2014-15
Marketing
Plan
1
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
2014-2015 visit florida
Marketing Plan
Developed by the official tourism marketing corporation
...
2
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
VISIT FLORIDA, the state’s official tourism marketing corporation, serves as Florida’s
source f...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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100 MILLION VISITORS AND BEYOND
The past 3 years have been exceptional for Florida tourism. We ...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Create Value & Add Value
CO-OP IS CRITICAL
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Quality v...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Create Value & Add Value
CO-OP IS CRITICAL
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Quality v...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Create Value & Add Value
Everything Is Co-opable
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Qua...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Create Value & Add Value
CO-OP IS CRITICAL
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Quality v...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
8
Create Value & Add Value
CO-OP IS CRITICAL
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Quality v...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
9
Create Value & Add Value
CO-OP IS CRITICAL
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Quality v...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
10
Create Value & Add Value
CO-OP IS CRITICAL
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Quality ...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
11
Create Value & Add Value
CO-OP IS CRITICAL
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Quality ...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
12
Create Value & Add Value
CO-OP IS CRITICAL
CLARITY COMES FIRST
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Quality ...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
13
MARKETING planning process
As the official destination marketing organization
charged with pro...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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MARKETING EFFECTIVENESS
VISIT FLORIDA measures its ability to influence visitors through an ann...
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CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS
For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State
experienced growt...
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Total Visitor Volume
Domestic Visitor Volume
Resident Visitor Volume *Methodology change in 20...
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Total Visitor Volume
Domestic Visitor Volume
Resident Visitor Volume
INTERNATIONAL VISITOR VOL...
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Total Visitor Volume
Domestic Visitor Volume
Resident Visitor Volume
Source: VISIT FLORIDA (20...
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FLORIDA’S MARKET SHARE (2003-2012)
This chart tracks Florida’s share of the domestic vacation ...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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HOTEL OCCUPANCY (2013)
This chart compares Florida’s hotel industry against the values from th...
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Maintaining a Balanced Mix
As a mature destination that hosts more than 94
million visitors a ...
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CONSUMER CONFIDENCE
Consumer confidence started out lower in 2013 than
in 2012, but continued ...
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ImportanceOF THE DOMESTIC MARKET
Domestic Visitor Volume
Combined business and leisure travel ...
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Visitor spending increased both in Florida and
on average in the U.S. In 2012, Florida enjoyed...
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VISITOR VOLUME TRENDS
Florida tourism rebounded from the recession dip and impacts of the Deep...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Average Trip Value
Average trip value is the typical amount spent per visit by a travel party....
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APPROACH
As Florida marches toward 100 million visitors
and beyond, market segmentation is par...
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Highlights
•	In 2012, Texas was the third-strongest origin
state for Florida, which is especia...
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Top States 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Georgia 11.5% 11.7% 11.3% 10.6% 11.9%
New York 9.2% 9.3% 7...
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Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates
Feeder States: Top 5
TOP FEEDER STATES OVER FIVE YEARS - TRE...
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Visitor Origin DMAS
Following the state pattern, Atlanta and New York City are the top feeder ...
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Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets
Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, ...
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DMA Market Snapshot
ATLANTA, GA
Of all the markets in the Super
Eight, Atlanta has the largest...
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DMA Market Snapshot
CHICAGO, IL
Chicago is a strong origin market
for couples and singles. The...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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DMA Market Snapshot
Boston, MA
Boston is a strong couples and
Boomers market with traditionall...
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DMA Market Snapshot
WASHINGTON, D.C.
D.C. visitors have the highest
average household income o...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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DMA Market Snapshot
PHILADELPHIA, PA
The number of flights from this
market to Florida has dec...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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DMA Market Snapshot
DETROIT, MI
Detroit is a strong couples and
families market. Visitors come...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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DMA Market Snapshot
DALLAS, TX
Dallas is the newest market in the
Super Eight, even though it ...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets
Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to nation...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Click DMA for snapshot
Partner Tools
Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles
Super EIGHT Comparison Char...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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DMA Market Snapshot
CHICAGO, IL
Chicago is a strong origin market
for couples and singles. The...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Click DMA for snapshot
Partner Tools
Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles
Super EIGHT Comparison Char...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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DMA Market Snapshot
WASHINGTON, D.C.
D.C. visitors have the highest
average household income o...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
45
Click DMA for snapshot
Partner Tools
Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles
Super EIGHT Comparison Char...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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DMA Market Snapshot
DETROIT, MI
Detroit is a strong couples and
families market. Visitors come...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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Click DMA for snapshot
Partner Tools
Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles
Super EIGHT Comparison Char...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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* percentage point
Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA		
2008 2009 2...
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Super Eight Five
Year Trends: Chart
Super Eight Five
Year Trends: Graph
FIVE-YEAR TRENDS
Combi...
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FLY/DRIVE VISITORS TO FLORIDA BY QUARTER, 2013
This chart shows the percentage of air and non-...
2014-2015 Marketing Plan
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AIR AND DRIVE EXPENDITURES YEAR-OVER-YEAR
(Including Transportation)
This line graph tracks th...
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AIR AND DRIVE EXPENDITURES BY QUARTER
2011 & 2012 PER PERSON PER DAY AVERAGES
Q1: January, Feb...
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Origin States
Origin Airports
ORIGIN STATES - AIR
Florida’s air visitors come primarily from s...
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Origin States
Origin Airports
ORIGIN AIRPORTS
In 2012-13, eight of the 10 leading origin airpo...
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Destination regions
The Central Florida region receives more than 40 percent of Florida’s
air ...
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Destination Regions
Destination Airports
DESTINATION AIRPORTS
Four international airports acco...
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Air Origin Trends
Air Destination Trends
AIR ORIGIN TRENDS
Origin states for air visitors are
...
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Air Origin Trends
Air Destination Trends
AIR DESTINATION TRENDS
The share of air visitors to F...
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Drive Origin States
Feeder Highways
ORIGIN STATES - DRIVE
No surprise, the majority of
Florida...
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Drive Origin States
Feeder Highways
Primary Feeder Highways
This map identifies the primary fe...
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Destination Regions
Destination Regions
by State
DESTINATION Regions
Florida’s drive visitors ...
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Destination Regions
Destination Regions
by State
DESTINATION Regions
Preliminary numbers for 2...
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Top Drive Market Origin
States for Drive Travelers
Top Destination Regions
for Drive Travelers...
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DESTINATION TRENDS
The top Florida destination regions for auto
visitors are Central and North...
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VISITOR VOLUME BY LIFESTAGE SEGMENT
Florida’s 79 million-plus domestic visitors represent a di...
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GENERATIONAL COMPOSITION
Florida’s visitors span the generations. While Boomers (born
1946-196...
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All Lifestages
Visitor Volume By:
Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates
FAMILY /...
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All Lifestages
Visitor Volume By:
Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates
VISITOR ...
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Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates
VISITOR SPEND BY LIFESTAGE
In order to measure spending by ...
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VISITOR VOLUME TRENDS
69 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors are from Generation X and the ...
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VOLUME BY LIFESTAGE OVER FIVE YEARS
This table breaks out Florida’s visitors by lifestage segm...
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Visit Florida 2014-2015 Marketing Plan

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Evolution of the 2013-2014 Marketing Plan towards a wide marketing social concept. Very nice Marketing principles description and quality vs. Quantity figures focus

Published in: Business, Travel

Visit Florida 2014-2015 Marketing Plan

  1. 1. 2014-15 Marketing Plan
  2. 2. 1 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 2014-2015 visit florida Marketing Plan Developed by the official tourism marketing corporation of the Sunshine State with the assistance and approval of the Florida tourism industry This plan provides the strategic foundation for the 2014-15 programs of VISIT FLORIDA. A significant amount of data is provided to assure that all Florida stakeholders can assess the performance of the state’s tourism marketing efforts and strengthen their own marketing by aligning with VISIT FLORIDA’s plan. Additional research data and information tools are offered for VISIT FLORIDA Partners.
  3. 3. 2 2014-2015 Marketing Plan VISIT FLORIDA, the state’s official tourism marketing corporation, serves as Florida’s source for travel planning to visitors across the globe. VISIT FLORIDA is not a government agency, but rather a not-for-profit corporation created as a public/ private partnership by the Florida Legislature in 1996. VISIT FLORIDA receives state funding in the form of a portion of the $2 per-day rental car surcharge. For every $1 spent on tourism marketing, VISIT FLORIDA generates more than $390 in tourism spending and $23 in new sales tax collections paid by visitors, not residents. Additional funding is secured from the private sector to expand VISIT FLORIDA’s marketing dollars and, since its founding, VISIT FLORIDA has generated more than $1 billion in cooperative investment by the Sunshine State tourism industry. As a public/private partnership, VISIT FLORIDA serves nearly 12,000 tourism industry businesses, including major strategic alliance partnerships with Disney Destinations, The Hertz Corporation, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment and Universal Orlando. Learn more about VISIT FLORIDA: VISITFLORIDA.org Follow our corporate blog: SunshineMatters.org ABOUT VISIT FLORIDA Mission: To promote travel and drive visitation to and within Florida. Vision: VISIT FLORIDA establishes Florida as the No. 1 travel destination in the world. Goals: • Provide leadership to ensure the Florida tourism industry is competitive and sustainable. • Become the trusted source of information that informs and inspires travel to and within Florida. • Protect and grow Florida’s share of destination travel through integrated sales and marketing programs that drive visitation to and within Florida. • Leverage VISIT FLORIDA resources through cooperative marketing programs that create and add value for Partners within and outside the Florida tourism industry. • Put all VISIT FLORIDA resources to their highest and most productive uses to maximize operating efficiencies and the positive impact of all organizational efforts.
  4. 4. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 3 100 MILLION VISITORS AND BEYOND The past 3 years have been exceptional for Florida tourism. We experienced year-over-year growth in visitation, unprecedented in-state tourism spend ($76.1 billion in 2013) and increased share across all top leisure categories. The biggest challenge ahead will be maintaining our success on top of current peak performance. In the coming years, VISIT FLORIDA programs will need to be more strategic than they have ever been and increasingly able to serve the needs of tourism partners in a collaborative effort to grow Florida’s share. With that in mind, VISIT FLORIDA has begun development of a seven-year comprehensive strategic plan. This plan will evolve annually to respond to opportunities and challenges, but its foundation is based on eight critically important objectives that will align the efforts of multiple departments and co-op programs throughout the coming years. 2020 OBJECTIVES 1. Yield – Increase gross taxable sales through tourism. 2. Volume – Increase the number of visitors coming to Florida. 3. Share – Maintain our share of visitors from domestic and international markets while growing share in specific markets. 4. Brand Engagement – Build relationships with visitors through highly relevant content and experiences. 5. Destination Diversity – Grow economic activity throughout the state by encouraging visitation to geographically diverse destinations and participation in a broader range of activities. 6. Partner Participation – Improve Partner investment and engagement in VISIT FLORIDA programs. 7. Investment Efficiency – Optimize organization spending to deliver increased results in the most cost-effective way. 8. Influence – Grow perceived desirability and intent to travel to Florida. All VISIT FLORIDA tactics outlined in this plan roll up to achieve these goals.
  5. 5. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 4 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships Create Value & Add Value Every VISIT FLORIDA program or initiative must create value and add value for travelers and industry Partners. If the industry can produce a program at the same cost and with the same impact, there is no reason for VISIT FLORIDA to invest resources in the program. VISIT FLORIDA programs must provide the Florida tourism industry a strategic advantage and must inspire consumers with valuable information or a valuable service. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  6. 6. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 5 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships CO-OP IS CRITICAL At its core, VISIT FLORIDA is a cooperative marketing company. Since 1996, industry partners have invested more than $1 billion in VISIT FLORIDA co-op marketing programs. Florida tourism industry Partners will have the opportunity to leverage VISIT FLORIDA’s investment in marketing programs to maximize the impact of their individual resources even as this joint effort increases the impact of the shared Florida brand. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  7. 7. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 6 Create Value & Add Value Everything Is Co-opable CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships CLARITY COMES FIRST VISIT FLORIDA must prioritize its time, energy and budget to optimize the organization and maximize the impact of our efforts by focusing only on programs that create and add value for travelers and industry Partners. That means executing against a strategic plan with a tactical focus on co-op marketing and strategic marketing partnerships. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  8. 8. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 7 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE There is a tendency in membership organizations to stick to the “Fairness Doctrine,” build programs to the lowest common denominator and provide the same benefits to all members in all cases. The result is often a marketing structure that tends toward mediocrity. VISIT FLORIDA represents an industry that is remarkable in its breadth and diversity and a “one size fits all” approach simply will not work. VISIT FLORIDA has made a strategic decision to strive to provide valuable programs for all Partners, while recognizing and communicating that not all programs will be a good fit for every Partner. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  9. 9. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 8 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships Quality vs. Quantity Size matters, but impact matters more. The impact of a promotion on consumer behavior is more important than the number of people the promotion reaches. For instance, how many incremental visitors to Florida were influenced in their decision making by the press release, promotion, advertisement or sales effort? marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  10. 10. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 9 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right While wise financial stewardship is critical in all that we do, VISIT FLORIDA will not sacrifice quality to save money; nor will we initiate a new program or continue with an existing program without dedicating the resources necessary to make the program a success. VISIT FLORIDA will protect our brand promise and will commit to do it right or not do it at all. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  11. 11. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 10 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships CONTENT IS CORE Regardless of whether stories are told in advertising, on VISITFLORIDA.com, social media or any other traditional or digital media, stories that inspire travel to Florida are core to VISIT FLORIDA’s marketing efforts. VISIT FLORIDA is committed to creating, curating and distributing compelling articles, photographs and videos that tell the Florida travel story. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  12. 12. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 11 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE INNOVATION Best-in-Class Partnerships INNOVATION VISIT FLORIDA is committed to building a culture of innovation that encourages staff and Partners to create more effective products, services and technologies to give Florida a competitive advantage in the global travel and tourism industry. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  13. 13. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 12 Create Value & Add Value CO-OP IS CRITICAL CLARITY COMES FIRST SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Quality vs. Quantity If It’s Worth Doing, It’s Worth Doing Right CONTENT IS CORE Innovation Best-in-Class Partnerships Best-in-Class Partnerships Just as the Florida tourism industry expects VISIT FLORIDA to create and add value to their independent marketing efforts, VISIT FLORIDA expects our partners to create and add value to our internal efforts. As a result, VISIT FLORIDA has assembled a first-class team of marketing partners to help us do our job better. These advertising, public relations, digital development and publishing partners bring substantial resources and expertise to execute strategic marketing plans. Working with partners, VISIT FLORIDA is able to implement strategic co-op marketing that significantly leverages our budget and provides Partners with access to programs on a scale not otherwise possible. marketing principles VISIT FLORIDA’s Vision – to establish Florida as the No.1 travel destination in the world – is ambitious but achievable. To succeed, VISIT FLORIDA must build a strategic marketing platform that aligns the collective interests of the Florida tourism industry and provides integrated marketing opportunities for the industry to leverage. In order to ensure that VISIT FLORIDA is maximizing the impact of its marketing resources (money, time and relationships), the organization has adopted a set of Marketing Principles that drives all strategic thinking:
  14. 14. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 13 MARKETING planning process As the official destination marketing organization charged with promoting Florida as a leisure travel and meetings destination, VISIT FLORIDA plans and implements a variety of sales and marketing initiatives. This strategic marketing plan is the road map that guides all VISIT FLORIDA sales and marketing efforts for 2014-15. The plan was developed by VISIT FLORIDA staff based on guidance and insight from the Florida tourism industry as represented by members of VISIT FLORIDA’s marketing committees, including: • Advertising and Internet • Communications • Culture, Heritage, Rural & Nature • Industry Relations • International • Promotions • Meetings & Travel Trade • Visitor Services The 2014-15 marketing planning process began in December 2013 when representatives of Florida’s tourism industry, including members of the VISIT FLORIDA Board of Directors and committees, met at the annual Marketing Retreat to set industry priorities for VISIT FLORIDA’S marketing efforts. Addressing near-term needs as well as long-term goals, the industry identified strategic marketing objectives and helped prioritize initiatives for inclusion in the 2014-15 marketing plan. With the strategic direction provided by the industry in general and by the individual marketing committees, staff developed a proposed marketing plan and budget. This plan was then vetted through each marketing committee, as well as the Marketing Council Steering Committee, and forwarded to the Board of Directors for consideration.
  15. 15. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 14 MARKETING EFFECTIVENESS VISIT FLORIDA measures its ability to influence visitors through an annual independent third-party survey that began in 2008. In 2013, VISIT FLORIDA marketing materials and initiatives influenced 38 percent of the people who visited the state. VISIT FLORIDA INFLUENCE ON VISITORS [2009-2013] This graph shows the percentage of visitors to the state each year who acknowledged being influenced by VISIT FLORIDA marketing efforts. In 2009, VISIT FLORIDA campaigns and materials influenced over 27 percent of Florida’s visitors; in 2013, VISIT FLORIDA influenced 38 percent of Florida’s visitors. Source: VISIT FLORIDA
  16. 16. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 15 CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State experienced growth in the total number of visitors from the domestic U.S., Canada and overseas. Total visitor volume (excluding in-state travel by Florida residents) was up 3 percent and reached 94.3 million – a record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 91.5 million in 2012. Total Visitor Volume Domestic Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume *Methodology change in 2009 Source: VISIT FLORIDA TOTAL VISITOR VOLUME This chart shows the total visitor volume to the state over the past 10 years. International Visitor Volume International visitors from Canada and overseas – contributed a greater share of volume and spend than the historical pattern. In 2013, 11.1 million overseas visitors and 3.7 million Canadians came to Florida – both record highs. Year over year, overseas visitors increased by 7 percent, Canadian visitors by more than 4 percent. 94.3 91.5 87.3 82.380.984.284.583.983.6 79.7
  17. 17. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 16 Total Visitor Volume Domestic Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume *Methodology change in 2009 Source: VISIT FLORIDA DOMESTIC VISITOR VOLUME This chart shows the volume of domestic visitors to Florida over the past 10 years. International Visitor Volume Total Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume 79.577.6 74.7 71.271.2 76.177.377.677.2 73.4 CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State experienced growth in the total number of visitors from the domestic U.S., Canada and overseas. Total visitor volume (excluding in-state travel by Florida residents) was up 3 percent and reached 94.3 million – a record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 91.5 million in 2012. International visitors from Canada and overseas – contributed a greater share of volume and spend than the historical pattern. In 2013, 11.1 million overseas visitors and 3.7 million Canadians came to Florida – both record highs. Year over year, overseas visitors increased by 7 percent, Canadian visitors by more than 4 percent.
  18. 18. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 17 Total Visitor Volume Domestic Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume INTERNATIONAL VISITOR VOLUME This chart shows the volume of international visitors to Florida over the past 10 years. International Visitor Volume *Methodology change in 2009 Source: VISIT FLORIDA 14.8 13.9 12.6 11.1 9.6 8.1 7.2 6.26.46.3 CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State experienced growth in the total number of visitors from the domestic U.S., Canada and overseas. Total visitor volume (excluding in-state travel by Florida residents) was up 3 percent and reached 94.3 million – a record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 91.5 million in 2012. International visitors from Canada and overseas – contributed a greater share of volume and spend than the historical pattern. In 2013, 11.1 million overseas visitors and 3.7 million Canadians came to Florida – both record highs. Year over year, overseas visitors increased by 7 percent, Canadian visitors by more than 4 percent.
  19. 19. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 18 Total Visitor Volume Domestic Visitor Volume Resident Visitor Volume Source: VISIT FLORIDA (2004 - 2007 data based on data from the Consumer Attitude Survey of the University of Florida, BEBR; 2008-2010 data based on a consumer survey conducted by A New View Research d/b/a be Satisfied; 2011-2012 data based on phone surveys by American Directions Group). RESIDENT VISITOR VOLUME This chart shows the number of resident pleasure trips within the state over the past 10 years. International Visitor Volume 20.1 20.7 21.5 14.7 16.817.1 13.913.013.313.5 CONTINUING RECORD NUMBERS For the third consecutive year, the Sunshine State experienced growth in the total number of visitors from the domestic U.S., Canada and overseas. Total visitor volume (excluding in-state travel by Florida residents) was up 3 percent and reached 94.3 million – a record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 91.5 million in 2012. International visitors from Canada and overseas – contributed a greater share of volume and spend than the historical pattern. In 2013, 11.1 million overseas visitors and 3.7 million Canadians came to Florida – both record highs. Year over year, overseas visitors increased by 7 percent, Canadian visitors by more than 4 percent.
  20. 20. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 19 FLORIDA’S MARKET SHARE (2003-2012) This chart tracks Florida’s share of the domestic vacation travel market. In 2012, more than16 percent of domestic vacation travelers vacationed in the Sunshine State. DOMESTIC VACATIONERS In 2012, Florida’s share of the domestic travel market was the largest it has been in a decade, increasing from 15.8 percent in 2011, to 16.4 percent. Florida has not only recovered from the recession but has strengthened its lead. Source: D.K. Shifflet and Associates 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 15.5% 15.7% 15.5% 14.2% 14.2% 14.8% 15.5% 14.9% 15.8% 16.4%
  21. 21. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 20 HOTEL OCCUPANCY (2013) This chart compares Florida’s hotel industry against the values from the South Atlantic region and the U.S. POSITIVE TRENDS Hotel data from 2013 tells a terrific story. The U.S. as a whole and the South Atlantic region saw across- the-board increases, and Florida had an even better year, outpacing all in occupancy, average daily rate, revenue per available room and total room revenue. 2013 Occupancy % Change ADR % Change Rev PAR % Change Room Revenue % Change United States 62.3% 1.5% $110.35 3.9% $68.69 5.4% 6.2% South Atlantic 62.0% 1.9% $106.64 3.0% $66.06 5.0% 5.3% Florida 67.0% 3.5% $118.46 4.6% $79.34 8.3% 8.2% Source: Smith Travel Research Hotel occupancy in Florida was up every month in 2013, increasing 3.5 percent over 2012. Average daily room rate (ADR) was up 4.6 percent over 2012 to $118.46.
  22. 22. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 21 Maintaining a Balanced Mix As a mature destination that hosts more than 94 million visitors a year, Florida attracts a wide variety of visitors by age, income and lifestage. Compared to the U.S. average, Florida’s visitors include more Affluent Families and Affluent Matures. Overall, the average household income of Florida’s visitors Source: D.K. Shifflet and Associates is about $10,000 more than the average U.S. traveler. Though Florida is an iconic family destination, it is also strong in attracting 35- to 54-year-olds with no children in the household. Over the past five years, the number of Millennial visitors to Florida has increased. COMPARISON OF U.S. and florida travelers by lifestage (2012) This chart shows the share of U.S. travelers by lifestage compared to the share of Florida’s visitors by lifestage. For example, 15 percent of U.S. travelers are in the Young & Free lifestage compared to 14 percent of Florida visitors.
  23. 23. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 22 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE Consumer confidence started out lower in 2013 than in 2012, but continued an upward climb. By June, U.S. consumer confidence was the highest it had been in five years and remained steady until the government shutdown in October, which resulted in another drop in confidence. CONSUMER CONFIDENCE Index (2012/2013) This chart tracks consumer confidence as measured by the Consumer Confidence Index, a score based on a monthly survey conducted by Nielsen for the Conference Board.
  24. 24. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 23 ImportanceOF THE DOMESTIC MARKET Domestic Visitor Volume Combined business and leisure travel (2013 preliminary) Source: VISIT FLORIDA Note: 2013 visitor numbers are finalized mid-year. Preliminary numbers are used for this report. In 2013, Florida’s total visitor numbers reached an all-time high of 94.3 million (excluding in-state resident travelers), setting record numbers for the third consecutive year. Consistent with previous years, the majority of Florida’s visitors came from the United States – 79.5 million, up 2.5 percent. There were 14.8 million international visitors, up 6 percent. Year-over-year, the total number of visitors was up 3 percent. Domestic 84% (79.5M) Canada 4% (3.7M) Overseas 12% (11.1M) Partner Tools Domestic Visitor Profile
  25. 25. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 24 Visitor spending increased both in Florida and on average in the U.S. In 2012, Florida enjoyed increases in average spend per person per day (up 16 percent) – once again significantly outperforming the national average spend per person per day (up 9 percent). Average visitor spend in Florida varies by season, origin market, mode of travel and other factors. ImportanceOF THE DOMESTIC MARKET Partner Tools Domestic Visitor Profile VISITOR SPEND PER PERSON / PER DAY Combined business and leisure travel (2003-2012) Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates
  26. 26. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 25 VISITOR VOLUME TRENDS Florida tourism rebounded from the recession dip and impacts of the Deepwater Horizon event to reach an all-time high of hosting 79.5 million visitors from the U.S. Combined business and leisure travel increased for the third consecutive year, making 2013 the top year ever recorded. 10 YEARS OF VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure travel (2004-2013) *Methodology change in 2009 Source: VISIT FLORIDA Partner Tools Domestic Visitor Profile Domestic Visitor Volume Average Per Trip Spend 79.5M 77.6M 74.7M 71.2M71.2M 76.1M 77.3M77.6M 77.2M 73.4M
  27. 27. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 26 Average Trip Value Average trip value is the typical amount spent per visit by a travel party. To calculate, multiply the average per-day spending of each visitor, the total number of days on the trip and the number of visitors in the travel party. The average spending per person per day in 2012 was $148.40. The average stay was 5.15 days and the average party size was 2.2 persons. Based on the latest available data (2012), the average value of a domestic visitor’s trip is $1,681.37. Note: Florida visitor spending lags behind volume data by one year. Volume and spend comparisons are for a general frame of reference and not a precise ratio. Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates DOMESTIC VISITOR TRIP VALUE Combined business and leisure travel (2003-2012) Partner Tools Domestic Visitor Profile TRIP SPENDING TRENDS Following five years of overall declines in visitor spending, the needle is moving in the right direction. In 2012, Florida’s visitors spent more and stayed longer, resulting in an increase in average trip value. Domestic Visitor Volume Average Per Trip Spend
  28. 28. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 27 APPROACH As Florida marches toward 100 million visitors and beyond, market segmentation is particularly important. Florida approaches its domestic audience in four ways: where potential visitors live and travel from; how they travel to Florida; what the purpose of their trip is; and what is known about them demographically. Insights from these four filters are combined in a variety of ways for strategic planning, targeting and messaging. Affluent Mature 14% Young & Free 14% Young Family 12% Maturing & Free 17% Affluent Family 18% Moderate Mature 17% Moderate Family 8% General Vacation 37% Visit Friends / Relatives 26% Business 10% Special Event 8% Getaway Weekend 11% Other Leisure/Personal 8%
  29. 29. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 28 Highlights • In 2012, Texas was the third-strongest origin state for Florida, which is especially significant considering that Texas became a top five contributor for the first time in 2011. • Georgia and New York have been Florida’s top two origin markets for more than a decade, traditionally accounting for more than 20 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors. The National View Florida attracts visitors from all 50 states, most of them coming from markets east of the Mississippi. Florida’s top five feeder states are Georgia, New York, Texas, Alabama and Illinois.
  30. 30. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 29 Top States 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Georgia 11.5% 11.7% 11.3% 10.6% 11.9% New York 9.2% 9.3% 7.7% 8.9% 9.7% Texas 4.7% 4.8% 4.8% 5.7% 5.9% Alabama 4.0% 5.6% 4.2% 4.2% 5.6% Illinois 4.5% 5.7% 6.4% 5.6% 4.9% New Jersey 6.0% 4.4% 5.5% 4.5% 4.7% Ohio 4.7% 4.0% 4.2% 4.4% 3.9% Michigan 3.5% 3.1% 4.6% 4.4% 3.8% Massachusetts 3.1% 2.6% 2.5% 3.4% 3.7% North Carolina 4.7% 4.1% 5.5% 4.1% 3.6% Virginia 3.1% 3.6% 3.5% 3.7% 3.6% Pennsylvania 3.4% 4.1% 4.2% 3.9% 3.6% Tennessee 3.7% 2.3% 2.9% 3.6% 3.2% California 3.8% 3.6% 4.0% 3.8% 3.2% Louisiana 2.6% 2.2% 2.2% 1.3% 2.8% Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates Feeder States: Top 5 Feeder States: Top 12 Top States 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Georgia 10.9% 11.5% 11.7% 11.3% 10.6% New York 10.3% 9.2% 9.3% 7.7% 8.9% Texas 4.8% 4.7% 4.8% 4.8% 5.7% Illinois 5.0% 4.5% 5.7% 6.4% 5.6% New Jersey 5.5% 6.0% 4.4% 5.5% 4.5% Michigan 3.8% 3.5% 3.1% 4.6% 4.4% Ohio 4.9% 4.7% 4.0% 4.2% 4.4% Alabama 3.6% 4.0% 5.6% 4.2% 4.2% North Carolina 3.7% 4.7% 4.1% 5.5% 4.1% Pennsylvania 3.6% 3.4% 4.1% 4.2% 3.9% California 3.6% 3.8% 3.6% 4.0% 3.8% Virginia 3.6% 3.1% 3.6% 3.5% 3.7% Highlights • Consistent increases put Texas in the top three in 2011, supplanting Illinois. • Of the top 10 origin states for Florida visitors, five contributed their greatest share in five years: Alabama, Georgia, Texas, Massachusetts and New York. • Increased visitation from top drive states such as Alabama and Texas helped to fuel the 7.5 percent increase in drive visitors that Florida experienced in 2012. Visitor Origin States Georgia, New York and Texas account for 27 percent of Florida’s visitor base. Georgia and New York’s share of Florida visitors increased in 2012, ending a three-year decline. Top Feeder States Over Five Years Combined Fly / Drive (2008-2012) This chart shows the leading origin states’ variation in the share of Florida’s domestic visitors.
  31. 31. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 30 Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates Feeder States: Top 5 TOP FEEDER STATES OVER FIVE YEARS - TREND LINES COMBINED FLY/DRIVE (2008-2012) This graph shows the top five origin states of Florida’s domestic visitors over a five-year period. The share of Florida’s visitors who come from New York is increasing. Top States 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Georgia 10.9% 11.5% 11.7% 11.3% 10.6% New York 10.3% 9.2% 9.3% 7.7% 8.9% Texas 4.8% 4.7% 4.8% 4.8% 5.7% Illinois 5.0% 4.5% 5.7% 6.4% 5.6% New Jersey 5.5% 6.0% 4.4% 5.5% 4.5% Michigan 3.8% 3.5% 3.1% 4.6% 4.4% Ohio 4.9% 4.7% 4.0% 4.2% 4.4% Alabama 3.6% 4.0% 5.6% 4.2% 4.2% North Carolina 3.7% 4.7% 4.1% 5.5% 4.1% Pennsylvania 3.6% 3.4% 4.1% 4.2% 3.9% California 3.6% 3.8% 3.6% 4.0% 3.8% Virginia 3.6% 3.1% 3.6% 3.5% 3.7% Feeder States: Top 12 Highlights • Consistent increases put Texas in the top three in 2011, supplanting Illinois. • Of the top 10 origin states for Florida visitors, five contributed their greatest share in five years: Alabama, Georgia, Texas, Massachusetts and New York. • Increased visitation from top drive states such as Alabama and Texas helped to fuel the 7.5 percent increase in drive visitors that Florida experienced in 2012. Visitor Origin States Georgia, New York and Texas account for 27 percent of Florida’s visitor base. Georgia and New York’s share of Florida visitors increased in 2012, ending a three-year decline.
  32. 32. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 31 Visitor Origin DMAS Following the state pattern, Atlanta and New York City are the top feeder markets. Florida’s focus to capture more share from the Boston market clearly gained ground, as well as a slight increase for Washington, D.C. A decline in visitors from Philadelphia and Detroit is not surprising because flights from these markets to Florida declined from 2011 to 2012. 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 New York, NY 10.2% 9.4% 9.2% 9.7% 10.7% Atlanta, GA 6.8% 7.2% 6.9% 6.8% 7.6% Chicago, IL 3.8% 4.1% 4.7% 4.4% 4.3% Boston, MA 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 2.8% 3.5% Washington, DC 2.9% 2.9% 2.7% 2.9% 3.1% Philadelphia, PA 3.4% 3.9% 3.6% 3.0% 2.6% Detroit, MI 2.1% 1.9% 2.2% 2.5% 2.3% Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% Cleveland-Akron, OH 1.8% 1.6% 1.2% 1.8% 1.7% Houston, TX 1.1% 1.1% 1.1% 1.5% 1.6% Hartford-New Haven 1.5% 1.8% 1.4% 1.3% 1.6% Nashville, TN 1.6% 1.3% 1.4% 1.8% 1.5% Los Angeles, CA 1.5% 1.6% 1.7% 1.7% 1.4% Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN 1.2% 1.2% 1.0% 1.2% 1.4% Birmingham, AL 1.3% 1.6% 1.9% 1.4% 1.4% TOP 15 FEEDER DMAS OVER FIVE YEARS COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE (2008-2012) This table shows the leading origin DMAS variation in the share of Florida’s domestic visitors. Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates Partner Tools DMA Visitor Profile Highlights • The top eight origin markets have remained constant since 2007. • New York City showed a big bounce, reaching its highest share in five years. • Hartford, Minneapolis and Birmingham, which had fallen off for several years, are once again in the top 15. • Six of the top 15 markets enjoyed their biggest shares in five years.
  33. 33. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 32 Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. DMA Market Snapshot New York, NY New York City remains Florida’s strongest feeder market and in 2012 enjoyed its biggest share in five years. New York is a strong couples and singles market. More than two-thirds of the visitors to Florida from New York have no children in the household. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA
  34. 34. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 33 DMA Market Snapshot ATLANTA, GA Of all the markets in the Super Eight, Atlanta has the largest share of families visiting Florida. Atlanta’s share of visitors in 2012 also was the DMA’s biggest in five years. The top season is summer. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  35. 35. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 34 DMA Market Snapshot CHICAGO, IL Chicago is a strong origin market for couples and singles. They visit Florida in the fall. The majority of Florida visitors from Chicago are Boomers and more than 20 percent are in the Affluent Family life stage. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  36. 36. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 35 DMA Market Snapshot Boston, MA Boston is a strong couples and Boomers market with traditionally strong visitation in the spring and winter. Visitors from Boston are mostly in the Affluent Mature lifestage, the highest percentage compared to the other Super Eight markets. Boston visitors also have the highest average spend per person per day compared to the other Super Eight markets. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  37. 37. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 36 DMA Market Snapshot WASHINGTON, D.C. D.C. visitors have the highest average household income of the Super Eight markets. Nearly two- thirds earn $100,000 or more. D.C. is a strong couples and singles market. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  38. 38. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 37 DMA Market Snapshot PHILADELPHIA, PA The number of flights from this market to Florida has declined, contributing to the reduction in the share of visitors for three consecutive years. Philadelphia is a strong couples market and they tend to visit in the spring. Four of 10 visitors from Philadelphia are Boomers. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  39. 39. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 38 DMA Market Snapshot DETROIT, MI Detroit is a strong couples and families market. Visitors come in the winter. Nearly half are Boomers. Though the share of Florida’s visitors contributed by Detroit was down slightly, the actual volume from Detroit was up. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  40. 40. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 39 DMA Market Snapshot DALLAS, TX Dallas is the newest market in the Super Eight, even though it has been a top origin market for Florida since 2007. Dallas is a strong couples market. Visitors typically come in the summer. Rank DMAs 2012 % of Florida's Domestic Visitors PP* change '12/'11 Volume 1. New York, NY 10.7% +1.0 pp 2. Atlanta, GA 7.6% +0.8 pp 3. Chicago, IL 4.3% -0.1 pp 4. Boston, MA 3.5% +0.7 pp 5. Washington, D.C. 3.1% +0.2 pp 6. Philadelphia, PA 2.6% -0.4 pp 7. Detroit, MI 2.3% -0.2 pp 8. Dallas, TX 1.8% -0.3 pp Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES *percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Although Florida visitors come from all over the United States, eight metropolitan areas – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Philadelphia, New York City and Washington, D.C. – were the greatest contributors to Florida’s visitor numbers in 2012. When combined, these Super Eight DMAS (Designated Market Areas) account for more than one-third of Florida’s domestic volume. 2012 VISITOR VOLUME Combined business and leisure This chart shows the share of Florida’s domestic visitors that come from each Super Eight market. While Chicago and Detroit’s share of Florida’s domestic visitors declined, their individual visitor volume increased.
  41. 41. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 40 Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot New York, NY New York City remains Florida’s strongest feeder market and in 2012 enjoyed its biggest share in five years. New York is a strong couples and singles market. More than two-thirds of the visitors to Florida from New York have no children in the household.
  42. 42. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 41 Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot ATLANTA, GA Of all the markets in the Super Eight, Atlanta has the largest share of families visiting Florida. Atlanta’s share of visitors in 2012 also was the DMA’s biggest in five years. The top season is summer. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  43. 43. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 42 DMA Market Snapshot CHICAGO, IL Chicago is a strong origin market for couples and singles. They visit Florida in the fall. The majority of Florida visitors from Chicago are Boomers and more than 20 percent are in the Affluent Family life stage. Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  44. 44. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 43 Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot BOSTON, MA Boston is a strong couples and Boomers market with traditionally strong visitation in the spring and winter. Visitors from Boston are mostly in the Affluent Mature lifestage, the highest percentage compared to the other Super Eight markets. Boston visitors also have the highest average spend per person per day compared to the other Super Eight markets. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  45. 45. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 44 DMA Market Snapshot WASHINGTON, D.C. D.C. visitors have the highest average household income of the Super Eight markets. Nearly two- thirds earn $100,000 or more. D.C. is a strong couples and singles market. Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  46. 46. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 45 Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot PHILADELPHIA, PA The number of flights from this market to Florida has declined, contributing to the reduction in the share of visitors for three consecutive years. Philadelphia is a strong couples market and they tend to visit in the spring. Four of 10 visitors from Philadelphia are Boomers. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  47. 47. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 46 DMA Market Snapshot DETROIT, MI Detroit is a strong couples and families market. Visitors come in the winter. Nearly half are Boomers. Though the share of Florida’s visitors contributed by Detroit was down slightly, the actual volume from Detroit was up. Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  48. 48. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 47 Click DMA for snapshot Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank DMAs Per Person/ Per Day Spend Per Person/ Per Day Spend Minus Transportation 1. New York, NY $138 $96 2. Atlanta, GA $107 $83 3. Chicago, IL $130 $87 4. Boston, MA $144 $97 5. Washington, D.C. $134 $87 6. Philadelphia, PA $142 $100 7. Detroit, MI $140 $101 8. Dallas, TX $136 $90 DMA Market Snapshot DALLAS, TX Dallas is the newest market in the Super Eight, even though it has been a top origin market for Florida since 2007. Dallas is a strong couples market. Visitors typically come in the summer. 2012 Visitor SPEND leisure This chart shows the average expenditures per person per day in Florida from each DMA. For example, Florida visitors from New York City spend $138 per person per day. Minus transportation spending, the number is $96. Florida’s Super EIGHT Markets Florida maintains its enviable position: When compared to national spend, leisure visitors to Florida spend 18 percent more on average. Florida compares per person per day spend with and without transportation costs included. Visitors from Boston spend the most, at $144 per person per day. Visitors from Atlanta spent the least, at $107 per person per day. When transportation spending is removed, visitors from Detroit actually spent the most in Florida per person per day compared to other destinations.
  49. 49. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 48 * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 PP* change '12/'11 PP* change '12/'08 New York, NY 10.2% 9.4% 9.2% 9.7% 10.7% +1.0 pp +0.5 pp Atlanta, GA 6.8% 7.2% 6.9% 6.8% 7.6% +0.8 pp +0.8 pp Chicago, IL 3.8% 4.1% 4.7% 4.4% 4.3% -0.1 pp +0.5 pp Boston, MA 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 2.8% 3.5% +0.7 pp +0.4 pp Washington, D.C. 2.9% 2.9% 2.7% 2.9% 3.1% +0.2 pp +0.2 pp Philadelphia, PA 3.4% 3.9% 3.6% 3.0% 2.6% -0.4 pp -0.8 pp Detroit, MI 2.1% 1.9% 2.2% 2.5% 2.3% -0.2 pp +0.3 pp Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% -0.3 pp -0.1 pp SUPER EIGHT VISITOR VOLUME Five-year trends suggest that six of Florida’s top eight markets have experienced growth in share. Florida’s share of visitors from Philadelphia declined over a five-year period, which is not surprising considering the number of flights to Florida from the Philadelphia area declined 20 percent. Super Eight Five Year Trends: Chart Super Eight Five Year Trends: Graph FIVE YEARS OF VISITOR SHARE Combined business and leisure (2008-2012) This table shows the variation in the share of Florida visitors from the Super Eight DMAS. Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 PP* change '12/'11 PP* change '12/'08 New York, NY 10.2% 9.4% 9.2% 9.7% 10.7% +1.0 pp +0.5 pp Atlanta, GA 6.8% 7.2% 6.9% 6.8% 7.6% +0.8 pp +0.8 pp Chicago, IL 3.8% 4.1% 4.7% 4.4% 4.3% -0.1 pp +0.5 pp Boston, MA 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 2.8% 3.5% +0.7 pp +0.4 pp Washington, DC 2.9% 2.9% 2.7% 2.9% 3.1% +0.2 pp +0.2 pp Philadelphia, PA 3.4% 3.9% 3.6% 3.0% 2.6% -0.4 pp -0.8 pp Detroit, MI 2.1% 1.9% 2.2% 2.5% 2.3% -0.2 pp +0.3 pp Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% -0.3 pp -0.1 pp
  50. 50. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 49 Super Eight Five Year Trends: Chart Super Eight Five Year Trends: Graph FIVE-YEAR TRENDS Combined business and leisure (2008-2012) This line graph tracks the share of Florida’s visitors from each of the top eight origin DMAS for the past five years. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA SUPER EIGHT VISITOR VOLUME Five-year trends suggest that six of Florida’s top eight markets have experienced growth in share. Florida’s share of visitors from Philadelphia declined over a five-year period, which is not surprising considering the number of flights to Florida from the Philadelphia area declined 20 percent. Partner Tools Expanded Super EIGHT Profiles Super EIGHT Comparison Chart DMA VISITOR PROFILES 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 PP* change '12/'11 PP* change '12/'08 New York, NY 10.2% 9.4% 9.2% 9.7% 10.7% +1.0 pp +0.5 pp Atlanta, GA 6.8% 7.2% 6.9% 6.8% 7.6% +0.8 pp +0.8 pp Chicago, IL 3.8% 4.1% 4.7% 4.4% 4.3% -0.1 pp +0.5 pp Boston, MA 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 2.8% 3.5% +0.7 pp +0.4 pp Washington, DC 2.9% 2.9% 2.7% 2.9% 3.1% +0.2 pp +0.2 pp Philadelphia, PA 3.4% 3.9% 3.6% 3.0% 2.6% -0.4 pp -0.8 pp Detroit, MI 2.1% 1.9% 2.2% 2.5% 2.3% -0.2 pp +0.3 pp Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% -0.3 pp -0.1 pp
  51. 51. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 50 FLY/DRIVE VISITORS TO FLORIDA BY QUARTER, 2013 This chart shows the percentage of air and non-air visitors to the state by quarter. For example, in Quarter 1, 46.2 percent of Florida’s visitors came to the state by air. FLY AND DRIVE VISITOR VOLUME From 2012 to 2013, domestic visitation rose 2.5 percent, with the greatest increase in Quarter 1. Visitors to Florida by air have increased by 78,000; visitors by car by 1.8 million. As airfares continue to increase, more visitors are choosing to drive here. Highlights • In 2013, the largest share of visitors by air came in Quarter 1. • Auto or non-air visitors to Florida typically dominate in the summer months (Quarter 3). • From 2012 to 2013, drive visitor volume increased in all four quarters. Source: VISIT FLORIDA Partner Tools Air Visitor Profile Drive Visitor Profile Air & Drive SNAPSHOT
  52. 52. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 51 AIR AND DRIVE EXPENDITURES YEAR-OVER-YEAR (Including Transportation) This line graph tracks the average expenditures per person per day for fly and drive visitors over five years. With each group, spend has increased from 2011 to 2012. Since 2008, spending by drive visitors increased at a greater rate than air visitors. FLY AND DRIVE VISITOR SPENDING Spending is the highest it has been in five years. No surprise, length of stay has also risen. In 2012, air visitors spent 17 percent more per person per day (not including transportation costs) than drive visitors. While seasonal patterns differ for drive and air visitors, five-year trends show that spending by drive and air visitors is consistent year-over-year. Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates By Quarter Year Over Year Highlights • Average expenditures per person per day for air visitors (not including transportation costs) was $113.50, up 10 percent from 2011. • Average expenditures per person per day for auto visitors (not including transportation costs) was $97.10, up 21 percent from 2011. Partner Tools Air Visitor Profile Drive Visitor Profile Air & Drive SNAPSHOT AIR Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $170 $155 $158 $148 2012 $174 $198 $184 $197 DRIVE Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $109 $108 $98 $95 2012 $124 $126 $119 $131
  53. 53. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 52 AIR AND DRIVE EXPENDITURES BY QUARTER 2011 & 2012 PER PERSON PER DAY AVERAGES Q1: January, February, March, Q2: April, May, June, Q3: July, August, September, Q4: October, November, December Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, combined leisure and business travel By Quarter Year Over Year Partner Tools Air Visitor Profile Drive Visitor Profile Air & Drive SNAPSHOT AIR Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $170 $155 $158 $148 2012 $174 $198 $184 $197 DRIVE Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $109 $108 $98 $95 2012 $124 $126 $119 $131 AIR Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $170 $155 $158 $148 2012 $174 $198 $184 $197 DRIVE Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 $109 $108 $98 $95 2012 $124 $126 $119 $131 FLY AND DRIVE VISITOR SPENDING Spending is the highest it has been in five years. No surprise, length of stay has also risen. In 2012, air visitors spent 17 percent more per person per day (not including transportation costs) than drive visitors. While seasonal patterns differ for drive and air visitors, five-year trends show that spending by drive and air visitors is consistent year-over-year. Highlights • Average expenditures per person per day for air visitors (not including transportation costs) was $113.50, up 10 percent from 2011. • Average expenditures per person per day for auto visitors (not including transportation costs) was $97.10, up 21 percent from 2011.
  54. 54. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 53 Origin States Origin Airports ORIGIN STATES - AIR Florida’s air visitors come primarily from states east of the Mississippi, but also from Texas and California. TOP AIR ORIGIN STATES 2012 Where do Florida’s fly visitors come from? Start with New York, which provides 14 percent of Florida’s visitors who arrive by air. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Rank State FY '10-'11 FY '11-'12 % change 1. New York City* 4,698,700 4,768,000 1.5% 2. Chicago* 1,830,630 1,864,880 1.9% 3. Boston 1,392,550 1,408,520 1.1% 4. Philadelphia 1,348,400 1,311,310 -2.8% 5. Washington, D.C.* 1,244,700 1,296,680 4.2% 6. Detroit* 1,163,910 1,143,810 -1.7% 7. Atlanta 1,133,360 1,134,910 0.1% 8. Baltimore 1,107,910 1,063,650 -4.0% 9. Los Angeles* 891,720 916,140 2.7% 10. Dallas 767,330 784,870 2.3% Highlights • More than one-third of Florida’s air visitors come from the Northeast: New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Connecticut. • Florida’s third-largest air state is California, slightly behind New Jersey, which benefits from the New York metro air lift.
  55. 55. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 54 Origin States Origin Airports ORIGIN AIRPORTS In 2012-13, eight of the 10 leading origin airports sent more visitors to Florida than in the previous year. New York City is the clear No.1, sending nearly 5 million visitors, followed by Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia. TOP ORIGIN AIRPORTS 2012 Combined business and leisure Based on airline ticket data, this table represents the number of passengers who flew to Florida from top origin cities. For cities where there is more than one airport in the metro-city area, such as New York City and Chicago, passengers from all local airports are combined. *contains multiple airports Source: UBM Aviation Worldwide, table prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Rank City CY 2011 CY 2012 % change 1. New York City* 4,784,800 4,805,440 0.4% 2. Chicago* 1,837,290 1,901,700 3.5% 3. Boston 1,419,260 1,407,540 -0.8% 4. Philadelphia 1,335,860 1,304,160 -2.4% 5. Washington, D.C.* 1,267,820 1,278,350 0.8% 6. Atlanta 1,119,560 1,150,160 2.7% 7. Detroit* 1,167,970 1,135,360 -2.8% 8. Baltimore 1,089,090 1,086,600 -0.2% 9. Los Angeles* 913,510 922,540 1.0% 10. Dallas* 795,060 776,390 -2.3% Rank State FY '10-'11 FY '11-'12 % change 1. New York City* 4,698,700 4,768,000 1.5% 2. Chicago* 1,830,630 1,864,880 1.9% 3. Boston 1,392,550 1,408,520 1.1% 4. Philadelphia 1,348,400 1,311,310 -2.8% 5. Washington, D.C.* 1,244,700 1,296,680 4.2% 6. Detroit* 1,163,910 1,143,810 -1.7% 7. Atlanta 1,133,360 1,134,910 0.1% 8. Baltimore 1,107,910 1,063,650 -4.0% 9. Los Angeles* 891,720 916,140 2.7% 10. Dallas 767,330 784,870 2.3% Partner Tools Origin Airports: Outbound Destinations
  56. 56. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 55 Destination regions The Central Florida region receives more than 40 percent of Florida’s air visitors, followed by Southeast Florida at nearly 25 percent. Partner Tools Florida Airports: Passenger Origins Destination Regions Destination Airports Rank Airport CY 2011 CY 2012 % Change 1. Orlando 15,970,373 15,817,207 -1.0% 2. Miami 9,871,932 10,029,010 1.6% 3. Fort Lauderdale 9,846,938 9,978,271 1.3% 4. Tampa 8,200,853 8,037,499 -2.0% 5. Fort Myers 3,686,921 3,578,232 -2.9% 6. Palm Beach 2,871,449 2,772,555 -3.4% 7. Jacksonville 2,739,658 2,608,291 -4.8% 8. Pensacola 772,626 758,703 -1.8% 9. Sarasota 644,046 625,399 -2.9% 10. Panama City 433,081 439,183 1.4% 11. Okaloosa 462,623 386,533 -16.4% 12. Tallahassee 317,370 344,262 8.5% 13. Daytona 282,216 298,060 5.6% 14. Melbourne 205,206 214,233 4.4% Total 56,305,292 55,887,438 -0.7 Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Destination Regions
  57. 57. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 56 Destination Regions Destination Airports DESTINATION AIRPORTS Four international airports account for more than 75 percent of Florida’s domestic enplanements: Orlando, Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Tampa. TOP DESTINATION AIRPORTS Combined business and leisure This chart shows year-over-year air travel to Florida’s airports. At Orlando International Airport, there were nearly 15.5 million domestic enplanements (people getting on a domestic flight) in 2013, down 2 percent from 2012. Partner Tools Florida Airports: Passenger Origins Rank Airport CY 2011 CY 2012 % Change 1. Orlando 15,970,373 15,817,207 -1.0% 2. Miami 9,871,932 10,029,010 1.6% 3. Fort Lauderdale 9,846,938 9,978,271 1.3% 4. Tampa 8,200,853 8,037,499 -2.0% 5. Fort Myers 3,686,921 3,578,232 -2.9% 6. Palm Beach 2,871,449 2,772,555 -3.4% 7. Jacksonville 2,739,658 2,608,291 -4.8% 8. Pensacola 772,626 758,703 -1.8% 9. Sarasota 644,046 625,399 -2.9% 10. Panama City 433,081 439,183 1.4% 11. Okaloosa 462,623 386,533 -16.4% 12. Tallahassee 317,370 344,262 8.5% 13. Daytona 282,216 298,060 5.6% 14. Melbourne 205,206 214,233 4.4% Total 56,305,292 55,887,438 -0.7 Rank Airport CY 2012 CY 2013 % Change 1. Orlando 15,817,207 15,479,193 -2.1% 2. Miami 10,029,010 10,164,785 1.4% 3. Fort Lauderdale 9,978,271 9,949,181 -0.3% 4. Tampa 8,034,999 8,237,630 2.5% 5. Fort Myers 3,578,232 3,730,517 4.3% 6. Palm Beach 2,772,555 2,802,859 1.1% 7. Jacksonville 2,608,291 2,563,236 -1.7% 8. Orlando Sanford 830,706 814,868 -1.9% 9. Pensacola 758,703 756,042 -0.4% 10. Sarasota 625,399 579,944 -7.3% 11. St.Petersburg-Clearwater 415,221 495,509 19.3% 12. Panama City 439,183 406,082 -7.5% 13. Key West 374,184 401,660 7.3% 14. Okaloosa 386,533 370,261 -4.2% 15. Tallahassee 344,262 346,612 0.7% 16. Daytona 298,060 303,310 1.8% 17. Melbourne 214,233 212,228 -0.9% Total 57,505,049 57,613,917 0.2% Source: Figures come from individual airports.
  58. 58. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 57 Air Origin Trends Air Destination Trends AIR ORIGIN TRENDS Origin states for air visitors are predominantly in the Northeast and California. New York is first, followed by New Jersey, California, Illinois and Massachusetts. TOP ORIGIN STATES OVER FIVE YEARS This graph shows the share of Florida’s air visitors by origin state. In 2012, 14 percent of Florida’s air visitors came from the state of New York. Highlights • New York and New Jersey are the top origin states for air visitors to Florida. • Georgia, which is Florida’s strongest drive state, also is a top 10 fly state. • California experienced the largest increase, while Michigan had the biggest decline in air visitors. • The share of air visitors from Massachusetts (predominantly Logan airport) to Florida is the highest it has been in five years. *Percentage point Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 New York 14.9% 14.7% 11.3% 13.9% 14.0% +0.1 pp -0.9 pp New Jersey 8.8% 5.8% 6.4% 6.1% 7.1% +1.0 pp -1.7 pp California 7.3% 7.2% 7.3% 5.7% 7.0% +1.3 pp -0.3 pp Illinois 6.1% 6.9% 8.6% 6.4% 6.9% +0.5 pp +0.8 pp Massachusetts 4.0% 4.5% 4.5% 5.2% 5.9% +0.7 pp +1.9 pp Pennsylvania 4.1% 4.9% 5.4% 5.9% 5.3% -0.6 pp +1.2 pp Texas 5.4% 4.6% 6.0% 5.8% 5.0% -0.8 pp -0.4 pp Ohio 6.5% 4.2% 3.7% 4.2% 4.3% +0.1 pp -2.2 pp Connecticut 2.9% 3.6% 1.7% 3.5% 3.8% +0.3 pp +0.9 pp Georgia 2.4% 2.4% 3.4% 2.4% 3.6% +1.2 pp +1.2 pp Michigan 4.2% 3.2% 4.6% 4.9% 3.5% -1.4 pp -0.7 pp Virginia 2.8% 3.5% 4.7% 4.0% 3.3% -0.7 pp +0.5 pp Partner Tools Origin Airports: OUTBOUND DESTINATIONS State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 New York 14.9% 14.7% 11.3% 13.9% 14.0% +0.1 pp -0.9 pp New Jersey 8.8% 5.8% 6.4% 6.1% 7.1% +1.0 pp -1.7 pp California 7.3% 7.2% 7.3% 5.7% 7.0% +1.3 pp -0.3 pp Illinois 6.1% 6.9% 8.6% 6.4% 6.9% +0.5 pp +0.8 pp Massachusetts 4.0% 4.5% 4.5% 5.2% 5.9% +0.7 pp +1.9 pp Pennsylvania 4.1% 4.9% 5.4% 5.9% 5.3% -0.6 pp +1.2 pp Texas 5.4% 4.6% 6.0% 5.8% 5.0% -0.8 pp -0.4 pp Ohio 6.5% 4.2% 3.7% 4.2% 4.3% +0.1 pp -2.2 pp Connecticut 2.9% 3.6% 1.7% 3.5% 3.8% +0.3 pp +0.9 pp Georgia 2.4% 2.4% 3.4% 2.4% 3.6% +1.2 pp +1.2 pp Michigan 4.2% 3.2% 4.6% 4.9% 3.5% -1.4 pp -0.7 pp Virginia 2.8% 3.5% 4.7% 4.0% 3.3% -0.7 pp +0.5 pp County 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 36.7% 36.9% 37.5% 42.7% 40.5% -2.2 pp +3.8 pp Southeast 26.5% 26.5% 25.9% 26.6% 24.9% -1.7 pp -1.6 pp Central West 12.8% 15.2% 14.3% 11.3% 13.3% +2.0 pp +0.5 pp Southwest 10.0% 10.6% 10.0% 8.7% 9.4% +0.7 pp -0.6 pp Central East 6.6% 5.2% 5.3% 5.4% 5.1% -0.3 pp -1.5 pp Northeast 4.2% 3.4% 4.4% 2.3% 3.8% +1.5 pp -0.4 pp Northwest 2.3% 1.5% 1.8% 2.1% 2.4% +0.3 pp +0.1 pp North Central 0.9% 0.7% 0.8% 0.9% 0.7% -0.2 pp -0.2 pp
  59. 59. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 58 Air Origin Trends Air Destination Trends AIR DESTINATION TRENDS The share of air visitors to Florida regions has changed little in the past five years. The Central and Southeast vacation regions account for more than 60 percent of Florida’s domestic air visitors. DESTINATION regions OVER FIVE YEARS This graph shows the pattern of air visitor travel to different Florida regions during the past five years. From 2008 through 2012, the Central Florida region had nearly a four percentage point increase in their share of Florida’s air visitors. Highlights • The Central vacation region’s share of air visitors has been the largest for more than 16 years. • Year-over-year, the Central West vacation region had the largest increase in share of air visitors, up two points from the year before. *Percentage point Source: D.K Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Partner Tools Florida Airports: Passenger Origins Region 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 36.7% 36.9% 37.5% 42.7% 40.5% -2.2 pp +3.8 pp Southeast 26.5% 26.5% 25.9% 26.6% 24.9% -1.7 pp -1.6 pp Central West 12.8% 15.2% 14.3% 11.3% 13.3% +2.0 pp +0.5 pp Southwest 10.0% 10.6% 10.0% 8.7% 9.4% +0.7 pp -0.6 pp Central East 6.6% 5.2% 5.3% 5.4% 5.1% -0.3 pp -1.5 pp Northeast 4.2% 3.4% 4.4% 2.3% 3.8% +1.5 pp -0.4 pp Northwest 2.3% 1.5% 1.8% 2.1% 2.4% +0.3 pp +0.1 pp North Central 0.9% 0.7% 0.8% 0.9% 0.7% -0.2 pp -0.2 pp County 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 36.7% 36.9% 37.5% 42.7% 40.5% -2.2 pp +3.8 pp Southeast 26.5% 26.5% 25.9% 26.6% 24.9% -1.7 pp -1.6 pp Central West 12.8% 15.2% 14.3% 11.3% 13.3% +2.0 pp +0.5 pp Southwest 10.0% 10.6% 10.0% 8.7% 9.4% +0.7 pp -0.6 pp Central East 6.6% 5.2% 5.3% 5.4% 5.1% -0.3 pp -1.5 pp Northeast 4.2% 3.4% 4.4% 2.3% 3.8% +1.5 pp -0.4 pp Northwest 2.3% 1.5% 1.8% 2.1% 2.4% +0.3 pp +0.1 pp North Central 0.9% 0.7% 0.8% 0.9% 0.7% -0.2 pp -0.2 pp State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 New York 14.9% 14.7% 11.3% 13.9% 14.0% +0.1 pp -0.9 pp New Jersey 8.8% 5.8% 6.4% 6.1% 7.1% +1.0 pp -1.7 pp California 7.3% 7.2% 7.3% 5.7% 7.0% +1.3 pp -0.3 pp Illinois 6.1% 6.9% 8.6% 6.4% 6.9% +0.5 pp +0.8 pp Massachusetts 4.0% 4.5% 4.5% 5.2% 5.9% +0.7 pp +1.9 pp Pennsylvania 4.1% 4.9% 5.4% 5.9% 5.3% -0.6 pp +1.2 pp Texas 5.4% 4.6% 6.0% 5.8% 5.0% -0.8 pp -0.4 pp Ohio 6.5% 4.2% 3.7% 4.2% 4.3% +0.1 pp -2.2 pp Connecticut 2.9% 3.6% 1.7% 3.5% 3.8% +0.3 pp +0.9 pp Georgia 2.4% 2.4% 3.4% 2.4% 3.6% +1.2 pp +1.2 pp Michigan 4.2% 3.2% 4.6% 4.9% 3.5% -1.4 pp -0.7 pp Virginia 2.8% 3.5% 4.7% 4.0% 3.3% -0.7 pp +0.5 pp
  60. 60. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 59 Drive Origin States Feeder Highways ORIGIN STATES - DRIVE No surprise, the majority of Florida’s drive visitors originate from the closest markets east of the Mississippi. However, Texas is an outlier, contributing more than 6 percent. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Highlights • Drive visitors typically have larger travel parties than air visitors – 2.3 people versus 1.9. • New York ranked third for drive visitors to Florida in 2012, a significant increase from the year before. • Georgia and Alabama contribute nearly one-quarter of Florida’s drive visitors. • Prior to the Deepwater Horizon event, South Carolina ranked among the top 10 drive states. Since then, drive visitors from South Carolina declined and have not rebounded. TOP DRIVE ORIGIN STATES, 2012 Where do Florida’s drive visitors come from? Start with Georgia, which provides nearly 17 percent of Florida’s drive visitors. Partner Tools Drive Visitor Profile Drive States Visitor Profiles Drive State Comparison
  61. 61. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 60 Drive Origin States Feeder Highways Primary Feeder Highways This map identifies the primary feeder highways that connect top drive states to Florida. Top drive origin states are identified with each highway. I-75 / I-65 AL, GA, TN, KY, MO, OH I-95 GA, NC, SC, VA I-10 AL, LA, MS, TX Highlights • Florida’s drive markets are concentrated – 40 percent come from five states. • Drive visitors typically have larger travel parties than air visitors with approximately 4 of 10 travel parties representing couples and 2 of 10 representing families. • New York state historically has been a much weaker drive origin market, falling in the sixth or seventh position. In 2012, New York joined the top three. Partner Tools Drive Visitor Profile Drive States Visitor Profiles Drive State Comparison ORIGIN STATES - DRIVE No surprise, the majority of Florida’s drive visitors originate from the closest markets east of the Mississippi. However, Texas is an outlier, contributing more than 6 percent.
  62. 62. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 61 Destination Regions Destination Regions by State DESTINATION Regions Florida’s drive visitors predominantly travel to the Central and Northwest vacation regions. Summer is the most popular season for drive visitors, 94 percent of whom are traveling for leisure purposes. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Highlights • The Central Vacation region received more than a quarter of Florida’s drive visitors. • More than one-fifth of Florida’s drive visitors go to the Northwest Region. AL, IN, KY, LA, MS, MO, TN & TX GA NC & SC ALL states feed Central Florida SC NC SC & VA OH destination regions
  63. 63. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 62 Destination Regions Destination Regions by State DESTINATION Regions Preliminary numbers for 2013 indicate 57 percent of domestic visitors drove to Florida. Origin states on the East Coast tend to choose destinations on the east coast of Florida. Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates AL, IN, KY, LA, MS, MO, TN, TX GA NC, SC ALL states feed Central Florida SC NC SC, VA OH REGIONS FOR DIFFERENT DRIVE ORIGIN STATES This chart shows Florida regions as destinations for different drive origin states. Partner Tools Drive State Comparison AL, IN, KY, LA, MS, MO, TN, TX GA NC, SC ALL states feed Central Florida SC NC SC, VA OH
  64. 64. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 63 Top Drive Market Origin States for Drive Travelers Top Destination Regions for Drive Travelers ORIGIN TRENDS Top origin states for drive visitors to Florida have remained consistent the past several years. The top states are within 13 hours driving distance to Florida, with the exception of New York. As volume has grown from other drive origin states, Georgia’s share has declined, even though the actual number of Georgia visitors increased. Highlights • Drive visitors to Florida arrive from the Southeast and Midwest states, with the two outliers being New York and Texas. • Nearly 40 percent of Florida’s drive visitors come from Georgia, Alabama, Texas, North Carolina and Tennessee. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates TOP ORIGIN DRIVE STATES OVER FIVE YEARS This graph shows the share of Florida’s drive visitors by origin state. In 2012, 16.6 percent of Florida’s drive visitors came from Georgia. State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Georgia 20.2% 21.4% 18.9% 16.8% 16.6% -0.2 pp -3.6 pp Alabama 6.3% 10.5% 7.2% 6.6% 7.8% +1.2 pp +1.5 pp New York 4.3% 5.2% 4.5% 5.3% 7.5% +2.2 pp +3.2 pp Texas 3.6% 4.5% 4.0% 5.6% 6.2% +0.6 pp +2.6 pp North Carolina 6.8% 5.3% 6.9% 5.5% 4.5% -1.0 pp -2.3 pp Tennessee 5.6% 3.2% 5.2% 5.4% 4.2% -1.2 pp -1.4 pp Illinois 2.9% 4.9% 3.9% 5.0% 3.9% -1.1 pp +1.0 pp Ohio 3.8% 4.2% 4.9% 5.8% 3.8% -2.0 pp 0.0 pp Virginia 3.1% 3.8% 2.6% 3.4% 3.8% +0.4 pp +0.7 pp Michigan 2.7% 2.5% 4.9% 4.1% 3.7% -0.4 pp +1.0 pp Louisiana 4.6% 3.1% 3.4% 2.0% 3.7% +1.7 pp -0.9 pp Mississippi 3.0% 3.0% 1.4% 1.9% 3.4% +1.5 pp +0.4 pp South Carolina 5.9% 6.0% 6.6% 2.9% 3.4% +0.5 pp -2.5 pp State 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 pp* change '11/'10 pp* change '11/'07 Georgia 18.5% 20.2% 21.4% 18.9% 16.8% -2.1 pp -1.7 pp Alabama 6.6% 6.3% 10.5% 7.2% 6.6% -0.6 pp +/- 0.0 pp Texas 4.5% 3.6% 4.5% 4.0% 5.6% +1.6 pp +1.1 pp North Carolina 4.4% 6.8% 5.3% 6.9% 5.5% -1.4 pp +1.1 pp Tennessee 5.4% 5.6% 3.2% 5.2% 5.4% +0.2 pp +/- 0.0 pp New York 7.2% 4.3% 5.2% 4.5% 5.3% +0.8 pp -1.9 pp Illinois 5.7% 2.9% 4.9% 3.9% 5.0% +1.1 pp -0.7 pp Ohio 4.6% 3.8% 4.2% 4.9% 4.8% -0.1 pp +/- 0.2 pp Michigan 3.3% 2.7% 2.5% 4.9% 4.1% -0.8 pp +0.8 pp Virginia 4.8% 3.1% 3.8% 2.6% 3.4% +0.8 pp -1.4 pp New Jersey 2.6% 3.4% 3.0% 3.6% 3.0% -0.6 pp +0.4 pp South Carolina 5.0% 5.9% 6.0% 6.6% 2.9% -3.7 pp -2.1 pp Partner Tools Drive State PROFILES Region 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 34.0% 30.5% 27.7% 29.6% 26.3% -3.3 pp -7.7 pp Northwest 19.6% 18.1% 19.5% 19.5% 21.7% +2.2 pp +2.1 pp Southeast 11.6% 9.9% 9.4% 12.0% 12.6% +0.6 pp +1.0 pp Central West 10.5% 9.9% 12.0% 9.8% 10.7% +0.9 pp +0.2 pp Northeast 8.4% 9.7% 10.7% 8.7% 8.6% -0.1 pp +0.2 pp Central East 7.7% 11.2% 8.9% 9.5% 8.5% -1.0 pp +0.8 pp Southwest 5.8% 7.9% 8.5% 7.9% 6.6% -1.3 pp +0.8 pp North Central 2.4% 2.9% 3.3% 3.0% 5.1% +2.1 pp +2.7 pp
  65. 65. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 64 DESTINATION TRENDS The top Florida destination regions for auto visitors are Central and Northwest. Highlights • The North destination region receives more than a third of Florida’s auto visitors; 94 percent of these travelers are leisure visitors. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates, prepared by VISIT FLORIDA Top Drive Market Origin States for Drive Travelers Top Destination Regions for Drive Travelers TOP DESTINATION regions OVER FIVE YEARS Combined business and leisure (2008-2012) This table shows the share of drive visitors by vacation regions. For example, the Central vacation region draws the greatest share of Florida’s drive visitors (26%) followed closely by the Northwest vacation region (22%). Region 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 34.0% 30.5% 27.7% 29.6% 26.3% -3.3 pp -7.7 pp Northwest 19.6% 18.1% 19.5% 19.5% 21.7% +2.2 pp +2.1 pp Southeast 11.6% 9.9% 9.4% 12.0% 12.6% +0.6 pp +1.0 pp Central West 10.5% 9.9% 12.0% 9.8% 10.7% +0.9 pp +0.2 pp Northeast 8.4% 9.7% 10.7% 8.7% 8.6% -0.1 pp +0.2 pp Central East 7.7% 11.2% 8.9% 9.5% 8.5% -1.0 pp +0.8 pp Southwest 5.8% 7.9% 8.5% 7.9% 6.6% -1.3 pp +0.8 pp North Central 2.4% 2.9% 3.3% 3.0% 5.1% +2.1 pp +2.7 pp Region 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Central 34.0% 30.5% 27.7% 29.6% 26.3% -3.3 pp -7.7 pp Northwest 19.6% 18.1% 19.5% 19.5% 21.7% +2.2 pp +2.1 pp Southeast 11.6% 9.9% 9.4% 12.0% 12.6% +0.6 pp +1.0 pp Central West 10.5% 9.9% 12.0% 9.8% 10.7% +0.9 pp +0.2 pp Northeast 8.4% 9.7% 10.7% 8.7% 8.6% -0.1 pp +0.2 pp Central East 7.7% 11.2% 8.9% 9.5% 8.5% -1.0 pp +0.8 pp Southwest 5.8% 7.9% 8.5% 7.9% 6.6% -1.3 pp +0.8 pp North Central 2.4% 2.9% 3.3% 3.0% 5.1% +2.1 pp +2.7 pp State 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 pp* change '11/'10 pp* change '11/'07 Georgia 18.5% 20.2% 21.4% 18.9% 16.8% -2.1 pp -1.7 pp Alabama 6.6% 6.3% 10.5% 7.2% 6.6% -0.6 pp +/- 0.0 pp Texas 4.5% 3.6% 4.5% 4.0% 5.6% +1.6 pp +1.1 pp North Carolina 4.4% 6.8% 5.3% 6.9% 5.5% -1.4 pp +1.1 pp Tennessee 5.4% 5.6% 3.2% 5.2% 5.4% +0.2 pp +/- 0.0 pp New York 7.2% 4.3% 5.2% 4.5% 5.3% +0.8 pp -1.9 pp Illinois 5.7% 2.9% 4.9% 3.9% 5.0% +1.1 pp -0.7 pp Ohio 4.6% 3.8% 4.2% 4.9% 4.8% -0.1 pp +/- 0.2 pp Michigan 3.3% 2.7% 2.5% 4.9% 4.1% -0.8 pp +0.8 pp Virginia 4.8% 3.1% 3.8% 2.6% 3.4% +0.8 pp -1.4 pp New Jersey 2.6% 3.4% 3.0% 3.6% 3.0% -0.6 pp +0.4 pp South Carolina 5.0% 5.9% 6.0% 6.6% 2.9% -3.7 pp -2.1 pp
  66. 66. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 65 VISITOR VOLUME BY LIFESTAGE SEGMENT Florida’s 79 million-plus domestic visitors represent a diverse portfolio of gender, generational cohorts, income levels, family composition and ethnicities. Florida tracks visitor volume, spend and other patterns by lifestage segmentation. Lifestage categories combine three variables (age, household income, and the presence of children in the household) to create seven segments that are most likely to differentiate visitors. Definitions • Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) • Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) • Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) • Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) • Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) • Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$99K; no kids) • Affluent Mature (55 or older; $100K+, no kids) All Lifestages Visitor Volume By: Generational Composition Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates LIFESTAGE SEGMENT COMPOSITION COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows the share of domestic visitors to Florida by lifestage. 14 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors are in the Young & Free lifestage, which means they are ages 18-34 with no kids in the household. Family Composition Affluent Mature 14% Young & Free 14% Young Family 12% Maturing & Free 17% Affluent Family 18% Moderate Mature 17% Moderate Family 8% Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT
  67. 67. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 66 GENERATIONAL COMPOSITION Florida’s visitors span the generations. While Boomers (born 1946-1964) and Generation X (born 1965-1980) traditionally have had the largest share of Florida visitors, Millennial visitation is on the rise, especially as Millennials become more independent and start their own families. All Lifestages Visitor Volume By: Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates VISITOR VOLUME BY GENERATIONAL COHORT COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows the breakout of each lifestage by generation. For example, the bar at the far left representing the Young & Free Lifestage shows that 90 percent of those in that lifestage belong to the Millennial generation (born 1981 or after).Generational Composition Family Composition Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT Definitions • Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) • Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) • Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) • Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) • Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) • Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$99K; no kids) • Affluent Mature (55 or older; $100K+, no kids)
  68. 68. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 67 All Lifestages Visitor Volume By: Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates FAMILY / NON-FAMILY COMPOSITION Florida is recognized globally as a family vacation destination, but only one-third of Florida’s 79 million domestic visitors actually come with their families. The remaining 62 percent of Sunshine State visitors are non-family visitors who make frequent trips to the state and take shorter getaways. Highlights By Family Composition: • Three lifestages include children at home: Young Family, Moderate Family and Affluent Family. These groups account for 38 percent of Florida’s visitors. • Affluent Family, Young & Free and Affluent Mature lifestages all have experienced growth in the past five years. VISITOR VOLUME BY FAMILY COMPOSITION COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows that in 2012, Non-Family Lifestages (those with no children in the household) made up 62 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors. Generational Composition Family Composition Non-Family 62% Family 38% Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT
  69. 69. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 68 All Lifestages Visitor Volume By: Age Segmentation Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates VISITOR VOLUME BY AGE Florida attracts visitors from across the age spectrum, creating a mix of interests and budgets to fuel Sunshine State tourism. The largest portion of domestic visitors comes from the 35-54 age groups, and the average age of the Florida visitor is 46. Millennials (those under 30) represent 23 percent of overnight travel in the U.S. compared to 21 percent in Florida. Highlights • Among a well-balanced mix of ages, 35-to 54-year-olds make up the greatest portion of Florida’s visitors. • For both Florida and U.S. travelers, the 35-54 age group is the largest segment. This age represents 38 percent of U.S. overnight travel and 42 percent of Florida’s visitors. Generational Composition Family Composition VISITOR VOLUME BY AGE COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows that in 2012, the Mature Lifestages (55 and older) account for more than a third of Florida’s domestic visitors. Ages 55+ 34% Ages 18-34 25% Ages 35-54 42% Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT
  70. 70. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 69 Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates VISITOR SPEND BY LIFESTAGE In order to measure spending by different lifestages, the total trip value is considered, including party size and length of stay. No surprise, trip values are highest for the Affluent Family and the Affluent Mature lifestages. Trip Value: Definition Trip Value is the average amount spent during a Florida visit. To arrive at the numbers in the bar chart, multiply the average expenditure per person per day by the average length of stay and average travel party size. Here’s the calculation for the Affluent Family: $162.32 X 5.05 days X 2.9 persons = $2,377. FLORIDA TRIP VALUE BY LIFESTAGE COMBINED BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVEL (2012) This chart shows that in 2012, the Affluent Family lifestage had the greatest trip value compared to all other lifestages. Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT
  71. 71. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 70 VISITOR VOLUME TRENDS 69 percent of Florida’s domestic visitors are from Generation X and the Boomer generation. In the past five years, the share of visitors from the Millennial generation has increased 12 percentage points – more than for any other generation. This is mostly a result of the growing share of this demographic that has the means to travel. VOLUME BY GENERATION OVER FIVE YEARS This table breaks out Florida’s visitors by generational cohort. Over the past five years, Millennial visitors to Florida have increased the most. Generational Age Income Lifestage 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Millennials (1981 to present) 9% 11% 15% 16% 21% +5 pp +12 pp GenX (1965-1980) 39% 40% 36% 36% 30% -6 pp -9 pp Boomers (1946 -1964) 36% 35% 35% 35% 39% +4 pp +3 pp Silent/GI (1945 or earlier) 16% 14% 13% 13% 10% -2 pp -6 pp * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 18 - 34 Years Old 28% 28% 28% 25% 25% +/- 0 pp -3 pp 35 - 49 Years Old 32% 33% 30% 34% 30% -4 pp -2 pp 50 - 64 Years Old 28% 26% 28% 26% 29% +3 pp +1 pp 65+ Years Old 12% 13% 13% 15% 16% +1 pp +4 pp Average Age 46.0 45.7 45.9 46.4 46.9 -- -- Median Age 45.0 44.0 45.0 45.0 47.0 -- -- 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) 12% 14% 15% 14% 14% 0 pp +2 pp Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) 17% 15% 14% 12% 12% 0 pp -5 pp Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) 19% 20% 22% 18% 17% -1 pp -2 pp Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) 8% 9% 6% 10% 8% -2 pp 0 pp Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) 16% 16% 17% 18% 18% 0 pp +2 pp Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$60K; no kids) 16% 15% 16% 17% 17% 0 pp +1 pp Affluent Mature (55 or older; $60K+, no kids) 12% 11% 11% 11% 14% +3 pp +2 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Millennials (1981 to present) 9% 11% 15% 16% 21% +5 pp +12 pp GenX (1965-1980) 39% 40% 36% 36% 30% -6 pp -9 pp Boomers (1946 -1964) 36% 35% 35% 35% 39% +4 pp +3 pp Silent/GI (1945 or earlier) 16% 14% 13% 13% 10% -2 pp -6 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Under $49,999 23% 24% 20% 26% 25% -1 pp +2 pp $50,000-$74,999 20% 19% 18% 20% 18% -2 pp -2 pp $75,000-$99,999 18% 16% 18% 16% 17% +1 pp -1 pp $100,000-$149,999 28% 28% 31% 25% 20% -5 pp -8 pp $150,000-$199,999 7% 9% 7% 8% 12% +4 pp +5 pp $200,000+ 5% 5% 5% 5% 7% +2 pp +3 pp Average $96,700 $97,600 $101,500 $95,400 $111,300 --- ---
  72. 72. 2014-2015 Marketing Plan 71 VOLUME BY LIFESTAGE OVER FIVE YEARS This table breaks out Florida’s visitors by lifestage segment. Over the past five years, the share of Florida’s visitors belonging to the Affluent Mature Lifestage has increased. Generational Age Income Lifestage VISITOR VOLUME TRENDS In the past five years, visits to Florida by different lifestage segments has remained relatively stable. While Florida remains a popular destination for families, nearly 62 percent of domestic visitors do not have children in the household. * percentage point Source: D.K. Shifflet & Associates 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) 12% 14% 15% 14% 14% 0 pp +2 pp Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) 17% 15% 14% 12% 12% 0 pp -5 pp Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) 19% 20% 22% 18% 17% -1 pp -2 pp Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) 8% 9% 6% 10% 8% -2 pp 0 pp Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) 16% 16% 17% 18% 18% 0 pp +2 pp Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$99K; no kids) 16% 15% 16% 17% 17% 0 pp +1 pp Affluent Mature (55 or older; $100K+, no kids) 12% 11% 11% 11% 14% +3 pp +2 pp Partner Tools Detailed Lifestage Profiles Lifestage SEGMENT SNAPSHOT 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 18 - 34 Years Old 28% 28% 28% 25% 25% +/- 0 pp -3 pp 35 - 49 Years Old 32% 33% 30% 34% 30% -4 pp -2 pp 50 - 64 Years Old 28% 26% 28% 26% 29% +3 pp +1 pp 65+ Years Old 12% 13% 13% 15% 16% +1 pp +4 pp Average Age 46.0 45.7 45.9 46.4 46.9 -- -- Median Age 45.0 44.0 45.0 45.0 47.0 -- -- 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Young & Free (18-34; any income; no kids) 12% 14% 15% 14% 14% 0 pp +2 pp Young Family (18-34; any income; kids in HH) 17% 15% 14% 12% 12% 0 pp -5 pp Maturing & Free (35-54; any income; no kids) 19% 20% 22% 18% 17% -1 pp -2 pp Moderate Family (35-54; <$75K; kids in HH) 8% 9% 6% 10% 8% -2 pp 0 pp Affluent Family (35-54; $75K+; kids in HH) 16% 16% 17% 18% 18% 0 pp +2 pp Moderate Mature (55 or older, <$60K; no kids) 16% 15% 16% 17% 17% 0 pp +1 pp Affluent Mature (55 or older; $60K+, no kids) 12% 11% 11% 11% 14% +3 pp +2 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Millennials (1981 to present) 9% 11% 15% 16% 21% +5 pp +12 pp GenX (1965-1980) 39% 40% 36% 36% 30% -6 pp -9 pp Boomers (1946 -1964) 36% 35% 35% 35% 39% +4 pp +3 pp Silent/GI (1945 or earlier) 16% 14% 13% 13% 10% -2 pp -6 pp 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 pp* change '12/'11 pp* change '12/'08 Under $49,999 23% 24% 20% 26% 25% -1 pp +2 pp $50,000-$74,999 20% 19% 18% 20% 18% -2 pp -2 pp $75,000-$99,999 18% 16% 18% 16% 17% +1 pp -1 pp $100,000-$149,999 28% 28% 31% 25% 20% -5 pp -8 pp $150,000-$199,999 7% 9% 7% 8% 12% +4 pp +5 pp $200,000+ 5% 5% 5% 5% 7% +2 pp +3 pp Average $96,700 $97,600 $101,500 $95,400 $111,300 --- ---

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