Daryl O'Hare, 2012 TWSIA Award Presentation, Jasig-Sakai Conference Atlanta, GA
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Daryl O'Hare, 2012 TWSIA Award Presentation, Jasig-Sakai Conference Atlanta, GA

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English Composition I is a course that combines high-quality Open Education Resources (OER) and innovative course design to promote active learning and successful community building. Central to the ...

English Composition I is a course that combines high-quality Open Education Resources (OER) and innovative course design to promote active learning and successful community building. Central to the writing community is the use of collaborative writing spaces where students provide mutual support and engage in grammar reports, reflective assignments, and peer reviews. Innovations for English Composition I include: cross-referenced learning outcomes and topics for course alignment transparency; interactive grammar reports; a visual learning arc explaining course rationale and methods as well as explicit expectations for student success; guided, interactive pre-writing/note-taking; a virtual presence badge to indicate instructor availability for conferences/chats. All materials are ADA compliant. The presenter will discuss student success results with the new course design and provide a demo in Sakai CLE of key course components.

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  • Thank you to Sakai, the Award Sponsors,rSmart and Wiley Publishing, the judges, to Chadron State College and the Kaleidoscope Project, Dr. Susan C. Hines, my family who is here with me today.
  • collaboratively; faculty from at least two institutions would work together to design and test the course;to serve “at risk” students; courses would be designed for students who participated in transitional or remedial studies; to reduce textbook costs; Open Education Resources (OER) and/or publicly available materials would be leveraged within the course;in ways that challenge and innovate; online course designs would need to maintain or exceed student success rates;for reuse and adoption by other institutions; the course would feature an open Creative Commons license so that others may adopt its use; additionally, it would be designed in such a way that it could be installed easily in to any learning management system (LMS), including Sakai CLE.
  • collaboratively; faculty from at least two institutions would work together to design and test the course;to serve “at risk” students; courses would be designed for students who participated in transitional or remedial studies; to reduce textbook costs; Open Education Resources (OER) and/or publicly available materials would be leveraged within the course;in ways that challenge and innovate; online course designs would need to maintain or exceed student success rates;for reuse and adoption by other institutions; the course would feature an open Creative Commons license so that others may adopt its use; additionally, it would be designed in such a way that it could be installed easily in to any learning management system (LMS), including Sakai CLE.
  • have high-quality OER, and if the resources did not exist, we would create them. Additionally, the content would have to engage students from at-risk populations who enrolled in Composition I with a certain amount of dread or anxiety. To capture their attention, we made a effort to select from diverse, contemporary materials: textbooks, websites, videos, podcasts, and still images. We agreed the course should leverage collaborative writing spaces in order to address composition from a process-oriented perspective and to include students in a larger writing community.We agreed the course should align outcomes with activities and assessments in ways that are resoundingly clear, both to faculty and to students.We agreed the course should have a modular design, so it is easy to navigate.We agreed the course should meet compliance standards for ADA/508, both to meet accessibility standards but to assure the course addresses a variety of learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), as well.We agreed the course should meet or surpass online course design standards, such as those advocated by Quality Matters (see: http://www.qmprogram.org).We agreed the course should have interoperable features and a clear information architecture, so that it can be used by other institutions who may operate different LMSs.
  • have high-quality OER, and if the resources did not exist, we would create them. Additionally, the content would have to engage students from at-risk populations who enrolled in Composition I with a certain amount of dread or anxiety. To capture their attention, we made a effort to select from diverse, contemporary materials: textbooks, websites, videos, podcasts, and still images. We agreed the course should leverage collaborative writing spaces in order to address composition from a process-oriented perspective and to include students in a larger writing community.We agreed the course should align outcomes with activities and assessments in ways that are resoundingly clear, both to faculty and to students.We agreed the course should have a modular design, so it is easy to navigate.We agreed the course should meet compliance standards for ADA/508, both to meet accessibility standards but to assure the course addresses a variety of learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), as well.We agreed the course should meet or surpass online course design standards, such as those advocated by Quality Matters (see: http://www.qmprogram.org).We agreed the course should have interoperable features and a clear information architecture, so that it can be used by other institutions who may operate different LMSs.
  • have high-quality OER, and if the resources did not exist, we would create them. Additionally, the content would have to engage students from at-risk populations who enrolled in Composition I with a certain amount of dread or anxiety. To capture their attention, we made a effort to select from diverse, contemporary materials: textbooks, websites, videos, podcasts, and still images. We agreed the course should leverage collaborative writing spaces in order to address composition from a process-oriented perspective and to include students in a larger writing community.We agreed the course should align outcomes with activities and assessments in ways that are resoundingly clear, both to faculty and to students.We agreed the course should have a modular design, so it is easy to navigate.We agreed the course should meet compliance standards for ADA/508, both to meet accessibility standards but to assure the course addresses a variety of learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), as well.We agreed the course should meet or surpass online course design standards, such as those advocated by Quality Matters (see: http://www.qmprogram.org).We agreed the course should have interoperable features and a clear information architecture, so that it can be used by other institutions who may operate different LMSs.
  • have high-quality OER, and if the resources did not exist, we would create them. Additionally, the content would have to engage students from at-risk populations who enrolled in Composition I with a certain amount of dread or anxiety. To capture their attention, we made a effort to select from diverse, contemporary materials: textbooks, websites, videos, podcasts, and still images. We agreed the course should leverage collaborative writing spaces in order to address composition from a process-oriented perspective and to include students in a larger writing community.We agreed the course should align outcomes with activities and assessments in ways that are resoundingly clear, both to faculty and to students.We agreed the course should have a modular design, so it is easy to navigate.We agreed the course should meet compliance standards for ADA/508, both to meet accessibility standards but to assure the course addresses a variety of learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), as well.We agreed the course should meet or surpass online course design standards, such as those advocated by Quality Matters (see: http://www.qmprogram.org).We agreed the course should have interoperable features and a clear information architecture, so that it can be used by other institutions who may operate different LMSs.
  • have high-quality OER, and if the resources did not exist, we would create them. Additionally, the content would have to engage students from at-risk populations who enrolled in Composition I with a certain amount of dread or anxiety. To capture their attention, we made a effort to select from diverse, contemporary materials: textbooks, websites, videos, podcasts, and still images. We agreed the course should leverage collaborative writing spaces in order to address composition from a process-oriented perspective and to include students in a larger writing community.We agreed the course should align outcomes with activities and assessments in ways that are resoundingly clear, both to faculty and to students.We agreed the course should have a modular design, so it is easy to navigate.We agreed the course should meet compliance standards for ADA/508, both to meet accessibility standards but to assure the course addresses a variety of learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), as well.We agreed the course should meet or surpass online course design standards, such as those advocated by Quality Matters (see: http://www.qmprogram.org).We agreed the course should have interoperable features and a clear information architecture, so that it can be used by other institutions who may operate different LMSs.
  • have high-quality OER, and if the resources did not exist, we would create them. Additionally, the content would have to engage students from at-risk populations who enrolled in Composition I with a certain amount of dread or anxiety. To capture their attention, we made a effort to select from diverse, contemporary materials: textbooks, websites, videos, podcasts, and still images. We agreed the course should leverage collaborative writing spaces in order to address composition from a process-oriented perspective and to include students in a larger writing community.We agreed the course should align outcomes with activities and assessments in ways that are resoundingly clear, both to faculty and to students.We agreed the course should have a modular design, so it is easy to navigate.We agreed the course should meet compliance standards for ADA/508, both to meet accessibility standards but to assure the course addresses a variety of learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), as well.We agreed the course should meet or surpass online course design standards, such as those advocated by Quality Matters (see: http://www.qmprogram.org).We agreed the course should have interoperable features and a clear information architecture, so that it can be used by other institutions who may operate different LMSs.

Daryl O'Hare, 2012 TWSIA Award Presentation, Jasig-Sakai Conference Atlanta, GA Daryl O'Hare, 2012 TWSIA Award Presentation, Jasig-Sakai Conference Atlanta, GA Presentation Transcript

  • Daryl O’Hare Instructor Chadron State College June 10-15, 2012Growing Community;Growing Possibilities
  •  rSmart and Wiley TWSIA judges Chadron State College Kaleidoscope Project Dr. Susan C. Hines Family 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 2
  • English Composition I: Taught on-ground in sixteen week sections at Chadron State College Students bought a textbook that cost approximately $75 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 3
  • Chadron State College teamed with theKaleidoscope Project to develop a new eight-week English course in a fully online format. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 4
  • English Composition I should be developed: collaboratively to serve “at risk” students to reduce textbook costs by using OER in ways that challenge and innovate for reuse and adoption by other institutions 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 5
  • I worked with Dr. Susan C. Hines—a fellow Englishprofessor. We divided our labors for a more effectivedevelopment strategy. My role was principally that ofSubject Matter Expert (SME), content author, andinstructor. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 6
  •  The course should use high-quality OER, and if the resources did not exist, we would create them. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 7
  •  The course should have content that would engage students from at-risk populations who enrolled in Composition I with a certain amount of dread or anxiety. Video Still Images Diverse Podcasts Contemporary Materials OER Websites Textbooks 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 8
  •  The course should leverage collaborative writing spaces to address composition from a process- oriented perspective and to include students in a larger writing community. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 9
  •  The course should align outcomes with activities and assessments in ways that are resoundingly clear, both to faculty and to students. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 10
  •  The course should meet compliance standards for ADA/508, both to meet accessibility standards but to assure the course addresses a variety of learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), as well. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 11
  • The course should: have a modular design, so it is easy to navigate. meet or surpass online course design standards, such as those advocated by Quality Matters. have interoperable features and a clear information architecture, so that it can be used by other institutions who may operate different LMSs. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 12
  •  Student Engagement and Community Building Communication Learning Materials and Strategies Learning Outcomes & Assessments Learner Support 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 13
  • 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 14
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  • 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 18
  •  Kaleidoscope course textbooks costs were reduced by 98.7%. Textbook costs of English Composition I were reduced by 100%. 111 Students took the Kaleidoscope online course (fall 2011- Spring 2012); the cost savings were $8,325. Non-Kaleidoscope students (286 students) spent approximately $21,450. Students responded positively to the ways in which the embedded materials engaged their interests. Of the students completing Kaleidoscope surveys following the fall term 2011, 97% found the course materials to be of equal or higher quality than those used in their other courses.**(see: Bliss, TJ, John Hilton III, David Wiley, Kim Thanos. The Cost and Quality of Online Open Textbooks: Perceptions of Community College Instructors and Students. Submitted for publication.) 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 19
  • Learning Outcomes and AssessmentsThe central goal of Composition I is to improve upon student reading andwriting skills. So, one of the goals was to demonstrate a process to mystudents by which they may succeed. The weekly learning arc providesstudents with a rationale for the methods introduced in the course. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 20
  • Cross-Referenced Learning Outcomes and Topics 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 21
  • AssessmentsEach week, students are required to achieve learning outcomes through thefollowing outcome assessments:  a series of reading quizzes, delivered in each module. Quizzes were intended to reinforce reading knowledge/ability as well as assess reading knowledge/ability  discussions and writing assessments requiring careful textual analysis or peer editing  discussions and writing exercises that require a response to and/or analysis of podcasts, screencasts, and/or web video  discussion forums and w riting exercises geared toward attitudes about writing and self-reflection on essays  writing exercises and essay drafts  A series of grammar reports, which include error analyses, research on errors, and articulated remedies  A series of secondary -response discussion assignments that require peer feedback on written content  A series of essays, including narrative, descriptive, reflective, and analytical expression—essays from the course are included in a portfolio 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 22
  • Learner SupportIn addition to linking to institutional support services (academic andtechnical) in my syllabus, I also developed the habit of linking to servicesin places throughout the course where such support might proveimmediately helpful. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 23
  •  One of the students who enrolled in my course had not just one, but two disabilities. She was legally blind as well as hard of hearing. In fact, she was referred to the online version of the course because it struck the institution’s administrators as more accessible than the on- ground version. Thus, our decision to make the course ADA compliant was immediately useful. 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 24
  • Course Fall 2010 Fall 2011 Spring 2012 Historical Low-Income Low-Income ALL Success ALL Success Success Success SuccessBusiness Fundamentals 59% 65% 67% 61% 59%Biology 62% 70% 72% 67% 78%Chemistry N/A N/A 50% 53%Geography 74% 69% 71% 66% 68%Dev. Math 41% 61% 61% Awaiting DataInterm. Algebra 22% 62% 58% 12% 38%College Algebra N/A N/A 86% 57%Psychology 46% 56% 61% 48% 54%Dev. Reading 37% 45% 65% 85% 72%Dev. Writing 74% 83% 81% 70% 69%English Composition 43% 36% 43% 64% 58% 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 25
  • You can visit English Composition I at:http://shines.courseagent.com/kscopehttps://academic.rsmart.com/~Kaleidoscope-English-Composition-I 2012 Jasig Sakai Conference 26