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Evolution of the 2013-2014 Marketing Plan towards a wide marketing social concept. Very nice Marketing principles description and quality vs. Quantity figures focus

Evolution of the 2013-2014 Marketing Plan towards a wide marketing social concept. Very nice Marketing principles description and quality vs. Quantity figures focus

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Visit Florida 2014-2015 Marketing Plan Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 2014-15 Marketing Plan
  • 2. 1 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 2014-2015 visit florida Marketing Plan Developed by the official tourism marketing corporation of the Sunshine State with the assistance and approval of the Florida tourism industry This plan provides the strategic foundation for the 2014-15 programs of VISIT FLORIDA. A significant amount of data is provided to assure that all Florida stakeholders can assess the performance of the state’s tourism marketing efforts and strengthen their own marketing by aligning with VISIT FLORIDA’s plan. Additional research data and information tools are offered for VISIT FLORIDA Partners.
  • 3. 2 2014-2015 Marketing Plan VISIT FLORIDA, the state’s official tourism marketing corporation, serves as Florida’s source for travel planning to visitors across the globe. VISIT FLORIDA is not a government agency, but rather a not-for-profit corporation created as a public/ private partnership by the Florida Legislature in 1996. VISIT FLORIDA receives state funding in the form of a portion of the $2 per-day rental car surcharge. For every $1 spent on tourism marketing, VISIT FLORIDA generates more than $390 in tourism spending and $23 in new sales tax collections paid by visitors, not residents. Additional funding is secured from the private sector to expand VISIT FLORIDA’s marketing dollars and, since its founding, VISIT FLORIDA has generated more than $1 billion in cooperative investment by the Sunshine State tourism industry. As a public/private partnership, VISIT FLORIDA serves nearly 12,000 tourism industry businesses, including major strategic alliance partnerships with Disney Destinations, The Hertz Corporation, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment and Universal Orlando. Learn more about VISIT FLORIDA: VISITFLORIDA.org Follow our corporate blog: SunshineMatters.org ABOUT VISIT FLORIDA Mission: To promote travel and drive visitation to and within Florida. Vision: VISIT FLORIDA establishes Florida as the No. 1 travel destination in the world. Goals: • Provide leadership to ensure the Florida tourism industry is competitive and sustainable. • Become the trusted source of information that informs and inspires travel to and within Florida. • Protect and grow Florida’s share of destination travel through integrated sales and marketing programs that drive visitation to and within Florida. • Leverage VISIT FLORIDA resources through cooperative marketing programs that create and add value for Partners within and outside the Florida tourism industry. • Put all VISIT FLORIDA resources to their highest and most productive uses to maximize operating efficiencies and the positive impact of all organizational efforts.
  • 4. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 3 100 MILLION VISITORS AND BEYOND The past 3 years have been exceptional for Florida tourism. We experienced year-over-year growth in visitation, unprecedented in-state tourism spend ($76.1 billion in 2013) and increased share across all top leisure categories. The biggest challenge ahead will be maintaining our success on top of current peak performance. In the coming years, VISIT FLORIDA programs will need to be more strategic than they have ever been and increasingly able to serve the needs of tourism partners in a collaborative effort to grow Florida’s share. With that in mind, VISIT FLORIDA has begun development of a seven-year comprehensive strategic plan. This plan will evolve annually to respond to opportunities and challenges, but its foundation is based on eight critically important objectives that will align the efforts of multiple departments and co-op programs throughout the coming years. 2020 OBJECTIVES 1. Yield – Increase gross taxable sales through tourism. 2. Volume – Increase the number of visitors coming to Florida. 3. Share – Maintain our share of visitors from domestic and international markets while growing share in specific markets. 4. Brand Engagement – Build relationships with visitors through highly relevant content and experiences. 5. Destination Diversity – Grow economic activity throughout the state by encouraging visitation to geographically diverse destinations and participation in a broader range of activities. 6. Partner Participation – Improve Partner investment and engagement in VISIT FLORIDA programs. 7. Investment Efficiency – Optimize organization spending to deliver increased results in the most cost-effective way. 8. Influence – Grow perceived desirability and intent to travel to Florida. All VISIT FLORIDA tactics outlined in this plan roll up to achieve these goals.
  • 5. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 4 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships Create Value & Add Value Every VISIT FLORIDA program or initiative must create value and add value for travelers and industry Partners. If the industry can produce a program at the same cost and with the same impact, there is no reason for VISIT FLORIDA to invest resources in the program. VISIT FLORIDA programs must provide the Florida tourism industry a strategic advantage and must inspire consumers with valuable information or a valuable service. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 6. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 5 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships CO-OP IS CRITICAL At its core, VISIT FLORIDA is a cooperative marketing company. Since 1996, industry partners have invested more than $1 billion in VISIT FLORIDA co-op marketing programs. Florida tourism industry Partners will have the opportunity to leverage VISIT FLORIDA’s investment in marketing programs to maximize the impact of their individual resources even as this joint effort increases the impact of the shared Florida brand. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 7. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 6 Create Value & Add Value Everything Is Co-opable CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships CLARITY COMES FIRST VISIT FLORIDA must prioritize its time, energy and budget to optimize the organization and maximize the impact of our efforts by focusing only on programs that create and add value for travelers and industry Partners. That means executing against a strategic plan with a tactical focus on co-op marketing and strategic marketing partnerships. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 8. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 7 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE There is a tendency in membership organizations to stick to the “Fairness Doctrine,” build programs to the lowest common denominator and provide the same benefits to all members in all cases. The result is often a marketing structure that tends toward mediocrity. VISIT FLORIDA represents an industry that is remarkable in its breadth and diversity and a “one size fits all” approach simply will not work. VISIT FLORIDA has made a strategic decision to strive to provide valuable programs for all Partners, while recognizing and communicating that not all programs will be a good fit for every Partner. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 9. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 8 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships Quality vs. Quantity Size matters, but impact matters more. The impact of a promotion on consumer behavior is more important than the number of people the promotion reaches. For instance, how many incremental visitors to Florida were influenced in their decision making by the press release, promotion, advertisement or sales effort? marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 10. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 9 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right While wise financial stewardship is critical in all that we do, VISIT FLORIDA will not sacrifice quality to save money; nor will we initiate a new program or continue with an existing program without dedicating the resources necessary to make the program a success. VISIT FLORIDA will protect our brand promise and will commit to do it right or not do it at all. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 11. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 10 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships CONTENT IS CORE Regardless of whether stories are told in advertising, on VISITFLORIDA.com, social media or any other traditional or digital media, stories that inspire travel to Florida are core to VISIT FLORIDA’s marketing efforts. VISIT FLORIDA is committed to creating, curating and distributing compelling articles, photographs and videos that tell the Florida travel story. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 12. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 11 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE INNOVATION Best-in-Class Partnerships INNOVATION VISIT FLORIDA is committed to building a culture of innovation that encourages staff and Partners to create more effective products, services and technologies to give Florida a competitive advantage in the global travel and tourism industry. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 13. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 12 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships Best-in-Class Partnerships Just as the Florida tourism industry expects VISIT FLORIDA to create and add value to their independent marketing efforts, VISIT FLORIDA expects our partners to create and add value to our internal efforts. As a result, VISIT FLORIDA has assembled a first-class team of marketing partners to help us do our job better. These advertising, public relations, digital development and publishing partners bring substantial resources and expertise to execute strategic marketing plans. Working with partners, VISIT FLORIDA is able to implement strategic co-op marketing that significantly leverages our budget and provides Partners with access to programs on a scale not otherwise possible. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  • 14. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 13 MARKETING planning process As the official destination marketing organization charged with promoting Florida as a leisure travel and meetings destination, VISIT FLORIDA plans and implements a variety of sales and marketing initiatives. This strategic marketing plan is the road map that guides all VISIT FLORIDA sales and marketing efforts for 2014-15. The plan was developed by VISIT FLORIDA staff based on guidance and insight from the Florida tourism industry as represented by members of VISIT FLORIDA’s marketing committees, including: • Advertising and Internet • Communications • Culture, Heritage, Rural & Nature • Industry Relations • International • Promotions • Meetings & Travel Trade • Visitor Services The 2014-15 marketing planning process began in December 2013 when representatives of Florida’s tourism industry, including members of the VISIT FLORIDA Board of Directors and committees, met at the annual Marketing Retreat to set industry priorities for VISIT FLORIDA’S marketing efforts. Addressing near-term needs as well as long-term goals, the industry identified strategic marketing objectives and helped prioritize initiatives for inclusion in the 2014-15 marketing plan. With the strategic direction provided by the industry in general and by the individual marketing committees, staff developed a proposed marketing plan and budget. This plan was then vetted through each marketing committee, as well as the Marketing Council Steering Committee, and forwarded to the Board of Directors for consideration.
  • 15. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 14 MARKETING EFFECTIVENESS VISIT FLORIDA measures its ability to influence visitors through an annual independent third-party survey that began in 2008. In 2013, VISIT FLORIDA marketing materials and initiatives influenced 38 percent of the people who visited the state. VISIT FLORIDA INFLUENCE ON VISITORS [2009-2013] This graph shows the percentage of visitors to the state each year who acknowledged being influenced by VISIT FLORIDA marketing efforts. In 2009, VISIT FLORIDA campaigns and materials influenced over 27 percent of Florida’s visitors; in 2013, VISIT FLORIDA influenced 38 percent of Florida’s visitors. Source: VISIT FLORIDA
  • 16. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 15 CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State experienced growth in the total number of visitors from the domestic U.S., Canada and overseas. Total visitor volume (excluding in-state travel by Florida residents) was up 3 percent and reached 94.3 million – a record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 91.5 million in 2012. Total Visitor Volume Domestic Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume *Methodology change in 2009 Source: VISIT FLORIDA TOTAL VISITOR VOLUME This chart shows the total visitor volume to the state over the past 10 years. International Visitor Volume International visitors from Canada and overseas – contributed a greater share of volume and spend than the historical pattern. In 2013, 11.1 million overseas visitors and 3.7 million Canadians came to Florida – both record highs. Year over year, overseas visitors increased by 7 percent, Canadian visitors by more than 4 percent. 94.3 91.5 87.3 82.380.984.284.583.983.6 79.7
  • 17. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 16 Total Visitor Volume Domestic Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume *Methodology change in 2009 Source: VISIT FLORIDA DOMESTIC VISITOR VOLUME This chart shows the volume of domestic visitors to Florida over the past 10 years. International Visitor Volume Total Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume 79.577.6 74.7 71.271.2 76.177.377.677.2 73.4 CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State experienced growth in the total number of visitors from the domestic U.S., Canada and overseas. Total visitor volume (excluding in-state travel by Florida residents) was up 3 percent and reached 94.3 million – a record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 91.5 million in 2012. International visitors from Canada and overseas – contributed a greater share of volume and spend than the historical pattern. In 2013, 11.1 million overseas visitors and 3.7 million Canadians came to Florida – both record highs. Year over year, overseas visitors increased by 7 percent, Canadian visitors by more than 4 percent.
  • 18. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 17 Total Visitor Volume Domestic Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume INTERNATIONAL VISITOR VOLUME This chart shows the volume of international visitors to Florida over the past 10 years. International Visitor Volume *Methodology change in 2009 Source: VISIT FLORIDA 14.8 13.9 12.6 11.1 9.6 8.1 7.2 6.26.46.3 CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State experienced growth in the total number of visitors from the domestic U.S., Canada and overseas. Total visitor volume (excluding in-state travel by Florida residents) was up 3 percent and reached 94.3 million – a record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 91.5 million in 2012. International visitors from Canada and overseas – contributed a greater share of volume and spend than the historical pattern. In 2013, 11.1 million overseas visitors and 3.7 million Canadians came to Florida – both record highs. Year over year, overseas visitors increased by 7 percent, Canadian visitors by more than 4 percent.
  • 19. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 18 Total Visitor Volume Domestic Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume Source: VISIT FLORIDA (2004 - 2007 data based on data from the Consumer Attitude Survey of the University of Florida, BEBR; 2008-2010 data based on a consumer survey conducted by A New View Research d/b/a be Satisfied; 2011-2012 data based on phone surveys by American Directions Group). RESIDENT VISITOR VOLUME This chart shows the number of resident pleasure trips within the state over the past 10 years. International Visitor Volume 20.1 20.7 21.5 14.7 16.817.1 13.913.013.313.5 CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State experienced growth in the total number of visitors from the domestic U.S., Canada and overseas. Total visitor volume (excluding in-state travel by Florida residents) was up 3 percent and reached 94.3 million – a record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 91.5 million in 2012. International visitors from Canada and overseas – contributed a greater share of volume and spend than the historical pattern. In 2013, 11.1 million overseas visitors and 3.7 million Canadians came to Florida – both record highs. Year over year, overseas visitors increased by 7 percent, Canadian visitors by more than 4 percent.
  • 20. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 19 FLORIDA’S MARKET SHARE (2003-2012) This chart tracks Florida’s share of the domestic vacation travel market. In 2012, more than16 percent of domestic vacation travelers vacationed in the Sunshine State. DOMESTIC VACATIONERS In 2012, Florida’s share of the domestic travel market was the largest it has been in a decade, increasing from 15.8 percent in 2011, to 16.4 percent. Florida has not only recovered from the recession but has strengthened its lead. Source: D.K. Shifflet and Associates 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 15.5% 15.7% 15.5% 14.2% 14.2% 14.8% 15.5% 14.9% 15.8% 16.4%
  • 21. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 20 HOTEL OCCUPANCY (2013) This chart compares Florida’s hotel industry against the values from the South Atlantic region and the U.S. POSITIVE TRENDS Hotel data from 2013 tells a terrific story. The U.S. as a whole and the South Atlantic region saw across- the-board increases, and Florida had an even better year, outpacing all in occupancy, average daily rate, revenue per available room and total room revenue. 2013 Occupancy % Change ADR % Change Rev PAR % Change Room Revenue % Change United States 62.3% 1.5% $110.35 3.9% $68.69 5.4% 6.2% South Atlantic 62.0% 1.9% $106.64 3.0% $66.06 5.0% 5.3% Florida 67.0% 3.5% $118.46 4.6% $79.34 8.3% 8.2% Source: Smith Travel Research Hotel occupancy in Florida was up every month in 2013, increasing 3.5 percent over 2012. Average daily room rate (ADR) was up 4.6 percent over 2012 to $118.46.
  • 22. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 21 Maintaining a Balanced Mix As a mature destination that hosts more than 94 million visitors a year, Florida attracts a wide variety of visitors by age, income and lifestage. Compared to the U.S. average, Florida’s visitors include more Affluent Families and Affluent Matures. Overall, the average household income of Florida’s visitors Source: D.K. Shifflet and Associates is about $10,000 more than the average U.S. traveler. Though Florida is an iconic family destination, it is also strong in attracting 35- to 54-year-olds with no children in the household. Over the past five years, the number of Millennial visitors to Florida has increased. COMPARISON OF U.S. and florida travelers by lifestage (2012) This chart shows the share of U.S. travelers by lifestage compared to the share of Florida’s visitors by lifestage. For example, 15 percent of U.S. travelers are in the Young & Free lifestage compared to 14 percent of Florida visitors.
  • 23. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 22 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE Consumer confidence started out lower in 2013 than in 2012, but continued an upward climb. By June, U.S. consumer confidence was the highest it had been in five years and remained steady until the government shutdown in October, which resulted in another drop in confidence. CONSUMER CONFIDENCE Index (2012/2013) This chart tracks consumer confidence as measured by the Consumer Confidence Index, a score based on a monthly survey conducted by Nielsen for the Conference Board.
  • 24. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 23 ImportanceOF THE DOMESTIC MARKET Domestic Visitor Volume Combined business and leisure travel (2013 preliminary) Source: VISIT FLORIDA Note: 2013 visitor numbers are finalized mid-year. Preliminary numbers are used for this report. In 2013, Florida’s total visitor numbers reached an all-time high of 94.3 million (excluding in-state resident travelers), setting record numbers for the third consecutive year. Consistent with previous years, the majority of Florida’s visitors came from the United States – 79.5 million, up 2.5 percent. There were 14.8 million international visitors, up 6 percent. Year-over-year, the total number of visitors was up 3 percent. Domestic 84% (79.5M) Canada 4% (3.7M) Overseas 12% (11.1M) Partner Tools Domestic Visitor Profile
  • 25. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 24 Visitor spending increased both in Florida and on average in the U.S. In 2012, Florida enjoyed increases in average spend per person per day (up 16 percent) – once again significantly outperforming the national average spend per person per day (up 9 percent). Average visitor spend in Florida varies by season, origin market, mode of travel and other factors. ImportanceOF THE DOMESTIC MARKET Partner Tools Domestic Visitor Profile VISITOR SPEND PER PERSON / PER DAY Combined business and leisure travel (2003-2012) Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates
  • 26. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 25 VISITOR VOLUME TRENDS Florida tourism rebounded from the recession dip and impacts of the Deepwater Horizon event to reach an all-time high of hosting 79.5 million visitors from the U.S. Combined business and leisure travel increased for the third consecutive year, making 2013 the top year ever recorded. 10 YEARS OF VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure travel (2004-2013) *Methodology change in 2009 Source: VISIT FLORIDA Partner Tools Domestic Visitor Profile Domestic Visitor Volume Average Per Trip Spend 79.5M 77.6M 74.7M 71.2M71.2M 76.1M 77.3M77.6M 77.2M 73.4M
  • 27. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 26 Average Trip Value Average trip value is the typical amount spent per visit by a travel party. To calculate, multiply the average per-day spending of each visitor, the total number of days on the trip and the number of visitors in the travel party. The average spending per person per day in 2012 was $148.40. The average stay was 5.15 days and the average party size was 2.2 persons. Based on the latest available data (2012), the average value of a domestic visitor’s trip is $1,681.37. Note: Florida visitor spending lags behind volume data by one year. Volume and spend comparisons are for a general frame of reference and not a precise ratio. Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates DOMESTIC VISITOR TRIP VALUE Combined business and leisure travel (2003-2012) Partner Tools Domestic Visitor Profile TRIP SPENDING TRENDS Following five years of overall declines in visitor spending, the needle is moving in the right direction. In 2012, Florida’s visitors spent more and stayed longer, resulting in an increase in average trip value. Domestic Visitor Volume Average Per Trip Spend
  • 28. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 27 APPROACH As Florida marches toward 100 million visitors and beyond, market segmentation is particularly important. Florida approaches its domestic audience in four ways: where potential visitors live and travel from; how they travel to Florida; what the purpose of their trip is; and what is known about them demographically. Insights from these four filters are combined in a variety of ways for strategic planning, targeting and messaging. Affluent Mature 14% Young & Free 14% Young Family 12% Maturing & Free 17% Affluent Family 18% Moderate Mature 17% Moderate Family 8% General Vacation 37% Visit Friends / Relatives 26% Business 10% Special Event 8% Getaway Weekend 11% Other Leisure/Personal 8%
  • 29. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 28 Highlights • In 2012, Texas was the third-strongest origin state for Florida, which is especially significant considering that Texas became a top five contributor for the first time in 2011. • Georgia and New York have been Florida’s top two origin markets for more than a decade, traditionally accounting for more than 20 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors. The National View Florida attracts visitors from all 50 states, most of them coming from markets east of the Mississippi. Florida’s top five feeder states are Georgia, New York, Texas, Alabama and Illinois.
  • 30. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 29 Top States 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Georgia 11.5% 11.7% 11.3% 10.6% 11.9% New York 9.2% 9.3% 7.7% 8.9% 9.7% Texas 4.7% 4.8% 4.8% 5.7% 5.9% Alabama 4.0% 5.6% 4.2% 4.2% 5.6% Illinois 4.5% 5.7% 6.4% 5.6% 4.9% New Jersey 6.0% 4.4% 5.5% 4.5% 4.7% Ohio 4.7% 4.0% 4.2% 4.4% 3.9% Michigan 3.5% 3.1% 4.6% 4.4% 3.8% Massachusetts 3.1% 2.6% 2.5% 3.4% 3.7% North Carolina 4.7% 4.1% 5.5% 4.1% 3.6% Virginia 3.1% 3.6% 3.5% 3.7% 3.6% Pennsylvania 3.4% 4.1% 4.2% 3.9% 3.6% Tennessee 3.7% 2.3% 2.9% 3.6% 3.2% California 3.8% 3.6% 4.0% 3.8% 3.2% Louisiana 2.6% 2.2% 2.2% 1.3% 2.8% Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates Feeder States: Top 5 Feeder States: Top 12 Top States 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Georgia 10.9% 11.5% 11.7% 11.3% 10.6% New York 10.3% 9.2% 9.3% 7.7% 8.9% Texas 4.8% 4.7% 4.8% 4.8% 5.7% Illinois 5.0% 4.5% 5.7% 6.4% 5.6% New Jersey 5.5% 6.0% 4.4% 5.5% 4.5% Michigan 3.8% 3.5% 3.1% 4.6% 4.4% Ohio 4.9% 4.7% 4.0% 4.2% 4.4% Alabama 3.6% 4.0% 5.6% 4.2% 4.2% North Carolina 3.7% 4.7% 4.1% 5.5% 4.1% Pennsylvania 3.6% 3.4% 4.1% 4.2% 3.9% California 3.6% 3.8% 3.6% 4.0% 3.8% Virginia 3.6% 3.1% 3.6% 3.5% 3.7% Highlights • Consistent increases put Texas in the top three in 2011, supplanting Illinois. • Of the top 10 origin states for Florida visitors, five contributed their greatest share in five years: Alabama, Georgia, Texas, Massachusetts and New York. • Increased visitation from top drive states such as Alabama and Texas helped to fuel the 7.5 percent increase in drive visitors that Florida experienced in 2012. Visitor Origin States Georgia, New York and Texas account for 27 percent of Florida’s visitor base. Georgia and New York’s share of Florida visitors increased in 2012, ending a three-year decline. Top Feeder States Over Five Years Combined Fly / Drive (2008-2012) This chart shows the leading origin states’ variation in the share of Florida’s domestic visitors.
  • 31. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 30 Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates Feeder States: Top 5 TOP FEEDER STATES OVER FIVE YEARS - TREND LINES COMBINED FLY/DRIVE (2008-2012) This graph shows the top five origin states of Florida’s domestic visitors over a five-year period. The share of Florida’s visitors who come from New York is increasing. Top States 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Georgia 10.9% 11.5% 11.7% 11.3% 10.6% New York 10.3% 9.2% 9.3% 7.7% 8.9% Texas 4.8% 4.7% 4.8% 4.8% 5.7% Illinois 5.0% 4.5% 5.7% 6.4% 5.6% New Jersey 5.5% 6.0% 4.4% 5.5% 4.5% Michigan 3.8% 3.5% 3.1% 4.6% 4.4% Ohio 4.9% 4.7% 4.0% 4.2% 4.4% Alabama 3.6% 4.0% 5.6% 4.2% 4.2% North Carolina 3.7% 4.7% 4.1% 5.5% 4.1% Pennsylvania 3.6% 3.4% 4.1% 4.2% 3.9% California 3.6% 3.8% 3.6% 4.0% 3.8% Virginia 3.6% 3.1% 3.6% 3.5% 3.7% Feeder States: Top 12 Highlights • Consistent increases put Texas in the top three in 2011, supplanting Illinois. • Of the top 10 origin states for Florida visitors, five contributed their greatest share in five years: Alabama, Georgia, Texas, Massachusetts and New York. • Increased visitation from top drive states such as Alabama and Texas helped to fuel the 7.5 percent increase in drive visitors that Florida experienced in 2012. Visitor Origin States Georgia, New York and Texas account for 27 percent of Florida’s visitor base. Georgia and New York’s share of Florida visitors increased in 2012, ending a three-year decline.
  • 32. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 31 Visitor Origin DMAS Following the state pattern, Atlanta and New York City are the top feeder markets. Florida’s focus to capture more share from the Boston market clearly gained ground, as well as a slight increase for Washington, D.C. A decline in visitors from Philadelphia and Detroit is not surprising because flights from these markets to Florida declined from 2011 to 2012. 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 New York, NY 10.2% 9.4% 9.2% 9.7% 10.7% Atlanta, GA 6.8% 7.2% 6.9% 6.8% 7.6% Chicago, IL 3.8% 4.1% 4.7% 4.4% 4.3% Boston, MA 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 2.8% 3.5% Washington, DC 2.9% 2.9% 2.7% 2.9% 3.1% Philadelphia, PA 3.4% 3.9% 3.6% 3.0% 2.6% Detroit, MI 2.1% 1.9% 2.2% 2.5% 2.3% Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% Cleveland-Akron, OH 1.8% 1.6% 1.2% 1.8% 1.7% Houston, TX 1.1% 1.1% 1.1% 1.5% 1.6% Hartford-New Haven 1.5% 1.8% 1.4% 1.3% 1.6% Nashville, TN 1.6% 1.3% 1.4% 1.8% 1.5% Los Angeles, CA 1.5% 1.6% 1.7% 1.7% 1.4% Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN 1.2% 1.2% 1.0% 1.2% 1.4% Birmingham, AL 1.3% 1.6% 1.9% 1.4% 1.4% TOP 15 FEEDER DMAS OVER FIVE YEARS COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE (2008-2012) This table shows the leading origin DMAS variation in the share of Florida’s domestic visitors. Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates Partner Tools DMA Visitor Profile Highlights • The top eight origin markets have remained constant since 2007. • New York City showed a big bounce, reaching its highest share in five years. • Hartford, Minneapolis and Birmingham, which had fallen off for several years, are once again in the top 15. • Six of the top 15 markets enjoyed their biggest shares in five years.
  • 33. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 32 Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. DMA Market Snapshot New York, NY New York City remains Florida’s strongest feeder market and in 2012 enjoyed its biggest share in five years. New York is a strong couples and singles market. More than two-thirds of the visitors to Florida from New York have no children in the household. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA
  • 34. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 33 DMA Market Snapshot ATLANTA, GA Of all the markets in the Super Eight, Atlanta has the largest share of families visiting Florida. Atlanta’s share of visitors in 2012 also was the DMA’s biggest in five years. The top season is summer. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  • 35. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 34 DMA Market Snapshot CHICAGO, IL Chicago is a strong origin market for couples and singles. They visit Florida in the fall. The majority of Florida visitors from Chicago are Boomers and more than 20 percent are in the Affluent Family life stage. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  • 36. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 35 DMA Market Snapshot Boston, MA Boston is a strong couples and Boomers market with traditionally strong visitation in the spring and winter. Visitors from Boston are mostly in the Affluent Mature lifestage, the highest percentage compared to the other Super Eight markets. Boston visitors also have the highest average spend per person per day compared to the other Super Eight markets. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  • 37. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 36 DMA Market Snapshot WASHINGTON, D.C. D.C. visitors have the highest average household income of the Super Eight markets. Nearly two- thirds earn $100,000 or more. D.C. is a strong couples and singles market. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  • 38. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 37 DMA Market Snapshot PHILADELPHIA, PA The number of flights from this market to Florida has declined, contributing to the reduction in the share of visitors for three consecutive years. Philadelphia is a strong couples market and they tend to visit in the spring. Four of 10 visitors from Philadelphia are Boomers. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  • 39. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 38 DMA Market Snapshot DETROIT, MI Detroit is a strong couples and families market. Visitors come in the winter. Nearly half are Boomers. Though the share of Florida’s visitors contributed by Detroit was down slightly, the actual volume from Detroit was up. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  • 40. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 39 DMA Market Snapshot DALLAS, TX Dallas is the newest market in the Super Eight, even though it has been a top origin market for Florida since 2007. Dallas is a strong couples market. Visitors typically come in the summer. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  • 41. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 40 Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot New York, NY New York City remains Florida’s strongest feeder market and in 2012 enjoyed its biggest share in five years. New York is a strong couples and singles market. More than two-thirds of the visitors to Florida from New York have no children in the household.
  • 42. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 41 Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot ATLANTA, GA Of all the markets in the Super Eight, Atlanta has the largest share of families visiting Florida. Atlanta’s share of visitors in 2012 also was the DMA’s biggest in five years. The top season is summer. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  • 43. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 42 DMA Market Snapshot CHICAGO, IL Chicago is a strong origin market for couples and singles. They visit Florida in the fall. The majority of Florida visitors from Chicago are Boomers and more than 20 percent are in the Affluent Family life stage. Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  • 44. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 43 Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot BOSTON, MA Boston is a strong couples and Boomers market with traditionally strong visitation in the spring and winter. Visitors from Boston are mostly in the Affluent Mature lifestage, the highest percentage compared to the other Super Eight markets. Boston visitors also have the highest average spend per person per day compared to the other Super Eight markets. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  • 45. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 44 DMA Market Snapshot WASHINGTON, D.C. D.C. visitors have the highest average household income of the Super Eight markets. Nearly two- thirds earn $100,000 or more. D.C. is a strong couples and singles market. Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  • 46. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 45 Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot PHILADELPHIA, PA The number of flights from this market to Florida has declined, contributing to the reduction in the share of visitors for three consecutive years. Philadelphia is a strong couples market and they tend to visit in the spring. Four of 10 visitors from Philadelphia are Boomers. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  • 47. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 46 DMA Market Snapshot DETROIT, MI Detroit is a strong couples and families market. Visitors come in the winter. Nearly half are Boomers. Though the share of Florida’s visitors contributed by Detroit was down slightly, the actual volume from Detroit was up. Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  • 48. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 47 Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot DALLAS, TX Dallas is the newest market in the Super Eight, even though it has been a top origin market for Florida since 2007. Dallas is a strong couples market. Visitors typically come in the summer. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  • 49. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 48 * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 PP* change '12/'11 PP* change '12/'08 New York, NY 10.2% 9.4% 9.2% 9.7% 10.7% +1.0 pp +0.5 pp Atlanta, GA 6.8% 7.2% 6.9% 6.8% 7.6% +0.8 pp +0.8 pp Chicago, IL 3.8% 4.1% 4.7% 4.4% 4.3% -0.1 pp +0.5 pp Boston, MA 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 2.8% 3.5% +0.7 pp +0.4 pp Washington, D.C. 2.9% 2.9% 2.7% 2.9% 3.1% +0.2 pp +0.2 pp Philadelphia, PA 3.4% 3.9% 3.6% 3.0% 2.6% -0.4 pp -0.8 pp Detroit, MI 2.1% 1.9% 2.2% 2.5% 2.3% -0.2 pp +0.3 pp Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% -0.3 pp -0.1 pp SUPER EIGHT VISITOR VOLUME Five-year trends suggest that six of Florida’s top eight markets have experienced growth in share. Florida’s share of visitors from Philadelphia declined over a five-year period, which is not surprising considering the number of flights to Florida from the Philadelphia area declined 20 percent. Super Eight Five Year Trends: Chart Super Eight Five Year Trends: Graph FIVE YEARS OF VISITOR SHARE Combined business and leisure (2008-2012) This table shows the variation in the share of Florida visitors from the Super Eight DMAS. Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 PP* change '12/'11 PP* change '12/'08 New York, NY 10.2% 9.4% 9.2% 9.7% 10.7% +1.0 pp +0.5 pp Atlanta, GA 6.8% 7.2% 6.9% 6.8% 7.6% +0.8 pp +0.8 pp Chicago, IL 3.8% 4.1% 4.7% 4.4% 4.3% -0.1 pp +0.5 pp Boston, MA 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 2.8% 3.5% +0.7 pp +0.4 pp Washington, DC 2.9% 2.9% 2.7% 2.9% 3.1% +0.2 pp +0.2 pp Philadelphia, PA 3.4% 3.9% 3.6% 3.0% 2.6% -0.4 pp -0.8 pp Detroit, MI 2.1% 1.9% 2.2% 2.5% 2.3% -0.2 pp +0.3 pp Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% -0.3 pp -0.1 pp
  • 50. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 49 Super Eight Five Year Trends: Chart Super Eight Five Year Trends: Graph FIVE-YEAR TRENDS Combined business and leisure (2008-2012) This line graph tracks the share of Florida’s visitors from each of the top eight origin DMAS for the past five years. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA SUPER EIGHT VISITOR VOLUME Five-year trends suggest that six of Florida’s top eight markets have experienced growth in share. Florida’s share of visitors from Philadelphia declined over a five-year period, which is not surprising considering the number of flights to Florida from the Philadelphia area declined 20 percent. Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 PP* change '12/'11 PP* change '12/'08 New York, NY 10.2% 9.4% 9.2% 9.7% 10.7% +1.0 pp +0.5 pp Atlanta, GA 6.8% 7.2% 6.9% 6.8% 7.6% +0.8 pp +0.8 pp Chicago, IL 3.8% 4.1% 4.7% 4.4% 4.3% -0.1 pp +0.5 pp Boston, MA 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 2.8% 3.5% +0.7 pp +0.4 pp Washington, DC 2.9% 2.9% 2.7% 2.9% 3.1% +0.2 pp +0.2 pp Philadelphia, PA 3.4% 3.9% 3.6% 3.0% 2.6% -0.4 pp -0.8 pp Detroit, MI 2.1% 1.9% 2.2% 2.5% 2.3% -0.2 pp +0.3 pp Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% -0.3 pp -0.1 pp
  • 51. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 50 FLY/DRIVE VISITORS TO FLORIDA BY QUARTER, 2013 This chart shows the percentage of air and non-air visitors to the state by quarter. For example, in Quarter 1, 46.2 percent of Florida’s visitors came to the state by air. FLY AND DRIVE VISITOR VOLUME From 2012 to 2013, domestic visitation rose 2.5 percent, with the greatest increase in Quarter 1. Visitors to Florida by air have increased by 78,000; visitors by car by 1.8 million. As airfares continue to increase, more visitors are choosing to drive here. Highlights • In 2013, the largest share of visitors by air came in Quarter 1. • Auto or non-air visitors to Florida typically dominate in the summer months (Quarter 3). • From 2012 to 2013, drive visitor volume increased in all four quarters. Source: VISIT FLORIDA Partner Tools Air Visitor Profile Drive Visitor Profile Air & Drive SNAPSHOT
  • 52. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 51 AIR AND DRIVE EXPENDITURES YEAR-OVER-YEAR (Including Transportation) This line graph tracks the average expenditures per person per day for fly and drive visitors over five years. With each group, spend has increased from 2011 to 2012. Since 2008, spending by drive visitors increased at a greater rate than air visitors. FLY AND DRIVE VISITOR SPENDING Spending is the highest it has been in five years. No surprise, length of stay has also risen. In 2012, air visitors spent 17 percent more per person per day (not including transportation costs) than drive visitors. While seasonal patterns differ for drive and air visitors, five-year trends show that spending by drive and air visitors is consistent year-over-year. Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates By Quarter Year Over Year Highlights • Average expenditures per person per day for air visitors (not including transportation costs) was $113.50, up 10 percent from 2011. • Average expenditures per person per day for auto visitors (not including transportation costs) was $97.10, up 21 percent from 2011. Partner Tools Air Visitor Profile Drive Visitor Profile Air & Drive SNAPSHOT AIR Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $170 $155 $158 $148 2012 $174 $198 $184 $197 DRIVE Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $109 $108 $98 $95 2012 $124 $126 $119 $131
  • 53. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 52 AIR AND DRIVE EXPENDITURES BY QUARTER 2011 & 2012 PER PERSON PER DAY AVERAGES Q1: January, February, March, Q2: April, May, June, Q3: July, August, September, Q4: October, November, December Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, combined leisure and business travel By Quarter Year Over Year Partner Tools Air Visitor Profile Drive Visitor Profile Air & Drive SNAPSHOT AIR Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $170 $155 $158 $148 2012 $174 $198 $184 $197 DRIVE Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $109 $108 $98 $95 2012 $124 $126 $119 $131 AIR Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $170 $155 $158 $148 2012 $174 $198 $184 $197 DRIVE Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $109 $108 $98 $95 2012 $124 $126 $119 $131 FLY AND DRIVE VISITOR SPENDING Spending is the highest it has been in five years. No surprise, length of stay has also risen. In 2012, air visitors spent 17 percent more per person per day (not including transportation costs) than drive visitors. While seasonal patterns differ for drive and air visitors, five-year trends show that spending by drive and air visitors is consistent year-over-year. Highlights • Average expenditures per person per day for air visitors (not including transportation costs) was $113.50, up 10 percent from 2011. • Average expenditures per person per day for auto visitors (not including transportation costs) was $97.10, up 21 percent from 2011.
  • 54. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 53 Origin States Origin Airports ORIGIN STATES - AIR Florida’s air visitors come primarily from states east of the Mississippi, but also from Texas and California. TOP AIR ORIGIN STATES 2012 Where do Florida’s fly visitors come from? Start with New York, which provides 14 percent of Florida’s visitors who arrive by air. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Rank State FY '10-'11 FY '11-'12 % change 1. New York City* 4,698,700 4,768,000 1.5% 2. Chicago* 1,830,630 1,864,880 1.9% 3. Boston 1,392,550 1,408,520 1.1% 4. Philadelphia 1,348,400 1,311,310 -2.8% 5. Washington, D.C.* 1,244,700 1,296,680 4.2% 6. Detroit* 1,163,910 1,143,810 -1.7% 7. Atlanta 1,133,360 1,134,910 0.1% 8. Baltimore 1,107,910 1,063,650 -4.0% 9. Los Angeles* 891,720 916,140 2.7% 10. Dallas 767,330 784,870 2.3% Highlights • More than one-third of Florida’s air visitors come from the Northeast: New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Connecticut. • Florida’s third-largest air state is California, slightly behind New Jersey, which benefits from the New York metro air lift.
  • 55. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 54 Origin States Origin Airports ORIGIN AIRPORTS In 2012-13, eight of the 10 leading origin airports sent more visitors to Florida than in the previous year. New York City is the clear No.1, sending nearly 5 million visitors, followed by Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia. TOP ORIGIN AIRPORTS 2012 Combined business and leisure Based on airline ticket data, this table represents the number of passengers who flew to Florida from top origin cities. For cities where there is more than one airport in the metro-city area, such as New York City and Chicago, passengers from all local airports are combined. *contains multiple airports Source: UBM Aviation Worldwide, table prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank City CY 2011 CY 2012 % change 1. New York City* 4,784,800 4,805,440 0.4% 2. Chicago* 1,837,290 1,901,700 3.5% 3. Boston 1,419,260 1,407,540 -0.8% 4. Philadelphia 1,335,860 1,304,160 -2.4% 5. Washington, D.C.* 1,267,820 1,278,350 0.8% 6. Atlanta 1,119,560 1,150,160 2.7% 7. Detroit* 1,167,970 1,135,360 -2.8% 8. Baltimore 1,089,090 1,086,600 -0.2% 9. Los Angeles* 913,510 922,540 1.0% 10. Dallas* 795,060 776,390 -2.3% Rank State FY '10-'11 FY '11-'12 % change 1. New York City* 4,698,700 4,768,000 1.5% 2. Chicago* 1,830,630 1,864,880 1.9% 3. Boston 1,392,550 1,408,520 1.1% 4. Philadelphia 1,348,400 1,311,310 -2.8% 5. Washington, D.C.* 1,244,700 1,296,680 4.2% 6. Detroit* 1,163,910 1,143,810 -1.7% 7. Atlanta 1,133,360 1,134,910 0.1% 8. Baltimore 1,107,910 1,063,650 -4.0% 9. Los Angeles* 891,720 916,140 2.7% 10. Dallas 767,330 784,870 2.3% Partner Tools Origin Airports: Outbound Destinations
  • 56. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 55 Destination regions The Central Florida region receives more than 40 percent of Florida’s air visitors, followed by Southeast Florida at nearly 25 percent. Partner Tools Florida Airports: Passenger Origins Destination Regions Destination Airports Rank Airport CY 2011 CY 2012 % Change 1. Orlando 15,970,373 15,817,207 -1.0% 2. Miami 9,871,932 10,029,010 1.6% 3. Fort Lauderdale 9,846,938 9,978,271 1.3% 4. Tampa 8,200,853 8,037,499 -2.0% 5. Fort Myers 3,686,921 3,578,232 -2.9% 6. Palm Beach 2,871,449 2,772,555 -3.4% 7. Jacksonville 2,739,658 2,608,291 -4.8% 8. Pensacola 772,626 758,703 -1.8% 9. Sarasota 644,046 625,399 -2.9% 10. Panama City 433,081 439,183 1.4% 11. Okaloosa 462,623 386,533 -16.4% 12. Tallahassee 317,370 344,262 8.5% 13. Daytona 282,216 298,060 5.6% 14. Melbourne 205,206 214,233 4.4% Total 56,305,292 55,887,438 -0.7 Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Destination Regions
  • 57. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 56 Destination Regions Destination Airports DESTINATION AIRPORTS Four international airports account for more than 75 percent of Florida’s domestic enplanements: Orlando, Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Tampa. TOP DESTINATION AIRPORTS Combined business and leisure This chart shows year-over-year air travel to Florida’s airports. At Orlando International Airport, there were nearly 15.5 million domestic enplanements (people getting on a domestic flight) in 2013, down 2 percent from 2012. Partner Tools Florida Airports: Passenger Origins Rank Airport CY 2011 CY 2012 % Change 1. Orlando 15,970,373 15,817,207 -1.0% 2. Miami 9,871,932 10,029,010 1.6% 3. Fort Lauderdale 9,846,938 9,978,271 1.3% 4. Tampa 8,200,853 8,037,499 -2.0% 5. Fort Myers 3,686,921 3,578,232 -2.9% 6. Palm Beach 2,871,449 2,772,555 -3.4% 7. Jacksonville 2,739,658 2,608,291 -4.8% 8. Pensacola 772,626 758,703 -1.8% 9. Sarasota 644,046 625,399 -2.9% 10. Panama City 433,081 439,183 1.4% 11. Okaloosa 462,623 386,533 -16.4% 12. Tallahassee 317,370 344,262 8.5% 13. Daytona 282,216 298,060 5.6% 14. Melbourne 205,206 214,233 4.4% Total 56,305,292 55,887,438 -0.7 Rank Airport CY 2012 CY 2013 % Change 1. Orlando 15,817,207 15,479,193 -2.1% 2. Miami 10,029,010 10,164,785 1.4% 3. Fort Lauderdale 9,978,271 9,949,181 -0.3% 4. Tampa 8,034,999 8,237,630 2.5% 5. Fort Myers 3,578,232 3,730,517 4.3% 6. Palm Beach 2,772,555 2,802,859 1.1% 7. Jacksonville 2,608,291 2,563,236 -1.7% 8. Orlando Sanford 830,706 814,868 -1.9% 9. Pensacola 758,703 756,042 -0.4% 10. Sarasota 625,399 579,944 -7.3% 11. St.Petersburg-Clearwater 415,221 495,509 19.3% 12. Panama City 439,183 406,082 -7.5% 13. Key West 374,184 401,660 7.3% 14. Okaloosa 386,533 370,261 -4.2% 15. Tallahassee 344,262 346,612 0.7% 16. Daytona 298,060 303,310 1.8% 17. Melbourne 214,233 212,228 -0.9% Total 57,505,049 57,613,917 0.2% Source: Figures come from individual airports.
  • 58. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 57 Air Origin Trends Air Destination Trends AIR ORIGIN TRENDS Origin states for air visitors are predominantly in the Northeast and California. New York is first, followed by New Jersey, California, Illinois and Massachusetts. TOP ORIGIN STATES OVER FIVE YEARS This graph shows the share of Florida’s air visitors by origin state. In 2012, 14 percent of Florida’s air visitors came from the state of New York. Highlights • New York and New Jersey are the top origin states for air visitors to Florida. • Georgia, which is Florida’s strongest drive state, also is a top 10 fly state. • California experienced the largest increase, while Michigan had the biggest decline in air visitors. • The share of air visitors from Massachusetts (predominantly Logan airport) to Florida is the highest it has been in five years. *Percentage point Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 New York 14.9% 14.7% 11.3% 13.9% 14.0% +0.1 pp -0.9 pp New Jersey 8.8% 5.8% 6.4% 6.1% 7.1% +1.0 pp -1.7 pp California 7.3% 7.2% 7.3% 5.7% 7.0% +1.3 pp -0.3 pp Illinois 6.1% 6.9% 8.6% 6.4% 6.9% +0.5 pp +0.8 pp Massachusetts 4.0% 4.5% 4.5% 5.2% 5.9% +0.7 pp +1.9 pp Pennsylvania 4.1% 4.9% 5.4% 5.9% 5.3% -0.6 pp +1.2 pp Texas 5.4% 4.6% 6.0% 5.8% 5.0% -0.8 pp -0.4 pp Ohio 6.5% 4.2% 3.7% 4.2% 4.3% +0.1 pp -2.2 pp Connecticut 2.9% 3.6% 1.7% 3.5% 3.8% +0.3 pp +0.9 pp Georgia 2.4% 2.4% 3.4% 2.4% 3.6% +1.2 pp +1.2 pp Michigan 4.2% 3.2% 4.6% 4.9% 3.5% -1.4 pp -0.7 pp Virginia 2.8% 3.5% 4.7% 4.0% 3.3% -0.7 pp +0.5 pp Partner Tools Origin Airports: OUTBOUND DESTINATIONS State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 New York 14.9% 14.7% 11.3% 13.9% 14.0% +0.1 pp -0.9 pp New Jersey 8.8% 5.8% 6.4% 6.1% 7.1% +1.0 pp -1.7 pp California 7.3% 7.2% 7.3% 5.7% 7.0% +1.3 pp -0.3 pp Illinois 6.1% 6.9% 8.6% 6.4% 6.9% +0.5 pp +0.8 pp Massachusetts 4.0% 4.5% 4.5% 5.2% 5.9% +0.7 pp +1.9 pp Pennsylvania 4.1% 4.9% 5.4% 5.9% 5.3% -0.6 pp +1.2 pp Texas 5.4% 4.6% 6.0% 5.8% 5.0% -0.8 pp -0.4 pp Ohio 6.5% 4.2% 3.7% 4.2% 4.3% +0.1 pp -2.2 pp Connecticut 2.9% 3.6% 1.7% 3.5% 3.8% +0.3 pp +0.9 pp Georgia 2.4% 2.4% 3.4% 2.4% 3.6% +1.2 pp +1.2 pp Michigan 4.2% 3.2% 4.6% 4.9% 3.5% -1.4 pp -0.7 pp Virginia 2.8% 3.5% 4.7% 4.0% 3.3% -0.7 pp +0.5 pp County 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 36.7% 36.9% 37.5% 42.7% 40.5% -2.2 pp +3.8 pp Southeast 26.5% 26.5% 25.9% 26.6% 24.9% -1.7 pp -1.6 pp Central West 12.8% 15.2% 14.3% 11.3% 13.3% +2.0 pp +0.5 pp Southwest 10.0% 10.6% 10.0% 8.7% 9.4% +0.7 pp -0.6 pp Central East 6.6% 5.2% 5.3% 5.4% 5.1% -0.3 pp -1.5 pp Northeast 4.2% 3.4% 4.4% 2.3% 3.8% +1.5 pp -0.4 pp Northwest 2.3% 1.5% 1.8% 2.1% 2.4% +0.3 pp +0.1 pp North Central 0.9% 0.7% 0.8% 0.9% 0.7% -0.2 pp -0.2 pp
  • 59. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 58 Air Origin Trends Air Destination Trends AIR DESTINATION TRENDS The share of air visitors to Florida regions has changed little in the past five years. The Central and Southeast vacation regions account for more than 60 percent of Florida’s domestic air visitors. DESTINATION regions OVER FIVE YEARS This graph shows the pattern of air visitor travel to different Florida regions during the past five years. From 2008 through 2012, the Central Florida region had nearly a four percentage point increase in their share of Florida’s air visitors. Highlights • The Central vacation region’s share of air visitors has been the largest for more than 16 years. • Year-over-year, the Central West vacation region had the largest increase in share of air visitors, up two points from the year before. *Percentage point Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Partner Tools Florida Airports: Passenger Origins Region 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 36.7% 36.9% 37.5% 42.7% 40.5% -2.2 pp +3.8 pp Southeast 26.5% 26.5% 25.9% 26.6% 24.9% -1.7 pp -1.6 pp Central West 12.8% 15.2% 14.3% 11.3% 13.3% +2.0 pp +0.5 pp Southwest 10.0% 10.6% 10.0% 8.7% 9.4% +0.7 pp -0.6 pp Central East 6.6% 5.2% 5.3% 5.4% 5.1% -0.3 pp -1.5 pp Northeast 4.2% 3.4% 4.4% 2.3% 3.8% +1.5 pp -0.4 pp Northwest 2.3% 1.5% 1.8% 2.1% 2.4% +0.3 pp +0.1 pp North Central 0.9% 0.7% 0.8% 0.9% 0.7% -0.2 pp -0.2 pp County 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 36.7% 36.9% 37.5% 42.7% 40.5% -2.2 pp +3.8 pp Southeast 26.5% 26.5% 25.9% 26.6% 24.9% -1.7 pp -1.6 pp Central West 12.8% 15.2% 14.3% 11.3% 13.3% +2.0 pp +0.5 pp Southwest 10.0% 10.6% 10.0% 8.7% 9.4% +0.7 pp -0.6 pp Central East 6.6% 5.2% 5.3% 5.4% 5.1% -0.3 pp -1.5 pp Northeast 4.2% 3.4% 4.4% 2.3% 3.8% +1.5 pp -0.4 pp Northwest 2.3% 1.5% 1.8% 2.1% 2.4% +0.3 pp +0.1 pp North Central 0.9% 0.7% 0.8% 0.9% 0.7% -0.2 pp -0.2 pp State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 New York 14.9% 14.7% 11.3% 13.9% 14.0% +0.1 pp -0.9 pp New Jersey 8.8% 5.8% 6.4% 6.1% 7.1% +1.0 pp -1.7 pp California 7.3% 7.2% 7.3% 5.7% 7.0% +1.3 pp -0.3 pp Illinois 6.1% 6.9% 8.6% 6.4% 6.9% +0.5 pp +0.8 pp Massachusetts 4.0% 4.5% 4.5% 5.2% 5.9% +0.7 pp +1.9 pp Pennsylvania 4.1% 4.9% 5.4% 5.9% 5.3% -0.6 pp +1.2 pp Texas 5.4% 4.6% 6.0% 5.8% 5.0% -0.8 pp -0.4 pp Ohio 6.5% 4.2% 3.7% 4.2% 4.3% +0.1 pp -2.2 pp Connecticut 2.9% 3.6% 1.7% 3.5% 3.8% +0.3 pp +0.9 pp Georgia 2.4% 2.4% 3.4% 2.4% 3.6% +1.2 pp +1.2 pp Michigan 4.2% 3.2% 4.6% 4.9% 3.5% -1.4 pp -0.7 pp Virginia 2.8% 3.5% 4.7% 4.0% 3.3% -0.7 pp +0.5 pp
  • 60. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 59 Drive Origin States Feeder Highways ORIGIN STATES - DRIVE No surprise, the majority of Florida’s drive visitors originate from the closest markets east of the Mississippi. However, Texas is an outlier, contributing more than 6 percent. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Highlights • Drive visitors typically have larger travel parties than air visitors – 2.3 people versus 1.9. • New York ranked third for drive visitors to Florida in 2012, a significant increase from the year before. • Georgia and Alabama contribute nearly one-quarter of Florida’s drive visitors. • Prior to the Deepwater Horizon event, South Carolina ranked among the top 10 drive states. Since then, drive visitors from South Carolina declined and have not rebounded. TOP DRIVE ORIGIN STATES, 2012 Where do Florida’s drive visitors come from? Start with Georgia, which provides nearly 17 percent of Florida’s drive visitors. Partner Tools Drive Visitor Profile Drive States Visitor Profiles Drive State Comparison
  • 61. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 60 Drive Origin States Feeder Highways Primary Feeder Highways This map identifies the primary feeder highways that connect top drive states to Florida. Top drive origin states are identified with each highway. I-75 / I-65 AL, GA, TN, KY, MO, OH I-95 GA, NC, SC, VA I-10 AL, LA, MS, TX Highlights • Florida’s drive markets are concentrated – 40 percent come from five states. • Drive visitors typically have larger travel parties than air visitors with approximately 4 of 10 travel parties representing couples and 2 of 10 representing families. • New York state historically has been a much weaker drive origin market, falling in the sixth or seventh position. In 2012, New York joined the top three. Partner Tools Drive Visitor Profile Drive States Visitor Profiles Drive State Comparison ORIGIN STATES - DRIVE No surprise, the majority of Florida’s drive visitors originate from the closest markets east of the Mississippi. However, Texas is an outlier, contributing more than 6 percent.
  • 62. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 61 Destination Regions Destination Regions by State DESTINATION Regions Florida’s drive visitors predominantly travel to the Central and Northwest vacation regions. Summer is the most popular season for drive visitors, 94 percent of whom are traveling for leisure purposes. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Highlights • The Central Vacation region received more than a quarter of Florida’s drive visitors. • More than one-fifth of Florida’s drive visitors go to the Northwest Region. AL, IN, KY, LA, MS, MO, TN & TX GA NC & SC ALL states feed Central Florida SC NC SC & VA OH destination regions
  • 63. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 62 Destination Regions Destination Regions by State DESTINATION Regions Preliminary numbers for 2013 indicate 57 percent of domestic visitors drove to Florida. Origin states on the East Coast tend to choose destinations on the east coast of Florida. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates AL, IN, KY, LA, MS, MO, TN, TX GA NC, SC ALL states feed Central Florida SC NC SC, VA OH REGIONS FOR DIFFERENT DRIVE ORIGIN STATES This chart shows Florida regions as destinations for different drive origin states. Partner Tools Drive State Comparison AL, IN, KY, LA, MS, MO, TN, TX GA NC, SC ALL states feed Central Florida SC NC SC, VA OH
  • 64. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 63 Top Drive Market Origin States for Drive Travelers Top Destination Regions for Drive Travelers ORIGIN TRENDS Top origin states for drive visitors to Florida have remained consistent the past several years. The top states are within 13 hours driving distance to Florida, with the exception of New York. As volume has grown from other drive origin states, Georgia’s share has declined, even though the actual number of Georgia visitors increased. Highlights • Drive visitors to Florida arrive from the Southeast and Midwest states, with the two outliers being New York and Texas. • Nearly 40 percent of Florida’s drive visitors come from Georgia, Alabama, Texas, North Carolina and Tennessee. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates TOP ORIGIN DRIVE STATES OVER FIVE YEARS This graph shows the share of Florida’s drive visitors by origin state. In 2012, 16.6 percent of Florida’s drive visitors came from Georgia. State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Georgia 20.2% 21.4% 18.9% 16.8% 16.6% -0.2 pp -3.6 pp Alabama 6.3% 10.5% 7.2% 6.6% 7.8% +1.2 pp +1.5 pp New York 4.3% 5.2% 4.5% 5.3% 7.5% +2.2 pp +3.2 pp Texas 3.6% 4.5% 4.0% 5.6% 6.2% +0.6 pp +2.6 pp North Carolina 6.8% 5.3% 6.9% 5.5% 4.5% -1.0 pp -2.3 pp Tennessee 5.6% 3.2% 5.2% 5.4% 4.2% -1.2 pp -1.4 pp Illinois 2.9% 4.9% 3.9% 5.0% 3.9% -1.1 pp +1.0 pp Ohio 3.8% 4.2% 4.9% 5.8% 3.8% -2.0 pp 0.0 pp Virginia 3.1% 3.8% 2.6% 3.4% 3.8% +0.4 pp +0.7 pp Michigan 2.7% 2.5% 4.9% 4.1% 3.7% -0.4 pp +1.0 pp Louisiana 4.6% 3.1% 3.4% 2.0% 3.7% +1.7 pp -0.9 pp Mississippi 3.0% 3.0% 1.4% 1.9% 3.4% +1.5 pp +0.4 pp South Carolina 5.9% 6.0% 6.6% 2.9% 3.4% +0.5 pp -2.5 pp State 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 pp* change '11/'10 pp* change '11/'07 Georgia 18.5% 20.2% 21.4% 18.9% 16.8% -2.1 pp -1.7 pp Alabama 6.6% 6.3% 10.5% 7.2% 6.6% -0.6 pp +/- 0.0 pp Texas 4.5% 3.6% 4.5% 4.0% 5.6% +1.6 pp +1.1 pp North Carolina 4.4% 6.8% 5.3% 6.9% 5.5% -1.4 pp +1.1 pp Tennessee 5.4% 5.6% 3.2% 5.2% 5.4% +0.2 pp +/- 0.0 pp New York 7.2% 4.3% 5.2% 4.5% 5.3% +0.8 pp -1.9 pp Illinois 5.7% 2.9% 4.9% 3.9% 5.0% +1.1 pp -0.7 pp Ohio 4.6% 3.8% 4.2% 4.9% 4.8% -0.1 pp +/- 0.2 pp Michigan 3.3% 2.7% 2.5% 4.9% 4.1% -0.8 pp +0.8 pp Virginia 4.8% 3.1% 3.8% 2.6% 3.4% +0.8 pp -1.4 pp New Jersey 2.6% 3.4% 3.0% 3.6% 3.0% -0.6 pp +0.4 pp South Carolina 5.0% 5.9% 6.0% 6.6% 2.9% -3.7 pp -2.1 pp Partner Tools Drive State PROFILES Region 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 34.0% 30.5% 27.7% 29.6% 26.3% -3.3 pp -7.7 pp Northwest 19.6% 18.1% 19.5% 19.5% 21.7% +2.2 pp +2.1 pp Southeast 11.6% 9.9% 9.4% 12.0% 12.6% +0.6 pp +1.0 pp Central West 10.5% 9.9% 12.0% 9.8% 10.7% +0.9 pp +0.2 pp Northeast 8.4% 9.7% 10.7% 8.7% 8.6% -0.1 pp +0.2 pp Central East 7.7% 11.2% 8.9% 9.5% 8.5% -1.0 pp +0.8 pp Southwest 5.8% 7.9% 8.5% 7.9% 6.6% -1.3 pp +0.8 pp North Central 2.4% 2.9% 3.3% 3.0% 5.1% +2.1 pp +2.7 pp
  • 65. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 64 DESTINATION TRENDS The top Florida destination regions for auto visitors are Central and Northwest. Highlights • The North destination region receives more than a third of Florida’s auto visitors; 94 percent of these travelers are leisure visitors. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Top Drive Market Origin States for Drive Travelers Top Destination Regions for Drive Travelers TOP DESTINATION regions OVER FIVE YEARS Combined business and leisure (2008-2012) This table shows the share of drive visitors by vacation regions. For example, the Central vacation region draws the greatest share of Florida’s drive visitors (26%) followed closely by the Northwest vacation region (22%). Region 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 34.0% 30.5% 27.7% 29.6% 26.3% -3.3 pp -7.7 pp Northwest 19.6% 18.1% 19.5% 19.5% 21.7% +2.2 pp +2.1 pp Southeast 11.6% 9.9% 9.4% 12.0% 12.6% +0.6 pp +1.0 pp Central West 10.5% 9.9% 12.0% 9.8% 10.7% +0.9 pp +0.2 pp Northeast 8.4% 9.7% 10.7% 8.7% 8.6% -0.1 pp +0.2 pp Central East 7.7% 11.2% 8.9% 9.5% 8.5% -1.0 pp +0.8 pp Southwest 5.8% 7.9% 8.5% 7.9% 6.6% -1.3 pp +0.8 pp North Central 2.4% 2.9% 3.3% 3.0% 5.1% +2.1 pp +2.7 pp Region 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 34.0% 30.5% 27.7% 29.6% 26.3% -3.3 pp -7.7 pp Northwest 19.6% 18.1% 19.5% 19.5% 21.7% +2.2 pp +2.1 pp Southeast 11.6% 9.9% 9.4% 12.0% 12.6% +0.6 pp +1.0 pp Central West 10.5% 9.9% 12.0% 9.8% 10.7% +0.9 pp +0.2 pp Northeast 8.4% 9.7% 10.7% 8.7% 8.6% -0.1 pp +0.2 pp Central East 7.7% 11.2% 8.9% 9.5% 8.5% -1.0 pp +0.8 pp Southwest 5.8% 7.9% 8.5% 7.9% 6.6% -1.3 pp +0.8 pp North Central 2.4% 2.9% 3.3% 3.0% 5.1% +2.1 pp +2.7 pp State 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 pp* change '11/'10 pp* change '11/'07 Georgia 18.5% 20.2% 21.4% 18.9% 16.8% -2.1 pp -1.7 pp Alabama 6.6% 6.3% 10.5% 7.2% 6.6% -0.6 pp +/- 0.0 pp Texas 4.5% 3.6% 4.5% 4.0% 5.6% +1.6 pp +1.1 pp North Carolina 4.4% 6.8% 5.3% 6.9% 5.5% -1.4 pp +1.1 pp Tennessee 5.4% 5.6% 3.2% 5.2% 5.4% +0.2 pp +/- 0.0 pp New York 7.2% 4.3% 5.2% 4.5% 5.3% +0.8 pp -1.9 pp Illinois 5.7% 2.9% 4.9% 3.9% 5.0% +1.1 pp -0.7 pp Ohio 4.6% 3.8% 4.2% 4.9% 4.8% -0.1 pp +/- 0.2 pp Michigan 3.3% 2.7% 2.5% 4.9% 4.1% -0.8 pp +0.8 pp Virginia 4.8% 3.1% 3.8% 2.6% 3.4% +0.8 pp -1.4 pp New Jersey 2.6% 3.4% 3.0% 3.6% 3.0% -0.6 pp +0.4 pp South Carolina 5.0% 5.9% 6.0% 6.6% 2.9% -3.7 pp -2.1 pp
  • 66. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 65 VISITOR VOLUME BY LIFESTAGE SEGMENT Florida’s 79 million-plus domestic visitors represent a diverse portfolio of gender, generational cohorts, income levels, family composition and ethnicities. Florida tracks visitor volume, spend and other patterns by lifestage segmentation. Lifestage categories combine three variables (age, household income, and the presence of children in the household) to create seven segments that are most likely to differentiate visitors. Definitions • Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) • Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) • Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) • Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) • Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) • Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$99K; no kids) • Affluent Mature (55 or older; $100K+, no kids) All Lifestages Visitor Volume By: Generational Composition Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates LIFESTAGE SEGMENT COMPOSITION COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows the share of domestic visitors to Florida by lifestage. 14 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors are in the Young & Free lifestage, which means they are ages 18-34 with no kids in the household. Family Composition Affluent Mature 14% Young & Free 14% Young Family 12% Maturing & Free 17% Affluent Family 18% Moderate Mature 17% Moderate Family 8% Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT
  • 67. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 66 GENERATIONAL COMPOSITION Florida’s visitors span the generations. While Boomers (born 1946-1964) and Generation X (born 1965-1980) traditionally have had the largest share of Florida visitors, Millennial visitation is on the rise, especially as Millennials become more independent and start their own families. All Lifestages Visitor Volume By: Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates VISITOR VOLUME BY GENERATIONAL COHORT COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows the breakout of each lifestage by generation. For example, the bar at the far left representing the Young & Free Lifestage shows that 90 percent of those in that lifestage belong to the Millennial generation (born 1981 or after).Generational Composition Family Composition Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT Definitions • Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) • Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) • Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) • Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) • Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) • Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$99K; no kids) • Affluent Mature (55 or older; $100K+, no kids)
  • 68. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 67 All Lifestages Visitor Volume By: Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates FAMILY / NON-FAMILY COMPOSITION Florida is recognized globally as a family vacation destination, but only one-third of Florida’s 79 million domestic visitors actually come with their families. The remaining 62 percent of Sunshine State visitors are non-family visitors who make frequent trips to the state and take shorter getaways. Highlights By Family Composition: • Three lifestages include children at home: Young Family, Moderate Family and Affluent Family. These groups account for 38 percent of Florida’s visitors. • Affluent Family, Young & Free and Affluent Mature lifestages all have experienced growth in the past five years. VISITOR VOLUME BY FAMILY COMPOSITION COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows that in 2012, Non-Family Lifestages (those with no children in the household) made up 62 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors. Generational Composition Family Composition Non-Family 62% Family 38% Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT
  • 69. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 68 All Lifestages Visitor Volume By: Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates VISITOR VOLUME BY AGE Florida attracts visitors from across the age spectrum, creating a mix of interests and budgets to fuel Sunshine State tourism. The largest portion of domestic visitors comes from the 35-54 age groups, and the average age of the Florida visitor is 46. Millennials (those under 30) represent 23 percent of overnight travel in the U.S. compared to 21 percent in Florida. Highlights • Among a well-balanced mix of ages, 35-to 54-year-olds make up the greatest portion of Florida’s visitors. • For both Florida and U.S. travelers, the 35-54 age group is the largest segment. This age represents 38 percent of U.S. overnight travel and 42 percent of Florida’s visitors. Generational Composition Family Composition VISITOR VOLUME BY AGE COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows that in 2012, the Mature Lifestages (55 and older) account for more than a third of Florida’s domestic visitors. Ages 55+ 34% Ages 18-34 25% Ages 35-54 42% Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT
  • 70. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 69 Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates VISITOR SPEND BY LIFESTAGE In order to measure spending by different lifestages, the total trip value is considered, including party size and length of stay. No surprise, trip values are highest for the Affluent Family and the Affluent Mature lifestages. Trip Value: Definition Trip Value is the average amount spent during a Florida visit. To arrive at the numbers in the bar chart, multiply the average expenditure per person per day by the average length of stay and average travel party size. Here’s the calculation for the Affluent Family: $162.32 X 5.05 days X 2.9 persons = $2,377. FLORIDA TRIP VALUE BY LIFESTAGE COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows that in 2012, the Affluent Family lifestage had the greatest trip value compared to all other lifestages. Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT
  • 71. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 70 VISITOR VOLUME TRENDS 69 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors are from Generation X and the Boomer generation. In the past five years, the share of visitors from the Millennial generation has increased 12 percentage points – more than for any other generation. This is mostly a result of the growing share of this demographic that has the means to travel. VOLUME BY GENERATION OVER FIVE YEARS This table breaks out Florida’s visitors by generational cohort. Over the past five years, Millennial visitors to Florida have increased the most. Generational Age Income Lifestage 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Millennials (1981 to present) 9% 11% 15% 16% 21% +5 pp +12 pp GenX (1965-1980) 39% 40% 36% 36% 30% -6 pp -9 pp Boomers (1946 -1964) 36% 35% 35% 35% 39% +4 pp +3 pp Silent/GI (1945 or earlier) 16% 14% 13% 13% 10% -2 pp -6 pp * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 18 - 34 Years Old 28% 28% 28% 25% 25% +/- 0 pp -3 pp 35 - 49 Years Old 32% 33% 30% 34% 30% -4 pp -2 pp 50 - 64 Years Old 28% 26% 28% 26% 29% +3 pp +1 pp 65+ Years Old 12% 13% 13% 15% 16% +1 pp +4 pp Average Age 46.0 45.7 45.9 46.4 46.9 -- -- Median Age 45.0 44.0 45.0 45.0 47.0 -- -- 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) 12% 14% 15% 14% 14% 0 pp +2 pp Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) 17% 15% 14% 12% 12% 0 pp -5 pp Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) 19% 20% 22% 18% 17% -1 pp -2 pp Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) 8% 9% 6% 10% 8% -2 pp 0 pp Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) 16% 16% 17% 18% 18% 0 pp +2 pp Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$60K; no kids) 16% 15% 16% 17% 17% 0 pp +1 pp Affluent Mature (55 or older; $60K+, no kids) 12% 11% 11% 11% 14% +3 pp +2 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Millennials (1981 to present) 9% 11% 15% 16% 21% +5 pp +12 pp GenX (1965-1980) 39% 40% 36% 36% 30% -6 pp -9 pp Boomers (1946 -1964) 36% 35% 35% 35% 39% +4 pp +3 pp Silent/GI (1945 or earlier) 16% 14% 13% 13% 10% -2 pp -6 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Under $49,999 23% 24% 20% 26% 25% -1 pp +2 pp $50,000-$74,999 20% 19% 18% 20% 18% -2 pp -2 pp $75,000-$99,999 18% 16% 18% 16% 17% +1 pp -1 pp $100,000-$149,999 28% 28% 31% 25% 20% -5 pp -8 pp $150,000-$199,999 7% 9% 7% 8% 12% +4 pp +5 pp $200,000+ 5% 5% 5% 5% 7% +2 pp +3 pp Average $96,700 $97,600 $101,500 $95,400 $111,300 --- ---
  • 72. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 71 VOLUME BY LIFESTAGE OVER FIVE YEARS This table breaks out Florida’s visitors by lifestage segment. Over the past five years, the share of Florida’s visitors belonging to the Affluent Mature Lifestage has increased. Generational Age Income Lifestage VISITOR VOLUME TRENDS In the past five years, visits to Florida by different lifestage segments has remained relatively stable. While Florida remains a popular destination for families, nearly 62 percent of domestic visitors do not have children in the household. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) 12% 14% 15% 14% 14% 0 pp +2 pp Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) 17% 15% 14% 12% 12% 0 pp -5 pp Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) 19% 20% 22% 18% 17% -1 pp -2 pp Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) 8% 9% 6% 10% 8% -2 pp 0 pp Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) 16% 16% 17% 18% 18% 0 pp +2 pp Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$99K; no kids) 16% 15% 16% 17% 17% 0 pp +1 pp Affluent Mature (55 or older; $100K+, no kids) 12% 11% 11% 11% 14% +3 pp +2 pp Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 18 - 34 Years Old 28% 28% 28% 25% 25% +/- 0 pp -3 pp 35 - 49 Years Old 32% 33% 30% 34% 30% -4 pp -2 pp 50 - 64 Years Old 28% 26% 28% 26% 29% +3 pp +1 pp 65+ Years Old 12% 13% 13% 15% 16% +1 pp +4 pp Average Age 46.0 45.7 45.9 46.4 46.9 -- -- Median Age 45.0 44.0 45.0 45.0 47.0 -- -- 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) 12% 14% 15% 14% 14% 0 pp +2 pp Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) 17% 15% 14% 12% 12% 0 pp -5 pp Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) 19% 20% 22% 18% 17% -1 pp -2 pp Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) 8% 9% 6% 10% 8% -2 pp 0 pp Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) 16% 16% 17% 18% 18% 0 pp +2 pp Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$60K; no kids) 16% 15% 16% 17% 17% 0 pp +1 pp Affluent Mature (55 or older; $60K+, no kids) 12% 11% 11% 11% 14% +3 pp +2 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Millennials (1981 to present) 9% 11% 15% 16% 21% +5 pp +12 pp GenX (1965-1980) 39% 40% 36% 36% 30% -6 pp -9 pp Boomers (1946 -1964) 36% 35% 35% 35% 39% +4 pp +3 pp Silent/GI (1945 or earlier) 16% 14% 13% 13% 10% -2 pp -6 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Under $49,999 23% 24% 20% 26% 25% -1 pp +2 pp $50,000-$74,999 20% 19% 18% 20% 18% -2 pp -2 pp $75,000-$99,999 18% 16% 18% 16% 17% +1 pp -1 pp $100,000-$149,999 28% 28% 31% 25% 20% -5 pp -8 pp $150,000-$199,999 7% 9% 7% 8% 12% +4 pp +5 pp $200,000+ 5% 5% 5% 5% 7% +2 pp +3 pp Average $96,700 $97,600 $101,500 $95,400 $111,300 --- ---
  • 73. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 72 VISITOR AGE The average visitor age has increased since 2009, prompting a bump in the percentage of visitors older than 50. Meanwhile, the shares of visitors aged 35 to 49 decreased two percentage points and visitors 18 to 34 decreased three percentage points. volume by age over five years This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors over 50 years old was 45 percent in 2012, up four percentage points since 2011. Generational Age Income Lifestage Highlights • According to Census data, in the first decade of the 21st century the median age rose from 35.3 to 37.2. • Historically, the average age of Florida’s visitors falls in the mid-40s and has been increasing year over year. • Visitors 50 years and older make up 45 percent of Florida’s visitors; up 5 percentage points from 2008. 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 18 - 34 Years Old 28% 28% 28% 25% 25% +/- 0 pp -3 pp 35 - 49 Years Old 32% 33% 30% 34% 30% -4 pp -2 pp 50 - 64 Years Old 28% 26% 28% 26% 29% +3 pp +1 pp 65+ Years Old 12% 13% 13% 15% 16% +1 pp +4 pp Average Age 46.0 45.7 45.9 46.4 46.9 -- -- Median Age 45.0 44.0 45.0 45.0 47.0 -- -- * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 18 - 34 Years Old 28% 28% 28% 25% 25% +/- 0 pp -3 pp 35 - 49 Years Old 32% 33% 30% 34% 30% -4 pp -2 pp 50 - 64 Years Old 28% 26% 28% 26% 29% +3 pp +1 pp 65+ Years Old 12% 13% 13% 15% 16% +1 pp +4 pp Average Age 46.0 45.7 45.9 46.4 46.9 -- -- Median Age 45.0 44.0 45.0 45.0 47.0 -- -- 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) 12% 14% 15% 14% 14% 0 pp +2 pp Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) 17% 15% 14% 12% 12% 0 pp -5 pp Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) 19% 20% 22% 18% 17% -1 pp -2 pp Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) 8% 9% 6% 10% 8% -2 pp 0 pp Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) 16% 16% 17% 18% 18% 0 pp +2 pp Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$60K; no kids) 16% 15% 16% 17% 17% 0 pp +1 pp Affluent Mature (55 or older; $60K+, no kids) 12% 11% 11% 11% 14% +3 pp +2 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Millennials (1981 to present) 9% 11% 15% 16% 21% +5 pp +12 pp GenX (1965-1980) 39% 40% 36% 36% 30% -6 pp -9 pp Boomers (1946 -1964) 36% 35% 35% 35% 39% +4 pp +3 pp Silent/GI (1945 or earlier) 16% 14% 13% 13% 10% -2 pp -6 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Under $49,999 23% 24% 20% 26% 25% -1 pp +2 pp $50,000-$74,999 20% 19% 18% 20% 18% -2 pp -2 pp $75,000-$99,999 18% 16% 18% 16% 17% +1 pp -1 pp $100,000-$149,999 28% 28% 31% 25% 20% -5 pp -8 pp $150,000-$199,999 7% 9% 7% 8% 12% +4 pp +5 pp $200,000+ 5% 5% 5% 5% 7% +2 pp +3 pp Average $96,700 $97,600 $101,500 $95,400 $111,300 --- ---
  • 74. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 73 HOUSEHOLD INCOME In a dramatic year-over-year shift, the average household income of Florida visitors reached a record high in 2012 with nearly one-fifth of Florida’s visitors earning more than $150,000. Between 2011 and 2012, Florida’s share of visitors with household incomes below $75,000 declined. FIVE-YEAR TRENDS This chart shows the share of Florida visitors by household income. It illustrates the increase Florida experienced in 2012 of those whose income was over $150,000. Generational Age Income Lifestage Highlights • In 2012, the average household income of domestic visitors to Florida was $111,300, up 17 percent from 2011 and the highest income level in more than five years. • 2012 marked a six-point increase in visitors whose household income was greater than $150,000. • Those visitors with household incomes under $75,000 declined three percentage points from 2011 to 2012. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Under $49,999 23% 24% 20% 26% 25% -1 pp +2 pp $50,000-$74,999 20% 19% 18% 20% 18% -2 pp -2 pp $75,000-$99,999 18% 16% 18% 16% 17% +1 pp -1 pp $100,000-$149,999 28% 28% 31% 25% 20% -5 pp -8 pp $150,000-$199,999 7% 9% 7% 8% 12% +4 pp +5 pp $200,000+ 5% 5% 5% 5% 7% +2 pp +3 pp Average $96,700 $97,600 $101,500 $95,400 $111,300 --- --- Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 18 - 34 Years Old 28% 28% 28% 25% 25% +/- 0 pp -3 pp 35 - 49 Years Old 32% 33% 30% 34% 30% -4 pp -2 pp 50 - 64 Years Old 28% 26% 28% 26% 29% +3 pp +1 pp 65+ Years Old 12% 13% 13% 15% 16% +1 pp +4 pp Average Age 46.0 45.7 45.9 46.4 46.9 -- -- Median Age 45.0 44.0 45.0 45.0 47.0 -- -- 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) 12% 14% 15% 14% 14% 0 pp +2 pp Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) 17% 15% 14% 12% 12% 0 pp -5 pp Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) 19% 20% 22% 18% 17% -1 pp -2 pp Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) 8% 9% 6% 10% 8% -2 pp 0 pp Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) 16% 16% 17% 18% 18% 0 pp +2 pp Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$60K; no kids) 16% 15% 16% 17% 17% 0 pp +1 pp Affluent Mature (55 or older; $60K+, no kids) 12% 11% 11% 11% 14% +3 pp +2 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Millennials (1981 to present) 9% 11% 15% 16% 21% +5 pp +12 pp GenX (1965-1980) 39% 40% 36% 36% 30% -6 pp -9 pp Boomers (1946 -1964) 36% 35% 35% 35% 39% +4 pp +3 pp Silent/GI (1945 or earlier) 16% 14% 13% 13% 10% -2 pp -6 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Under $49,999 23% 24% 20% 26% 25% -1 pp +2 pp $50,000-$74,999 20% 19% 18% 20% 18% -2 pp -2 pp $75,000-$99,999 18% 16% 18% 16% 17% +1 pp -1 pp $100,000-$149,999 28% 28% 31% 25% 20% -5 pp -8 pp $150,000-$199,999 7% 9% 7% 8% 12% +4 pp +5 pp $200,000+ 5% 5% 5% 5% 7% +2 pp +3 pp Average $96,700 $97,600 $101,500 $95,400 $111,300 --- ---
  • 75. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 74 PRIMARY REASON FOR TRAVEL 90 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors come for leisure. Within that 90 percent, the top two reasons people travel to Florida are: a vacation (37 percent); or to visit friends and relatives (VFR) who live in the Sunshine State (26 percent). Business travelers contribute 10 percent of the visitor mix. VISITOR TRIP PURPOSE Visitors who came to Florida for a general vacation made up 37 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors. Source: D.K. Shifflet and Associates General Vacation 37% Visit Friends / Relatives 26% Business 10% Special Event 8% Getaway Weekend 11% Other Leisure/Personal 8% Partner Tools VFR PROFILE
  • 76. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 75 VISITOR PROFILE BASED ON TRIP PURPOSE Visitors to Florida come for a variety of reasons, and spending patterns vary based on the reason for travel. Business visitors tend to spend the most ($238 per day) but take shorter trips. Visitors seeing friends and family spend the least per day, but more of their dollars go LEISURE, BUSINESS AND VFR SPEND TRAVEL PROFILE to food, entertainment and shopping experiences, making this visitor important to Florida restaurants, merchants and attractions. General leisure travelers spend $140 per day (up 20 percent from 2011). Partner Tools VFR PROFILE Leisure VFR* Business Percentage of Total Domestic Visitation 90% 26%** 10% Per Day Spend $140 $95* $238 Avg Length of Stay 4.5 nights 4.5 nights 3.2 nights Paid Accommodations 65% 22% 91% Avg Party Size 2.3 1.9 1.5 Leading Season Summer (33%) Winter & Summer (27%) Fall (30%) Origin States Georgia (12%) New York (9%) Illinois (6%) New York (12%) Georgia (10%) North Carolina (6%) ) New York (15%) Georgia (12%) California (6%) *VFR (visit friends and relatives) visitors typically inspire increased entertainment and travel spending by their resident hosts – spending that is not reflected in the average per-day spend. **VFR percentage is also included within the 90 percent leisure.
  • 77. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 76 TRIP PURPOSE TRENDS The majority of Florida’s visitors come for a vacation, a fact that has been true for decades. To gain deeper insight into visitor behavior, Florida segments travel into six categories. During the past five years, the share of Florida visitors coming for business declined significantly, a drop spurred by the recession. In the same time period, visiting friends and relatives has increased two percentage points. FIVE-YEAR TRENDS This chart shows the single primary purpose identified by visitors for their travel to Florida. For example, 37 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors came for a general vacation in 2012, a decrease of one percentage point from the previous year. 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 General Vacation 38% 38% 41% 38% 37% -1 pp -1 pp Visit Friends/Relatives 24% 26% 25% 23% 26% +3 pp +2 pp Getaway Weekend 7% 8% 9% 11% 11% 0 pp +4 pp Special Event 9% 9% 8% 9% 8% -1 pp -1 pp Other Leisure/Personal 5% 5% 5% 7% 8% +1 pp +3 pp Business 18% 15% 13% 12% 10% -2 pp -8 pp *Percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet and Associates Highlights • The share of visitors coming to Florida for general vacation declined one percentage point year over year. • The share of travel to visit friends and relatives increased three percentage points year over year. • The share of business travel to the state continued a downward trend, declining two percentage points since 2011.
  • 78. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 77 COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE Florida is one of the world’s leading destinations, serving nearly 95 million visitors a year who come from outside the Sunshine State. 84 percent of Florida’s visitors travel from locations within the domestic U.S. Florida’s ability to inspire American desire to visit is a leading indicator of success and a strong competitive benchmark.
  • 79. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 78 FLORIDA’S ABILITY TO INSPIRE TRAVEL Which states inspire Americans to visit? As reported by the MMGY Global/Harrison Group, nearly half of surveyed Americans responded that they were interested in traveling to Florida or California in the next two years. Destination States TOP U.S. DESTINATION STATES By Generation Source: 2013 Portrait of American Travelers, MMGY Global/Harrison Group. Respondents could select more than one state. The states shown garnered the most responses.
  • 80. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 79 FLORIDA’S ABILITY TO INSPIRE TRAVEL Interest in traveling to Florida within the next two years is strongest among Generation X and Millennials. Boomer interest was slightly less, which may reflect a lifetime of already visiting the Sunshine State. Destination States TOP U.S. DESTINATIONS BY GENERATION By Generation Source: 2013 Portrait of American Travelers, MMGY Global/Harrison Group. Respondents could select more than one state. The states shown garnered the most responses.
  • 81. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 80 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Florida’s momentum is excellent. But the scale Florida has now achieved also creates some challenges for sustainability. CHANGING DEMOGRAPHICS Loyal, affluent and mature visitors have been a foundation of Florida tourism for some time. But the Baby Boomer generation is beginning to age into a lifestage when many will travel less. Florida will need to create enduring relationships with younger demographics to augment projected declines in the number of maturing visitors.
  • 82. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 81 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES BUDGET CHALLENGES Over the last five years, economic conditions for America’s younger households has not improved in a way that bodes well for travel spending. Because their homes represented a larger share of their wealth before the recession, declining housing values hit younger families harder. Compared to 2007-08, younger households have less home equity, tighter credit, fewer jobs and more education debt. They have developed a frugality that appears to linger, and they desire new and different travel bragging rights. The result? Florida’s messaging must update and strengthen its appeal. Florida’s momentum is excellent. But the scale Florida has now achieved also creates some challenges for sustainability.
  • 83. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 82 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES BALANCING GROWTH As visitor volume increases, Florida’s marketing challenge shifts from reacquiring its repeat visitors to acquiring new visitors – a marketing shift that typically carries a significant increase in spending. The opportunity is acquiring new visitors; the danger is the cost it will take to do so. It will be important to balance the potential gain from investing in expansion against continued support of traditional origin markets. Florida’s momentum is excellent. But the scale Florida has now achieved also creates some challenges for sustainability.
  • 84. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 83 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES WEEKEND GETAWAYS After years of steady increases, the getaway weekend is no longer a trend but a staple of Florida tourism, accounting for one in 10 domestic trips to the state. Florida will need to determine both what attracts and satisfies these “in and out” visitors. Equally important: the opportunity to engage them as repeat visitors. Florida’s momentum is excellent. But the scale Florida has now achieved also creates some challenges for sustainability.
  • 85. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 84 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES RELEVANCE In the face of increasing competition for consumer attention, Florida must improve its ability to provide the most relevant information, events and deals to consumers in advance of and during their trips in the Sunshine State. The more consumers interact with Florida’s content, the more Florida has an opportunity to influence their decisions. Content development and distribution remains critical. Florida’s momentum is excellent. But the scale Florida has now achieved also creates some challenges for sustainability.
  • 86. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 85 2014-15 DOMESTIC PLATFORM In fiscal year 2014-2015, VISIT FLORIDA will focus on growing share in specific demographic segments and expanding our geographic and digital footprint. An increased presence throughout the year in key origin markets and integrated projects crossing multiple departments will continue to support Florida’s brand positioning. This vision will be achieved by aligning department efforts with the eight objectives from the 2020 plan: 1. Yield – Increase gross taxable sales through tourism. 2. Volume – Increase the number of visitors coming to Florida. 3. Share – Maintain our share of visitors from domestic and international markets while growing share in specific markets. 4. Brand Engagement – Build relationships with visitors through highly relevant content and experiences. 5. Destination Diversity – Grow economic activity throughout the state by encouraging visitation to geographically diverse destinations and participation in a broader range of activities. 6. Partner Participation – Improve Partner investment and engagement in VISIT FLORIDA programs. 7. Investment Efficiency – Optimize organization spending to deliver increased results in the most cost-effective way. 8. Influence – Grow perceived desirability and intent to travel to Florida.
  • 87. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 86 DOMESTIC OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Create year-round brand presence (A/I 1) • Integrate the Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Expand VISIT FLORIDA geographic footprint by testing and developing domestic expansion markets (A/I 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Begin development of Destination Plus information/training for car rental companies, industry businesses, etc. (IR 10) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 1) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk- side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Attend tourism-focused, diversity-related conferences and events, and strengthen relations with media (i.e. LGBT, African American)(PR 3) • Employ promotions featuring unique experiences, less-traveled destinations, and multi-market prize packages (PROMO 3) • Establish tours for relationship building with industry partners (PROMO 6) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5) • Expand promotional opportunities (months and marketing-tie ins) (VS 3) • Create a state-wide Welcome Center network to provide Florida tourism information to visitors (VS 8)
  • 88. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 87 DOMESTIC OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Create year-round brand presence (A/I 1) • Expand VISIT FLORIDA geographic footprint by testing and developing domestic expansion markets (A/I 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Continue to evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Secure Partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Attend tourism-focused, diversity-related conferences and events, and strengthen relations with media (i.e. LGBT, African American)(PR 3) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 4) • Employ promotions targeting key domestic markets (PROMO 1) • Add new target markets with emphasis on drive markets (PROMO 4) • Initiate sales calls for relationship building in new and existing target markets (PROMO 5) • Establish tours for relationship building with industry partners (PROMO 6) • Promote sweepstakes on VISITFLORIDA.com (PROMO 7) • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Conduct and evaluate custom research studies (RSRCH 4) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5)
  • 89. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 88 DOMESTIC OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Create year-round brand presence (A/I 1) • Integrate the Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Expand VISIT FLORIDA geographic footprint by testing and developing domestic expansion markets (A/I 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Continue to evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 1) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Employ promotions targeting key domestic markets (PROMO 1) • Add new target markets with emphasis on drive markets (PROMO 4) • Initiate sales calls for relationship building in new and existing target markets (PROMO 5) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5) • Utilize Welcome Center staff expertise for Florida Insider requests and live phone inquiries (VS 1) • Integrate Florida Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA’s drive campaign (VS 7)
  • 90. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 89 DOMESTIC OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Integrate the Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Improve VISIT FLORIDA’s communication with current, potential and future visitors through improved email marketing program (A/I 11) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and Partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Develop grant programs for hospitality training and certification (IR 9) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 1) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Create and support marketing and PR campaigns that sustain and grow the Florida brand (PR 5) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Collaborate with DMO Partners during each quarter to pitch stories and host media visits that yield larger awareness of the state through earned media (PR 7) • Establish tours for relationship building with industry partners (PROMO 6) • Set media strategy for VISITFLORIDA.com sweepstakes (PROMO 8)) • Integrate content into promotions programs (PROMO 10) • Secure an opt-in element for at least 50 percent of programs (PROMO 11) • Build joint campaign with the seven NCAA Football bowl games hosted in Florida (PROMO 12) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Conduct and evaluate custom research studies (RSRCH 4) • Utilize Welcome Center staff expertise for Florida Insider requests and live phone inquiries (VS 1) • Provide travel counseling and reservation services to visitors (VS 2) • Integrate VISIT FLORIDA’s year-round campaigns in the Welcome Centers (VS 9)
  • 91. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 90 DOMESTIC OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Create year-round brand presence (A/I 1) • Integrate Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Facilitate conversation between larger and smaller DMOs to encourage cross-promotion (IR 6) • Begin development of Destination Plus information/training for car rental companies, industry businesses, etc. (IR 10) • Provide front line staff education/hospitality training, (SALS, #LoveFL) for visitor services (IR 11) • Launch places to Stay Initiative (IR 12) • Launch places to Play Initiative (IR 13) • Launch places to Eat/Drink Initiative (IR 14) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets) (PR 2) • Attend tourism-focused, diversity-related conferences and events, and strengthen relations with media (i.e. LGBT, African American)(PR 3) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Collaborate with DMO Partners during each quarter to pitch stories and host media visits that yield larger awareness of the state through earned media (PR 7) • Employ promotions featuring unique experiences, less traveled destinations, and multi- market prize packages (PROMO 3) • Promote sweepstakes on VISITFLORIDA.com (PROMO 7) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Conduct and evaluate custom research studies (RSRCH 4) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5) • Integrate Florida Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA’s drive campaign (VS 7) • Create state-wide Welcome Center network to provide Florida tourism information to visitors (VS 8)
  • 92. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 91 DOMESTIC OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Increase value of co-op to Partners with year-round and bundled packages (A/I 2) • Integrate Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 7) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Award advertising matching grants to promote Florida tourism (A/I 6) • Re-integrate the management of international advertising into the VISIT FLORIDA Advertising department (A/I 8) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Evolve the value proposition for VISIT FLORIDA Partnership (IR 3) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Gather input and feedback from Partners to evolve/ improve VISIT FLORIDA strategy service and relevance (IR 5) • Collaborate with partner trade associations to maximize benefits for all industry Partners (IR 7) • Refresh VISITFLORIDA.org (IR 8) • Develop grant programs for hospitality training and certification (IR 9) • Launch places to Stay Initiative (IR 12) • Launch places to Play Initiative (IR 13) • Launch places to Eat/Drink Initiative (IR 14) • Launch analytics and ROI Initiative (IR 15) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Create and support marketing and PR campaigns that sustain and grow the Florida brand (PR 5) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Collaborate with DMO Partners during each quarter to pitch stories and host media visits that yield larger awareness of the state through earned media (PR 7) • Employ promotions targeting key domestic markets (PROMO 1) • Establish tours for relationship building with industry partners (PROMO 6) • Promote sweepstakes on VISITFLORIDA.com (PROMO 7) • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1) • Conduct and evaluate custom research studies (RSRCH 4) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5) • Utilize Welcome Center staff expertise for Florida Insider requests and live phone inquiries (VS 1) • Provide travel counseling and reservation services to visitors (VS 2)
  • 93. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 92 DOMESTIC OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Re-integrate the management of international advertising into the VISIT FLORIDA Advertising department (A/I 8) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Gather input and feedback from Partners to evolve/ improve VISIT FLORIDA strategy service and relevance (IR 5) • Facilitate conversation between larger and smaller DMOs to encourage cross-promotion (IR 6) • Collaborate with partner trade associations to maximize benefits for all industry Partners (IR 7) • Refresh VISITFLORIDA.org (IR 8) • Provide front line staff education/hospitality training, (SALS, #LoveFL) for visitor services (IR 11) • Launch analytics and ROI Initiative (IR 15) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets) (PR 2) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Employ promotions targeting key domestic markets (PROMO 1) • Add new target markets with emphasis on drive markets (PROMO 4) • Initiate sales calls for relationship building in new and existing target markets (PROMO 5) • Establish tours for relationship building with industry partners (PROMO 6) • Set media strategy for VISITFLORIDA.com sweepstakes (PROMO 8) • Establish annual calendar for VISITFLORIDA.com sweepstakes (PROMO 9) • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1) • Provide travel counseling and reservation services to visitors (VS 2) • Enhance the visitor experience at the Welcome Center (VS 6) • Integrate VISIT FLORIDA’s year round campaigns in the Welcome Centers (VS 9) • Create statewide customer service training and certification program Welcome Center employees (VS 10)
  • 94. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 93 DOMESTIC OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Create year-round brand presence (A/I 1) • Expand VISIT FLORIDA geographic footprint by testing and developing domestic expansion markets (A/I 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Improve VISIT FLORIDA’s communication with current, potential and future visitors through an improved email marketing program (A/I 11) • Continue awareness testing, focus groups and other ad effectiveness research (A/I 12) • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1) • Provide travel counseling and reservation services to visitors (VS 2) • Create opportunities to influence Welcome Center visitors (VS 5)
  • 95. 94 2014-2015 Marketing Plan ImportanceOF THE IN-STATE MARKET In-state Traveler Volume This chart shows 2013 pleasure trips in the state of Florida by domestic visitors, international visitors and Florida residents. Florida residents took 20.1 million pleasure trips in state. Source: VISIT FLORIDA (In-state volume is based on data from a phone survey by American Directions Group. Domestic volume is based on data from TNS TravelsAmerica, D.K. Shifflet and Individual Florida Airports. International volume is derived using data from VisaVue Travel, Stats Canada, the U.S. Department of Commerce and other independent research sources.) Florida’s residents offer two valuable opportunities for tourism: They travel in-state as tourists themselves and they influence travel to the state, especially visits by friends and relatives. When travel to visit Florida friends and relatives (VFR) is combined with the number of Floridians vacationing within the state themselves, Florida residents are critical to 40.8 million pleasure trips a year. This volume helps the tourism industry sustain a year-round business. 2013 was a record year for VFR travel: the highest it has been for the last seven years. However, as Florida’s economy improved over the last two years, in-state travel by Florida residents has experienced consecutive declines (6 percent in 2012 and 3 percent in 2013). This could be a combination of several factors, chief among them: higher discretionary spend driving pent-up resident demand for travel further afield, and potential increases in staycation costs as high occupancy rates drive prices higher. *Pleasure travel by residents is reported separately from all other tourism activity. Florida’s total reported volume (94.3 million) does not count travel by residents. Partner Tools Resident Traveler Profile VFR Profile FLORIDA DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE
  • 96. 95 2014-2015 Marketing Plan ImportanceOF THE IN-STATE MARKET Average Expenditures by Category PER-PERSON PER DAY (2012) Note: The survey was revised in 2012 enabling greater precision in estimating per-person-per-day spending than in the past. Improved survey logic eliminated non-responses for spending, leading individual averages to no longer be calculated off a common base; therefore, the sum of the sub-category averages will no longer equal the total average. Source: D.K.Shifflet & Associates Floridians spent an estimated $6.9 billion vacationing within the state in 2012. Spending hit a record high, increasing 24 percent from 2011, to $120 per person per day. While domestic visitors spend the biggest portion of travel dollars on transportation, resident travelers in-state spend a large portion of their travel dollars on food, accommodation and shopping, making them especially important for Florida lodgings, restaurants and retailers. Partner Tools Resident Traveler Profile Categories
  • 97. 96 2014-2015 Marketing Plan Source: VISIT FLORIDA. 2004-2007 data based on the Consumer Attitude Survey by the University of Florida, BEBR. 2008-2010 data based on phone surveys conducted by A New View Research d/b/a beSatisfied. 2011-2013 data based on phone surveys by American Directions Group. Leisure trip patterns of Floridians in thousands of person-trips This chart shows the number of pleasure trips Floridians took in-state and out-of-state across 10 years. For example, between 2012 and 2013, total pleasure travel by Floridians – in-state and out-of-state – decreased. 2011 was the highest year of in-state travel, followed by 2012 and 2013. Highlights • Five-year seasonal trend patterns suggest that Florida residents take in-state leisure trips throughout the year, helping to sustain year-round tourism businesses in Florida. • On average, the gap in household income between residents who travel in-state compared to those who travel out-of-state is modest. Five-year average household income for residents who travel in-state is $80,600; five-year average household income for residents who travel out-of-state is $87,500. • More Affluent Florida households traveled within the state for leisure in 2012 than in 2011. Average household income rose from $68,900 to $82,500 in 2012. • Florida households who traveled out-of-state had an average income of $92,600. Floridian Pleasure Trip Trends Between 2012 and 2013, fewer Floridians traveled for pleasure than during the previous year – 200,000 fewer traveled in-state and 3.5 million fewer traveled out of state. In-state travel saw an all-time high during and coming out of the recession as consumers stayed closer to home for their vacations. It is no surprise that as consumer confidence and the economy improved, in-state travel declined. Partner Tools Resident Travel Seasonal Trends
  • 98. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 97 APPROACH VISIT FLORIDA approaches in-state audiences in three ways: as promoters of Florida’s tourism assets; as hosts to visiting friends and relatives (VFR); and as resident travelers. Instead of in-state destination- specific marketing – which Florida tourism Partners already successfully execute – VISIT FLORIDA promotes an advocacy platform called Share a Little Sunshine, which creates opportunities for Florida fans to influence potential travelers to the state. As an additional benefit, research has shown a correlation between resident knowledge about the importance of tourism and resident travel within the state. Other research has demonstrated the power of social networks and peer recommendations in influencing travel – especially in a digital era. Combining these findings, Florida’s advocacy platform focuses on awareness and engagement to influence travel to and within the state. Food (Excluding Resturants) Dining Out Entertainment Shopping No increase 8% 5% 2% 18% 1-20% 50% 37% 33% 52% 21-50% 31% 37% 42% 20% 50% + 11% 20% 22% 8% Not sure 1% 1% 2% 1% When Considering Vacation Destinations, Extremely/Very Confident in Millennials Xers Boomers Matures Recommendations of a friend or family member 85% 81% 82% 80% Reviews you have read in an online advisory site such as TripAdvisor.com 66% 56% 55% 44% Information in travel guidebooks 57% 57% 59% 49% Information on the website of an online travel agency such as Expedia, Travelocity, etc. 52% 52% 47% 30% Reviews you have read on an online blog 53% 42% 31% 24%
  • 99. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 98 Highlights • Personal sources of advice are critical to travel-related decisions. 82 percent of American travelers view family and friend recommendations as the most trusted sources for travel information. Reviews on travel advisory sites (tripadvisor.com), at 58 percent, are second. • Millennials are more likely than GenXers and Boomers to have confidence in the recommendations of a friend or family member. They are also more likely to trust reviews from online advisory sites. • Online reviews and personal recommendations are considered the world’s most trusted source of information. According to a 2013 Nielsen study on advertising, 84 percent of consumers around the world trust recommendations from friends and family. Online consumer reviews, at least 68 percent, are the second-most trusted source of brand information and messaging. PROMOTER When it comes to promoting the state’s tourism assets and influencing potential travelers, Floridians have a natural advantage: They live here. Historically, and especially in the digital era, visitors look to personal recommendations and local insights to inform their travel planning. Florida residents are a valuable and trusted source of knowledge for potential visitors. Confidence in Travel Planning Information Sources When Considering Vacation Destinations, Extremely/Very Confident in Millennials Xers Boomers Matures Recommendations of a friend or family member 85% 81% 82% 80% Reviews you have read in an online advisory site such as TripAdvisor.com 66% 56% 55% 44% Information in travel guidebooks 57% 57% 59% 49% Information on the website of an online travel agency such as Expedia, Travelocity, etc. 52% 52% 47% 30% Reviews you have read on an online blog 53% 42% 31% 24% Source: MMGY Global / Harrison Group 2013 Portrait of American Travelerssm ; Nielsen’s Global Trust in Advertising Report 2013 Partner Tools Resident Traveler Profile VFR Profile FLORIDA DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE
  • 100. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 99 HOST Visitors have many reasons to travel to Florida for leisure: vacations, special events, visiting friends and family (VFR). Of all the reasons, VFR had the highest year-over-year increase in 2013 and has always been an important visitor source – accounting for over one-quarter of Florida’s domestic visitors. According to a Florida resident survey conducted by VISIT FLORIDA, approximately 65 percent of Floridians invited friends and relatives to visit in 2013, an 8 percentage-point increase from 2012. Highlights • More Florida residents invited friends and family to visit in 2013 than in 2012. The months with the highest percentage of invitations were May, August, September and December. • Florida residents aware of Share a Little Sunshine were slightly more likely (68%) to invite VFR travelers than those unaware (64%). • 55 percent of U.S. travelers chose their travel destinations according to where friends and family lived. • According to a VISIT FLORIDA survey, a majority of residents say they spend more while hosting visitors: 97 percent, dining out; 94 percent, entertainment; 92 percent, food; and 80 percent, shopping. Source: VISIT FLORIDA; Phocuswright Destination Unknown Study INCREMENTAL SPEND OF RESIDENT HOST This chart shows the estimated increase in spending by Florida residents when hosting visitors to the state. For example, more than 50 percent of residents spend between 1-20 percent more on shopping expenses while hosting out-of-state visitors. Food (Excluding Resturants) Dining Out Entertainment Shopping No increase 8% 5% 2% 18% 1-20% 50% 37% 33% 52% 21-50% 31% 37% 42% 20% 50% + 11% 20% 22% 8% Not sure 1% 1% 2% 1% Source: VISIT FLORIDA; 2013 Share a Little Sunshine Survey Partner Tools VFR Profile
  • 101. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 100 IN-STATE TRAVELER Florida resident travel helps sustain year-round tourism, especially during the spring and summer months. Over the past 10 years, Florida has experienced consistent growth in resident in-state travel. Between 2012 and 2013, leisure travel by Florida residents declined slightly; however, it remains near the all-time high. Highlights • More than 20 million in-state pleasure trips were taken by Florida residents in 2013. • Residents who travel in-state generally take quick getaway trips of one or two nights. • Florida residents travel in-state fairly evenly throughout the year. On average, Q2 is the highest season of travel and Q4 is the lowest, but in 2013 Q3 was the highest and Q1 the lowest. • In-state travelers are typically couples (44%) and single adult travelers (21%). Family travel decreased four percentage points (18%) in 2012. • 58 percent of in-state travelers are GenX (32%) and Millennials (26%), bringing down the average age of in-state travelers to slightly under 45 years old. Estimated Pleasure trips of Residents Traveling In-State (in millions) Source: VISIT FLORIDA (2009-2010 figures based on data from a consumer survey conducted by A New View Research d/b/a beSatisfied; 2011-2013 figures derived using data from phone surveys conducted by American Directions Group). Partner Tools Resident Traveler Profile
  • 102. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 101 Challenges Between 2011 and 2012, the importance of recommendations by friends or family in the selection of a travel destination increased across all generations. The same trend held for online advisory sites. Converting Florida fans (both resident and visitors) into Florida advocates will be a critical component of Florida’s future marketing. Promoter. To get the attention of Floridians in an already noisy and time-starved environment; VISIT FLORIDA must connect to their existing passions with a relevant message to recruit a broad advocacy base. Host. As hosts, residents are limited to their existing knowledge of Florida’s tourism assets and all the available options. It is difficult for them to keep up with changes and improvements in the tourism landscape. In-state Traveler. Encouraging residents to vacation within the state will remain a challenge in 2014 as Florida’s economy continues to rebound and more Floridians take pleasure trips elsewhere.
  • 103. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 102 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Five insights form the foundation of the 2014-15 advocacy program focused on engaging Florida travel fans. AWARENESS Floridian attitudes about tourism suggest a correlation between awareness about the economic impact of tourism for Florida and in-state resident travel. There is an opportunity to increase in-state travel by increasing awareness among Floridians to the beneficial impact of tourism.
  • 104. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 103 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES EMPOWERING HOSTS Inspiring and informing residents about travel opportunities could have a positive impact on the travel experience and spend of their visiting friends and relatives, who now account for about 26 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors. Positioning VISITFLORIDA.com as a resource for in-state residents can positively impact tourism spend. Five insights form the foundation of the 2014-15 advocacy program focused on engaging Florida travel fans.
  • 105. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 104 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES BENEFITS TO THE FOOD AND LODGING SECTOR 2012 in-state vacationers spent over 50 percent of their daily vacation budget on food and lodging – up significantly from 2011. Advocacy-focused marketing benefits Florida’s businesses, and also has an indirect incremental input on resident travel. Five insights form the foundation of the 2014-15 advocacy program focused on engaging Florida travel fans.
  • 106. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 105 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES RECOMMENDATIONS Traveler confidence in personal recommendations continues to rise. Travelers find a friend’s or relative’s endorsement more trustworthy than any other source of travel information. Success with VISIT FLORIDA’S 2013 advocacy program suggests the need for a continued commitment to fan engagement. Five insights form the foundation of the 2014-15 advocacy program focused on engaging Florida travel fans.
  • 107. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 106 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES INVITATIONS Several years of success with the resident invitation program have confirmed a quantifiable impact on VFR travel to the state. Additional opportunities may exist in an expansion of the program beyond Florida residents to non-resident fans. Five insights form the foundation of the 2014-15 advocacy program focused on engaging Florida travel fans.
  • 108. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 107 2014-15 IN-STATE PLATFORM In fiscal year 2014-2015, VISIT FLORIDA will continue to engage Florida fans as tourism advocates through the Share a Little Sunshine platform. Expansion of the in-state PSA campaign provided the foundation for targeting social communities of interest and engaging them in sharing invitations, content and offers. The Share a Little Sunshine vision will be achieved by aligning departmental efforts with the eight objectives from the 2020 plan: 1. Yield – Increase gross taxable sales through tourism. 2. Volume – Increase the number of visitors coming to Florida. 3. Share – Maintain our share of visitors from domestic and international markets while growing share in specific markets. 4. Brand Engagement – Build relationships with visitors through highly relevant content and experiences. 5. Destination Diversity – Grow economic activity throughout the state by encouraging visitation to geographically diverse destinations and participation in a broader range of activities. 6. Partner Participation – Improve Partner investment and engagement in VISIT FLORIDA programs. 7. Investment Efficiency – Optimize organization spending to deliver increased results in the most cost-effective way. 8. Influence – Grow perceived desirability and intent to travel to Florida.
  • 109. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 108 In-state OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Integrate the Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Begin development of Destination Plus information/training for car rental companies, industry businesses, etc. (IR 10) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5) • Expand promotional opportunities (months and marketing-tie ins) (VS 3) • Create a state-wide Welcome Center network to provide Florida tourism information to visitors (VS 8)
  • 110. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 109 In-state OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Continue to evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Conduct and evaluate custom research studies (RSRCH 4)
  • 111. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 110 In-state OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Continue to evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5) • Utilize Welcome Center staff expertise for Florida Insider requests and live phone inquiries (VS 1) • Integrate Florida Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA’s drive campaign (VS 7)
  • 112. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 111 In-state OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Improve VISIT FLORIDA’s communication with current, potential and future visitors through improved email marketing program (A/I 11) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and Partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 1) • Create and support marketing and PR campaigns that sustain and grow the Florida brand (PR 5) • Integrate content into promotions programs (PROMO 10) • Build campaign with the seven NCAA Football bowl games hosted in Florida (PROMO 12) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Conduct and evaluate custom research studies (RSRCH 4) • Utilize Welcome Center staff expertise for Florida Insider requests and live phone inquiries (VS 1) • Provide travel counseling and reservation services to visitors (VS 2) • Integrate VISIT FLORIDA’s year-round campaigns in the Welcome Centers (VS 9)
  • 113. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 112 In-state OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Facilitate conversation between larger and smaller DMOs to encourage cross- promotion (IR 6) • Begin development of Destination Plus information/training for car rental companies, industry businesses, etc. (IR 10) • Provide front line staff education/hospitality training, (SALS, #LoveFL) for visitor services (IR 11) • Launch Places to Stay Initiative (IR 12) • Launch Places to Play Initiative (IR 13) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets) (PR 2) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Conduct and evaluate custom research studies (RSRCH 4) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5) • Integrate Florida Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA’s drive campaign (VS 7) • Create state-wide Welcome Center network to provide Florida tourism information to visitors (VS 8)
  • 114. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 113 In-state OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Increase value of co-op to Partners with year-round and bundled packages (A/I 2) • Integrate Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Evolve the value proposition for VISIT FLORIDA Partnership (IR 3) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Gather input and feedback from Partners to evolve/improve VISIT FLORIDA strategy service and relevance (IR 5) • Collaborate with partner trade associations to maximize benefits for all industry Partners (IR 7) • Refresh VISITFLORIDA.org (IR 8) • Develop grant programs for hospitality training and certification (IR 9) • Launch places to Stay Initiative (IR 12) • Launch places to Play Initiative (IR 13) • Launch places to Eat/Drink Initiative (IR 14) • Launch Analytics and ROI Initiative (IR 15) • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1) • Conduct and evaluate custom research studies (RSRCH 4) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5) • Utilize Welcome Center staff expertise for Florida Insider requests and live phone inquiries (VS 1)
  • 115. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 114 In-state OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Continue to evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Increase engagement with Florida’s in-state and out-of-state fans (A/I 10) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Gather input and feedback from Partners to evolve/ improve VISIT FLORIDA strategy service and relevance (IR 5) • Facilitate conversation between larger and smaller DMOs to encourage cross- promotion (IR 6) • Collaborate with partner trade associations to maximize benefits for all industry Partners (IR 7) • Refresh VISITFLORIDA.org (IR 8) • Provide front line staff education/hospitality training, (SALS, #LoveFL) for visitor services (IR 11) • Launch Analytics and ROI Initiative (IR 15) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets) (PR 2) • Create and support significant marketing and PR campaigns that sustain and grow the Florida brand (PR 5) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Establish tours for relationship building with industry partners (PROMO 6) • Establish annual calendar for VISITFLORIDA.com sweepstakes (PROMO 9) • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1) • Enhance the visitor experience at the Welcome Center (VS 6) • Integrate VISIT FLORIDA’s year-round campaigns in the Welcome Centers (VS 9) • Create statewide customer service training and certification program Welcome Center employees (VS 10)
  • 116. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 115 In-state OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1) • Provide travel counseling and reservation services to visitors (VS 2) • Create opportunities to influence Welcome Center visitors (VS 5)
  • 117. 116 2014-2015 Marketing Plan ImportanceOF THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET INTERNATiONAL Visitor Volume Combined business and leisure travel Note: Because 2013 visitor numbers are finalized mid-year, preliminary numbers are used for this report. Canadian numbers are provided by Statistics Canada by quarter. The Canadian 2013 estimate was derived using preliminary data obtained from Statistics Canada. 2013 appears to be another record year for Canadian visitation to the Sunshine State. Source: VISIT FLORIDA International visitors play an increasingly important role for Florida tourism, fueling growth in top gateways and contributing to total tourism spend. In 2013, Florida observed another year of record highs for overseas and Canadian visitors. As a share of total volume, Canada remained Florida’s strongest source of international visitors, contributing 4 percent of Florida’s total volume with an estimated 3.7 million visitors. Overseas visitors delivered 12 percent of total volume. International visitors to Florida originate from more than 185 countries, half of which (53 %) come from five global markets: Canada, U.K., Germany, Brazil and Mexico. Domestic 84% (79.5M) Canada 4% (3.7M) Overseas 12% (11.1M) Partner Tools INTERNATIONAL VOLUME FOR FLORIDA REGIONS
  • 118. 117 2014-2015 Marketing Plan ImportanceOF THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET INTERNATiONAL Visitor SPEND Combined business and leisure travel Note: Because 2013 visitor numbers are finalized mid-year, preliminary numbers are used for this report. The 2013 Canadian estimate reflects 2012 data obtained from Statistics Canada, since data has not been recieved for 2013. Source: VISIT FLORIDA Generally favorable exchange rates, combined with long vacations and the availability of variety and reasonably priced U.S. goods, contributed to an increase in spending by Florida’s international visitors. Florida’s overseas and Canadian visitors spent more than $16 billion in 2013 – an 8 percent increase year over year. Florida’s five global markets accounted for 52 percent of total international spending, with visitors from Canada, the U.K., Germany, Brazil and Mexico pouring $8.4 billion into Florida’s economy. Overseas 73% Canada 27% Partner Tools INTERNATIONAL SPEND FOR FLORIDA REGIONS
  • 119. 118 2014-2015 Marketing Plan FIVE YEARS OF VISITOR VOLUME This bar graph shows the steady growth in visitors from Canada and overseas. Since 2008, Florida’s overseas visitors grew from approximately 7.1 million to 11.1 million. Spend Volume Currency * estimate is preliminary and subject to change Source: Canadian estimates for 2009-2012 come from Statistics Canada. The Canadian 2013 estimate was derived using historical trend data obtained on Canadian visitors. Overseas estimates for 2009-2013 are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel and incorporate data from other independent research sources. Highlights • Five-year Canada growth: up 29 percent • Five-year overseas growth: up 57 percent Note: To capture 5-year growth, 2008 estimates (not shown) are used. Partner Tools INTERNATIONAL VOLUME FOR FLORIDA REGIONS visitor volume trends Visitation by Canadians and overseas visitors has increased over the past four years as the U.S. dollar continued to decline in relation to other major global currencies. Canada has shown a steady increase in visitation to Florida, with the exception of a slight dip since the recent recession. Among overseas origin markets, South America and Europe have been the greatest contributors to visitation within the last five years.
  • 120. 119 2014-2015 Marketing Plan visitor SPENDING trends After several years of hovering around par with the U.S. dollar, the Canadian dollar began declining in 2013 and is predicted for the balance of 2014 to remain bellow the dollar. This could impact Canadian discretionary spend and create a negative impact for Florida. Even so, volume and spending increases from other markets, especially Latin America, have the potential to mitigate any declines. Spend Volume Currency * estimates are preliminary and subject to change Note: Overseas spending estimates reflect face-to-face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida; Overseas cash estimates began in 2010, when cash withdrawn data became available. Source: Canadian estimates for 2009-2012 obtained from Statistics Canada; the 2013 estimate reflects 2012 data, since 2013 data is not yet available. Overseas estimates for 2009-2013 are extrapolated from aggregate credit card data provided by VisaVue Travel and incorporate data from other independent sources. Highlights • Five-year growth in Canadian spend: up 40 percent* • Five-year growth in overseas card spend: up 53 percent** *Canadian spend reflects 2012 data; 2013 data has not been received. **Growth in overseas spend does not include cash. Note: To capture 5-year growth, 2008 estimates (not shown) are used. FIVE YEARS OF VISITOR SPENDING The bar graph shows the steady growth of spending by Canadian and overseas visitors in Florida. The chart indicates that 2013 spending by both visitor groups has surpassed previous levels. Since 2008, overseas card spending increased by approximately $2.2 billion. Partner Tools INTERNATIONAL SPEND FOR FLORIDA REGIONS
  • 121. 120 2014-2015 Marketing Plan Impact of CURRENCY FLUCTUATION Currency fluctuation is a powerful influence on international visitation and spend. Changes in the exchange rate for Florida’s core markets can have a significant impact on visitor spending and state revenues. In 2013, Canada’s currency lost value against the U.S. dollar. The British pound and Euro are projected to remain at the same levels. Currency Exchange Rates per U.S. Dollar This chart shows the fluctuation of major international currencies over the past 6 years, relative to the U.S. dollar. Spend Volume Currency Brazil may be showing signs of slowing. Though this would have a limited impact on the top echelon of Brazilian travelers, the downturn could have a negative effect on the mid- to-entry-level Brazilian middle class that has fed U.S. long-haul travel growth in recent years. *Projected rate of exchange as of November 2013. Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
  • 122. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 121 Canada France Germany United Kingdom Argentina Brazil Colombia Mexico Venezuela Australia China India Russia South Korea APPROACH VISIT FLORIDA historically has approached international audiences as Core, Growth and Emerging markets, based on the likelihood and timing of conversion to travel. Core and growth markets provide the potential for current and near- term visitation, while emerging markets provide potential visitor growth over a much longer time frame. Focusing on the combination of volume and growth in the near term, five global markets rise to the top, representing slightly more than half of Florida’s total international visitation: Brazil, Canada, Germany, Mexico and the United Kingdom.
  • 123. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 122 overview Florida’s core international markets are countries where Florida is a known destination and visitation from those countries has a long and steady track record. In these markets, the Florida product has long been visible to consumers through advertising, representation and promotion by in-country airlines and tour operators. Florida typically has excellent industry partnerships in-country, further increasing Florida awareness, engagement and conversion with these consumers. The countries that rise to the top of this market segment for Florida are Canada, U.K., Germany and France. Highlights: U.K. • U.K. visitors travel in small groups – generally two or more families together – and take multigenerational holidays. • Peak travel months: March, May, June, July, August, September and October. • Travel patterns of British visitors are changing. European economic uncertainty and a changing geopolitical world are motivating U.K. residents to choose cost-effective and safer travel destinations. Note: Highlights reflect long-haul travelers who take trips that, point to point, require multiple days in a car or 7 hours or more in a plane. CORE MARKETS AS A PERCENTAGE OF INTERNATIONAL VOLUME AND SPEND This table compares the volume and spending contribution of different countries to Florida’s total international visitor volume and spending numbers. Core markets comprise 51 percent of Florida’s international visitors and 44 percent of spending by international visitors. Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Core Markets 7,476,000 51% $7,083,500,000 44% Canada 3,705,000 25% $4,383,500,000 27% United Kingdom 1,516,000 10% $954,700,000 6% Germany 403,000 3% $284,000,000 2% France 300,000 2% $211,000,000 1% Other Core 1,553,000 11% $1,250,200,000 8% Total Florida Core Market Note: estimates are preliminary and subject to change Overseas spending estimates reflect face-to-face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida, not transactions made overseas or online. Source: Canadian estimates reflect 2012 data obtained from Statistics Canada, since 2013 data has not been received. Overseas estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by Visa Vue® Travel for 2012 and incorporate data from other research sources. Partner Tools Core Country Profiles Merchant Category Data TOP INTERNATIONAL COUNTRIES FOR FLORIDA REGIONS Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Core Markets 7,476,000 51% $7,083,500,000 44% Canada 3,705,000 25% $4,383,500,000 27% United Kingdom 1,516,000 10% $954,700,000 6% Germany 403,000 3% $284,000,000 2% France 300,000 2% $211,000,000 1% Other 1,553,000 11% $1,250,200,000 8% Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Core Markets 7,476,000 100% $7,083,500,000 100% Canada 3,705,000 50% $4,383,500,000 62% United Kingdom 1,516,000 20% $954,700,000 13% Germany 403,000 5% $284,000,000 4% France 300,000 4% $211,000,000 3% Other 1,553,000 21% $1,250,200,000 18%
  • 124. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 123 INDIVIDUAL CORE MARKET COUNTRIES VOLUME AND SPEND This table compares the volume and spending contribution of individual core market countries as a percentage of combined core market volume and spending. Canada comprises 50 percent of the volume of all core market visitors combined and provides 62 percent of the spending by core market visitors. Note: estimates are preliminary and subject to change. Overseas spending estimates reflect face-to-face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida, not transactions made overseas or online. Source: Canadian spend estimates reflect 2012 data obtained from Statistics Canada, since 2013 data has not been received; and Canadian visitation estimate based on historical trend data obtained from Statistics Canada and other research sources. Overseas estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other research sources. Total Florida Core Market Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Core Markets 7,476,000 100% $7,083,500,000 100% Canada 3,705,000 50% $4,383,500,000 62% United Kingdom 1,516,000 20% $954,700,000 13% Germany 403,000 5% $284,000,000 4% France 300,000 4% $211,000,000 3% Other Core 1,553,000 21% $1,250,200,000 18% Partner Tools Core Country Profiles Merchant Category Data TOP INTERNATIONAL COUNTRIES FOR FLORIDA REGIONS Highlights: Germany • German travelers tend to be independent tourists who are well-educated, 30-50 years old, with average to high income levels. • 27 percent of German travelers to the U.S. used a travel agency as a source for trip planning. • German travelers still turn to offline sources for trip planning, particularly travel guides. Note: Highlights reflect long-haul travelers who take trips that, point to point, require multipledays in a car or 7 hours or more in a plane. Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Core Markets 7,476,000 100% $7,083,500,000 100% Canada 3,705,000 50% $4,383,500,000 62% United Kingdom 1,516,000 20% $954,700,000 13% Germany 403,000 5% $284,000,000 4% France 300,000 4% $211,000,000 3% Other 1,553,000 21% $1,250,200,000 18% Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Core Markets 7,476,000 51% $7,083,500,000 44% Canada 3,705,000 25% $4,383,500,000 27% United Kingdom 1,516,000 10% $954,700,000 6% Germany 403,000 3% $284,000,000 2% France 300,000 2% $211,000,000 1% Other 1,553,000 11% $1,250,200,000 8% overview Florida’s core international markets are countries where Florida is a known destination and visitation from those countries has a long and steady track record. In these markets, the Florida product has long been visible to consumers through advertising, representation and promotion by in-country airlines and tour operators. Florida typically has excellent industry partnerships in-country, further increasing Florida awareness, engagement and conversion with these consumers. The countries that rise to the top of this market segment for Florida are Canada, U.K., Germany and France.
  • 125. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 124 Total Florida Growth Market overview Growth markets include those countries from which Florida is seeing strong current and projected future visitation. Top growth markets for Florida include Argentina, Brazil, Columbia, Mexico and Venezuela. Combined, they provided about a third of Florida’s 2013 international visitors. Because opportunities may be of short or longer duration and occur for a variety of reasons, some of these markets offer better potential return on the Florida marketing investment than others. Florida continues to benefit from the addition of lift in many growth markets. GROWTH MARKETS AS A PERCENTAGE OF INTERNATIONAL VOLUME AND SPEND This table shows the volume and spending contribution of different growth market countries to Florida’s total international visitor volume and spending numbers. Growth markets comprise 32 percent of Florida’s international visitors and 36 percent of spending by international visitors. Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Growth Markets 4,653,000 32% $5,716,200,000 36% Brazil 1,817,000 12% $2,384,100,000 15% Argentina 808,000 5% $988,700,000 6% Venezuela 617,000 4% $559,900,000 3% Mexico 416,000 3% $399,700,000 2% Colombia 369,000 2% $605,200,000 4% Other Growth 627,000 4% $778,500,000 5% Note: estimates are preliminary and subject to change Overseas spending estimates reflect face-to-face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida, not transactions made overseas or online. Source: Overseas estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other independent research sources. Highlights: Latin America • Latin American countries have a comparably younger population, with approximately 50 percent under the age of 30. • Latin American travelers tend to be high spenders on vacation and expect value (quality) for their money. • At least 30 percent of visitors to the U.S. from Mexico and Venezuela come to visit friends and relatives as part of their leisure travel. • Business travel to the U.S. from Latin America is highest from Mexico, Colombia and Chile. Note: Highlights reflect long-haul travelers who take trips that, point to point, require multipledays in a car or 7 hours or more in a plane. Partner Tools GROWTH Country Profiles Merchant Category Data TOP INTERNATIONAL COUNTRIES FOR FLORIDA REGIONS Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Growth Markets 4,653,000 32% $5,716,200,000 36% Brazil 1,817,000 12% $2,384,100,000 15% Argentina 808,000 5% $988,700,000 6% Venezuela 617,000 4% $559,900,000 3% Mexico 416,000 3% $399,700,000 2% Colombia 369,000 2% $605,200,000 4% Other 627,000 4% $778,500,000 5% Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Growth Markets 4,653,000 100% $5,716,200,000 100% Brazil 1,817,000 39% $2,384,100,000 42% Argentina 808,000 17% $988,700,000 17% Venezuela 617,000 13% $559,900,000 10% Mexico 416,000 9% $399,700,000 7% Colombia 369,000 8% $605,200,000 11% Other 627,000 13% $778,500,000 14%
  • 126. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 125 Highlights: Latin America • The greatest increases in both spend and visitation to Florida came from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela. • Colombia showed a slightly greater increase in visitation to Florida (+21%), than it did in spending (+18%). • Visitors from Argentina and Brazil travel to the U.S. predominantly for leisure. Note: Highlights reflect long-haul travelers who take trips that, point to point, require multipledays in a car or 7 hours or more in a plane. Total Florida Growth Market Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Growth Markets 4,653,000 100% $5,716,200,000 100% Brazil 1,817,000 39% $2,384,100,000 42% Argentina 808,000 17% $988,700,000 17% Venezuela 617,000 13% $559,900,000 10% Mexico 416,000 9% $399,700,000 7% Colombia 369,000 8% $605,200,000 11% Other Growth 627,000 13% $778,500,000 14% INDIVIDUAL GROWTH MARKET COUNTRIES Volume and Spend This table compares the volume and spending contribution of individual growth market countries as a percentage of combined growth market volume and spending. Brazil comprises 39 percent of the volume of all growth market visitors combined and provides 42 percent of the spending by growth market visitors. Note: estimates are preliminary and subject to change. Overseas spending estimates reflect face-to-face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida, not transactions made overseas or online. Source: Overseas estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other in0dependent research sources. Partner Tools GROWTH Country Profiles Merchant Category Data TOP INTERNATIONAL COUNTRIES FOR FLORIDA REGIONS Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Growth Markets 4,653,000 32% $5,716,200,000 36% Brazil 1,817,000 12% $2,384,100,000 15% Argentina 808,000 5% $988,700,000 6% Venezuela 617,000 4% $559,900,000 3% Mexico 416,000 3% $399,700,000 2% Colombia 369,000 2% $605,200,000 4% Other 627,000 4% $778,500,000 5% Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Growth Markets 4,653,000 100% $5,716,200,000 100% Brazil 1,817,000 39% $2,384,100,000 42% Argentina 808,000 17% $988,700,000 17% Venezuela 617,000 13% $559,900,000 10% Mexico 416,000 9% $399,700,000 7% Colombia 369,000 8% $605,200,000 11% Other 627,000 13% $778,500,000 14% overview Growth markets include those countries from which Florida is seeing strong current and projected future visitation. Top growth markets for Florida include Argentina, Brazil, Columbia, Mexico and Venezuela. Combined, they provided about a third of Florida’s 2013 international visitors. Because opportunities may be of short or longer duration and occur for a variety of reasons, some of these markets offer better potential return on the Florida marketing investment than others. Florida continues to benefit from the addition of lift in many growth markets.
  • 127. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 126 Total Florida Emerging Market overview Emerging markets are countries that represent a small percentage of Florida’s current international visitors but have the potential to be much stronger feeder markets in the future. At present, these markets represent 9 percent of Florida’s International visitors. Emerging markets include: Australia, China, India, Japan, South Korea and Russia. Highlights: Asia • Chinese visitors generally travel in large groups, but individual travel is increasing. • Peak travel months for Chinese visitors are February, July, August and October – coinciding with school breaks, the Chinese New Year and National Day. • Indian visitors traveling for leisure tend to be families with kids traveling independently or with a tour group. • Peak travel times for Indian visitors to Florida are April to June. • India’s luxury travel sector is expected to see strong growth in the coming year. Note: Highlights reflect long-haul travelers who take trips that, point to point, require multipledays in a car or 7 hours or more in a plane. Note: estimates are preliminary and subject to change Overseas spending estimates reflect face-to-face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida, not transactions made overseas or online. Source: Overseas estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other independent research sources. Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Emerging Markets 1,259,000 8.5% $1,114,800,000 6.9% Australia 303,000 2.1% $218,200,000 1.4% China 266,000 1.8% $253,500,000 1.6% Japan 255,000 1.7% $84,800,000 0.5% Russia 95,000 0.6% $213,000,000 1.3% South Korea 73,000 0.5% $33,600,000 0.2% India 47,000 0.3% $84,800,000 0.5% Other Emerging 221,000 1.5% $227,000,000 1.4% EMERGING MARKETS AS A PERCENTAGE OF INTERNATIONAL VOLUME AND SPEND This table shows the volume and spending contribution of different emerging market countries to Florida’s total international visitor volume and spending numbers. Emerging markets comprise nearly 9 percent of Florida’s international visitors and 7 percent of spending by international visitors. Partner Tools EMERGING Country Profiles Merchant Category Data TOP INTERNATIONAL COUNTRIES FOR FLORIDA REGIONS Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Emerging Markets 1,259,000 8.5% $1,114,800,000 6.9% Australia 303,000 2.1% $218,200,000 1.4% China 266,000 1.8% $253,500,000 1.6% Japan 255,000 1.7% $84,800,000 0.5% Russia 95,000 0.6% $213,000,000 1.3% South Korea 73,000 0.5% $33,600,000 0.2% India 47,000 0.3% $84,800,000 0.5% Other 221,000 1.5% $227,000,000 1.4% Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Emerging Markets 1,259,000 100% $1,114,800,000 100% Australia 303,000 24% $218,200,000 20% China 266,000 21% $253,500,000 23% Japan 255,000 20% $84,800,000 8% Russia 95,000 8% $213,000,000 19% South Korea 73,000 6% $33,600,000 3% India 47,000 4% $84,800,000 8% Other 221,000 18% $227,000,000 20%
  • 128. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 127 Total Florida Emerging Market Highlights: Australia and Russia • Australia continued to show strong growth in both visitation and spend. • Russia, although relatively small in visitation by comparison, showed a 24% increase in visitation and a 23% increase in spend, year-over-year. Note: Highlights reflect long-haul travelers who take trips that, point to point, require multipledays in a car or 7 hours or more in a plane. Note: estimates are preliminary and subject to change Overseas spending estimates reflect face-to-face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida, not transactions made overseas or online. Source: Overseas estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other independent research sources. Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Emerging Markets 1,259,000 100% $1,114,800,000 100% Australia 303,000 24% $218,200,000 20% China 266,000 21% $253,500,000 23% Japan 255,000 20% $84,800,000 8% Russia 95,000 8% $213,000,000 19% South Korea 73,000 6% $33,600,000 3% India 47,000 4% $84,800,000 8% Other Emerging 221,000 18% $227,000,000 20% Partner Tools EMERGING Country Profiles Merchant Category Data TOP INTERNATIONAL COUNTRIES FOR FLORIDA REGIONS Individual EMERGING MARKET COUNTRIES VOLUME AND SPEND This table compares the volume and spending contribution of individual emerging market countries as a percentage of combined emerging market volume and spending. Australia comprises 24 percent of the volume of all emerging market visitors combined and provides 20 percent of the spending by emerging market visitors.Volume International Percent Spend International Percent Emerging Markets 1,259,000 8.5% $1,114,800,000 6.9% Australia 303,000 2.1% $218,200,000 1.4% China 266,000 1.8% $253,500,000 1.6% Japan 255,000 1.7% $84,800,000 0.5% Russia 95,000 0.6% $213,000,000 1.3% South Korea 73,000 0.5% $33,600,000 0.2% India 47,000 0.3% $84,800,000 0.5% Other 221,000 1.5% $227,000,000 1.4% Volume Market Percent Spend Market Percent Emerging Markets 1,259,000 100% $1,114,800,000 100% Australia 303,000 24% $218,200,000 20% China 266,000 21% $253,500,000 23% Japan 255,000 20% $84,800,000 8% Russia 95,000 8% $213,000,000 19% South Korea 73,000 6% $33,600,000 3% India 47,000 4% $84,800,000 8% Other 221,000 18% $227,000,000 20% overview Emerging markets are countries that represent a small percentage of Florida’s current international visitors but have the potential to be much stronger feeder markets in the future. At present, these markets represent 9 percent of Florida’s International visitors. Emerging markets include: Australia, China, India, Japan, South Korea and Russia.
  • 129. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 128 CORE, GROWTH AND EMERGING MARKET volume INTERNATIONAL VISITOR VOLUME (2013) Note: estimate is preliminary and subject to change Source: Canadian estimates derived using historical trend data obtained from Statistics Canada as well as other research. All other estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other independent research sources. Volume Core Markets 7,476,000 Growth Markets 4,653,000 Emerging Markets 1,259,000 Other Markets 1,370,000 Total International 14,759,000 Core. These markets comprise nearly 51 percent of Florida’s international visitor volume, with Canada alone accounting for 25 percent of the international visitation to Florida. Growth. Mexico and South America make up nearly 32 percent of Florida’s international visitor volume. Emerging. The emerging markets currently account for nearly 9 percent of Florida’s international visitor volume – an increase of 11 percent from 2012 to 2013. Partner Tools INTERNATIONAL VOLUME FOR FLORIDA REGIONS
  • 130. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 129 INTERNATIONAL VISITOR SPEND (2013) Note: estimate is preliminary and subject to change Spending estimates, excluding Canada, reflect face-to-face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida, not transactions made overseas or online. Source: Canadian estimate reflects 2012 data obtained from Statistics Canada, since 2013 data has not been received. All other estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other independent research sources. Spending Core Markets $7,083,500,000 Growth Markets $5,716,200,000 Emerging Markets $1,114,800,000 Other Markets $2,170,800,000 Total International $16,085,300,000 CORE, GROWTH AND EMERGING MARKET SPEND Core. These markets accounted for 44 percent of the spending by international visitors in the state, with Canada accounting for 27 percent of the international spending here. Growth. The growth markets represent 36 percent of spending by international visitors in the state and from 2012 to 2013 their spending has increased 23 percent. Emerging. The emerging markets account for 7 percent of spending by international visitors. Partner Tools INTERNATIONAL Spend FOR FLORIDA REGIONS Merchant Category Data
  • 131. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 130 Two-Year Comparisons This table shows [two-year] changes in volume and spending by key core, growth and emerging markets. Between 2012 and 2013, the number of international visitors increased 6 percent while spending by these visitors increased 8 percent. Note: estimates are preliminary and subject to change Source: Canadian visitation estimate derived using trend data obtained from Statistics Canada and the spending estimate reflects 2012 data, since 2013 data has not been received. All other international estimates are extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for the 2013 and incorporate data from other independent research sources. CORE, GROWTH AND EMERGING MARKET TRENDS International visitation rose 6 percent and spend rose 8 percent from 2012 to 2013. In real numbers: an additional 832,000 visitors and $1.2 billion. The largest increase in volume was from growth markets, which sent an additional 472,000 visitors to the state. Growth markets also accounted for the largest increase in spending, up 23 percent in 2013 to reach $5.7 billion. Two Year Comparison Visitor Volume 2012-13 Visitor Spending 2012-13 Volume Change '13/'12 Spending Change '13/'12 Total International 14,759,000 6% 16,085,300,000 8% Core Markets 7,476,000 3% 7,083,500,000 0% Canada 3,705,000 4% 4,383,500,000 0% Europe 3,771,000 1% 2,700,000,000 0% Growth Markets 4,653,000 11% 5,716,200,000 23% South America 4,237,000 12% 5,316,500,000 25% Mexico 416,000 7% 399,700,000 5% Emerging Markets 1,259,000 11% 1,114,800,000 15% Other Markets 1,370,000 3% 2,170,800,000 1% Volume Change '13/'12 Spending Change '13/'12 Total International 14,759,000 6% 16,085,300,000 8% Core Markets 7,476,000 3% 7,083,500,000 0% Canada 3,705,000 4% 4,383,500,000 0% Europe 3,771,000 1% 2,700,000,000 0% Growth Markets 4,653,000 11% 5,716,200,000 23% South America 4,237,000 12% 5,316,500,000 25% Mexico 416,000 7% 399,700,000 5% Emerging Markets 1,259,000 11% 1,114,800,000 15% Other Markets 1,370,000 3% 2,170,800,000 1% Highlights • In 2013, Canada and Europe sent more than 7 million visitors to Florida. Canadian visitation was up 4 percent and European visitation was up 1 percent. Spending remained steady. • Though emerging markets at present contribute a small percentage of the international volume and spend, two-year trends indicate volume increased by 11 percent and spend increased by 15 percent. • The momentum is in the growth markets: up 11 percent in volume and 23 percent in spend. Note: Percent increase reflects unrounded numbers.
  • 132. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 131 Market Comparisons: VISITOR VOLUME 2012-13* This bar graph compares the growth of core, growth and emerging markets between 2012 and 2013. Core markets increased 3 percent. By comparison, both growth and emerging markets grew 11 percent. In millions * estimates are preliminary and subject to change Source: International estimates include Canadian estimates derived using historical trend data obtained from Statistics Canada as well as other research sources; and all other international estimates are based on and extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other independent research sources. Two Year Comparison Visitor Volume 2012-13 Visitor Spending 2012-13 Volume Change '13/'12 Spending Change '13/'12 Total International 14,759,000 6% 16,085,300,000 8% Core Markets 7,476,000 3% 7,083,500,000 0% Canada 3,705,000 4% 4,383,500,000 0% Europe 3,771,000 1% 2,700,000,000 0% Growth Markets 4,653,000 11% 5,716,200,000 23% South America 4,237,000 12% 5,316,500,000 25% Mexico 416,000 7% 399,700,000 5% Emerging Markets 1,259,000 11% 1,114,800,000 15% Other Markets 1,370,000 3% 2,170,800,000 1% CORE, GROWTH AND EMERGING MARKET TRENDS International visitation rose 6 percent and spend rose 8 percent from 2012 to 2013. In real numbers: an additional 832,000 visitors and $1.2 billion. The largest increase in volume was from growth markets, which sent an additional 472,000 visitors to the state. Growth markets also accounted for the largest increase in spending, up 23 percent in 2013 to reach $5.7 billion. Highlights • In 2013, Canada and Europe sent more than 7 million visitors to Florida. Canadian visitation was up 4 percent and European visitation was up 1 percent. Spending remained steady. • Though emerging markets at present contribute a small percentage of the international volume and spend, two-year trends indicate volume increased by 11 percent and spend increased by 15 percent. • The momentum is in the growth markets: up 11 percent in volume and 23 percent in spend. Note: Percent increase reflects unrounded numbers.
  • 133. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 132 Market Comparisons: VISITOR spend 2012-13 This bar graph compares the increased total visitor spending by core, growth and emerging markets. Spending by core market visitors remained steady and spending by visitors from growth markets increased by 23 percent. In billions * 2013 estimates are preliminary and subject to change. Note: Spending estimates, excluding Canada, reflect face to face card transactions and cash withdrawn in Florida, not transactions overseas or online. Source: Canadian estimate reflects 2012 data, since 2013 data has not been received. All other international estimates are based on and extrapolated from aggregate card usage data provided by VisaVue® Travel for 2013 and incorporate data from other independent sources. Two Year Comparison Visitor Volume 2012-13 Visitor Spending 2012-13 Volume Change '13/'12 Spending Change '13/'12 Total International 14,759,000 6% 16,085,300,000 8% Core Markets 7,476,000 3% 7,083,500,000 0% Canada 3,705,000 4% 4,383,500,000 0% Europe 3,771,000 1% 2,700,000,000 0% Growth Markets 4,653,000 11% 5,716,200,000 23% South America 4,237,000 12% 5,316,500,000 25% Mexico 416,000 7% 399,700,000 5% Emerging Markets 1,259,000 11% 1,114,800,000 15% Other Markets 1,370,000 3% 2,170,800,000 1% CORE, GROWTH AND EMERGING MARKET TRENDS International visitation rose 6 percent and spend rose 8 percent from 2012 to 2013. In real numbers: an additional 832,000 visitors and $1.2 billion. The largest increase in volume was from growth markets, which sent an additional 472,000 visitors to the state. Growth markets also accounted for the largest increase in spending, up 23 percent in 2013 to reach $5.7 billion. Highlights • In 2013, Canada and Europe sent more than 7 million visitors to Florida. Canadian visitation was up 4 percent and European visitation was up 1 percent. Spending remained steady. • Though emerging markets at present contribute a small percentage of the international volume and spend, two-year trends indicate volume increased by 11 percent and spend increased by 15 percent. • The momentum is in the growth markets: up 11 percent in volume and 23 percent in spend. Note: Percent increase reflects unrounded numbers.
  • 134. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 133 COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE For three consecutive years, Florida has experienced record international visitation, increasing 7 percent from 2012 to 2013 alone. In comparison, international tourist arrivals to the U.S. grew only 5 percent as reported by the World Tourism Organizations (WTO) Barometer. For 2014, the WTO forecasts that international tourist arrivals will grow 3 to 4 percent and average 3.8 percent growth over the decade. By regions, the strongest growth is projected for Asia and the Pacific (5-6%), followed by Africa (4-6%), Europe (3-4%), the Americas (3-4%), and the Middle East (0-5%). Competition for international travelers is fierce and includes countries with tourism marketing budgets that significantly exceed Florida’s. Across the complex multi-nation landscape that comprises Florida’s international markets, one thing is consistent: Competitive pressure for Florida’s visitors continues to increase. Lift, trade and awareness continue to be critical to our success. As more competitors enter the fray, Florida’s long time in the market can offer a significant advantage – if the Florida brand remains strong.
  • 135. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 134 Competitive Long-Haul Destinations These tables show the most popular long-haul destinations for those core markets that are especially important to Florida. CANADA* Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of arrivals) 2012 % of total long-haul Cuba 1,072 9.8% France 931 8.5% United Kingdom 745 6.8% China 708 6.4% Dominican Republic 690 6.3% FRANCE Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of departures) 2012 % of total long-haul United States 1,456 11.2% Thailand 576 4.5% China 525 4.1% Canada 455 3.5% Guadeloupe 428 3.3% GERMANY Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of departures) 2012 % of total long-haul United States 1,876 17.9% Egypt 1,165 11.1% Thailand 682 6.5% Russian Federation 672 6.4% China 660 6.3% UNITED KINGDOM Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of arrivals) 2012 % of total long-haul United States 3,763 21.9% Egypt 1,012 5.9% Thailand 873 5.1% United Arab Emirates 825 4.8% India 788 4.6% *Because the U.S. is not a long-haul destination for its neighbor, it does not appear in this chart. However, Florida is the top worldwide destination for Canada, attracting 10 percent of its population. Note: Competitive information is made available by the U.S. Travel Association. Revised numbers will be updated when they come available. Source: Oxford Economics Tourism Decision Metrics, U.S. Travel Association Partner Tools CORE Country Profiles
  • 136. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 135 Competitive Long-Haul Destinations These tables show the most popular long-haul destinations for those growth markets that are especially important to Florida. BRAZIL Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of arrivals) 2012 % of total long-haul United States 1,791 28.0% France 1,170 18.3% Portugal 479 7.5% Spain 409 6.4% Italy 311 4.9% MEXICO* Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of arrivals) 2012 % of total long-haul France 364 18.3% Spain 274 13.8% Canada 142 7.1% Italy 100 5.0% Colombia 99 5.0% *Because the U.S. is not a long-haul destination for its neighbor, it does not appear in this chart. However, the U.S. is the top worldwide destination for Mexico. Note: Competitive information is made available by the U.S. Travel Association. Revised numbers will be updated when they come available. Source: Oxford Economics Tourism Decision Metrics, U.S. Travel Association Partner Tools GROWTH Country Profiles
  • 137. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 136 Competitive Long-Haul Destinations These tables show the most popular long-haul destinations for those emerging markets that are especially important to Florida. AUSTRALIA Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of departures) 2012 % of total long-haul United States 1,122 9.5% Thailand 954 8.1% United Kingdom 954 8.1% Indonesia 858 7.3% China 710 6.0% CHINA Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of arrivals) 2012 % of total long-haul United States 1,474 14.8% France 1,394 14.0% Russian Federation 830 8.3% Germany 757 7.6% Australia 626 6.3% INDIA Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of arrivals) 2012 % of total long-haul Saudi Arabia 999 15.4% United Arab Emirates 895 13.8% Dubai 764 11.8% Bahrain 755 11.6% United States 724 11.2% SOUTH KOREA Top Long-Haul Destinations (Thousands of departures) 2012 % of total long-haul United States 1,251 35.4% Australia 194 5.5% France 181 5.1% Germany 166 4.7% Slovakia 163 4.6% Note: Competitive information is made available by the U.S. Travel Association. Revised numbers will be updated when they come available. Source: Oxford Economics Tourism Decision Metrics, U.S. Travel Association Partner Tools EMERGING Country Profiles
  • 138. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 137 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Changing MARKET landscapes Core Even with the recent dip in the currency exchange rate, Canada continues to send approximately 10 percent of its population to Florida to visit. A strong travel connection between the two countries and a strong Canadian economy should offset any potential declines resulting from current exchange rate issues. Europe seems to have stabilized after the economic challenges of previous years, with promising growth from Germany. Growth In Brazil, Florida fares well against other U.S. destinations and has excellent prospects for continued strength. However, the rate of growth from this market has begun to slow - no surprise given the degree of Florida’s dominance. Emerging According to the World Tourism Organization, China is the fastest-growing tourism source market in the world. Volume increased to 83 million travelers in 2012 and spending was a record $102 billion. A growing middle class in some emerging markets will continue to change the map of world tourism. Across core, growth and emerging markets, five challenges prevail either as barriers to or predictors of success.
  • 139. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 138 ACCESS For all travelers, access is of prime importance, but for long-haul visitors it is especially powerful. Within core markets, it is crucial that Florida strengthen its support of new international airlift because carriers have a variety of destination options around the world to place their aircraft. Flights from Latin America continue to grow as a result of adding both capacity to existing patterns and new departure cities. Florida is beginning to see direct service from emerging markets, a trend that should be encouraged. INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Across core, growth and emerging markets, five challenges prevail either as barriers to or predictors of success.
  • 140. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 139 PARTNERSHIPS In-country travel industry partnerships are critical because they multiply Florida’s limited investments through co-op marketing efforts. In countries and markets where Florida has strong co-op partnerships with powerful travel brands, Florida has been able to increase the relevance of its messaging and achieve greater presence. Traditionally, the international co-op partners also provide an important conversion call to action. INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Across core, growth and emerging markets, five challenges prevail either as barriers to or predictors of success.
  • 141. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 140 BRAND In many core countries, the Florida brand is well established and Florida will continue to expand and build on consumer awareness in a variety of ways. In emerging countries, with the advent of Brand USA, Florida will be able to position itself geographically and thematically within the U.S. and leverage significant co-op buying power to the benefit of the brand. Florida’s strong network of industry partners offers unique opportunities for collaborative efforts that have the potential to trump competitive brands in specific global markets. INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Across core, growth and emerging markets, five challenges prevail either as barriers to or predictors of success.
  • 142. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 141 DIGITAL LANDSCAPE Consumer media consumption patterns and preferences differ from market to market and effective communications take national and cultural boundaries into consideration. However, in a global digital environment, there are few boundaries. Consumers will access the Florida brand in multiple ways outside their own national and cultural walls. Local preferences must be balanced against global brand consistency. Florida must establish and sustain a stronger digital presence that reinforces brand truths that are relevant across all markets. INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Across core, growth and emerging markets, five challenges prevail either as barriers to or predictors of success.
  • 143. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 142 2014-15 INTERNATIONAL PLATFORM In fiscal year 2014-15, VISIT FLORIDA will continue to evolve its global brand and build a multi-year plan to maintain share in its strongest markets while growing awareness in growth and emerging markets. Cross-departmental efforts will continue to support Florida’s brand positioning, balancing local customization with brand consistency needs. Co-op continues to be an important tactic for achieving reach and conversion. VISIT FLORIDA will continue to dedicate significant research dollars and other resources to build a strategic foundation for its international platform. This vision will be achieved by aligning departmental efforts with the eight objectives from the 2020 plan: 1. Yield – Increase gross taxable sales through tourism. 2. Volume – Increase the number of visitors coming to Florida. 3. Share – Maintain our share of visitors from domestic and international markets while growing share in specific markets. 4. Brand Engagement – Build relationships with visitors through highly relevant content and experiences. 5. Destination Diversity – Grow economic activity throughout the state by encouraging visitation to geographically diverse destinations and participation in a broader range of activities. 6. Partner Participation – Improve Partner investment and engagement in VISIT FLORIDA programs. 7. Investment Efficiency – Optimize organization spending to deliver increased results in the most cost-effective way. 8. Influence – Grow perceived desirability and intent to travel to Florida.
  • 144. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 143 INTERNATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Target high yield visitors within foundation and growth markets through trade relationships and with owned, earned and paid media (INT 1) • Expand custom content production and distribution (INT 2) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Begin development of Destination Plus information/training for car rental companies, industry businesses, etc. (IR 10) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 1) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Attend tourism-focused, diversity-related conferences and events, and strengthen relations with media (i.e. LGBT, African American)(PR 3) • Employ promotions targeting key international markets (PROMO 2) • Employ promotions featuring unique experiences, less-traveled destinations, and multi-market prize packages (PROMO 3) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3)
  • 145. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 144 INTERNATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Increase value of co-op to Partners with year round and bundled packages (A/I 2) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Expand geographic footprint in targeted core and growth markets through trade programs and direct to consumer campaigns (INT 3) • Develop relationships with airlines and airports to support route development (INT 4) • Leverage Air Team Florida grants to support route development (INT 5) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Attend tourism-focused, diversity-related conferences and events, and strengthen relations with media (i.e. LGBT, African American)(PR 3) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 4) • Employ promotions targeting key international markets (PROMO 2) • Establish tours for relationship building with industry partners (PROMO 6) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3)
  • 146. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 145 INTERNATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Increase in-market presence in foundation countries to stabilize Florida brand strength in the face of increased competition (INT 6) • Participate in Brand USA programs that introduce Florida to new markets where there is a high product affinity by potential visitors (INT 7) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 1) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3) • Expand access to data that identifies projected changes in key markets (RSRCH 5)
  • 147. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 146 INTERNATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Integrate the Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Expand custom content production and distribution (INT 2) • Create events for B2B networking for Florida Partners through trade shows, missions and signature events (INT 8) • Leverage Brand USA trade opportunities to develop and expand B2B relationships (INT 9) • Develop educational programming for travel trade through FAM trips and in- agency trainings (INT 10) • Expand social media with consumers (INT 11) • Enhance international digital and mobile platforms to reach and influence consumers in their native language (INT 12) • Secure Partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Build new strategic alliance Partners and partnerships with emerging tourism sectors (IR 4) • Build and sustain relations with media and social influencers throughout domestic and international markets (PR 1) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Create and support significant marketing and PR campaigns that sustain and grow the Florida brand (PR 5) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Collaborate with DMO Partners during each quarter to pitch stories and host media visits that yield larger awareness of the state through earned media (PR 7) • Build and create information tools to support marketing initiatives (RSRCH 2) • Present and distribute research findings to VF Partners and employees (RSRCH 3)
  • 148. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 147 INTERNATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Integrate the Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Expand custom content production and distribution (INT 2) • Develop relationships with airlines and airports to support route development (INT 4) • Leverage Air Team Florida grants to support route development (INT 5) • Enhance international digital and mobile platforms to reach and influence consumers in their native language (INT 12) • Expand relationships with international media through media FAM trips, participation in international media events and tradeshows, and targeted pitching (INT 13) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets) (PR 2) • Attend tourism-focused, diversity-related conferences and events, and strengthen relations with media (i.e. LGBT, African American)(PR 3) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Collaborate with DMO Partners during each quarter to pitch stories and host media visits that yield larger awareness of the state through earned media (PR 7)
  • 149. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 148 INTERNATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Increase value of co-op to Partners with year round and bundled packages (A/I 2) • Integrate Welcome Centers into VISIT FLORIDA marketing and digital platforms (A/I 3) (VS 4) • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Re-integrate the management of international advertising into the VISIT FLORIDA Advertising department (A/I 8) • Create events for B2B networking for Florida Partners through trade shows, missions and signature events (INT 8) • Develop educational programming for travel trade through FAM trips and in-agency trainings (INT 10) • Create a buffet of international co-op opportunities for Partners, leveraging the Florida brand strength (INT 14) • Participate in Partner Road Shows to inform Partners about international opportunities (INT 15) • Secure partnerships with tourism industry and marketing organizations that support specific objectives and initiatives (IR 1) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Evolve the value proposition for VISIT FLORIDA Partnership (IR 3) • Gather input and feedback from Partners to evolve/ improve VISIT FLORIDA strategy service and relevance (IR 5) • Collaborate with partner trade associations to maximize benefits for all industry Partners (IR 7) • Refresh VISITFLORIDA.org (IR 8) • Launch Analytics and ROI Initiative (IR 15) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets)(PR2) • Create and support marketing and PR campaigns that sustain and grow the Florida brand (PR 5) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Collaborate with DMO Partners during each quarter to pitch stories and host media visits that yield larger awareness of the state through earned media (PR 7) • Employ promotions targeting key international markets (PROMO 2)
  • 150. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 149 INTERNATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Re-integrate the management of international advertising into the VISIT FLORIDA Advertising department (A/I 8) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Re-integrate international advertising within the VISIT FLORIDA Advertising department (INT 16) • Re-integrate international PR efforts within the VISIT FLORIDA Public Relations department (INT 17) • Leverage Partner investment in co-op to extend international reach beyond VISIT FLORIDA’s investment (INT 18) • Leverage Brand USA programs to maximize awareness and conversion programs (INT 19) • Develop and execute Partner road show program (IR 2) • Gather input and feedback from Partners to evolve/ improve VISIT FLORIDA strategy service and relevance (IR 5) • Facilitate conversation between larger and smaller DMOs to encourage cross- promotion (IR 6) • Launch Analytics and ROI Initiative (IR 15) • Plan and execute media receptions and desk-side missions in domestic and international markets (key and emerging markets) (PR 2) • Align in-market media missions and collaborative pitching with press visits and media relations that support earned media results for the brand (PR 6) • Employ promotions targeting key international markets (PROMO 2) • Establish tours for relationship building with industry partners (PROMO 6) • Conduct studies to measure VF campaign and program performance (RSRCH 1)
  • 151. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 150 INTERNATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Develop and foster marketing partnerships that gain media exposure and in-market engagement (A/I 7) • Evolve our branded content to build relationships with target segments (A/I 9) • Continue awareness testing, focus groups and other ad effectiveness research (A/I 12)
  • 152. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 151 Date Location JULY 2014 Gala Awards Dinner - VUSA Ball 7/3/14 London, England DMAI 7/21-23/2014 Las Vegas, NV NEW Australia Sales Mission 7/TBD/2014 TBD Australia AUGUST 2014 MP IncentiveWorks 8/19-20/2014 Toronto, Ontario Irish Summer Event 8/30/14 Dublin, Ireland US Consulates Road Show 8/TBD/2015 Guangzhou, China SEPTEMBER 2014 India V.I.P. event 9/8-12/2014 Mumbai India Mission 9/8-12/2014 Mumbai, New Delhi, TBD, India NEW Routes Rendevous 9/20/14 Chicago, IL Routes World Forum 9/20-23/2014 Chicago, IL Governor's Conference 9/22-24/2014 Boca Raton, FL Brazil V.I.P. (around ABAV) 9/24-28/2014 Sao Paulo, Brazil ABAV & PR ABAV 9/24-28/2014 Sao Paulo, Brazil Nordic Sales Mission 9/TBD/2014 Oslo, Norway; Copenhagen, Denmark; Stockholm, Sweden US Consulates Road Show 9/TBD/2014 Chengdu/Chongqing, China UK Summer Event (Jamie Oliver) 9/TBD/2014 Goodwood, England OCTOBER 2014 SITV (Montreal) 10/24-26/2014 Montreal, Quebec FIT 10/25-28/2014 Buenos Airea, Argentina NEW FIT V.I.P. Event 10/25-28/2014 Buenos Airea, Argentina ITB Asia 10/29-31/2014 Singapore China Travel Trade FAM 10/TBD/2014 Florida NEW German V.I.P. Event 10/TBD/2014 Munich, Germany Date Location NOVEMBER 2014 Florida UK Night 11/3/14 London, England World Travel Market 11/3-6/2014 London, England NEW CITM 11/13-16/2014 Shanghai, China MP EIBTM 11/18-20/2014 Barcelona, Spain China Media Individual FAM 11/TBD/2014 Florida DECEMBER 2014 Marketing Retreat 12/TBD/2014 Florida JANUARY 2015 TWIGS 1/12-13/2015 Palm Beach, FL Florida Huddle 1/14-16/2015 Fort Lauderdale, FL Vakantiebeurs 1/15-18/2015 Utrecht, Netherlands UK/Ireland Tour Operator FAM (post huddle) 1/17-21/2015 Florida Holiday World Dublin 1/23-25/2015 Dublin, Ireland SATTE 1/29-31/2015 New Delhi Gala Awards Dinner 1/TBD/2015 Dublin, Ireland NEW French Tour Operator FAM (pre/post Huddle) 1/TBD/2015 Florida German Tour Operator FAM (pre/post Huddle) 1/TBD/2015 Florida FEBRUARY 2015 RSAA 2/3-4/2015 Las Vegas, NV NEW VUSA Workshops - France 2/TBD/2015 France ANATO 2/TBD/2015 Bogota, Colombia Colombia Sales Mission 2/TBD/2015 Medellin & Bogota International TRADE & EVENTS CALENDAR Italicized denotes a program produced by VISIT FLORIDA MP: Denotes Meeting Planners Program **** Denotes VISIT FLORIDA participation only PR: Denotes Public Relations Program New Programs are bolded
  • 153. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 152 Date Location MARCH 2015 Canuck Connection 3/1/15 Calgary, Canada ITB Signature Event: Pan Am Late Night 3/5/15 Berlin, Germany ITB 3/6-10/2015 Berlin, Germany LGBT Party at ITB 3/TBD/2015 Berlin, Germany NEW Ottawa Outdoor Show 3/TBD/2015 Ottawa, Canada US Consulates Road Show 3/TBD/2015 China TBD India Trade FAM 3/TBD/2015 Florida Brand USA Seminar - India 3/TBD/2015 India TBD APRIL 2015 US Consulates Road Show 4/TBD/2015 China TBD WTM - LATAM 4/TBD/2015 Sao Paulo, Brazil China Sales Mission 4/TBD/2015 Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou, Chengdu, Hangzhou, China NEW Pan-European Sales Mission 4/TBD/2015 Europe TBD MP Ignite 4/TBD/2015 Toronto, Ontario Brazil Mission 4/TBD/2015 Sao Paulo, Porto Alegre & Manaus UK Tour Operator Advisory Luncheon 4/TBD/2015 London, England MAY 2015 MP IMEX 5/19-21/2015 Frankfurt, Germany Int'l Pow Wow (IPW) 5/30-6/3/2015 Orlando, FL Arabian Travel Mart 5/TBD/2015 Dubai, UAE China Media Group FAM 5/TBD/2015 Florida Brand USA Seminar - India 5/TBD/2015 India TBD Irish Luncheon 5/TBD/2015 Dublin, Ireland JUNE 2015 Toronoto Jazz Fest 6/1/15 Toronto, Ontario IPW Post FAMs 6/TBD/2015 Florida Le Mans 6/TBD/2015 Le Mans, France IAGTO N.A. Conference 6/TBD/2015 Palm Springs, CA Date Location ONGOING University of VF (Specialist Program) ongoing Canada Latin America Sales Activity ongoing Brazil; Argentina Brazil Tour Operator Programs ongoing Brazil UK Sales Calls ongoing UK/Ireland Europe Sales Calls ongoing Germany, Switzerland, Austria China Sales Calls ongoing India Sales Calls ongoing E-learning (Specialist Program) ongoing LATAM Italicized denotes a program produced by VISIT FLORIDA MP: Denotes Meeting Planners Program **** Denotes VISIT FLORIDA participation only PR: Denotes Public Relations Program New Programs are bolded International TRADE & EVENTS CALENDAR
  • 154. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 153 Business TRAVEL VOLUME 2012 Data for 2012 business travel is derived from domestic visitation only. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Business Volume Purpose Importanceof the Meeting and Conventions Market In 2012, nearly 8 million business travelers accounted for 10 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors. Compared to 2011, the volume of business travelers is down from nearly 9 million in 2011, as is the percentage of business travelers contributing to Florida’s domestic total (12% in 2011). Nearly 60 percent of business travelers to Florida in 2012 came for conventions, meetings, seminars and training. More than two-thirds of business visitors to Florida travel alone and go to the central and southeast regions of the state. Purpose Partner Tools Business Travel Destinations Business Travel Origin States
  • 155. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 154 Business TRAVEL PURPOSE 2012 Data for 2012 business travel is derived from domestic visitation only. This chart shows the reason for travel by Florida’s business visitors – who account for 10 percent of all Florida’s visitors. Note: Transient business includes travel primarily for consulting/client services, inspection/audit, construction/repair, sales/purchasing, government/military, and other business. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Importanceof the Meeting and Conventions Market Business Volume Purpose Partner Tools Business Travel Destinations Business Travel Origin States MEETINGS TRAVELER PROFILE In 2012, nearly 8 million business travelers accounted for 10 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors. Compared to 2011, the volume of business travelers is down from nearly 9 million in 2011, as is the percentage of business travelers contributing to Florida’s domestic total (12% in 2011). Nearly 60 percent of business travelers to Florida in 2012 came for conventions, meetings, seminars and training. More than two-thirds of business visitors to Florida travel alone and go to the central and southeast regions of the state.
  • 156. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 155 Business vs. Leisure Spend AVERAGE EXPENDITURES PER DAY BY CATEGORY (2012) This chart compares the average daily spending of Florida’s business and leisure visitors by category. As shown by the chart, business visitors spend more in transportation, lodging and food & beverage than leisure visitors. Note: The survey was revised in 2012 enabling greater precision in estimating per-person-per-day spending than in the past. Improved survey logic eliminated non-responses for spending, leading individual averages to no longer be calculated off a common base; therefore, the sum of the sub-category averages will no longer equal the total average. Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates At $238 per day including transportation, the business traveler to Florida spends $98 more per day than the domestic leisure traveler. Business visitors spend 76 percent more on lodging and 28 percent more on food and beverage. The business visitor also spends more than double the amount leisure visitors spend on transportation. Importanceof the Meeting and Conventions Market Partner Tools Value of a Business Traveler MEETINGS TRAVELER PROFILE Average Expenditures Per Person Per Day With Transportation Without Transportation Business traveler $238 $140 Leisure traveler $140 $100 Categories
  • 157. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 156 CHANGING INDUSTRY LANDSCAPE According to a recent study by Price Waterhouse Coopers, the meetings industry contributed more than $115 billion to the national economy in 2012, putting an additional $88 billion into the economy through federal, state and local taxes. Even so, tough conditions over the past few years have created a value-focused industry that will be using a variety of approaches to reduce costs and optimize ROI. Overall, as meeting professionals focus on improving the value they deliver, there is increased pressure to innovate and a growing concern about the importance of social and mobile media. Highlights • Nearly half the planners surveyed by MPI report arranging their meetings on shorter notice. • Anecdotally, budget controls are tighter. The 2014 American Express Meetings and Events Forecast projects a more rigorous approval process for meeting budgets. • According to MPI, 24 percent of meeting planners are using technology to enhance face-to-face meetings and 30 percent are using technology to integrate on-site and remote meeting elements. Only 3 percent of planners are replacing face to face with virtual meetings. • According to a survey reported in Meetings Focus magazine, 52 percent of planners believe the economy is the biggest threat to the meetings industry. Partner Tools Florida Destinations Considered Florida Meeting Locations TOP 10 Meeting Trends For 2014 As reported by Benchmark Resorts and Hotels, and featured in the March 2014 ConventionSouth magazine. Need for Speed – Attendees often come with multiple wireless devices demanding greater bandwidth availability at meeting sites. Teambuilding – Groups often look for unique ways to motivate, inspire and build camaraderie as the business environment continues to improve. Web content is King – Planners increasingly use Google and other search engines to discover new properties. Be Healthy – Food and beverage in 2014 is all about health and variety. Planners and attendees want breaks that perk them up. Meeting demand and booking pace is on the upswing. Planners and attendees use Twitter and LinkedIn for communicating during events. Event apps are also becoming popular. Creating new, out-of-the-ordinary experiences is increasingly a factor in meeting destination decisions. Going green feels like the right thing to do, but remains an “uncritical factor” in property selection. ROI - More Meetings Accountability. Budgets are increasing. Traditional industry segments such as financial, pharmaceutical, insurance, and associations continue to meet the most. Healthcare industries are increasing and High Tech industries are on the rebound. 1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10
  • 158. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 157 HIGH ASSOCIATIONS CORPORATE SPORTSSMERF*/OTHER LOW APPROACH VISIT FLORIDA approaches the Meetings and Conventions market in two ways: by business segment and by affinity to Florida. Business segments are defined according to the type of organization holding the event. This segmentation allows VISIT FLORIDA to refine and focus messaging as well as leverage the distribution channels for each business segment. Segmentation by affinity enables VISIT FLORIDA to focus on planners who have the highest propensity to choose Florida as their destination.
  • 159. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 158 FLORIDA’S IMAGE As a meetings destination, Florida excels in a number of important categories. In addition to the outstanding destination and activity ratings expected of a global leisure destination, Florida also offers the advantage of high appeal with attendees, reasonable room rates and meeting costs, as well as affordable access. Where florida ranks Well Above the Average Highlights • Florida significantly outpaces other meeting destinations in outdoor recreation, beaches and golf. • In most categories, Florida is rated 50 percent higher than other destinations. Partner Tools Florida Destinations Considered Florida Meeting Locations Florida Percentage Average of Competitive Destinations Source: Smith Travel Research, Inc. DestinationMAP for VISIT FLORIDA
  • 160. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 159 Associations, Corporate, SMERF/Others AND SPORTS The meetings industry is generally organized into four business segments: Associations, Corporate/ Incentive, SMERF and Sports. VISIT FLORIDA reaches these four market segments through partnerships with the leading meetings and conventions industry organizations. Associations. With more than 1.9 million associations worldwide, this segment is important to VISIT FLORIDA. This business category includes non-profit organizations, universities and government agencies. Corporate/Incentive. This business segment includes for- profit organizations and businesses that use in-house or outside meeting planners to coordinate corporate meetings, trade shows and conventions, sales meetings and incentive travel. In the past few years, incentive travel has rebounded in the Sunshine State, with coastal properties seeing a 20- to 25-percent increase in this segment. SMERF. The SMERF segment includes independent planners who represent social/sports, military, education, religious and fraternal organizations. Third-party planners are also included in the category. SPORTS. Florida has a competitive advantage in the sports market, with year-round mild climate and diverse opportunities in the small, medium and large destinations in Florida. This segment continues to be stable in any economic situation. Florida offers an immense amount of diversity in hotels and facilities that meet the needs of all business segments. INDUSTRY COMPOSITION This chart shows the composition of the meetings industry by business segment based on the DestinationMAP comprehensive study of meeting planners and the meetings market in North America.
  • 161. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 160 AFFINITY TO FLORIDA Florida’s strength as a repeat destination for leisure travel holds true for meetings and conventions. Research has demonstrated that those who have previously held meetings in the Sunshine State are most likely to do so again. Given the 18- to 32-month planning cycle, keeping Florida top of mind requires maintaining contact with the most likely prospects throughout the planning cycle. HIGH AFFINITY Meeting planners who have held a meeting in Florida in the past 3 years or plan to in the next 3 years. LOW AFFINITY Meeting Planners who have not held a Florida meeting and are not currently planning one. Highlights •High-affinity meeting planners are more likely than low-affinity planners to be from the South (34% high, 24% low) and less likely to be from the West (4% high, 22% low). •High-affinity and low-affinity meeting planners are equally likely to hold major meetings that rotate among a set of destinations. •The number of meetings planners are organizing is on the rise. In the past year, high-affinity planners saw a 77-percent increase in the number of meetings planned (from 22 to 39) and low-affinity planners saw a 64-percent increase (from 14 to 23). •High-affinity and low-affinity planners book the majority of their major meetings in the U.S. •The high-affinity meeting planners are slightly more connected through social media, with an average of 11 social/business networks, compared to 5 for the low-affinity planner. Partner Tools BUSINESS TRAVEL ORIGIN STATES
  • 162. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 161 COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE California, Chicago, Las Vegas and Texas remain the most popular competitive destinations other than Florida that have hosted a meeting in the past three years. Between 2011 and 2013, California has taken the lead as a competing destination. Nevada (Las Vegas) has made significant gains over other competing destinations. STATE COMPETITORS FOR MOST RECENT MEETING Based on the DestinationMAP survey of planners (both high and low Florida affinity), when considering Florida as their meeting destination, one in five planners also considers California. Source: Smith Travel Research, Inc. DestinationMAP for VISIT FLORIDA
  • 163. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 162 Highlights • Six Florida cities rank in Cvent’s Top 50 Meetings Destinations for 2013: Orlando: 1; Miami: 9; Kissimmee: 23; Tampa: 28; Fort Lauderdale: 36; Hollywood: 39. • Orlando ranked No.1 in Corporate Meetings held in the past three years, and No.2 for Association Major Conventions held during the last three years. Average Ratings as Business Meeting Site, FloridaMAP 2013 Source: Smith Travel Research, Inc. DestinationMAP for VISIT FLORIDA High Florida Affinity Low Florida Affinity Partner Tools FLORIDA MEETING LOCATIONS Business Meeting Site In general, Florida rates exceptionally well as a business destination. The FloridaMap 2013 survey rated Florida 8.7 out of 10 as an ideal convention site, well ahead of the average rating by other destinations (7.3). Among planners who know Florida, there is an even more positive perception. Meeting planners who have held a meeting in Florida in the past three years (or plan to in the next three years) rate Florida higher than any competitive destinations. However, among planners who have not held a meeting in Florida in the past three years or are not planning to, Chicago and Southern California rank higher. Avg. Ratings as Business Meeting Site Avg. Ratings as Convention Site
  • 164. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 163 Avg. Ratings as Business Meeting Site Avg. Ratings as Convention Site Average Ratings as Convention Site, FloridaMAP 2013 Partner Tools FLORIDA MEETING LOCATIONS Source: Smith Travel Research, Inc. DestinationMAP for VISIT FLORIDA High Florida Affinity Low Florida Affinity Highlights • Six Florida cities rank in Cvent’s Top 50 Meetings Destinations for 2013: Orlando: 1; Miami: 9; Kissimmee: 23; Tampa: 28; Fort Lauderdale: 36; Hollywood: 39. • Orlando ranked No.1 in Corporate Meetings held in the past three years, and No.2 for Association Major Conventions held during the last three years. Convention Site In general, Florida rates exceptionally well as a business destination. The FloridaMap 2013 survey rated Florida 8.7 out of 10 as an ideal convention site, well ahead of the average rating by other destinations (7.3). Among planners who know Florida, there is an even more positive perception. Meeting planners who have held a meeting in Florida in the past three years (or plan to in the next three years) rate Florida higher than any competitive destinations. However, among planners who have not held a meeting in Florida in the past three years or are not planning to, Chicago and Southern California rank higher.
  • 165. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 164 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES VISIT FLORIDA uses five insights to prioritize and customize an approach to maintain share and increase the number of meetings held throughout the state. Top Five Attributes Florida continues to excel in the five attributes most important to meeting planners in selecting a site: convenient air service; easy access to major airports; reasonable food and lodging costs; affordable travel costs; and diverse hotel options.
  • 166. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 165 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Importance of references and word of mouth The majority of planners choose their event location based on previous experience, attendee feedback, and the reputation/image of the destination – all factors that work well for Florida. As Florida marketers are fond of saying, “those who know us, love us,” which suggests a potential opportunity to gain even more business by better leveraging the positive recommendations of highly successful and satisfied planners. VISIT FLORIDA uses five insights to prioritize and customize an approach to maintain share and increase the number of meetings held throughout the state.
  • 167. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 166 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES CONTINUED ECONOMY Following the economic downturn and event budget cuts, many planners traded large one- time events for smaller regional meetings. Although many organizations have recovered from extreme budget constraints and optimism is growing among planners, there is also a continued focus on reducing expenses. As reported by Conventionsouth.com, 17 percent of planners are booking more economical meeting sites and 68 percent are willing to change meeting dates to get deals. VISIT FLORIDA uses five insights to prioritize and customize an approach to maintain share and increase the number of meetings held throughout the state.
  • 168. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 167 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES Affinity Although Florida stands out as a meeting destination among both high- and low-Florida affinity planners, there is an opportunity to better promote Florida business attributes to these groups. Florida’s easy access for much of the eastern and southern U.S. has established Florida as a go-to destination for meetings and business. Florida’s exceptional service and value on top of easy access have created a repeat meetings planner group that is the core of Florida’s business. Future opportunities lie in the ability of Florida to continue serving this group. VISIT FLORIDA uses five insights to prioritize and customize an approach to maintain share and increase the number of meetings held throughout the state.
  • 169. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 168 INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES VISIT FLORIDA uses five insights to prioritize and customize an approach to maintain share and increase the number of meetings held throughout the state. Digital Adoption Meeting planners are increasingly looking to technology to help make site selection easier. Smart phone and tablet usage is increasing among planners and as a component of meetings. High-affinity planners are even more connected to social media, presenting an opportunity for Florida to better serve and connect with its industry.
  • 170. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 169 2014-15 MEETINGS PLATFORM In fiscal year 2014-2015, VISIT FLORIDA will continue to focus on strengthening relationships with Florida’s high- affinity planners through consistent communication efforts and improved service. The business platforms will continue to support Florida’s brand positioning and provide Partners with additional opportunities to reach Florida’s business travelers. This vision will be achieved by aligning departmental efforts with the eight objectives from the 2020 plan: 1. Yield – Increase gross taxable sales through tourism. 2. Volume – Increase the number of visitors coming to Florida. 3. Share – Maintain our share of visitors from domestic and international markets while growing share in specific markets. 4. Brand Engagement – Build relationships with visitors through highly relevant content and experiences. 5. Destination Diversity – Grow economic activity throughout the state by encouraging visitation to geographically diverse destinations and participation in a broader range of activities. 6. Partner Participation – Improve Partner investment and engagement in VISIT FLORIDA programs. 7. Investment Efficiency – Optimize organization spending to deliver increased results in the most cost-effective way. 8. Influence – Grow perceived desirability and intent to travel to Florida.
  • 171. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 170 MEETINGS OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Launch two-year initiatives: Business Plus; Incentive (MTG 7)
  • 172. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 171 MEETINGS OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Communications Initiative (editorial, email, social) (MTG 1) • Launch two-year initiatives: Soft Season Promotion (MTG 7)
  • 173. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 172 MEETINGS OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5) • Communications Initiative (editorial, email, social) (MTG 1) • Expand relationships with Meetings Media through FAM trips, communication program, and targeted story pitching (MTG 3) • Leverage Best in Class Partnerships to extend the Florida Meetings message through larger channels (MTG 6) • Launch two-year initiatives: Business Plus; Incentive; Soft Season Promotion (MTG 7)
  • 174. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 173 MEETINGS OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Communications Initiative (editorial, email, social) (MTG 1) • Create events for B2B networking for Florida Partners at trade shows and signature events (MTG 2)
  • 175. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 174 MEETINGS OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Expand relationships with Meetings Media through FAM trips, communication program, and targeted story pitching (MTG 3)
  • 176. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 175 MEETINGS OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Continue Signature and VIP events (MTG 4) • Increase benefit to Partners of participating with VF at large trade shows (MTG 5)
  • 177. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 176 MEETINGS OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Gather input and feedback from Partners to evolve/ improve VISIT FLORIDA strategy service and relevance (IR 5) • Analytics and ROI Initiative (IR 15) • Communications Initiative (editorial, email, social) (MTG 1) • Leverage Best in Class Partnerships to extend the Florida Meetings message through larger channels (MTG 6)
  • 178. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 177 MEETINGS OBJECTIVES 1. Yield 2. Volume 3. share 4. Brand Engagement 5. Destination Diversity 6. Partner Partcipation 7. Investment Efficiency 8. Influence DEPARTMENTAL TACTICS • Enrich the consumer digital experience with enhanced features and functionality on VISITFLORIDA.com (A/I 5)
  • 179. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan A/I: Advertising and Internet INT: International IR: Industry Relations MTG: Meetings PR: Public Relations PROMO: Promotions RSRCH: Research VS: Visitor Services 178 Date Location JULY 2014 DMAI 98th Annual Convention 7/21-23/2014 Las Vegas, NV MAZDA Race Planner Event - Indy TBD Indianapolis, IN AUGUST 2014 MP MPI-WEC 8/2-5/2014 Minneapolis, MN MP MPI-SEC 8/13-16/2014 Fort Lauderdale, FL MP Connect Marketplace 8/21-23/2014 Orlando, FL MP Connect Marketplace VF Reception 8/21-23/2014 Orlando, FL SYTA 8/22-26/2014 Toronto, Canada MAZDA Race Planner Event - Kansas Speedway TBD Kansas City, KS SEPTEMBER 2014 Florida Governor's Conference 9/22-24/2014 Boca Raton, FL OCTOBER 2014 MP IMEX America 10/14-16/2014 Las Vegas, NV MP Rejuvenate Marketplace 10/28-30/2014 Atlanta, GA NOVEMBER 2014 DEMA Dive Show 11/19-22/2014 Las Vegas, NV VISIT FLORIDA TRADE EVENT - Georgia TBD Atlanta, GA VISIT FLORIDA TRADE EVENT - Boston TBD Boston, MA DECEMBER 2014 Florida Encounter 12/3-5/2014 Fort Lauderdale, FL JANUARY 2015 MP PCMA Annual Meeting: Convening Leaders 1/11-14/2015 Chicago, IL One Travel Conference 1/19-21/2015 Fairfax, VA The New York Times Travel Show 1/23-25/2015 New York, NY Diversity Summit TBD TBD Date Location FEBRUARY 2015 VISIT FLORIDA Trade Event - Dallas TBD Dallas, TX MARCH 2015 VIP - Midwest (St. Louis or Minneapolis) TBD Minneapolis, MN VISIT FLORIDA TRADE EVENT - Chicago TBD Chicago, IL MP VIP - Boston TBD Boston, MA APRIL 2015 MP VIP - Chicago TBD Chicago, IL VIP - Dallas TBD Dallas, TX MAZDA Race Planner Event - Road Atlanta TBD Braselton, GA MAY 2015 The Players Championship 5/14-17/2015 Jacksonville, FL VISIT FLORIDA TRADE EVENT - Philadelphia TBD Philadelphia, PA MP VIP - Atlanta TBD Atlanta, GA MP VIP - Washington DC TBD Washington, D.C. JUNE 2015 MP Collaborate Marketplace TBD Orlando, FL MP AIBTM TBD Chicago, IL MP VIP - New York TBD New York, NY MEETINGS, TRADE AND EVENTS CALENDAR Italicized denotes a program produced by VISIT FLORIDA MP Denotes VIP Meeting Planner Events VISIT FLORIDA Trade Events Meeting Planner Trade Shows and Conferences Group/Tour Operator Marketplaces Consumer Travel Shows
  • 180. The Official Tourism Marketing Corporation for the State of Florida