Smithsonian Digital Learning Resources Project

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Digital Learning Resources for and by 21st-Century Educators

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  • Presentation to the Palme rLeadership Development Program, at the Smithsonian Institution.Intro: We are taking the time to think carefully about what educators need from institutions like the Smithsonian. We are researching, writing, talking to teachers, prototyping and trying to make smart decisions that will make what we do here on the Mall, in New York, and at sites all over the world relevant, personal, and we hope transformative for learners.I am sure all of us, in our time at the Smithsonian have had the chance to find some personal connections to this collection. The reality though is that most students will never have the opportunity to become visitors, to wander around this museum and find artifacts that can personally inspire them, much less connect with our experts and the work going on outside these walls.You are now involved in research project to help the Smithsonian understand how it could offer personalized learning experiences digitally.Going to start with a little context...
  • What is SCEMS - role is to connect the resources of the entire Smithsonian with teachers and learners wherever they are, primarily though technology - with the goal of increasing the impact the Smithsonian has on learners.
  • What is educational outreach at SCEMS - discussion of units edu websites/pages
  • SmithsonianEducation.org - attempt to offer unified experience to educators - portal to all the educational content from across SI - provide access to more than 2000 resources, key worded with educator-appropriate language, aligned to standards of learning - content syndication - net trekker, promethean, learning.com, CA DoE, NYC DoE, Gooru Learning, ePals, and Learning Registry - talk about publishing - Smithsonian in Your Classroom - history - format - downloads - what we know about how teachers don't use it as published
  • Realization that SmithsonianEducation.org nor the lesson plans that SCEMS is offering are no longer serving the needs of 21st Century educators. Previous study looked at usage of resources distributed at Smithsonian Teachers’ Night in 2008 showed that teachers do not use content as published, they pick and choose content. They need to ability to customize and personalize resources to the individual needs of their classrooms.
  • What Do Our Users Need?Cooking analogy: - frozen dinner to market with kitchen tools - high quality raw materials: digital assets (both lesson plans, website, and digitized collections) - set of simple tools - OR, an entire toolset, a kitchen of tools, devices, cookbooks, places to store they raw materials
  • What Do Our Users Need?Cooking analogy: - high quality raw materials: digital assets (both lesson plans, website, and digitized collections)
  • What Do Our Users Need?Cooking analogy: - set of simple tools
  • What Do Our Users Need?Cooking analogy: - OR, an entire toolset, a kitchen of tools, devices, cookbooks, places to store they raw materials
  • “We have ambitious plans to use new technologies to reach new audiences. … We have much to offer students and teachers in art, science, history, education, and culture. We want to give learners of all ages access to America’s treasures and our creative experts who bring them to life” –G. Wayne CloughLearning Registry Launch, July 22, 2010
  • “We have ambitious plans to use new technologies to reach new audiences. … We have much to offer students and teachers in art, science, history, education, and culture. We want to give learners of all ages access to America’s treasures, our creative experts who bring them to life,” and enable these audiences to use our content to improve their lives.–G. Wayne Clough and Darren Milligan
  • Phase 1: audience definition - Foresee study - This is what we know about our users, who they are and what they do on our site.SCEMS has just finalized a two-year study of user satisfaction for SmithsonianEducation.org using the Foresee Results tools. The study was conducted using the American Consumer Satisfaction Index developed by the National Quality Research Center at the University of Michigan. Visitors to the site were presented with a brief survey to analyze their profile, their motivations for visiting the site, their activities on the site, and their overall satisfaction with the site and its contents. More than 7,000 surveys were completed between March of 2009 and March of 2011. WHO:63% EducatorsTeacher: 48%Librarian: 5%Curriculum Developer: 4%Home School Teacher: 4%School Administrator: 2%9% Student7% ParentAll visitors indicate that they come to the site primarily to find educational resources (45–72%) followed by information on specific topics (9–21%). although satisfaction for those looking for specific information is much lower.
  • Smithsonian Digital Learning Resouces (DLR) ProjectPartnered with Center for the Advancement of Digital Resources in Education via funding from the Assistant Secretary for Education and Access (Smithsonian Institution) Youth Access Grant program.
  • DLR Logic Model
  • DLR Phase 2: toolset definition - talk about research design - literature review, environmental scan - Focus groups in California - search find, collect, organize, supplement, teach -identify, analyze, extract, customize
  • DLE Prototype Testing and iteration - summarize the 3 weeks research - iterative testing of prototype against our outcomes, changes made to the prototype throughout based on teacher feedback. Data was collected through focused observations, informal interviewing, online surveys
  • Smithsonian Digital Learning Resources Project

    1. 1. Digital Learning Resources for and by 21st-Century Educators Darren Milligan, Michelle Smith, Melissa Wadman Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies August 9, 2012
    2. 2. Photo by Flickr user Herr_Bert, used under a CC BY-NC 2.0 license
    3. 3. What Do Our Users Need?
    4. 4. Photo by Flickr user felix388, used under a CC BY-ND 2.0 license
    5. 5. Photo by Flickr user Angela de Março, used under a CC BY-NC- 2.0 license
    6. 6. “We have ambitious plans to usenew technologies to reach newaudiences. … We have much tooffer students and teachers inart, science, history, education, andculture. We want to give learners ofall ages access to America’streasures and our creative expertswho bring them to life” –G. Wayne Clough Learning Registry Launch, July 22, 2010
    7. 7. “We have ambitious plans to usenew technologies to reach newaudiences. … We have much tooffer students and teachers inart, science, history, education, andculture. We want to give learners ofall ages access to America’streasures, our creative experts whobring them to life,” and enablethese audiences to use our contentto improve their lives. –G. Wayne Clough and Darren Milligan
    8. 8. $$$Youth Access Grant
    9. 9. Phase 1 Teacher engagement(recruiting) and research
    10. 10. Phase 2Assessment, inquiry, andprototype development
    11. 11. Photo by Joe Hobson
    12. 12. http://prezi.com/rpivswlr1jus/scems-prototypes/?auth_key=930463102e3bacd7be8a1ce8c33bf08c284ed167
    13. 13. Phase 3Prototype testing and iteration
    14. 14. Photos by Joe Hobson
    15. 15. http://scems.navnorth.com
    16. 16. Phase 4 Deliverablesand next steps
    17. 17. smithsonian-digital-learning.wikispaces.com Thank you. Darren Milligan milligand@si.edu Melissa Wadman wadmanm@si.edu smithsonianeducation.org @smithsonianedu

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