demand is revised down by 70 kb/d for 2011 and by 20 kb/d for 2012, with lower‐ than‐expected 3Q11 readings in the US, China and Japan. Stronger‐than‐expected demand in Korea,  India  and  Brazil  provide  some  offsetting  support,  with  overall  demand  growth  largely  supported  by  gasoil.  Global  oil  demand  is  expected  to  rise  to  89.2 mb/d  in  2011  (+1.0%  or  +0.9 mb/d y‐o‐y)  and  reach 90.5 mb/d (+1.5% or +1.3 mb/d) in 2012.   Global Oil Demand (2010-2012) (millio n barrels per day) 1Q10 2Q10 3Q10 4Q10 2010 1Q11 2Q11 3Q11 4Q11 2011 1Q12 2Q12 3Q12 4Q12 2012 Africa 3.3 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.3 3.3 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.5 Americas 29.5 30.0 30.5 30.2 30.1 30.0 29.8 30.2 30.0 30.0 30.0 29.8 30.3 30.3 30.1 Asia/Pacific 27.2 26.9 26.7 28.3 27.3 28.6 27.4 27.5 29.0 28.1 29.6 28.6 28.3 29.5 29.0 Europe 15.0 14.9 15.6 15.5 15.3 14.9 14.8 15.4 15.3 15.1 14.7 14.6 15.3 15.2 15.0 FSU 4.4 4.3 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.6 4.9 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.9 4.8 4.7 Middle East 7.4 7.8 8.3 7.7 7.8 7.6 8.0 8.3 7.8 7.9 7.8 8.2 8.6 8.0 8.2 World 86.8 87.4 89.0 89.8 88.3 88.9 87.9 89.6 90.2 89.2 90.2 89.4 90.9 91.4 90.5 Annual Chg (%) 2.6 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.1 2.5 0.5 0.6 0.5 1.0 1.4 1.7 1.5 1.3 1.5 Annual Chg (mb/d) 2.2 2.7 2.9 3.0 2.7 2.2 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.4 1.2 1.3 Changes from last OMR (mb/d) 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 -0.06 -0.20 -0.03 -0.07 -0.02 -0.04 -0.05 0.04 -0.02   • Projected  OECD  demand  for  2011  is  now  45.8 mb/d  (‐0.8%  or  ‐380 kb/d)  for  2011  and  45.5 mb/d  (‐0.5% or ‐220 kb/d) for 2012. Demand has been revised down by 60 kb/d this year and by 20 kb/d  next  year,  led  by  downward  adjustments  to  the  US  and  Japan.  Nonetheless,  European  demand  was  broadly unchanged and oil‐fired power generation in Japan is expected to rise in coming months.  • Estimated non‐OECD oil demand for 2011 and 2012 is now seen at 43.4 mb/d (+3.0% or +1.3 mb/d)  and  44.9 mb/d  (+3.5%  or  +1.5 mb/d),  respectively.  Recent  Chinese  data  have  come  in  lower  than  expected, but higher readings from India and Latin America offered a partial offset. Overall revisions  were marginal, with 2011 adjusted down by 10 kb/d and 2012 left unchanged.  • An economic sensitivity analysis, with GDP growth one‐third lower than in our base case, would cut  0.2 mb/d  from  expected  2011  oil  demand  and  1.2 mb/d  from  the  2012  projection,  effectively  curbing global annual demand growth to 0.7 mb/d and 0.3 mb/d, respectively.  Global OverviewAmid  continued  economic  uncertainty  and  sustained  high  oil  prices,  we  have  revised  down  global  oil demand versus last month’s report. Our base case global economic growth assumptions remain steady at  3.8%  for  2011  and  3.9%  for  2012,  but  3Q11  demand  readings  have  come  in  weaker  than  expected. Indeed, we estimate global demand in September, albeit based on preliminary data, as flat compared to the same month in 2010. This follows growth of 1.4% in August. If this result holds, it would signal the weakest monthly demand growth since October 2009. Nevertheless, the forecast revisions are moderate overall;  we  have  cut  2011  by  70 kb/d  and  lowered  2012  by  only  20 kb/d,  with  an  upward  baseline revision to 2010 of 20 kb/d, primarily due to Syria, providing some offset.   The short‐term oil demand picture remains cautious but stable. Recent weaker‐than‐expected data for China, the US and Japan, led to combined downward revisions in September of 670 kb/d. Russian gasoil demand  has  eased  from  its  recent  soaring  heights,  and  baseline  revisions  have  reduced  Kuwait’s consumption. Although JODI data have yet to show dents in Thailand’s consumption, recent widespread flooding  may  signal  future  downward  adjustments  there.  As  such,  global  growth  should  remain  tepid over the next few months, with average annual increases of 0.5% expected in 4Q11. Nevertheless, this 10 N OVEMBER  2011  5 
  6. 6. D EMAND   I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT  annual comparison needs to be seen in context. For one, demand in 4Q10 grew exceptionally, by +3.4% (3.0 mb/d),  a  strong  comparison  baseline.  Real  power  sector  requirements  in  Japan  suggest  increased oil‐burning  there  in  the  coming  months  and  potential  needs  for  diesel  generators  in  China  also  lend upside risks, though gasoil there is not expected to grow at the pace of 4Q10’s expansion. Moreover, the global consumption picture still appears broadly supportive, with annual European demand expectations unchanged  and  Korea,  India  and  Brazil  Oil Demand Sensitivitygrowing  stronger  than  expected.  Robust  (millio n barrels per day) 2010 2011 2012 2011 vs. 2010 2012 vs. 2011gasoil  continues  to  underpin  product  % m b/d % m b/ddemand  in  many  countries.  Leading  Base GDPindicators point to economic caution, but  Global GDP (y-o-y chg) 5.0% 3.8% 3.9% OECD 46.2 45.8 45.5 -0.8% -0.38 -0.5% -0.22gasoil  strength  may  signify  lingering  Non-OECD 42.1 43.4 44.9 3.0% 1.28 3.5% 1.53industrial  strength  in  some  markets,  World 88.3 89.2 90.5 1.0% 0.90 1.5% 1.31particularly the US.  Low er GDP  Global GDP (y-o-y chg) 5.0% 2.6% 2.6%As  we  habitually  note,  the  demand  OECD 46.2 45.7 45.2 -0.9% -0.42 -1.1% -0.50 Non-OECD 42.1 43.2 44.0 2.6% 1.11 1.8% 0.80picture  could  sour  significantly  should  World 88.3 89.0 89.3 0.8% 0.69 0.3% 0.30economic  prospects  falter.  Our sensitivity  analysis  provides  an  indicative  view  with  GDP  growth  one‐third  lower  than  the  base  case. Under such conditions, global oil demand would be reduced versus our base case by 0.2 mb/d for 2011 and by 1.2 mb/d for 2012, with annual growth at 0.7 mb/d and 0.3 mb/d, respectively. As previously, we assume that the more income elastic developing economies would feel this impact most intensely.   Gasoil Demand, Actual & FCast Y-o-Y World: Total Oil Product Demand mb/d % Chg 14.0 27.5 6 13.5 27.0 4 13.0 26.5 2 26.0 12.5 25.5 - 12.0 25.0 (2) 11.5 24.5 (4) 11.0 24.0 (6) 10.5 23.5 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan 1Q07 4Q07 3Q08 2Q09 1Q10 4Q10 3Q11 2008 2009 2010 2011 OECD Non-OECD World (RHS)         Global Oil Demand Growth 2010/2011/2012 thousand barrels per day North America Europe 464 FSU 288 194 -112 -120 54 -174 1400 Asia Middle East -115 287 240 857 860 118 -249 Latin America 305 174 188 212 Africa 60 Global Demand Growth (mb/d) -35 2010 2.69 3.1% 2011 0.90 1.0% 2012 1.31 1.5%  6  10 N OVEMBER  2011 
  7. 7. I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT   D EMAND  OECDAccording to preliminary data, OECD inland deliveries (oil products supplied by refineries, pipelines and terminals)  fell  by  2.2%  year‐on‐year  in  September,  with  all  three  regions  posting  declines.  All  products fell  year‐on‐year  except  for  diesel  (+2.0%)  and  residual  fuel  oil  (+1.6%),  amid  strength  from  North America and the Pacific, respectively.    m b/d OECD: Total Oil Product Demand OECD: Demand by Driver, Y-o-Y Chg 52 Transport Heating m b/d Pow er Gen. Other Total Dem . 1.0 49 0.5 - 46 (0.5) (1.0) 43 (1.5) Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan (2.0) Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012         Revisions to August preliminary data, at ‐190 kb/d, stemmed largely from the US (‐260 kb/d) and Japan (‐150 kb/d),  which  outweighed  upward  adjustments  to  Turkey  (+130 kb/d)  and  Germany  (+60 kb/d).  In the  US,  downward  revisions  were  concentrated  in  residual  fuel,  ‘other  products’  and  gasoline. Downward adjustments to ‘other products’ (which includes direct crude burn) led the revision in Japan. Yet, as noted last month, given volatility in deliveries and the strength of preliminary September  data, there  is  little  evidence  to  suggest  a  retrenchment  in  Japanese  oil‐fired  power  generation.  Meanwhile, gasoil in Turkey and naphtha in Korea have continued to surprise to the upside.   Overall,  OECD  demand  declined  by  only  0.2%  year‐on‐year  in  August  versus  ‐2.3%  in  July.  September preliminary data, however, suggest a weaker picture, with consumption declining by 2.2% year‐on‐year. Japan, in particular, appears to be contributing to the weaker‐than‐expected September data. While oil burning in power generation remains strong, downward adjustments to all other product categories may indicate some slowing in the recovery effect after March’s earthquake and tsunami. We have continued to revise down the annual OECD demand picture, but only moderately, with downward adjustments of 60 kb/d in 2011 and 20 kb/d in 2012. Our outlook sees OECD demand declining by 0.8% (‐380 kb/d) to 45.8 mb/d in 2011 and falling by 0.5% (‐220 kb/d) in 2012.   OECD Demand based on Adjusted Preliminary Submissions - September 2011 (millio n barrels per day) Gasoline Jet/Kerosene Diesel Other Gasoil RFO Other Total Products mb/d % pa mb/d % pa mb/d % pa mb/d % pa mb/d % pa mb/d % pa mb/d % pa OECD North Am erica* 10.32 -3.5 1.63 -2.2 4.19 5.4 0.80 -15.3 0.91 2.4 5.55 -5.03 23.40 -2.6 US50 8.73 -4.2 1.43 -2.1 3.61 5.6 0.33 -29.8 0.53 4.2 4.21 -5.6 18.85 -3.0 Canada 0.76 -0.9 0.11 -10.4 0.23 -2.3 0.31 -5.2 0.09 2.4 0.73 -0.1 2.22 -1.8 Mexico 0.78 1.0 0.05 14.3 0.32 9.8 0.14 9.8 0.21 -1.4 0.56 -6.8 2.06 0.5 OECD Europe 2.22 -4.5 1.37 0.0 4.55 -1.1 1.84 -4.2 1.26 -3.3 3.80 -1.4 15.04 -2.2 Germany 0.48 -3.0 0.20 0.0 0.70 -5.5 0.52 -6.8 0.13 -16.9 0.64 2.2 2.67 -3.9 United Kingdom 0.34 -5.8 0.32 -4.5 0.46 -0.1 0.14 6.8 0.06 6.9 0.28 -0.2 1.61 -1.5 France 0.18 -5.9 0.17 4.5 0.73 0.2 0.32 -6.7 0.08 1.1 0.46 -1.9 1.94 -1.7 Italy 0.24 -5.1 0.11 -3.3 0.53 0.4 0.11 -9.9 0.12 -0.5 0.45 -5.8 1.55 -3.4 Spain 0.13 -6.8 0.14 13.9 0.47 -2.4 0.14 -12.2 0.19 -2.8 0.31 -5.3 1.38 -3.3 OECD Pacific 1.54 -3.6 0.65 -6.9 1.10 2.2 0.45 -9.8 0.81 9.2 3.08 -1.4 7.64 -1.4 Japan 0.98 -5.8 0.34 -16.5 0.41 -7.2 0.34 -16.1 0.51 17.9 1.69 -3.3 4.26 -4.5 Korea 0.20 1.0 0.16 6.7 0.28 10.4 0.12 13.2 0.27 -4.1 1.21 1.9 2.24 2.9 Australia 0.31 -0.3 0.13 4.2 0.36 7.2 0.00 0.0 0.02 5.7 0.17 -0.6 0.99 3.0 OECD Total 14.08 -3.7 3.64 -2.3 9.85 2.0 3.10 -8.1 2.98 1.6 12.43 -3.1 46.08 -2.2 * Including US territo ries  10 N OVEMBER  2011  7 
  8. 8. D EMAND   I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT  North AmericaPreliminary  data  show  oil  product  demand  in  North  America  (including  US  territories)  falling  by  2.6% year‐on‐year in September, following a 1.5% decrease in August. Declines were led by gasoline (‐3.5%), heating oil (‐15.3%) and naphtha (‐17.0%). Diesel (+5.4%) continued to post strong readings, amid still‐positive  industrial  indicators.  US  GDP  grew  at  an  annualised  2.5%  in  3Q11,  suggesting  a  degree  of economic stability amid recent pessimistic headlines. Our assumptions for US and North American GDP growth in 2012 remain at 1.8% and 2.0%, respectively. Still, preliminary October readings for the US have come  in  lower  than  expected.  Going  into  November,  an  early  blizzard  in  the  US  Northeast  may  help temporarily boost heating oil demand, but travel disruptions may further depress gasoline.   OECD North America: OECD North America: Demand by m b/d Total Oil Product Demand Driver, Y-o-Y Chg 27 Transport Heating m b/d Pow er Gen. Other 26 Total Dem . 0.5 25 - 24 (0.5) 23 (1.0) 22 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan (1.5) Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012         Revisions  to  August  data  averaged  ‐200 kb/d  and  were  driven  by  the  US  (‐260 kb/d).  Residual  fuel  oil (‐130 kb/d),  other  products  (‐130 kb/d)  and  gasoline  (‐50 kb/d)  were  all  lower,  while  gasoil  (+50 kb/d) provided some offset. Weekly‐to‐monthly gasoil revisions in the US continue to be difficult to anticipate, with  adjustments  alternating  between  positive  and  negative  over  the  past  four  months;  by  contrast, gasoline adjustments to weekly data have been consistently negative.  Adjusted preliminary weekly data for the United States (excluding territories) up to the 28th of October, which would exclude the unseasonably early winter storm, indicate that inland deliveries – a proxy of oil product demand‐ declined by 1.7% year‐on‐year in October, following a 3.0% fall in September. October data  featured  a  sharp  year‐on‐year  decline  in  residual  fuel  (‐36.5%)  amid  mild  autumn  temperatures. Gasoline  demand  declined  by  an  estimated  4.9%,  suggesting  that  passenger  travel  has  continued  to deteriorate  even  with  retail  prices  around  $3.40/gallon  at  month‐end,  some  15%  below  price  highs reached in May, but 25% above prior‐year levels.    kb/d US50 Monthly Revisions: kb/d US50: Residual Fuel Oil Demand MOS vs EIA Weekly 1,000 500 900 300 800 100 700 (100) 600 (300) 500 (500) 400 (700) (900) 300 Aug-09 Mar-10 Oct-10 May-11 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Gasoline Gasoil Jet Fuel Fuel Oil Other Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011   Meanwhile,  gasoil  demand  appears  to  have  strengthened  in  October,  growing  at  an  estimated  13.6%. Such  a  strong  rate  should  be  viewed  cautiously;  it  may  indeed  stem  from  both  methodological  and economic  factors.  Our  growth  assessment,  which  adjusts  weekly  data  for  prior  weekly‐to‐monthly 8  10 N OVEMBER  2011 
  9. 9. I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT   D EMAND  revisions,  may  be  producing  an  inflated  result  compared  to  a  seasonally  low  October  2010.  Moreover, diesel indicators, while still strong, suggest that year‐on‐year growth may be somewhat less robust. US intermodal rail traffic from the Association of American Railroads rose 3.6% year‐on‐year in October and the latest truck tonnage index from the American Trucking Association in September showed growth of 5.8% year‐on‐year.   kb/d US50: Gasoil Demand kb/d Mexico: Motor Gasoline Demand 4,700 850 4,500 4,300 800 4,100 750 3,900 3,700 700 3,500 3,300 650 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Range 2006-2010 5-year avg Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2010 2011   Mexico’s oil demand grew by 0.5% in September with positive readings coming from jet fuel/kerosene (+14.3%)  and  gasoil  (+9.8%)  partly  offset  by  weak  readings  of  residual  fuel  and  naphtha.  Mexico’s  air travel activity has recovered from last year’s lows as other carriers have stepped‐in to cover routes once flown  by  bankrupt  Mexicana.  Gasoil  demand  strength  has  continued  to  benefit  from  strong  industrial activity, though leading indicators suggest that manufacturing may moderate over the next six months.   EuropePreliminary  estimates  of  European  demand  in  September  point  to  a  2.2%  year‐on‐year  decline,  with naphtha (‐4.6%), motor gasoline (‐4.5%) and heating oil (‐4.2%) performing poorly. September’s gasoline contraction  implies  a  combination  of  fuel  switching  and  simple  economising,  as  new  car  registrations continued  to  rise,  according  to  the  European  Automobile  Manufacturers’  Association,  up  0.6%  in September after August’s 7.7% gain. Considering the declining nature of the European demand picture, jet/kerosene’s steadiness (flat compared to 2010) has been another positive, with the International Air Transport Association reporting a 9.2% gain in European airline traffic flows this September. Moreover, revisions to August preliminary data were positive, at 160 kb/d, largely due to stronger‐than‐anticipated diesel  and  heating  oil;  a  downward  baseline  revision  to  Norwegian  LPG  provided  a  partial  offset.  Our forecast remains largely unchanged, with demand averaging 14.4 mb/d in 2011 and 14.3 mb/d in 2012.   OECD Europe: OECD Europe: Demand by Driver, m b/d Total Oil Product Demand Y-o-Y Chg 16.5 Transport Heating 16.0 m b/d Pow er Gen. Other Total Dem . 15.5 0.2 15.0 - 14.5 (0.2) 14.0 (0.4) 13.5 (0.6) Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan (0.8) Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012         Still,  the  two‐tier  nature  of  the  European  oil  demand  picture  remains – with  the  more  northerly European nations seeing stronger demand than their more heavily indebted Mediterranean brethren –10 N OVEMBER  2011  9 
  10. 10. D EMAND   I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT  albeit the gap appears to be narrowing, with the general economic gloom spreading north. Germany and France  saw  sub‐50  purchasing  managers’  indices  in  October,  at  49.1  and  49.0  respectively.  Having enjoyed strong growth in August, above 3.5%, preliminary estimates for French oil demand in September point towards a return to its long‐run declining trend, down 1.7% on the corresponding period last year. The gasoline market in France was particularly sluggish, down 5.9%. Early estimates for September imply year‐on‐year  declines  across  the  continent,  with  neither  Germany  (‐3.9%),  Spain  (‐3.3%),  nor  Italy (‐3.4%) escaping the malaise. Still, German heating oil demand continued to rise on a seasonal basis.   kb/d France: Motor Gasoline Demand kb/d Germany: Heating Oil Demand 280 800 260 700 240 600 220 500 200 400 180 300 160 200 140 100 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 5-year avg 2010 2011 2010 2011         August data for the UK showed a decline of 1.5% year‐on‐year, led by gasoline (‐4.7%) with potentially weaker readings ahead. The UK purchasing managers’ index for October fell  to 47.4 from September’s 50.8  reading.  Not  only  is  the  reading  a  28‐month  low  for  this  index  but  its  decline  below  the  key 50 threshold  effectively  signals  a  contraction.  Nevertheless,  European  demand  supports  persist. September  preliminary  data  indicate  Poland  grew  by  0.5%,  following  6.9%  growth  in  August.  Turkey’s demand also continues to surprise to the upside, led by gasoil, though its growth rate (+20.8% in August versus the prior year) may be unsustainably high.   The Winter That Cries Wolf for Heating Oil While autumn prevails in the calendar, a late October blizzard in the US Northeast serves as a reminder of  the  approaching  winter  heating  season  in  the  OECD.  Oil  market  players  often  greet  cold  winter  weather  surges  with  excitement,  in  anticipation  of  upward  revisions  to  heating  oil  consumption  above  forecasted  seasonal rises. In exceptional cases where impairment to the power sector prompts a widespread rollout of  diesel  generators,  the  uptick  to  oil  demand  could  be  significant.  However,  as  elaborated  previously  (see  Watching the Mercury, OMR dated 10 December 2010), the real upside of many cold shocks on anticipated  demand often falls short of headlines over the course of a winter, given uncertainties over the duration of  colder‐than‐normal weather and structurally declining OECD oil use for heating and power generation.  A simple, top‐down examination of OECD heating oil demand during winters (October‐March) over the last  decade suggests that original forecast estimates have been prone to sharp swings, with changing economic  conditions and distillate categorisation likely playing a larger role than the weather. It appears for the five  coldest  winters  during  that  period,  final  heating  oil  demand  has  come  in  roughly  between  ‐100 kb/d  to  +300 kb/d versus our original forecast. During these winters, heating‐degree days (HDDs) averaged 5‐to‐15%  higher  than  the  prevailing  10‐year  average.  During  last  year’s  winter  (2010‐2011)  heating  oil  demand  was  revised  up  by  160 kb/d  versus  the  original  forecast  with  HDDs  6%  above  normal.  Still  with  the  economy  recovering from recession at that time, the demand upside attributable solely to weather was probably less.  Indeed,  given  structural  inter‐fuel  substitution,  the  weather  impact  on  OECD  oil  use  continues  to  slowly  recede over time. Ongoing changes in the US are illustrative of this trend. Demand for heating oil has fallen  as  less  homes  use  oil  as  their  chief  source  of  heat,  while  those  still  doing  so  have  become  more  efficient  consumers.  The  US  Energy  Information  Administration’s  (EIA)  Residential  Energy  Consumption  Survey  indicates that in 2009 only 6.3% of US homes were dependent upon heating oil to heat their homes, down  from  6.6%  in  2005  and  7.6%  in  2001.  Most  of  these  households  are  located  in  the  US  Northeast,  where  heating oil accounts for about 27% of space heating. Since 2003, the number of heating oil households in the 10  10 N OVEMBER  2011 
  11. 11. I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT   D EMAND   The Winter That Cries Wolf for Heating Oil (continued) US  Northeast has  fallen  by 20%,  with  over  half  of  the  decline  due  to  increased  natural  gas  penetration,  a  trend that is likely to continue as natural gas maintains an advantageous price gap over oil products.   US Northeast: Households by Primary US50: Gasoil Demand, mb/d Million Heating Source, Winter Period 3.6 12-m roll avg 1.4 11 1.2 10 3.3 1.0 9 Natural gas 0.8 3.0 8 0.6 Heating oil 7 2.7 0.4 6 0.2 2.4 0.0 5 2003/04 2005/06 2007/08 2009/10 2011/12 Jan 00 Jul 02 Jan 05 Jul 07 Jan 10 Source: EIA; 2011/2012 is EIA projection Diesel Heating & Other Gasoil (RHS)         Still, gauging the demand impact of substitution is difficult given ongoing challenges in characterising gasoil  consumption  by  use.  Evolving  fuel  quality  specifications  and  changing  consumption  patterns  have  blurred  the  distinction  between  ‘Transport  Diesel’  (defined  as  on‐road  diesel)  and  ‘Heating  and  Other  Gasoil’  (heating oil for industrial/commercial uses, marine diesel, rail diesel and other uses, irrespective of sulphur  content) in monthly data submitted to the IEA. In the US, dramatic changes in heating oil demand in recent  years  may  stem  as  much  from  data  classification  issues  as  from  economics,  weather  and  inter‐fuel  substitution. With several states in the US Northeast planning to reduce sulphur in heating oil to that of low‐ sulphur diesel in the next few years, the picture may become even more muddled going forward.  Data  classification  issues  notwithstanding,  we  would  caution  that  any  impending  cold  snap  during  the  coming winter may have less impact on OECD heating oil demand over the course of a winter than many  commentators  think.  This  contrasts  with  developments  in  emerging  markets,  particularly  China,  where  a  combination of weather, government policy and non‐oil generation shortages can induce huge short‐term  swings in gasoil demand of several hundred thousand barrels per day in magnitude.   PacificPreliminary data indicate that Pacific oil product demand declined by 1.4% year‐on‐year in September, led by LPG, jet fuel/kerosene and gasoline. Revisions to August preliminary data, at ‐140 kb/d, stemmed mostly from lower ‘other products’ in Japan. Still, the outlook for crude and fuel oil burning in Japan has improved,  while  petrochemical  activity  in  Korea  has  acted  as  a  near‐term  support.  In  contrast,  weaker readings across other product categories suggest that the recovery effect after Japan’s earthquake and tsunami in March may be waning. We have revised down 2011 demand by 30 kb/d to 7.9 mb/d (+0.7% or 50 kb/d y‐o‐y) while leaving 2012 unchanged at the same level (+0.3% or 20 kb/d y‐o‐y).   OECD Pacific: OECD Pacific: Demand by Driver, m b/d Total Oil Product Demand Y-o-Y Chg 10.0 Transport Heating 9.5 m b/d Pow er Gen. Other 9.0 Total Dem . 0.2 8.5 0.1 8.0 - 7.5 (0.1) 7.0 (0.2) 6.5 (0.3) Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan (0.4) Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012  10 N OVEMBER  2011  11 
  12. 12. D EMAND   I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT  In  Japan,  oil  demand  declined  by  4.5%  year‐on‐year  in  September,  with  all  categories,  bar  ‘other products’,  which  include  crude  direct  burn,  and  residual  fuel  oil,  posting  declines.  Jet  fuel/kerosene (‐16.5%)  and  gasoil  (‐11.4%)  posted  the  steepest  falls.  Due  to  higher  assessed  needs  for  power generation, the outlook for ‘other products’ and residual fuel oil has been raised by a modest 10 kb/d for 2012. Our base case profile for nuclear power generation continues to see a recovery starting in spring 2012,  though  at  a  slightly  slower  pace  versus  the  previous  assessment.  Oil  burning  needs  in  2012  are forecast to add 290 kb/d to ‘normal’ levels (around 200 kb/d). To be sure, the nuclear policy debate in Japan  continues.  In  the  less  likely  event  that  no  nuclear  power  returns  in  2012,  incremental  oil  burn needs versus normal would stand at 460 kb/d next year.   kb/d Japan : Oil Consumption (Crude + kb/d Korea: Naphtha Demand Fuel Oil) for Power Generation* 1,050 800 *Main Utilities; Source: FEPC, IEA 950 600 400 850 200 750 0 650 Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan 2007 2008 2009 Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2010 2011   In  Korea,  demand  rose  by  2.9%  in  September.  Despite  indications  of  generally  weak  petrochemical activity in Asia, naphtha demand continued to hold up, growing by 7.3% year‐on‐year. Still, expectations are for moderating growth rates through 2012, with naphtha demand growth forecast to fall below 3% in the  fourth  quarter  of  2011  and  demand  remaining  relatively  steady  in  2012.  Korean  diesel  demand (+10.4%) posted strong  gains while gasoline grew moderately (+1.0%) in  September, in  contrast to the declining motor fuel picture in many other OECD countries.  Non-OECDPreliminary demand data indicate that non‐OECD oil demand grew by 2.4% year‐on‐year (+1.0 mb/d) in September, down from 3.1% growth in August. Chinese apparent demand growth was markedly slower, though  questions  persist  over  the  true  weakness  of  underlying  consumption.  Russian  demand, particularly in gasoil, also slowed from its torrid pace during the previous four months. Still, the overall demand picture remained supportive, with India’s growth rate notably picking up.    m b/d Non-OECD: Total Oil Product Demand m b/d Non-OECD: Gasoil Demand 46 14.0 13.5 44 13.0 42 12.5 40 12.0 38 11.5 11.0 36 10.5 34 10.0 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Range 2006-2010 5-year avg Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2010 2011         12  10 N OVEMBER  2011 
  13. 13. I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT   D EMAND   Non-OECD: Demand by Product (tho usand barrels per day) D e m a nd A nnua l C hg ( k b/ d) A nnua l C hg ( %) Jul-11 Aug-11 Sep-11 Aug-11 Sep-11 Aug-11 Sep-11 LPG & Ethane 4,911 4,971 5,025 224 216 4.7 4.5 Naphtha 2,631 2,608 2,664 -19 21 -0.7 0.8 Motor Gasoline 8,478 8,499 8,464 410 275 5.1 3.4 Jet Fuel & Kerosene 2,751 2,774 2,795 66 87 2.4 3.2 Gas/Diesel Oil 13,488 13,484 13,398 563 480 4.4 3.7 Residual Fuel Oil 5,398 5,463 5,348 55 -171 1.0 -3.1 Other Products 6,050 5,921 5,944 35 108 0.6 1.9 Total Products 43,707 43,720 43,637 1,333 2.4   1,016 3.1 Total  September  demand  is  estimated  at  43.6 mb/d,  while  August  levels  have  been  revised  up  by 210 kb/d to 43.7 mb/d (+1.3 mb/d year‐on‐year). Still, part of August’s upward revision included a boost to  Thailand,  as  reported  via  JODI  data.  With  recent  flooding  dampening  industrial  output  there,  the demand  risk  looking  forward  lies  increasingly  to  the  downside.  The  latest  JODI  update  also  included sizeable  revisions  to  Kuwaiti  demand,  resulting  in  the  downward  adjustment  of  our  estimate  there  by 160 kb/d  in  June  and  by  110 kb/d  in  July  (these  revisions  were  smaller  than  the  changes  to  the  JODI numbers themselves, given our previous adjustments for data points we believed to be too high).   Non-OECD: Demand by Region (tho usand barrels per day) D e m a nd A nnua l C hg ( k b/ d) A nnua l C hg ( %) Jul-11 Aug-11 Sep-11 Aug-11 Sep-11 Aug-11 Sep-11 Africa 3,300 3,253 3,297 -113 -72 -3.3 -2.1 Asia 19,932 19,717 19,934 889 596 4.7 3.1 FSU 4,748 5,026 4,783 396 142 8.6 3.1 Latin America 6,549 6,695 6,659 240 205 3.7 3.2 Middle East 8,492 8,300 8,246 -123 131 -1.5 1.6 Non-OECD Europe 687 728 718 44 13 6.4 1.9 Total Products 43,707 43,720 43,637 1,333 1,016 3.1 2.4   ChinaChina’s monthly apparent demand (calculated as refinery output plus net product imports) rose by only 1.9%  year‐on‐year  in  September  as  higher  refinery  runs  were  weighed  down  by  lower  net  imports compared to a year ago. Apparent demand in August was revised down marginally, by 20 kb/d, putting growth  for  that  month  at  5.6%.  September  demand  was  led  by  year‐on‐year  increases  in  gasoline (+6.4%),  jet/kerosene  (+16.0%)  and  gasoil  (+4.6%).  Residual  fuel  oil  (‐24.8%)  posted  a  sharp  fall,  while LPG continued to decline (‐1.5%). The monthly demand pattern fits with our view of moderating growth rates  over  the  next  18  months  as  the  economy  slows  and  particularly  heading  into  4Q11,  which  is  not expected to feature the almost 300 kb/d quarter‐on‐quarter gasoil increase that characterised 4Q10.    kb/d China: Residual Fuel Oil Demand m b/d China: Apparent Gasoil Demand 1,000 4.2 900 3.7 800 3.2 700 600 2.7 500 2.2 400 1.7 300 Jan 09 Jul 09 Jan 10 Jul 10 Jan 11 Jul 11 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan OMR Dem and Range 2006-2010 5-year avg Adjusted for OGP/Xinhua Stock Changes 2010 2011 Adjusted for JODI Stock Changes         10 N OVEMBER  2011  13 
  14. 14. D EMAND   I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT  However,  questions  remain  over  the  viability  of  Chinese  consumption  indicators.  While  our  apparent demand calculation implicitly includes stock changes, recent month product draws may be exacerbating apparent demand weakness and could signal stockpiling ahead. September’s calculated inventory change (see OECD Stocks section) suggests gasoil stocks may have drawn 8.9 mb, with Sinopec indicating a need to  replenish  its  holdings.  Moreover,  indicators  again  point  to  shortfalls  in  winter  power  generation, which  may  incentivise  higher‐than‐expected  diesel  use.  Nevertheless,  the  economy  has  slowed  on  the back  of  monetary  tightening,  with  GDP  growing  at  9.1%  in  3Q11.  Notably,  the  official  purchasing managers’  index  fell  in  October  to  a  level  only  just  in  expansionary  territory.  Overall,  our  forecast  for 2012 is revised down modestly, by 20 kb/d, though growth at 5.3% (+500 kb/d) remains robust.    China: Demand by Product (tho usand barrels per day) D e m a nd A nnua l C hg ( k b/ d) A nnua l C hg ( %) 2010 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 LPG & Ethane 668 680 699 13 18 1.9 2.7 Naphtha 1,129 1,184 1,241 56 56 4.9 4.8 Motor Gasoline 1,546 1,657 1,736 112 78 7.2 4.7 Jet Fuel & Kerosene 368 400 419 32 19 8.6 4.8 Gas/Diesel Oil 3,142 3,335 3,498 193 163 6.1 4.9 Residual Fuel Oil 531 532 539 0 8 0.1 1.5 Other Products 1,685 1,756 1,915 71 159 4.2 9.1 Total Products 9,069 9,544 10,047 476 502 5.2 5.3   Other Non-OECDIn India, oil demand rose by 6.7% year‐on‐year in September, faster than August’s 3.4% growth. Gasoil (+9.8%), LPG (+10.2%) and naphtha (+18.5%) posted the largest gains, though residual fuel oil (‐20.2%) and jet fuel/kerosene (‐2.5%) declined. Gasoline, which is priced higher than diesel and whose price rose in  September,  still  increased  by  6.2%  y‐o‐y  while  gasoil  demand  benefitted  from  coal‐fired  power shortfalls. Despite September’s strong growth, the Indian economy continues to show signs of slowing, with both industrial output and auto sales moderating. Nevertheless, with a now higher 2011 baseline, our forecast is revised up by 20 kb/d for 2012, with growth marginally higher at 3.7%.    India: Demand by Product (tho usand barrels per day) D e m a nd A nnua l C hg ( k b/ d) A nnua l C hg ( %) 2010 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 LPG & Ethane 455 495 525 40 30 8.8 6.1 Naphtha 201 207 198 6 -10 3.1 -4.7 Motor Gasoline 338 359 379 21 20 6.2 5.6 Jet Fuel & Kerosene 299 299 302 0 3 -0.1 1.1 Gas/Diesel Oil 1,290 1,364 1,435 74 71 5.7 5.2 Residual Fuel Oil 195 173 183 -21 10 -11.0 5.6 Other Products 559 564 568 5 4 0.9 0.7 Total Products 3,337 3,462 3,590 125 128 3.7 3.7    kb/d India: Gasoil Demand kb/d India: Jet Fuel & Kerosene Demand 1,600 340 1,500 330 1,400 320 1,300 310 1,200 300 1,100 1,000 290 900 280 800 270 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Range 2006-2010 5-year avg Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2010 201114  10 N OVEMBER  2011 
  15. 15. I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY   ‐    O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT   D EMAND  Demand growth in Russia eased from its previous lofty heights, rising 2.8% in September versus the prior year. This deceleration comes after four‐months of average 10%+ growth. Slowing gasoil explains much of the retrenchment, with demand declining slightly (‐0.3%) in September, and baseline demand revised down slightly over the previous four months. Gasoline (+0.7%) also registered a notably slower growth rate. Persistent strength in LPG (+4.5%) and ‘other products’ (+12.2%) continued to lend support to the consumption picture.   Russia: Demand by Product (tho usand barrels per day) D e m a nd A nnua l C hg ( k b/ d) A nnua l C hg ( %) 2010 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 LPG & Ethane 493 514 531 22 16 4.4 3.2 Naphtha 289 286 292 -3 6 -1.0 1.9 Motor Gasoline 774 777 778 3 1 0.4 0.2 Jet Fuel & Kerosene 255 266 270 11 3 4.3 1.3 Gas/Diesel Oil 634 686 685 52 0 8.2 0.0 Residual Fuel Oil 291 300 282 8 -18 2.9 -6.0 Other Products 542 612 626 70 14 12.9 2.3 Total Products 3,278 3,441 3,464 163 23 5.0 0.7 Source: Petromarket RG, IEA    kb/d Russia: Gasoil Demand kb/d Brazil: Residual Fuel Oil Demand 900 220 210 810 200 720 190 630 180 170 540 160 S o urc e : P e t ro m a rk e t R G , IE A 450 150 Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Jan Apr Jul Oct Jan Range 2006-2010 5-year avg Range 2006-2010 5-year avg 2010 2011 2010 2011         In  Brazil,  product  demand  rose  3.2%  year‐on‐year  in  August,  led  by  jet  fuel/kerosene  (+8.6%),  gasoil (+7.3%) and LPG (+4.7%). Residual fuel oil (‐15.9%) continued to decline, displaced in the power sector by increased gas and hydro supplies. Brazil’s industrial indicators have continued to soften; as such, gasoil growth rates are expected to moderate through the end of the year. Gasoline demand growth, at 3.4%, improved versus the 2.6% decline registered in July. As elaborated in last month’s issue, a reduction in anhydrous alcohol blending from 1 October may have a neutral effect on overall motor gasoline demand, while increasing petroleum based products requirements. Still, auto sales have been declining year‐on‐year  since  July  (by  comparison,  sales  grew  by  7%  in  2010),  suggesting  potentially  more  moderate gasoline growth rates ahead.    Brazil: Demand by Product (tho usand barrels per day) D e m a nd A nnua l C hg ( k b/ d) A nnua l C hg ( %) 2010 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 LPG & Ethane 219 223 225 4 2 1.8 0.9 Naphtha 166 166 167 1 0 0.4 0.2 Motor Gasoline 792 817 843 25 26 3.1 3.2 Jet Fuel & Kerosene 110 121 132 11 10 10.2 8.4 Gas/Diesel Oil 886 924 958 38 34 4.2 3.7 Residual Fuel Oil 187 163 154 -24 -9 -12.6 -5.7 Other Products 374 380 384 6 4 1.6 1.2 Total Products 2,733 2,794 2,862 61 68 2.2 2.410 N OVEMBER  2011  15 
  16. 16. S UPPLY   I NTERNATIONAL  E NERGY  A GENCY  ‐   O IL  M ARKET  R EPORT  SUPPLY Summary• Global  oil  supply  rose  by  1.1  mb/d  to  89.3  mb/d  in  October  from  September,  driven  higher  by  rebounding non‐OPEC output. Compared to a year ago, global oil production stood 1.2 mb/d higher,  70%  of  which  stemmed  in  roughly  equal  shares  from  higher  OPEC  crude  and  NGLs  production  and  30% from increased non‐OPEC oil output.    • Non‐OPEC  supply  rose  by  0.9  mb/d  to  53.3  mb/d  in  October,  largely  due  to  the  completion  of  maintenance  in  the  North  Sea,  as  well  as  increased  production  in  Brazil  and  North  America.  Unplanned outages in China and the Middle East only modestly dented overall output. Compared to  last year, 4Q11 production should grow by around 300 kb/d to 53.4 mb/d. Annual non‐OPEC supply  growth now averages only 0.1 mb/d for 2011 but recovers to 1.1 mb/d for 2012.   • OPEC supply rose by 95 kb/d to 30.01 mb/d in October, with higher output by Libya, Saudi Arabia  and  Angola  partially  offset  by  lower  output  from  all  other  members.  Libya  continued  to  ramp‐up  crude  production  from  75 kb/d  in  September,  to  a  monthly  average  of  350 kb/d  in  October  and  by  early November it was hovering around the 500 kb/d mark. OPEC NGLs supply averages 5.9 mb/d in  2011 and 6.3 mb/d for 2012, representing annual growth of 0.5 mb/d and 0.4 mb/d respectively.   • The  ‘call  on  OPEC  crude  and  stock  change’  for  2011  is  largely  unchanged  at  30.5  mb/d  while  a  further increase in non‐OPEC supplies results in a 0.2 mb/d downward adjustment in the 2012 call  to  30.4 mb/d.  Meanwhile,  estimated  OPEC  spare  capacity  for  October  stood  at  3.58  mb/d  versus  3.31 mb/d  in  September.  OPEC  spare  capacity  reached  a  2011  low  of  3.21  mb/d  in  June  compared  with 4.74 mb/d prior to the Libyan crisis in January.  OPEC and Non-OPEC Oil Supply OPEC and Non-OPEC Oil Supply m b/d m b/d m b/d Year-on-Year Change 62 31.0 3.5 3.0 60 30.5 2.5 58 30.0 2.0 56 29.5 1.5 54 29.0 1.0 0.5 52 28.5 0.0 50 28.0 -0.5 Jan 11 Jul 11 Jan 12 Jul 12 Jul 10 Oct 10 Jan 11 Apr 11 Jul 11 Oct 11 Non-OP EC OP EC NGLs OP EC Crude Non-OP EC OP EC Crude - RS OP EC NGLs Total Supply          All  world  oil  supply  figures  for  October  discussed  in  this  report  are  IEA  estimates.  Estimates  for  OPEC countries, Alaska, and Russia are supported by preliminary October supply data.   Note: Random events present downside risk to the non‐OPEC production forecast contained in this report. These events  can  include  accidents,  unplanned  or  unannounced  maintenance,  technical  problems,  labour  strikes, political unrest, guerrilla activity, wars and weather‐related supply losses. Specific allowance has been made in the  forecast  for  scheduled  maintenance  in  all  regions  and  for  typical  seasonal  supply  outages  (including hurricane‐related stoppages) in North America. In addition, from July 2007, a nationally allocated (but not field‐specific) reliability adjustment has also been applied for the non‐OPEC forecast to reflect a historical tendency for  unexpected  events  to  reduce  actual  supply  compared  with  the  initial  forecast.  This  totals  ‒200 kb/d  for non‐OPEC as a whole, with downward adjustments focused in the OECD.  16  10 N OVEMBER  2011 

×