Crime and Punishment         What to expect in your         June 2012 GCSE exam                   By      Mr Hartley and M...
The idea of this booklet is to help you prepare for your exam in June, byexplaining what topics you need to revise, which ...
There are some great websites you can look at to help youwith your preparations for this exam.http://www.crimeandpunishmen...
The core content: c1450 to present dayHow has the nature of crime changed? What were considered crimes in the past that th...
Extension studies (That’s question 5 or 6 to you and me!)In the examination, one question will be set on each study. You m...
Past Exam Papers Tuesday 17 January 2012 – AfternoonQuestion 1- Study Sources A and B.                                    ...
Answer EITHER Question 5 OR Question 6.You must answer both parts of the question you choose.5 Crime and punishment from R...
QuestionNumber1                 What can you learn from sources A and B about changes in attitudes towards                ...
Question Number Target: Analysis of consequence (AO 1 & marks)3               How successful were attempts to enforce law ...
QuestionNumber4               How much has the role of the police changed since the mid-nineteenth century?               ...
Question Number5 (a)               Describe the key features of punishments used during the Middle Ages.                  ...
How similar were the systems of law and order in under the Romans and the Normans?                            Roman punish...
Question Number6 (a)                   What developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to the 1976 Domestic Violence         ...
‘The attitude of the authorities was the most important reason for the increase in witchcraft                     accusati...
Question 1 – Inference questionThe first question is asking you to make inferences from a set ofsources.The question requi...
Question 2 – EXPLAIN questionThe second question is asking you for a detailed explanation ofone of the events or people in...
Question 3/4 – Analysis of causes,  Changes and continuitiesThe third and fourth questions are asking you demonstrateknowl...
Question 6 – extendeddescribe/explainQuestion 6 can come in a variety of forms. Below are some ofthe key ways to answer th...
EXAMPRACTISE!
Crime and punishment course guide
Crime and punishment course guide
Crime and punishment course guide
Crime and punishment course guide
Crime and punishment course guide
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Crime and punishment course guide

16,318

Published on

A course guide for the Crime and Punishment unit of the Edexcel GCSE History course.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
16,318
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
85
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Crime and punishment course guide"

  1. 1. Crime and Punishment What to expect in your June 2012 GCSE exam By Mr Hartley and Mr Wallbanks.
  2. 2. The idea of this booklet is to help you prepare for your exam in June, byexplaining what topics you need to revise, which need most preparationand what type of questions you can expect to answer.This is the Unit 1 Exam. We study Option B: Crime and punishment Unitcode 5HB01This unit is assessed through a 1-hour and 15-minute examination. Youneed to answer five questions. There are 50 marks available for thispaper. This accounts for 25% of your final GCSE grade.You will have questions on what is known as the core content of crime,policing and punishment since 1450 but will also have to complete aquestion based on one of two extension studies (This is half of the markson this exam paper (or 12.5% of your final grade) so needs you to reviseand prepare hard for this unit)In this unit these are on;Crime and punishment from Roman Britain to c1450 (Not studied inschool)ORChanging views of the nature of criminal activity c1450 to present day(Question 6 – Do this!!!)
  3. 3. There are some great websites you can look at to help youwith your preparations for this exam.http://www.crimeandpunishmentthroughtime.co.uk/index.htm (new)http://www.gcsecandp.com/http://vcp.e2bn.org/http://www.learnhistory.org.uk/cpphttp://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/suffragettes.htmhttp://www.gunpowder-plot.org/http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/candp/http://www.outlawsandhighwaymen.com/http://vcp.e2bn.org/gaols/TopicsPower, Politics and Protest - http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/politics/default.htmPrisoner 4099 - http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/prisoner4099/default.htmCaptain Blood - http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/snapshots/snapshot51/snapshot51.htmThe Gunpowder Plot - http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/snapshots/snapshot07/snapshot7.htmVictorian Criminal Children http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/snapshots/snapshot25/snapshot25.htmVictorian Prison - http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/snapshots/snapshot24/snapshot24.htmCrime and Punishment http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/educationservice/ks3.htm#crime-punishmentJack the Ripper http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/educationservice/ks3.htm#a5
  4. 4. The core content: c1450 to present dayHow has the nature of crime changed? What were considered crimes in the past that that are no longer illegal? Some crimeshave never changed such as murder or theft but there are now a huge number of new offences such as car crimes orcomputer hacking. Why have some offences now been classed as criminal activities?How has the government and the people in charge responded to crime? What different types of punishments have been usedon criminals and how effective were they? Why don’t we execute criminals any more?How have society’s attitudes to law, crime and punishment changed and what have been the factors that changed ourattitudes? We consider attitudes and beliefs in society; the roles of governments, science and technology, economic andsocial conditions.c1450–c1750The nature of criminal activity: crimes against the person, property and authority.The nature of punishment and law enforcement; the development of the Bloody Code.The influence of attitudes in society on crime and punishment.Content1) Criminal activity in the late Middle Ages and Tudor and Stuart periods: the nature of and attitudes to theft, violence,poaching, smuggling, vagabondage and treason.2) The roles and approaches of the authorities and local communities in law enforcement and keeping the peace.3) Capital and corporal punishment. The reasons for increasingly severe approaches to punishment.4) The significance of key individuals and events: Guy Fawkes, Jonathan Wild — the start of transportation.c1750–c1900The nature of criminal activity: crimes against the person, property and authority.The nature of punishment and law enforcement: penal and prison reform; the development of the police force.The influence of attitudes in society on crime and punishment; the influence of industrialization.Content1) The nature of criminal activity and the problems of law enforcement in the period of industrialisation. The impact ofurbanisation.2) The approaches of the authorities to law enforcement and dealing with riot and disorder. Policing: the work of the Fieldingbrothers and Sir Robert Peel.3) Punishment: penal reform; new prisons; the ending of transportation. Attitudes in society: the reasons for changes to theBloody Code; the ending of public executions; the reform of prison conditions.4) Attitudes to social crimes: poaching and smuggling. The significance of key individuals and events: John Howard; ElizabethFry; the transportation of the ‘Tolpuddle Martyrs’.c1900 to present dayThe nature of criminal activity: crimes against the person, property and authority.The nature of punishment and law enforcement: new approaches to punishment and developments in policing.The influences of attitudes in society on crime and punishment; the shift to reform and rehabilitation.Content1) The nature of criminal activity in the modern period and the influence of technology. Computer and car crime: ‘new’ crimesor ‘old’ crimes in a new format? The role of government in defining crime: traffic offences, race relations.2) Law enforcement; the role of the police and local communities; the move towards crime prevention. The effect of terrorismon the roles of the police and government.3) Punishment: alternatives to prison; the different experiences of men, women and children within the penal system. Attitudesin society: the reasons for the abolition of the death penalty and the development of a range of punishments with an emphasison reform and rehabilitation.4) Attitudes to social crimes: smuggling and tax evasion.5) The significance of key individuals and events: the execution of Derek Bentley; the London bombings July 2005.
  5. 5. Extension studies (That’s question 5 or 6 to you and me!)In the examination, one question will be set on each study. You must be prepared to draw on yourknowledge of the core content when answering these questions.Question 5) Crime and punishment from Roman Britain to c1450 NOT STUDIEDThis, combined with the core, will comprise a study of the process of change in crime and punishment from RomanBritain to the present day.The nature of criminal activity.The nature of punishment and law enforcement.The influence of attitudes in societies on crime and punishment.ContentIdeas about crime and approaches to punishment and law enforcement in Roman Britain, Anglo-Saxon and medievalEngland, including the role of governments and communities in each society.The role of religion.The similarities and differences in approaches to law making and the definition of crimes.The nature and extent of change that resulted from the Norman conquest.The links between attitudes and belief in society and approaches to punishment and law enforcement.The significance of key events: the Norman Conquest.Question 6) Changing views of the nature of criminal activity c1450 to present day( REMEMBER - This is half of the marks on this exam paper (or 12.5% of your final grade)so needs you to revise and prepare hard for this unit)This, combined with the core, will comprise a study of crime and punishment and changingdefinitions of criminal activity from c1450 to the present day.A) Witchcraft in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.•Why were people afraid of witchcraft?•How did the authorities make this a crime?•How were witches punished?•Why did society undergo a witchcraft craze? - You need to focus on the influence of the attitudesin society on the fear of witches.•Why did the fear of witchcraft die out?•Finally you need to be able to identify how the changing of attitudes resulted in changes to thelaw.B) Conscientious objection in the twentieth century.•How were the Conscientious Objectors punished by the authorities in the First and SecondWorld Wars?•What were the attitudes in society of the Conscientious Objectors?•Why was being a CO considered to be a crime in World War One and why did attitudes to beinga CO change?•How did the changing of attitudes towards being a CO result in changes to the law?C) Domestic violence in the twentieth century.•How have attitudes towards domestic violence changed? What caused these changes?•You need to understand why domestic violence was not considered to be a crime and whyattitudes to domestic violence changed.•You need to be able to identify how the changing of attitudes resulted in changes to the law.•You need to understand how authority reacted to domestic violence and how those involvedwere punished.
  6. 6. Past Exam Papers Tuesday 17 January 2012 – AfternoonQuestion 1- Study Sources A and B. Source A: A drawing of prison inmates on a treadmill at Devizes Prison in the late nineteenth century. Source B: From a speech by a government minister in June 2010, explaining the government’s attitude towards prisons. Too often prison has failed to turn criminals into law-abiding citizens. Prisons are supposed to deter crime, protect the public, punish offenders and cut re-offending. Prisons are places of punishment, but also of education and change. 1) What can you learn from Sources A and B about changes in attitudes towards prison as a punishment? Explain your answer, using these sources. (4) 2) The boxes below show two types of criminals. Choose one and explain why they were punished so harshly at the time. (9) Poachers in the eighteenth century. Vagabonds in the Tudor period (sixteenth century). Answer EITHER Question 3 OR Question 4. 3 How successful were attempts to enforce law and order during the period c1450– c1800? (12) You may use the following in your answer and any other information of your own. In the sixteenth century, the position of village constable was unpaid. 1718: Jonathan Wild gave himself the title of ‘Thief Taker General of Great Britain and Ireland’. 1749: Henry Fielding established the Bow Street Runners. (Total for Question 3 = 12 marks) OR 4 How much has the role of the police changed since the mid-nineteenth century? (12) You may use the following in your answer and any other information of your own. 1877: The Criminal Investigation Department (CID) was set up. 1937: 999 emergency phone number introduced. 2002: Police Community Support Officers introduced.
  7. 7. Answer EITHER Question 5 OR Question 6.You must answer both parts of the question you choose.5 Crime and punishment from Roman Britain onwards.(a) Describe the key features of punishments used during the Middle Ages.(9)(b) How similar were the systems of law and order in England under the Romansand the Normans? (16)You may use the following in your answer and any other information of your own.Roman punishments included whipping and execution.The Normans introduced Trial by Combat.Under the Normans, priests could claim Benefit of the Clergy.(Total for Question 5 = 25 marks)OR6 Changing views of the nature of criminal activity c1450 to the present day.(a) What developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to the 1976 DomesticViolence Act? (9)(b) ‘The attitude of the authorities was the most important reason for theincrease in witchcraft accusations in Britain.’ Do you agree? Explainyour answer. (16)You may use the following in your answer and any other information of yourown.•James I wrote a book called Daemonologie.•Matthew Hopkins called himself the ‘Witchfinder General’.•Many people were very religious during the seventeenth century.(Total for Question 6 = 25 marks)
  8. 8. QuestionNumber1 What can you learn from sources A and B about changes in attitudes towards prison as a punishment? Explain your answer, using these sources. Target: Inference and analysis of change (AO 3 : 4 marks)Level Mark Descriptor 0 No rewardable material 1 1-2 Simple statement Student provides relevant examples from the sources or offers generalised unsupported comment about change. Eg in the late nineteenth century prison was a place of punishment; In 2010 there was an emphasis on reforming prisoners; Attitudes had changed / treatment in prison was less severe by 2010. Award 1 mark for each relevant detail. 2 3-4 Developed statement An inference about change is made and supported, based on the use of both sources. Eg in the late nineteenth century the emphasis was on punishment but by 2010 attitudes had changed to place an emphasis on reform; In the late nineteenth century prison involved hard physical work as punishment but by 2010 education was intended to bring about mental change in the prisoner.Question Number2 The boxes below show two types of criminals. Choose one and explain why they were punished so harshly at the time. Vagabonds in the Tudor period (sixteenth century). Poachers in the eighteenth century. Target: Analysis of key features & attitudes (AO 1 & 2 : 9 marks)Level Mark Descriptor 0 No rewardable material 1 1-3 Generalised answer is offered with little specific detail. Answer offers general comment that could apply to either example or simple comment about individual case. Eg They were seen as a threat; There were no prisons to provide an alternative punishment; Vagabonds were seen as criminals; Poachers were trespassing and stealing from the landowners. 2 4-6 Relevant details are offered but the link to the question is left implicit. Answer offers information with limited commentary. Eg describes the legislation relating to, or treatment of, vagabonds/poachers; Describes the inability of the system to cope with crimes; Describes the fears of the upper classes in relation to criminals 3 7-9 Analysis of reasons securely linked to context of the example. Answer explains the harsh treatment in terms of the attitude/fears of the authorities and/or the inability of the system to deal with the specific crime. Eg explains the fear that sturdy beggars were criminals in the context of Tudor system of law and order / difficulties faced by the authorities in controlling ‘masterless men’; Perceived role of poachers in challenging authority and social hierarchy / context of fear of rising crime and the consequent response of the Bloody Code.
  9. 9. Question Number Target: Analysis of consequence (AO 1 & marks)3 How successful were attempts to enforce law and order during the period c1450- c1800? In the sixteenth century, the position of village constable was unpaid 1718: Jonathan Wild gave himself the title of ‘Thief Taker General of and ’ 1749: Henry Fielding established the Bow Street RunnersLevel Mark Descriptor 0 No rewardable material 1 1-4 Simple comment is offered, supported by some knowledge. Student may provide generalised answer with little supporting detail or relevant details on a very limited aspect of the question. Eg Describes the lack of an organised police force; Says that Bow St. Runners were an early attempt to create a police force. Reserve top mark for answers making at least 2 valid points. 2 5-8 Statements are developed with support from material which is mostly relevant and accurate. Describes the work of Fielding, the activities of Wild or the difficulties of enforcing the law. Eg Bow St Runners a small force used to track down criminals and/or stolen property, only operated in ; Wild was the leader of a gang of thieves and receiver of stolen goods, he controlled thieves by handing them over to the authorities, he claimed the fee for ‘finding’ stolen goods; Criminals had to be caught by civilians, unpaid constables, low level officials such as night watchmen, or a privately paid ‘thief taker’ and brought before magistrate; no organised system of enforcing law and order. Reserve top mark for answers making at least 2 developed points. 3 9-12 The response shows understanding of the focus of the question and deploys sufficient accurate and relevant material to support the points the student makes. Answer assesses success of the system in enforcing law and order Eg the lack of a professional force made the system ineffective and allowed Wild to become a key figure in organised crime, co-ordinating thefts but also controlling the thieves; Even when the Bow St. Runners were set up, the scheme was very limited in its operations. Reserve top mark for answers covering a broad timescale.
  10. 10. QuestionNumber4 How much has the role of the police changed since the mid-nineteenth century? 1877: The Criminal Investigation Department () was set up. 1937 : 999 emergency phone number introduced 2002 : Police Community Support Officers introduced Target: Evaluation of change (AO 1 & 2 : 12 marks)Level Mark Descriptor 0 No rewardable material 1 1-4 Simple comment is offered, supported by some knowledge. Student may provide generalised answer with little supporting detail or relevant details on a very limited aspect of the question. Eg it has changed a lot, they now do much more; There are special groups now to deal with different types of crime; The basic role of the police is still about catching criminals. Reserve top mark for answers making at least 2 valid points. 2 5-8 Statements are developed with support from material which is mostly relevant and accurate. Answer describes change(s) or continuity in the work/role of the police Eg. describes change in the nature of police work such as detection using fingerprints, prevention, community liaison; Describes changes brought about by ‘new’ crimes or new responsibilities such as car or computer crime, riot control, bomb squad etc. Describes changes in organisation – women police/ reorganisation of police forces / specialist squads etc.; Continuity in the basic nature of police work supported by examples from 19 th and 20th century. Reserve top mark for answers making at least 2 developed points. 3 9-12 The response shows understanding of the focus of the question and deploys sufficient accurate and relevant material to support the points the student makes. Reaches a judgement on extent / nature of change in role. Eg. Explains change in nature of role or additional responsibilities, using details of at least 2 examples of change or with thorough explanation of one change based on details of before & after; Weighs examples of change/continuity in order to decide extent of change. Reserve top mark for answers reaching a judgement based on an evaluation of change covering the whole period.
  11. 11. Question Number5 (a) Describe the key features of punishments used during the Middle Ages. Target: Recall; identification of key features (AO 1 & 2 : 9 marks)Level Mark Descriptor 0 No rewardable material 1 1-3 Simple or generalised comment is offered, supported by some knowledge. Answer identifies a key feature or offers limited detail. Eg they were very physical; they used the stocks. 2 4-6 Statements are developed with support from material which is mostly relevant and accurate. Answer provides information about punishments used during the Middle Ages Eg describes several punishments such as the use of stocks/pillory, whipping, fines, hanging etc. OR Identifies underlying characteristics – physical punishment, public humiliation, intended deterrence. 3 7-9 The response shows understanding of the focus of the question and deploys sufficient accurate and relevant material to support the points the student makes. Answer identifies a range of key features of punishments used during the Middle Ages and offers supporting detail. Eg explains that punishments were based on physical retribution/public humiliation / deterrence and offers examples to support the comments, showing how the punishment was designed to inflict pain / humiliation etc.
  12. 12. How similar were the systems of law and order in under the Romans and the Normans? Roman punishments included whipping and execution.Question Number The introduced Trial by Combat5 (b) Under the , priests could claim Benefit of the Clergy. Target: Evaluation of similarity (AO 1 & 2 : 16 marks) For the highest mark in a level all criteria for the level, including those for QWC must be met.Level Mark Descriptor 0 No rewardable material 1 1-4 Simple or generalised comment is offered, supported by some knowledge. QWC Answer offers a general comparison between the systems of law and order, or limited amount i-ii-iii of detail on one aspect. Eg Suggests that there was a lot of similarity because they both had harsh punishments; Describes Trial by Combat. Writing communicates ideas using everyday language and showing some selection of material but the response lacks clarity and organisation. The student spells, punctuates and uses the rules of grammar with limited accuracy. NB Do not credit repetition of bullet points without development. Reserve top mark for answers making 2 valid points. 2 5-8 Statements are developed with support from material which is mostly relevant and QWC accurate. i-ii-iii Answer provides information about law and order in the Roman and/or Norman period, with comparison stated in general terms or left implicit. Eg describes the harsh punishments in each system; Shows different attitude to religion; Describes the process of trial and punishment. Writing communicates ideas using a limited range of historical terminology and showing some skills of selection and organisation of material, but passages lack clarity and organisation. The student spells, punctuates and uses some of the rules of grammar with general accuracy. Reserve top mark for answers making 2 developed points. 3 9-12 The response shows understanding of the focus of the question and deploys sufficient QWC accurate and relevant material to support the points the student makes. i-ii-iii Answer offers analysis of the two systems in order to identify similarity / difference. Eg identifies similarity in the lack of police force and reliance on individuals to catch and prosecute the criminal or similarity in emphasis on respect for authority /harsh punishments to act as deterrent; Identifies differences in the role of religion / local community Writing communicates ideas using historical terms accurately and showing some direction and control in the organising of material. The student uses some of the rules of grammar appropriately and spells and punctuates with considerable accuracy, although some spelling errors may still be found. Reserve top mark for answers which identify a range of similarities and/or differences. 4 13-16 A sustained analysis is supported by precisely selected and accurate material and with QWC sharply focused development of points made. The answer as a whole will focus well on i-ii-iii the question. Answer weighs similarities and differences in order to reach a judgement. Eg evaluates the overall significance of the nature / extent of similarities & differences used as examples in L3. Writing communicates ideas effectively, using a range of precisely selected historical terms and organising information clearly and coherently. The student spells, punctuates and uses the rules of grammar with considerable accuracy, although some spelling errors may still be found. Reserve top mark for answers where the criteria for judgement are made explicit.
  13. 13. Question Number6 (a) What developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to the 1976 Domestic Violence Act? Target: Recall; identification of key features (AO 1 & 2 : 9 marks)Level Mark Descriptor 0 No rewardable material 1 1-3 Simple or generalised comment is offered, supported by some knowledge. Answer offers general comment or limited detail on one aspect of this question. Eg. attitudes towards women changed; Erin Pizzey set up the first women’s refuge in 1971. 2 4-6 Statements are developed with support from material which is mostly relevant and accurate. Answer provides information about the changing situation in the 1960s and 1970s. Eg describes the Women’s Lib campaign; Describes changes in the law that reflected changes in women’s status in society; Describes changing attitudes towards women; Describes the work of individuals such as Erin Pizzey & Jack Ashley. 3 7-9 The response shows understanding of the focus of the question and deploys sufficient accurate and relevant material to support the points the student makes. Answer shows the link between events/trends during the 1960s and 1970s & the Act in 1976. Eg shows how women’s lib campaigns /publicity / changes in the law /the work of individuals led to a greater awareness and willingness to change the law about the situation within the home. Reserve top mark for answers which show the act was the result of a combination of events/trends.
  14. 14. ‘The attitude of the authorities was the most important reason for the increase in witchcraft accusations in Britain.’ Do you agree? Explain your answer.Question Number 6(b) .’ Do you agree? Explain your answer. James I wrote a book called Daemonologie Matthew Hopkins called himself the ‘Witchfinder General’. Many people were very religious during the seventeenth century Target: Evaluation of causation (AO 1 & 2 : 16 marks) For the highest mark in a level all criteria for the level, including those for QWC must be met.Level Mark Descriptor 0 No rewardable material 1 1-4 Simple or generalised comment is offered, supported by some knowledge. QWC Answer offers general comment or very limited details on one aspect. i-ii-iii Eg describes the ideas of James I; describes unofficial tests for witchcraft; describes the link between witchcraft and religion. Writing communicates ideas using everyday language and showing some selection of material, but the response lacks clarity and organisation. The student spells, punctuates and uses the rules of grammar with limited accuracy. NB Do not credit repetition of bullet points without development. Reserve top mark for answers which make at least 2 valid points. 2 5-8 Statements are developed with support from material which is mostly relevant and accurate. QWC Answer provides information about reasons for witchcraft accusations i-ii-iii Eg describes the attitudes towards witchcraft or role in witchcraft trials of the authorities and /or local communities . describes the instability / need for a scapegoat caused by religious divisions, poverty, the Civil War, Matthew Hopkins etc. Writing communicates ideas using a limited range of historical terminology and showing some skills of selection and organisation of material, but passages lack clarity and organisation. The student spells, punctuates and uses some of the rules of grammar with general accuracy. Reserve top mark for answers making at least 2 developed points. 3 9-12 The response shows understanding of the focus of the question and deploys sufficient QWC accurate and relevant material to support the points the student makes. i-ii-iii Answer offers evidence for and/or against the importance of the attitude of the authorities as the most important factor Eg explains how the approval of the king, the role of the justices and assize judges, the self- titles Witchfinder General gave an official sanction and further impetus for the witchcraze; Shows how popular beliefs were fuelled by the self-fulfilling tests; Shows that fear of witches continued after authorities ceased to endorse trials. Writing communicates ideas using historical terms accurately and showing some direction and control in the organising of material. The student uses some of the rules of grammar appropriately and spells and punctuates with considerable accuracy, although some spelling errors may still be found. Reserve top mark for answers which consider a range of factors. 4 13-16 A sustained analysis is supported by precisely selected and accurate material and with QWC sharply focused development of points made. The answer as a whole will focus well on the i-ii-iii question. Answer evaluates both sides of the issue in order to reach a judgement. Eg discusses relative importance of official attitudes and other factors in order to reach a judgement on the most important factor. Writing communicates ideas effectively, using a range of precisely selected historical terms and organising information clearly and coherently. The student spells, punctuates and uses the rules of grammar with considerable accuracy, although some spelling errors may still be found. Reserve top mark for answers which make the criteria explicit.
  15. 15. Question 1 – Inference questionThe first question is asking you to make inferences from a set ofsources.The question requires you to:- Choose examples from the sources to answer the question. E.g.Source A suggests that….this is because…- You don’t need to bring in any specific knowledge, just use theevidence in the sources to answer the question.- You need to talk about a change that happens in both sourcesWhat is an inference?An inference means:Something you can work out from the source which is not directlysaid. For example:• What is the source suggesting?• What is its attitude or tone? Is the writer sarcastic, sad,pleased, angry, happy, supportive etc? If it’s a visual source, whatdo the details, expressions etc suggest?• What evidence in the source supports this attitude, tone, ormessage?
  16. 16. Question 2 – EXPLAIN questionThe second question is asking you for a detailed explanation ofone of the events or people in the boxes.The question requires you to:• Make sure your answer is focused on what the question isasking you to explain, e.g. their importance in something etc• Back up your explanations with relevant and accuratematerial• Make a judgement at the end to tie it all in.
  17. 17. Question 3/4 – Analysis of causes, Changes and continuitiesThe third and fourth questions are asking you demonstrateknowledge of something and then analyse the factors involved.How to write effective explanations1) Identify a range of factors you need for the question, e.g. Laws to do with smuggling or why vagabonds were punished the way they were.2) Select two or three factors to write about in detail. Remember you will only have 15 minutes to answer this type of question.3) Use connectives to tie in your knowledge to the question. - POINT: One reason why..... - EVIDENCE: For example... - EXPLAIN: This meant that...(or) This resulted in4) Structure your conclusion so it clearly analyses the factors - Start by showing that a range of factors played a role - Make it clear which factor you think played the most important role etc - Support the argument with the key reason why you have come to this overall judgement.
  18. 18. Question 6 – extendeddescribe/explainQuestion 6 can come in a variety of forms. Below are some ofthe key ways to answer them.1) Describe/Explain the key features...-The key to a good mark is by describing (using evidence/keywords) at least 2 things and explain them in detail.-Give specific details and link what you say to the question atall times.2) Why did…/How far do you agree…- This is the biggest mark question in the paper so plan arough answer and spend the most time on it. - Use the PEE method to help explain your answer - A list will appear below the question which might give yousome points to include. But remember to explain the points ifyou use them, don’t just mention them! - Use a conclusion to answer the question. Overall I believethat …. Overall I agree with the statement…
  19. 19. EXAMPRACTISE!

×