Nyu stern design thinking
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October 26th, we had the distinct pleasure to give a workshop on design thinking at NYU Stern...a few students said it was the most fun they had had in that classroom. Score!

October 26th, we had the distinct pleasure to give a workshop on design thinking at NYU Stern...a few students said it was the most fun they had had in that classroom. Score!

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  • Miles
  • Miles
  • Miles
  • MilesAlso, Disney does this really well.
  • Miles“Improving the lives of New Yorkers through the power of good design.” also, paul bennett / ideo / iceland
  • Miles
  • Miles
  • Miles
  • Miles
  • MilesRemember: these ideas are not always fully baked!
  • Miles
  • Miles“Does the creation of design admit constraint?”“Design depends largely on constraints. The sum of all constraints. Here is one of the few effective keys to the design problem: the ability of the designer to recognize as many of the constraints as possible. His willingness and enthusiasm for working within these constraints. Constraints of price, of size, of strength, of balance, of surface, of time, and so forth. Each problem has it’s own peculiar list.”
  • Miles
  • MilesWe’re going to try to bounce back and forth between over simplified and real world today. Remember this? This is a case study.
  • Jason
  • JasonBank of America came to IDEO in search of ethnography-based innovation opportunities.The team arrived at a solution that harnessed existing habits – saving change in jars.After Bank of America’s extensive testing, refinement, and validation of prototypes, Keep the Change launched in October 2005. In less than one year, it attracted 2.5 million customers, translating into more than 700,000 new checking accounts and one million new savings accounts for Bank of America.
  • Pete
  • PeteHow has this investment in customer service affected your sales in the long run?Basically, over a nine-year period, we’ve gone from zero to $1 billion in gross merchandise sales. And the No. 1 driver of that growth has been repeat customers and word-of-mouth. On any given day, [repeat business] is about 75 percent of our orders. zappos: designing the customer service experience to drive repeat business. here's a high level q&aarticlethat gives a decent perspective. highlights: 24 hour warehouses, 365 day returns, free shipping both ways, never upsell customers, overdeliver (guarantee delivery in 5 days, but regularly surprise upgrade to overnight), and happy employees=happy customers philosophy.
  • PeteCreating a new Advertising opportunity where there was none before:why the security bins were so ugly and boring? Zappos had to work with many different organizations to figure out how to get their ads in the bins, but the effort has paid off - an entirely differentiated way to market their site at a fraction of the cost of traditional advertising..
  • Katie
  • KatieFab’s Pivot DecisionFirst, we couldn’t do the math. Even though Fab attracted 50,000 members in our first three months, we only doubled in size over the next five, and our updated projections showed that we would never pass the $10 million revenue mark with our business model. We had raised $1.25 million in angel financing and an additional $1.75 million from VCs with the expectation that we would be building a $50-$100 million business, and we clearly couldn’t deliver. Our team signed up for building a big business, we are passionate about building a big business, but the math no longer added up.Second, our market had shifted. Gay rights progress over the past year had a positive impact on the gay community but a negative impact on the demand for our services. With developments like the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, the court victories over California’s Proposition 8 gay marriage ban, the Obama administration’s tacit rejection of the Defense of Marriage Act, and the anti-bullying It Gets Better Project continuing to integrate gays into the mainstream, we saw a diminished need for a gay Facebook or a gay Yelp or a gay Foursquare or a gay Groupon.Third, our maniacal focus on customer input drove us to a new opportunity. From selling daily deals we discovered that the idea of a design site had legs. We found that out when we introduced a Gay Deal of the Day program that sold more than $40,000 of goods in the first 20 days alone. The biggest sellers weren’t gay-focused, nearly half of the buyers were straight, and the response showed that there was a demand for good design available online at affordable prices – sexual orientation notwithstanding.
  • Daniel
  • Daniel
  • Daniel
  • Daniel
  • Daniel
  • Daniel
  • Daniel
  • Daniel
  • KatieEveryone get into your groups!Now we’re going to practice these steps together on a common problem, which will be…
  • Katie.can we get 3 volunteers to share some experiences with air travel?
  • (this slide will stay up as run through activity 01)
  • PeteWhat did we mean earlier when we talked about this process being iterative? Constraints?
  • PeteWe’re going to run our solutions for air travel back through the process. But now you’re building out this sulution for Jet Blue! We’ll need to understand how this solution evolves when it’s for a specific brand.
  • PeteSome context / brand artifacts to get usthinking… populist, humanist, simple pleasures…
  • (this slide will stay up as run through activity 02)

Nyu stern design thinking Presentation Transcript

  • 1. WELCOME.
  • 2. TONIGHT!-DESIGN: LET’S TALK ABOUT THAT.-WHY AND WHAT IS DESIGN FOR?-SOME CASE STUDIES, LARGE AND SMALL.-AN OVERVIEW OF THE DESIGN PROCESS.-SCRIMMAGE.
  • 3. DESIGN:LET’S TALKABOUT THAT
  • 4. WHY AND WHATIS DESIGN FOR?
  • 5. LEAPS
  • 6. HOW IS ITDIFFERENT?
  • 7. VISUAL
  • 8. CONTEXT
  • 9. COLLABORATIVE
  • 10. CONSTRAINTS
  • 11. SOME CASESTUDIES, LARGEAND SMALL
  • 12. ETHNOGRAPHYBASEDINNOVATIONOPPORTUNITY
  • 13. SERVICEBASEDINNOVATIONOPPORTUNITY
  • 14. PIVOTALDECISIONS
  • 15. AN OVERVIEW OFTHE DESIGNPROCESS
  • 16. Design Process: First, Meet the world.
  • 17. Open and Close. But *never* at the same time.
  • 18. Steps in a Process.
  • 19. Where When How How MuchWho/ WhyWhat Draw your ideas!
  • 20. Make and use artifacts.
  • 21. If you don’t write it down it didn’t happen.
  • 22. Think out loud – words, arrows, boxes.
  • 23. SCRIMMAGE!
  • 24. AIR TRAVEL
  • 25. SCRIMMAGEAIR TRAVELAGAIN!
  • 26. AIR TRAVELBRANDING
  • 27. AIR TRAVEL
  • 28. Q&A?
  • 29. THANK YOU!