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Level of classification

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  • 1. LEVEL OFCLASSIFICATION Prepared by: MARICARR D. ALEGRE
  • 2. • Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 BC) grouped life forms as either plant or animal. Microscopic organisms were unknown. PLANTS ANIMALS PLANTS ANIMALS FUNGI
  • 3. • In 1735 Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus formalized the use of two Latin names to identify each organism, a system called binomial nomenclature. He grouped closely related organisms and introduced the modern classification groups: kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species. Single-celled organisms were observed but not classified. KINGDOM: PLANTAE ANIMALIA ORGANISMS: PLANTS ANIMALS FUNGI
  • 4. • In 1866 German biologist Ernst Haeckel proposed a third kingdom, Protista, to include all single-celled organisms. Some taxonomists also placed simple multicellular organisms, such as seaweeds, in Kingdom Protista. Bacteria, which lack nuclei, were placed in a separate group within Protista called Monera.
  • 5. KINGDOM PROTISTS PLANTAE ANIMALIAOrganisms All single-celled plants animals organisms, such as amoebas and diatoms, and sometimes simple multicellular organisms such as seaweeds
  • 6. • In 1938 American biologist Herbert Copeland proposed a fourth kingdom, Monera, to include only bacteria. This was the first classification proposal to separate organisms without nuclei, called prokaryotes, from organisms with nuclei, called eukaryotes, at the kingdom level. PROKARYOTES EUKARYOTES
  • 7. PROKARYOTES EUKARYOTESKINGDOM MONERA PROTISTA PLANTAE ANIMALIA (Prokaryotes)Organisms Bacteria Amoebas, Plants animals diatoms, and fungi other single- celled eukaryotes, and sometimes simple multicellular organisms, such as seaweeds
  • 8. • In 1957 American biologist Robert H. Whittaker proposed a fifth kingdom, Fungi, based on fungis unique structure and method of obtaining food. Fungi do not ingest food as animals do, nor do they make their own food, as plants do; rather, they secrete digestive enzymes around their food and then absorb it into their
  • 9. KINGDOM: MONERA PROTISTA FUNGI PLANTAE ANIMALIA (prokaryote)Organisms; bacteria Amoebas, Multicellular Multicellular Multicellular diatoms, , organisms organisms and other filamentous that obtain that ingest single-celled organisms food food eukaryotes, that absorb through and food photosynthe sometimes sis simple multicellular organisms, such as seaweeds
  • 10. • In 1990 American molecular biologist Carl Woese proposed a new category, called a Domain, to reflect evidence from nucleic acid studies that more precisely reveal evolutionary, or family, relationships. He suggested three domains, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya, based largely on the type of ribonucleic acid (RNA) in cells.
  • 11. PROKARYOTES EUKARYOT ESDOMAIN ARCHEA BACTERIA EUCARYAKINGDOM Crenarchaeota Euryachaeota Protist fungi planta animal e iaORGANISMS Ancient bacteria Ancient bacteria that produce that grow in high methane temperatures

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