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Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes
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Asexuality, hybridisation and comparative genomics of root knot nemtodes

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Talk at UCL October 2013

Talk at UCL October 2013

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  • 1. THE COMPARATIVE GENOMICS OF ‘ANCIENT ASEXUALITY’AND HYBRIDIZATION IN ROOT KNOT NEMATODES Dave Lunt Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Hull
  • 2. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES Dave Lunt Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Hull Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh Georgios Koutsovoulos Mark Blaxter Sujai Kumar
  • 3. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES Acknowledgements Africa Gómez, Richard Ennos,Amir Szitenberg, Karim Gharbi, Chris Mitchell, Steve Moss,Tom Powers, Janete Brito, Etienne Danchin, Marian Thomson & GenePool Funding NERC, BBSRC,Yorkshire Agricultural Society, Nuffield Foundation, University of Hull, University of Edinburgh
  • 4. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES Dave Lunt davelunt.net @davelunt dave.lunt@gmail.com @EvoHull +EvoHull +davelunt Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Hull http://www.github.com/davelunt
  • 5. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES WHAT’S IN A GENOME & WHY?
  • 6. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES WHAT’S IN A GENOME & WHY? mostly transposons, repeats, & sequences of incertae sedis For many eukaryotes: but why?
  • 7. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES SEM Meloidogyne female WHAT’S IN A GENOME & WHY? Evolutionary Forces: Selection Gene Flow Mutation Drift Recombination
  • 8. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES Studying Recombination Study its effects in genomic regions with reduced recombination • sex chromosomes • inversions Study its action in species that have lost meiotic recombination • asexuals A B C D E F sexualasexual origin of asexuality asexual
  • 9. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES Studying Recombination Mitotic reproduction has consequences for the genome • decay of sex-specific genes • extreme Allelic Sequence Divergence • loss of mutational effects of recombination A B C D E F sexualasexual origin of asexuality asexual
  • 10. THE MELOIDOGYNE RKN SYSTEM Meloidogyne Root Knot Nematodes • Globally important agricultural pest species • Enormous plant host range • parasitize all main crop plants • ~5% loss of world agriculture JD Eisenback RKN juveniles enter root tip infected uninfected SEM Meloidogyne female JD Eisenback
  • 11. THE MELOIDOGYNE RKN SYSTEM Meloidogyne Reproduction • Wide variety of reproductive modes in a single genus • Many species are mitotic parthenogens without chromosome pairs • Incapable of meiosis • Could be ‘ancient’ asexuals • 17 million years without meiosis?
  • 12. THE MELOIDOGYNE RKN SYSTEM Meloidogyne Reproduction • Wide variety of reproductive modes in a single genus • Many species are mitotic parthenogens without chromosome pairs • Other species are meiotic parthenogens • automixis
  • 13. THE MELOIDOGYNE RKN SYSTEM Meloidogyne Reproduction • Wide variety of reproductive modes in a single genus • Many species are mitotic parthenogens without chromosome pairs • Some species are obligatory outbreeding sexuals with males & females • amphimixis • Other species are meiotic parthenogens
  • 14. THE MELOIDOGYNE RKN SYSTEM Meloidogyne Reproduction • Wide variety of reproductive modes in a single genus
  • 15. MELOIDOGYNE REPRODUCTION Are RKN Ancient Asexuals? Investigations based on multi-species single gene sequencing and phylogenetics: •testing for extreme allelic sequence divergence •testing for changes in molecular evolution pattern of sex-specific loci Lunt DH 2008 BMC Evolutionary Biology 8:194
  • 16. RECOMBINATION AND ASEXUALITY Extreme Allelic Sequence Divergence "If we suppose an ameiotic form evolving for a very long period of time we might imagine its two chromosome sets becoming completely unlike, so that it could no longer be considered as a diploid either in a genetical or cytological sense." Sometimes called Meselson effect, similar to paralogous loci A B C D E F sexualasexual origin of asexuality asexual MJD White ‘Animal Cytology and Evolution’ 1st ed 1945, p283
  • 17. RECOMBINATION AND ASEXUALITY Extreme Allelic Sequence Divergence A B C D E F sexualasexual origin of asexuality asexual
  • 18. RECOMBINATION AND ASEXUALITY loss of meiosis A B C D E F Extreme Asexual ASD alleles taxon Recent Ancient 1 2 3 asexual sexualasexual Redrawn after Birky 1996 Divergence between alleles of sexual species Divergence between asexual species ‘alleles’ alleles by recom bination m eiosis hom ogenizes
  • 19. THE SIGNATURES OF ANCIENT ASEXUALITY Extreme allelic sequence divergence Allelic Sequence Divergence levels are much greater in asexuals Meloidogyne than sexual Meloidogyne Pi(nucleotidediversity) Sexual Asexual apomicts| Species Max intraspecific substitutions Substitutions to closest relative M. incognita 15 0 M. javanica M. javanica 16 0 M. incognita RNA polymerase II Dystrophin Species Max intraspecific substitutions Substitutions to closest relative M. javanica 30 0 M. arenaria M. arenaria 32 0 M. javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.arenaria M.javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.incognita
  • 20. THE SIGNATURES OF ANCIENT ASEXUALITY Extreme allelic sequence divergence ASD can be very large within asexual individuals Pi(nucleotide Sex Asexual| Species Max intraspecific substitutions Substitutions to closest relative M. incognita 15 0 M. javanica M. javanica 16 0 M. incognita RNA polymerase II Dystrophin Species Max intraspecific substitutions Substitutions to closest relative M. javanica 30 0 M. arenaria M. arenaria 32 0 M. javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.arenaria M.javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.incognita Yet identical alleles can be found between different species
  • 21. THE SIGNATURES OF ANCIENT ASEXUALITY Extreme allelic sequence divergence Lunt DH 2008 BMC Evolutionary Biology 8:194 Pi(nucleotide Sex Asexual| Species Max intraspecific substitutions Substitutions to closest relative M. incognita 15 0 M. javanica M. javanica 16 0 M. incognita RNA polymerase II Dystrophin Species Max intraspecific substitutions Substitutions to closest relative M. javanica 30 0 M. arenaria M. arenaria 32 0 M. javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.arenaria M.javanica M.javanica M.javanica M.incognita This allele sharing is not predicted by ancient asexuality, and suggests interspecific hybridization
  • 22. RECOMBINATION AND ASEXUALITY loss of meiosis A B C D E F Extreme Asexual ASD alleles taxon Recent Ancient 1 2 3 asexual sexualasexual Redrawn after Birky 1996 Divergence between alleles of sexual species Divergence between asexual species ‘alleles’ alleles by recom bination m eiosis hom ogenizes
  • 23. RECOMBINATION AND ASEXUALITY A B A D C Extreme Hybrid ASD Alleles Taxa Recent Ancient Sexual parental species Redrawn after Birky 1996 Divergence between alleles of parental species Divergence between hybrid species alleles m eiosis hom ogenizes alleles by recom bination A C D Ancestor of sexual parental species Hybridization event meiosishomogenizesalleles Sexual parental species hybrid apomict hybrid apomict mitotic
  • 24. TESTING ANCIENT ASEXUALITY Sex Specific Loci Electron microscope images from Ward lab, http:// www.mcb.arizona.edu/wardlab/ • Nematodes have amoeboid (crawling) sperm • msp genes only expressed in sperm and spermatocytes • Structural protein of sperm • Signal to recommence meiosis • Prediction: msp gene should show signatures of loss of function (pseudogenization) in asexuals Major Sperm Protein
  • 25. msp intron diversity in asexuals 14 Mutations are not randomly distributed but cluster within the intron, exactly as for functional genes Selection on this gene cannot have been abandoned anciently
  • 26. msp intron diversity in asexuals 14 ML models of evolution are identical on sexual and asexual branches of tree Selection on this gene cannot have been abandoned anciently
  • 27. MELOIDOGYNE REPRODUCTION Previous Single Gene Sequencing I can reject ancient asexuality on basis of interspecific allele sharing and identical molecular evolution of sperm protein genes Data suggests interspecific hybrid origins Lunt DH 2008 BMC Evolutionary Biology 8:194
  • 28. MELOIDOGYNE HYBRIDIZATION Hybrid Speciation • Once thought that hybrid speciation was rare and inconsequential in animals • Genome biology is revealing a very different view • We have investigated the origins of Meloidogyne asexuals in this context
  • 29. Is M. floridensis the parent of the asexuals? M. floridensis is found within the phylogenetic diversity of asexual species It reproduces sexually by automixis Could it be a parent of the asexual lineages via interspecific hybridization? MELOIDOGYNE HYBRIDIZATION GENOMICS M.floridensis M. ??? M. incognita M. javanica M. arenaria x apomicts parental species automict
  • 30. Is M. floridensis the parent of the asexuals? Investigated using whole genome sequences and 2 distinct approaches; --look at the within-genome patterns of diversity to determine hybrid nature of genomes --look at phylogenetic relationships of all genes to study origins and parents MELOIDOGYNE HYBRIDIZATION GENOMICS M.floridensis M. ??? M. incognita M. javanica M. arenaria x apomicts parental species automict
  • 31. MELOIDOGYNE HYBRIDIZATION GENOMICS Meloidogyne comparative genomics We have sequenced M. floridensis genome and are able to compare to 2 other Meloidogyne genomes published by other groups M.floridensis M. ??? M. incognita M. javanica M. arenaria x apomicts parental species automict asexual, hybrid? sexual, parental? sexual, outgroup
  • 32. MELOIDOGYNE COMPARATIVE GENOMICS The Meloidogyne floridensis genome • 100Mb assembly ~100x genomic coverage • 15.3k predicted proteins • Directly comparable to published Meloidogyne genomes Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163
  • 33. MELOIDOGYNE COMPARATIVE GENOMICS Comparative genomics questions Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 • Is there evidence of hybrid origins of asexual species? • Nature of hybridization? • Is M. floridensis a parental? • How do offspring and parental genomes differ?
  • 34. INTRA-GENOMIC ANALYSES ID of duplicated protein-coding regions Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 • Coding sequences from each of the three target genomes (M. hapla, M. incognita and M. floridensis) were compared to the set of genes from the same species • The percent identity of the best matching (non-self) coding sequence was calculated, and is plotted as a frequency histogram • Both M. incognita and M. floridensis show evidence of presence of many duplicates, while M. hapla does not Self identity comparisons
  • 35. INTRA-GENOMIC ANALYSES ID of duplicated protein-coding regions Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 • Coding sequences from each of the three target genomes (M. hapla, M. incognita and M. floridensis) were compared to the set of genes from the same species • The percent identity of the best matching (non-self) coding sequence was calculated, and is plotted as a frequency histogram • Both M. incognita and M. floridensis show evidence of presence of many duplicates, while M. hapla does not Self identity comparisons
  • 36. INTRA-GENOMIC ANALYSES ID of duplicated protein-coding regions Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 • Coding sequences from each of the three target genomes (M. hapla, M. incognita and M. floridensis) were compared to the set of genes from the same species • The percent identity of the best matching (non-self) coding sequence was calculated, and is plotted as a frequency histogram • Both M. incognita and M. floridensis show evidence of presence of many duplicates, while M. hapla does not Self identity comparisons
  • 37. INTRA-GENOMIC ANALYSES ID of duplicated protein-coding regions Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 Self identity comparisons • Both M. incognita and M. floridensis contain diverged gene copies. • These loci duplicated at approximately the same point in time. • A ploidy change is not involved. • This is expected pattern for hybrid genomes
  • 38. COMPARATIVE GENOMICS M. floridensis Genome Size Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 • Assembly size is not haploid genome size for hybrid species • Divergence (4-8%) between homeologous (hybrid) copies will preclude assembly • Our assembly of 100Mb is ~2x 50-54Mb genome size of M. hapla
  • 39. HYBRIDIZATION HYPOTHESES Hybridization Hypotheses Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 There are very many ways species could hybridize, duplicate genes, lose genes We have selected a broad range of possibilities informed by prior knowledge We have tested their predictions phylogenetically M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 A M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 B M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 C M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+ZM.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z X+Y D
  • 40. 39 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z D Scenario 5 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 Z M.incognita Z+Z 1 & 2 X+Y M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z D Scenario 5 Z M.incognita +Z X+Y M.hapla X Y M.floridensis X+Y C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla DM.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2Hybridization hypotheses A B C D
  • 41. M.hapla X M.floridensis X B Scenario M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 (A) Whole genome duplication(s)
  • 42. 41 M.hapla X M.floridensis X+Y C Scena M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.incognita Z (B) M. incognita is an interspecific hybrid with M. floridensis as one parent
  • 43. M.hapla X Y ZM.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Y M.florid X+Y D Scenario X+Y (C) M. incognita and M. floridensis are independent hybrids sharing one parent
  • 44. Z M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z D Scenario 5 X+Y (D) M. floridensis is a hybrid and M. incognita is a secondary hybrid between M. floridensis and a 3rd parent
  • 45. HYBRIDIZATION HYPOTHESES Testing by Phylogenomics Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 M.hapla M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 A M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 B M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z D Scenario 5 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 X+Y C M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z D Scenario 5 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 X+Y D • Coding sequences from 3 genomes were placed into orthologous groups (InParanoid) • 4018 ortholog clusters included all 3 species • We retained those with a single copy in the outgroup M. hapla • Phylogenies of relationships between Mi and Mf gene copies (RAxML) • Trees were parsed and pooled to represent frequencies of different relationships
  • 46. 45 Each tree contains a single M. hapla sequence as outgroup (black square) Grey square indicates relative frequency of those topologies Trees are pooled within squares into different patterns of relationships Grid squares represent different numbers of gene copies
  • 47. HYBRIDIZATION HYPOTHESES Testing by Phylogenomics Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 M.hapla M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 A M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 B M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z D Scenario 5 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 X+Y C M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z D Scenario 5 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z A Scenario 1 & 2 X+Y D • We assess the fit of the tree topologies to our hypotheses • Five out of seven cluster sets, and 95% of all trees, support hybrid origins for both M. floridensis and M. incognita • ie exclude hypotheses A and B • Hypothesis C best explains 17 trees • Hypothesis D best explains 1335 trees
  • 48. HYBRIDIZATION HYPOTHESES Testing by Phylogenomics Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognitaX+Y Y+Z M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z X+Y A M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z X+Y B M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z M.hapla X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X Z+Z X+Y C • The genome data supports both M. incognita and M. floridensis as interspecific hybrids • M. floridensis is a parental species of “double hybrid” M. incognita with other parent unknown M.hapla X Y ZM.floridensis M.incognita X+Y Y+Z C Scenario 4 M.hapla X Y Z M.floridensis M.incognita X+Y (X+Y)+Z D Scenario 5 X Z M.floridensis M.incognita X X+Z B Scenario 3 X+Y Hypothesis D
  • 49. MELOIDOGYNE COMPARATIVE GENOMICS Comparative genomics questions Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 • Is there evidence of hybrid speciation? • Yes, complex hybrid origins are clear • Is M. floridensis a parental? • Yes, identified by phylogenomics and allelic sequence identity • How do offspring and parental genomes differ? What are the broader implications? • Ongoing work...
  • 50. MELOIDOGYNE COMPARATIVE GENOMICS Ongoing Work Lunt et al arXiv 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6163 • 19 genomes in a phylogenetic design • Testing effect of recombination & breeding system on genome change • hybrids, inbred, outbred, loss of meiosis • TEs, mutational patterns, gene families Current NERC grant on Meloidogyne breeding system and genome evolution Recombination and genomic rates and patterns of molecular evolution
  • 51. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES SEM Meloidogyne female Dave Lunt JD Eisenback JD Eisenback juveniles enter root tip Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Hull
  • 52. COMPLEX HYBRID ORIGINS OF ROOT KNOT NEMATODES SEM Meloidogyne female Dave Lunt JD Eisenback JD Eisenback juveniles enter root tip Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Hull davelunt.net @davelunt dave.lunt@gmail.com @EvoHull +EvoHull +davelunt http://www.github.com/davelunt

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