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Kupka Fugue In Two Colors
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Kupka Fugue In Two Colors

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  • Replica of Fugue in Two Colors: Amorpha, 1912. (1946). Gouache, ink and pencil on paper.

Transcript

  • 1. Frantisek Kupka The Fugue of Two Colors
  • 2. Combining Movement with Music
    • Frantisek Kupka (1871-1957) was one of the most influential Modern Czech painters
    • Contributed to the development of Abstract Art Movement
    • Studied in Prague, Vienna and Paris
    • Was puzzled with a dilemma of combining painting, which is a static medium of delivering a message and music, which is a dynamic medium that cannot be pictured as an image.
  • 3. Fugue of Two Colors
    • The idea of the Fugue of Two Colors is not completely abstract
    • On one side coming from – Movement of a ball of red and blue color
    • On the other – Listening to Music of Wagner
    • Many sketches have been made until the final masterpiece could be embedded on canvas with oil paint
  • 4. Initial Draft with the Final Piece
    • The world of movement contrasting the world of abstract thinking
    Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors. (1912). Gouache and ink on paper Replica of Fugue in Two Colors: Amorpha, 1912. (1946). Gouache, ink and pencil on paper.
  • 5. Initial Draft with the Final Piece
    • What can be noted right away from those drafts?
    • What is similar to the initial draft?
    • What is different?
    • Which one is more appealing?
    • Do you notice the movement of the ball transforming into music?
  • 6. Development Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors. (1912). Gouache and ink on paper.
  • 7. Second Draft of the Fugue
    • What is different about it?
    • What makes you differentiate the two?
    • Why the lines are so thin in this draft?
  • 8. The Costume of a Clown Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors . (1912). Gouache and ink on paper
  • 9. Third Draft of the Fugue
    • Isn’t this draft more playful? More Life-like?
    • Can you hear the music, when you look at it?
    • What is the difference between the 2 nd and 3 rd drafts?
  • 10. UNIVERSE Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors . (1912). Gouache on paper
  • 11. Fourth Draft of the Fugue
    • Is the 4 th draft deeper than the 3 rd ?
    • If so, how is it expressed?
    • Which one is more appealing? Gives more freedom to the eyes? Gives more freedom to the thought?
  • 12. Imagination Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors . (1912). Gouache and ink on paper
  • 13. Returning Back & Polishing What has changed? Any new techniques added?
  • 14. Geometry of Circles and Ovals Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors. (1912). Gouache and ink on paper
  • 15. Reshaping Do the shapes of circles produce sounds? What are you hearing? Initial Draft 6 th Draft
  • 16. Crater Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors. (1912). Gouache and ink on paper
  • 17. Upward Water Flow Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors. (1912). Gouache and ink on paper
  • 18. Three Players Chess Game Amorpha: Fugue in Two Colors. (1912). Gouache and ink on paper
  • 19. immortem Replica of Fugue in Two Colors: Amorpha, 1912. (1946)
  • 20. Conclusion
    • Extraordinary image is hard to forget
    • Just like music… it is hard to hear it again, exactly the same way as for the first time
    • Kupka achieved a balance between the fine arts and performing arts – colors and movement coming to sound like a melody of his soul, in the Fugue of Two Colors: Shapeless.