• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Webquest Project
 

Webquest Project

on

  • 3,411 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,411
Views on SlideShare
3,406
Embed Views
5

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
36
Comments
0

2 Embeds 5

http://www.slideshare.net 4
https://learn.vccs.edu 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Webquest Project Webquest Project Presentation Transcript

    • The Lost Generation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 9 th - 12 th Grade (Language Arts) Designed by Davey McGoldrick [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page ernest.hemingway.com – Caroline Hulse
    • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Let’s travel back in time to the early 20 th century, around the time of the first World War. It was a bleak and disheartening time for some of the most renowned American authors. Thus, the title “Lost Generation” was coined in order to categorize a large assortment of American authors that shared the same ideals and frustrations concerning the state of America. The authors that comprise “The Lost Generation” consist of T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and many others. Now it is time for each of you to learn more about the individual authors that defined this era in writing. You are going to pick one author from “The Lost Generation,” and write an autobiography, or memoir, from their point of view. Therefore, you are going to be playing the role of the author, exploring their works and lives.
    • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You will form groups of three in order to compile the final products into a sort of anthology of three different authors from “The Lost Generation.” The final product should be a two-three page paper that is written from the point of view of the chosen author and reads like an autobiography/memoir. You want to be creative with these; therefore, everything mentioned in the paper does not have to be factual. You are allowed to provide anecdotes, comments, and opinions from the author’s perspective that are related to the characteristics of “The Lost Generation” and/or the author. That is, you do not need factual evidence to support every statement in your paper, but each statement should be in some way connected to factual evidence (e.g. you may make a comment from the perspective of Fitzgerald along the lines of “I found the lack of cultural diversity in America to be constraining and tiresome. I had to explore more exotic places to truly find a creative environment” – this comment could be later justified in the memoir by mentioning Fitzgerald’s move to Paris and visit to North Africa, etc. ). You should try to include graphic representations of either the time period or author throughout the paper as well (e.g. a headshot of the author placed next to the title). Title
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • Choose one author that is deemed a member of the “Lost Generation” (e.g. F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, John Dos Passos, Gertrude Stein, etc…). You can even choose an author from the same time period that you believe should be considered a part of the “Lost Generation,” as long as you explain or justify it through your assignment without allowing the explanation/justification to overpower the purpose of the assignment.
      • Form groups of three with students that have chosen authors different than yours.
      • Research your author and document facts and characteristics that define the author
      • Also, research “The Lost Generation” and document facts and characteristics that define the era.
      • Now, make connections between the author and the movement.
      • Once you have sufficiently researched your author and the time period, find a creative way to incorporate your research into an autobiography from the author’s perspective.
      • Try to make connections between your author and the authors your other group members have chosen in order to make the presentation more interesting.
      • When everyone has completed their autobiographies, each person from your group will present their stories to the entire class.
      • Check to make sure your story accomplishes the following criteria:
      • - Makes connections between the “Lost Generation” and the chosen author
      • - Includes anecdotes/comments that reveal some factual information about the author
      • - Includes anecdotes/comments that reveal some factual information about the time period
      • - Incorporates some creative aspects that maintain the audience’s interest (e.g. avoids listing facts and statistics)
    • Evaluation Example: Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Development/Information
      • No factual information concerning author or time period
      • Redundancy
      • Little factual information on author and time period
      • Redundancy
      • Illustrates knowledge of the author and time period
      • Some supporting details
      • Some repetition of story components
      • Incorporates much factual information on author and time period
      • New information presented throughout
      • No repetition of story components
      Coherence/ Order
      • Incomprehensible or confusing order of components
      • Loosely organized
      • No clear connection between anecdotes and information
      • Narrative components are loosely organized
      • The reader occasionally gets confused
      • Narrative components connect clearly
      • The reader does not get confused
      Audience/ Voice
      • No character of author
      • Does not answer readers’ questions
      • Does not invite reader interest
      • Overuse of passive voice
      • Little character of author
      • Few connections between narrative and tone
      • Invites little reader interest
      • Character of author varies
      • Tone strays from narrative
      • Leaves some unanswered questions
      • Invites some interest
      • Moderate use of the passive voice
      • Character of author is consistently conveyed
      • Tone fits narrative
      • Anticipates and answers readers’ questions
      • Engages readers’ interest
      • Active voice
      Grammar/ Spelling
      • 4+ errors in grammar or spelling per page
      • Boring sentence form
      • 3+ errors per page
      • 2 errors per page
      • Repeats sentence form
      • 0-1 errors per page
      • Varies sentence form
      Presentation
      • Monotonous
      • Boring
      • Shows no knowledge of author or time period
      • Unenthusiastic
      • Shows little knowledge of author and time period
      • Illustrates some signs of good research
      • Invites audience interest
      • Slightly energetic
      • Shows clear signs of good research and knowledge concerning the author and time period
      • Energetic
      • Enthusiastic
      • Captivating
    • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations! You have now experienced the lives of the “Lost Generation.” Hopefully, you have learned something about this unusual and fascinating group of writers, and better understand some of the struggles they endured. Now, you all can go forth and share your detailed knowledge of the authors that comprise this amazing writing movement. Itwuzcryptic’s - flickr
    • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Here are some links to useful websites and resources concerning the “Lost Generation”: “The Lost Generation” – What is it? “The Lost Generation” – More Information Ernest Hemingway Ezra Pound F. Scott Fitzgerald T. S. Eliot More information on “The Lost Generation” Thanks to Dr. James Folkestad for giving me the resources and knowledge to create a Webquest Assignment
    • The Lost Generation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 9 th – 12 th Grades (Language Arts) Designed by Davey McGoldrick [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion ernest.hemingway.com – Caroline Hulse Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed in order to transition the students’ focus from Classical Literature to literature more modern in style. After having studied a large amount of Classical Literature, the students are now given a chance to study other great authors of American Literature and are given the opportunity to apply creativity to their studies. The purpose of this assignment is to organize a research project concerning “The Lost Generation,” while requiring the students to apply creativity and structure to their writing skills. They will study the bleak and disheartening beginning of the twentieth century, and learn about some of the most renowned American authors. The “Lost Generation” includes the authors: T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and many others. The students will pick one author from “The Lost Generation,” and write an autobiography, or memoir, from their point of view. Therefore, they are going to be playing the role of the author, exploring their life and works. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is intended for grades 9 – 12. It is anchored in Language Arts and develops issues concerning Social Studies and American History as well. The students will be focusing on the group of writers known as “The Lost Generation,” which will expand their knowledge of literature. They will write a creative memoir, which will develop their formal and creative writing skills. Additionally, they will research the author(s) and time period, which will expand their knowledge of Social Studies and 20 th Century American History. The students will need to know how to write from a different perspective (i.e. the author they are researching). They will also need to know how to conduct informative research as well as implement creative skills in their writings. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Reading and Writing Standards Addressed: - Students will compare and contrast authors, time periods, and motives for “The Lost Generation” movement - Students will write for various purposes: to tell a story, present information, and make connections between their information and creative aspects - Students will practice the correct use of grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, and spelling History Standards Addressed: - Students will practice their abilities to organize events and people into major eras to identify and explain historical relationships The students will also develop their creative writing and creative thinking skills while challenging themselves to find a clever and resourceful ways of implementing historical facts and information into their creative memoirs. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • Students will choose one author that is deemed a member of the “Lost Generation” (e.g. F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, John Dos Passos, Gertrude Stein, etc…). They can even choose an author from the same time period that they believe should be considered a part of the “Lost Generation,” as long as they explain or justify it through their assignment without allowing the explanation/justification to overpower the purpose of the assignment.
      • They will form groups of three with students that have chosen authors different than theirs.
      • They will research their author and document facts and characteristics that define the author.
      • Also, they will research “The Lost Generation” and document facts and characteristics that define the era.
      • Now, they will make connections between the author and the movement.
      • Once they have sufficiently researched their author and the time period, they will find a creative way to incorporate their research into an autobiography from the author’s perspective.
      • They need to try to make connections between their author and the authors their other group members have chosen in order to make the presentation more interesting.
      • When everyone has completed their autobiographies, each person from their group will present their stories to the entire class.
      Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • The Process Page Two (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion 9 . They need to check to make sure their story accomplishes the following criteria: - Makes connections between the “Lost Generation” and the chosen author - Includes anecdotes/comments that reveal some factual information about the author - Includes anecdotes/comments that reveal some factual information about the time period - Incorporates some creative aspects that maintain the audience’s interest (e.g. avoids listing facts and statistics) This assignment should be distributed and given in-class work time for two class periods. The students then need to finish their projects on their own time after hours. However, they should be given at least a week to complete the project after school hours and should also be given a small amount of time each class period to meet and collaborate with their groups. Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page For this lesson, teachers will need any materials concerning World War I and its relevance to American Literature, any authors that are a part of the “Lost Generation,” or any texts concerning the “Lost Generation;” however, it is not necessary to have any of these materials if they are unobtainable. If you do not have any of these materials, then you will need to note the list of links and references in the “Credits” section, and use these as well as any other useful resources from the internet. You will need access to a computer lab in order to help the students research their authors as well as the movement. If the lesson makes extensive use of specific websites, it would be appropriate to list, describe and link them here. Here are some links to useful websites and resources concerning the “Lost Generation”: “The Lost Generation” – What is it? “The Lost Generation” – More Information Ernest Hemingway Ezra Pound F. Scott Fitzgerald T. S. Eliot More information on “The Lost Generation” One teacher will be enough to implement this particular lesson and coordination between teachers and parents is perfectly fine, but hardly necessary. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page The students final product should strongly illustrate that they have done detailed research and have taken the lesson seriously. They should give enthusiastic presentations that make clear they have strong opinions regarding their particular author and the time period. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • Evaluation Page Two (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Development/Information
      • No factual information concerning author or time period
      • Redundancy
      • Little factual information on author and time period
      • Redundancy
      • Illustrates knowledge of the author and time period
      • Some supporting details
      • Some repetition of story components
      • Incorporates much factual information on author and time period
      • New information presented throughout
      • No repetition of story components
      Coherence/ Order
      • Incomprehensible or confusing order of components
      • Loosely organized
      • No clear connection between anecdotes and information
      • Narrative components are loosely organized
      • The reader occasionally gets confused
      • Narrative components connect clearly
      • The reader does not get confused
      Audience/ Voice
      • No character of author
      • Does not answer readers’ questions
      • Does not invite reader interest
      • Overuse of passive voice
      • Little character of author
      • Few connections between narrative and tone
      • Invites little reader interest
      • Character of author varies
      • Tone strays from narrative
      • Leaves some unanswered questions
      • Invites some interest
      • Moderate use of the passive voice
      • Character of author is consistently conveyed
      • Tone fits narrative
      • Anticipates and answers readers’ questions
      • Engages readers’ interest
      • Active voice
      Grammar/ Spelling
      • 4+ errors in grammar or spelling per page
      • Boring sentence form
      • 3+ errors per page
      • 2 errors per page
      • Repeats sentence form
      • 0-1 errors per page
      • Varies sentence form
      Presentation
      • Monotonous
      • Boring
      • Shows no knowledge of author or time period
      • Unenthusiastic
      • Shows little knowledge of author and time period
      • Illustrates some signs of good research
      • Invites audience interest
      • Slightly energetic
      • Shows clear signs of good research and knowledge concerning the author and time period
      • Energetic
      • Enthusiastic
      • Captivating
    • Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page When at the home page, you might mention the picture of Ernest Hemingway and his relevance to the “Lost Generation.” During the introduction, try to get them excited about the project by explaining that they will be taking on the role of an earlier author. The task is an excellent point to clarify any misunderstandings. For example, you should explain to them how they might add creativity to their autobiographies without exaggerating or completely making things up that are irrelevant and unnecessary. Go through the process step-by-step so that the students thoroughly understand their assignment. Then show the grading rubric so they know exactly what you are looking for. You can implement the conclusion after their presentations are over in order to congratulate them on their hard work and encourage them to maintain interest in reading and writing. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson should be a fun and helpful way to introduce a range of Literature movements (e.g. “The Lost Generation, Modernism) that will most likely be relevant to any texts and readings that take place in the early twentieth century (e.g. Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck, etc…). It will be very effective considering the students are given the opportunity to flex their creative writing skills and can have fun while studying this particular writing movement. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two
    • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Here are some links to useful websites and resources concerning the “Lost Generation”: “ The Lost Generation” – What is it? “The Lost Generation” – More Information Ernest Hemingway Ezra Pound F. Scott Fitzgerald T. S. Eliot More information on “The Lost Generation” Thanks to Dr. James Folkestad for giving me the resources and knowledge to create a Webquest Assignment Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Page Two Evaluation Page Two