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  • 1. Contexts and consequences of (effective) college student learning assessments Eric L. Dey Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education University of Michigan
  • 2.  
  • 3. A Modern Culture of Evidence
    • The plural of anecdote is not evidence
    The absence of evidence does not mean the evidence of absence
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6. A Question of Grain Size
  • 7. A Little Sorting Does Wonders
  • 8. Assessment Consequences
  • 9. Assessment Questions
    • Individuals
    • Courses
    • Programs
    • Units
    • Institutions
    • Systems
    Environments Outcomes Inputs
  • 10. Where Should We Focus? Source: University of Washington LIFE Center
  • 11. Who’s an Educator Here?
    • Faculty
    Time on campus
    • Student affairs staff
    • Students
    • Community partners
    • Other professionals
  • 12. Student Learning at the Center
    • Blending teaching and research ethos
    • Redefining roles and structures
    • Changing language, communication, and culture
  • 13. New Directions Campus level Local Educators Students
  • 14. Making New Connections
    • Campus-wide and local efforts
    • New professional partnerships
    • The disciplinary dance
    • Repurposing our “routine” assessments
    • Students as our secret weapon
  • 15. Points of Balance
    • Recognizing different structures, and the need for different incentives
    • Identifying resources
    • Coordinating, not centralizing, efforts
  • 16. Our Leadership Opportunity