Personalized LearningHow to discover the tools that will enableteachers, students, and everyone tofind, understand, and ad...
What Can the SmithsonianDo to Help Young PeopleBe Successful in Their Lives?
What Can My MuseumDo to Help Young PeopleBe Successful in Their Lives?
What Can My ResourcesDo to Help Young PeopleBe Successful in Their Lives?
Photo by Flickr user Herr_Bert, used under a CC BY-NC 2.0 license
What Do Our Users Need?
Photo by Flickr user felix388, used under a CC BY-ND 2.0 license
Photo by Flickr user Angela de Março, used under a CC BY-NC- 2.0 license
“We have ambitious plans to usenew technologies to reach newaudiences. … We have much tooffer students and teachers inart,...
“We have ambitious plans to usenew technologies to reach newaudiences. … We have much tooffer students and teachers inart,...
So? What Do We Do?
1. create digital inquiryopportunities for learners2. operate more ubiquitously withinthe digital space3. Make/allow/empow...
# One:Redefining OurPublishing Model
“WHAT IS THE INTERNET?Todays Internet, in aphysical sense, is acollection of sixty thousandlinked computer networksthat co...
http://smithsonianeducation.org/idealabs/universe/index.html
# Two:Metadata(and Sometimes Content)Here, There, Everywhere
# Three:Digital Learning ResourcesProjectDeveloping aDigital Toolset
Long-term Outcome:enable online users tobecome active creators ofdigitalresources, personalized forlearning in their owncl...
Phase 1Teacher engagement(recruiting) and research
Phase 2Assessment, inquiry, andprototype development
Photo by Joe Hobson
http://prezi.com/rpivswlr1jus/scems-prototypes/?auth_key=930463102e3bacd7be8a1ce8c33bf08c284ed167
Phase 3Prototype testingand iteration
Photos by Joe Hobson
scems.navnorth.com
http://scems.navnorth.com
What Did We Learn?
Search and Visualization(Identification)Teachers Prefer:•  To search broadly first followed by specifics,•  Visual search ...
Authentication, Saving, andStoring (Analyzing)Teachers Prefer:•  To save resources that they find useful and will   use wh...
Instructional Tools(Extracting)Teachers Prefer:•  variety of tools,•  better visibility of the tools, including prompts   ...
What’s Next?
“…it is our responsibility to carefor the art. I think we do that bestby allowing users to find, shareand build upon our i...
smithsonian-digital-learning.wikispaces.com              Thank you                 Darren Milligan                milligan...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, an...
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Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, and adapt museum resources (…or how to accept your responsibility in a digitally-enabled world)

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Personalized Learning: How to Discover the Tools That Will Enable Teachers, Students, and Everyone to Find, Understand, and Adapt Museum Resources (...Or How to Accept Responsibility in a Digitally-Enabled World)
Fri, 11/09/2012 - 1:30pm - 2:00pm

Museums, scientific, and cultural institutions must play a major role to ignite a new generation of creativity-based, personalized learners. As more institutional assets are made or born digital, we, as technologists, educators, and communicators must expand our focus to understanding our user needs beyond findability and offer the tools that allow them to understand and then adapt our content, whether through the building of new tools or the sharing of our content in platforms where these tools exist. The Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies will present a multi-phased research and evaluation-based strategy that addresses their Institution’s need to update their relationship with educators, to change online users of museum assets from passive recipients of prescribed content into active creators of digital resources personalized for learning in their own classrooms. 

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  • I am going to talk about some specific projects today, and I have been struggling with how to frame them in a way connects more deeply with what I have been thinking about lately, and have been especially noting at MCN this year about how much we need to be thinking more about our responsibilities.I am sure all of us, in our experiencesin museums have had the chance to find some personal connections to thecollection. To wander through exhibits and have that experience, that sort of magic that can happen in the presence of the “real thing.” The reality though is that most students will never have the opportunity to become visitors, to wander around the museum and find artifacts that can personally inspire them, much less connect with our experts and the work going on outside these galleries.In 07-08 school year, museums hosted about 55 million students in school trips. So, that is about 1 museum visit per student per year. (from http://www.aam-us.org/docs/default-document-library/on-the-horizon-web-version.pdf?sfvrsn=0)Stats: April 2011 survey by the American Association of School Administrators: More than one‐third (36 percent) eliminated field trips for the 2010‐11 school year, 57 percentanticipate doing so in 2011‐12. So, this is pretty giant. The projects I will talk about are an effort to address that; to think beyond our walls and figure out what it means to be a museum in this new reality. I am really interested in making the resources at the Smithsonian answer a very important question:
  • I’d like to share this with you, offer it up as a way to think about the work that you do.
  • Or maybe to think a little more about your museum, but more importantly, your stuff.Going to start with a little context...
  • What is SCEMS - role is to connect the resources of the entire Smithsonian with teachers and learners wherever they are, primarily though technology - with the goal of increasing the impact the Smithsonian has on learners.
  • What is educational outreach at Smithsonian - discussion of units education websites/pages - lots of great work being done to connect resources with educators, experts with learners, etc., but being done still in a way that works really well if you understand our buildings, our geography, but not so great if you don’t.
  • SmithsonianEducation.orgMain feature is an indexed collection of learning resources that are aligned to all state, national, and now, Common Core standards of learning. The site’s 2,000 record-collection of resources such as lesson plans, video and audio clips, and interactive instructional games is one of several Smithsonian finding. I get a lot of pressure, as the webmaster, to redesign, make this look better, etc. And, honestly, I have been trying to get out of the webmaster business for some time. Been doing this a long time, but recently found some courage and admitted to ourselves that we really knew very little about those we were supposed to be serving. The Smithsonian suffers from its massive popularity. There tends to be little drive, from a management perspective, to figure this out, since the keep on coming, the galleries are always full, the website numbers grow, the lesson plans are being downloaded, etc. But what we came to find, through research is that we have been offering is this:
  • While we might like to think that the lesson plans or other educational resources we offer to our audiences are some classy version of a frozen dinner, it is still a frozen dinner. Chicken or Steak?Realization that SmithsonianEducation.org nor the lesson plans that SCEMS offersno longer serving the needs of 21st Century educators, and we had no idea if they were impacting the lives of learners. Previous study looked at usage of resources distributed at Smithsonian Teachers’ Night in 2008 showed that teachers do not use content as published, they pick and choose content. They need to ability to customize and personalize resources to the individual needs of their classrooms.
  • What Do Our Users Need?Cooking analogy: - frozen dinner to market with kitchen tools - high quality raw materials: digital assets (both lesson plans, website, and digitized collections) - set of simple tools - OR, an entire toolset, a kitchen of tools, devices, cookbooks, places to store they raw materials
  • What Do Our Users Need?Cooking analogy: - high quality raw materials: digital assets (both lesson plans, website, and digitized collections)
  • What Do Our Users Need?Cooking analogy: - set of simple tools
  • What Do Our Users Need?Cooking analogy: - OR, an entire toolset, a kitchen of tools, devices, cookbooks, places to store their raw materials
  • “We have ambitious plans to use new technologies to reach new audiences. … We have much to offer students and teachers in art, science, history, education, and culture. We want to give learners of all ages access to America’s treasures and our creative experts who bring them to life” –G. Wayne CloughLearning Registry Launch, July 22, 2010
  • “We have ambitious plans to use new technologies to reach new audiences. … We have much to offer students and teachers in art, science, history, education, and culture. We want to give learners of all ages access to America’s treasures, our creative experts who bring them to life,” and enable these audiences to use our content to improve their lives.–G. Wayne Clough and Darren Milligan
  • The Updated Smithsonian Learning ModelUpdate the Smithsonian Learning ModelJames Smithson wrote that “Knowledge should not be viewed as existing in isolated parts, but as a whole. Every portion throws light on all the others.” This Web and New Media Strategy seeks to update the Smithsonian’s learning model to be aligned with Smithson’s founding vision and new kinds of education and knowledge creation made possible, in part, by technology.This strategy is based on the growing understanding of learning as a hybrid of formal education and self-directed discovery that can be brought together and enhanced by online tools and communities. Increasing online access to Smithsonian collections is part of the equation for promoting learning. (A detailed digitization strategy is under development.) The impact of online collections can be greatly magnified by highlighting the knowledge and insight of Smithsonian experts, an intellectual property policy that encourages re-use and sharing of our assets (where appropriate), and a matrix of tools, policies, and resources that allows our audiences to be our partners in the increase and diffusion of knowledge.(from http://smithsonian-webstrategy.wikispaces.com/Strategy+--+Themes)
  • Museum educators are uniquely positioned to help usher in this new era if they are prepared to do three things:
  • create inquiry opportunities for learners, operate more ubiquitously within the digital space, and Make/allow/empower them to do the work: expose collections alongside tools that foster 21st skills(fromScott Kratz (National Building Museum) and Elizabeth Merritt (center for the Future of Museums): Museums and the Future of Education, On the Horizon,http://www.aam-us.org/docs/default-document-library/on-the-horizon-web-version.pdf?sfvrsn=0)Going to talk about 3 projects at Smithsonian Education that we have been working on to make this a reality.
  • create inquiry opportunities for learners, WHY:Shift from teacher-focus to student, or “learner” focused6 million teachers in the USA, but more than 50 million primary and secondary studentsTransition the 36 years of print publications to digital fixed web-based, tablet-based, or mobile interactives, demonstrations, simulations, and gamesThen, contextualize these learner-focused experiences in a “pedagogical wrapper,” (lesson integration tips, alignments to standards) to allow them to be used in a formalized setting, a school, with practical, standards-aligned instructional strategy
  • First Issue from March 1976. Formerly called Art to Zoo.“This is the first issue of ARTZOO, bringing news from theSmithsonian Institution to teachers of grades three through six. (this is a little broader now) The purpose is to help you use museums, parks, libraries, zoos, andmany other resources within your community to open up new learningopportunities for your students.Our reason for launching a new publication dedicated to promotingthe use of community resources among students and teachers nationallystems from a fundamental belief, shared by all of us here atthe Smithsonian, in the power of objects.” -so from the beginning it was about the collection and how the collection can inspire learning”
  • March 1997 – 21 year later – Caribbean coral reefs in the Netscape browser70 million internet users, 1.7% of populationToday: Almost 2.27 Billion internet users now79% penetration in North America33% worldwide penetration(from: http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats.htm)
  • This is how SIYC was until very recently presented online. PDF downloads including online only content, short summaries, links to related content, including, when possible video materials.Links to online conference sessions with Lisa, the planet hunter (“Are there other worlds out there?”) and Phil Sadler (Astronomer and educator) (“How do we grasp the vastness of the universe?”)And then the interactive:Current fiscal year (10/1/2011-8/20/2012)Downloads: 2,200Interactive: 14,765 (views)
  • Goals: -engage with kids directly online with standards-aligned experiences, whether guided there by their teacher, parent, or on their own (6 million teachers in the U.S. alone, there are more than 50 million primary and secondary students.)Allow choice in the learning process (kids choose scale)Make the universe scale personal (through address selection)
  • operate more ubiquitously within the digital space
  • Aggressively pursuing partnerships with educational resource content aggregators: non-profit, for-profit, state departments of education. These content aggregators want your stuff, will distribute it their users, and give you data back on its usage. We are able to do this because we worked with our general council to develop a standard two-page MOU:Where you get the metadata from, how you use the logo, and what you have to give back to us (usage data).Current collaborating sites:Brokers-CA Department of EdPromethean PlanetLearning.comNettrekkerNYC Department of EdLearning Registry*ePals – 800,000 active schools!Working on: OER Commons, Edmoto, Gooru
  • Make/allow/empower them to do the work: expose collections alongside tools that foster 21st skillsThe impetus for the Digital Learning Resources Project was to help my organization better understand current and potential educational uses of Smithsonian digital resources and provide a roadmap for future digital development. Why? Smithsonian has 2000 learning resources, but 137 million objects in its collections.7.89 million digital catalog records, with more than 775,000 images, videos, and sound files available online, TODAY.We need to start thinking about how these audiences use that content.An exercise in organizational redefinition: from being an organization that defines itself through its expertise and ability to publish the crafted experience (lesson plans) to one the acknowledges the audiences' potential, explosive potential, to craft their own the fully-enabled experiences, customized to their needs (teacher to student)
  • Phase 1: audience definition - Foresee study - This is what we know about our users, who they are and what they do on our site.SCEMS has just finalized a two-year study of user satisfaction for SmithsonianEducation.org using the Foresee Results tools. The study was conducted using the American Consumer Satisfaction Index developed by the National Quality Research Center at the University of Michigan. Visitors to the site were presented with a brief survey to analyze their profile, their motivations for visiting the site, their activities on the site, and their overall satisfaction with the site and its contents. More than 7,000 surveys were completed between March of 2009 and March of 2011. WHO:63% EducatorsTeacher: 48%Librarian: 5%Curriculum Developer: 4%Home School Teacher: 4%School Administrator: 2%9% Student7% ParentAll visitors indicate that they come to the site primarily to find educational resources (45–72%) followed by information on specific topics (9–21%). although satisfaction for those looking for specific information is much lower.
  • DLRP Logic ModelThe project had three sets of intended outcomes for the short, medium, and long-term. To achieve them, the Digital Learning Resource Project was executed through the lens of intended learning outcomes inspired by a competency framework for teacher instructional analysis and development based on the Next Generation Science Standards.Original short-term outcomes were to increase teachers’ skills in:identifying specific Smithsonian digital learning contentanalyzing specific Smithsonian digital learning contentextracting specific content from Smithsonian digital learning resourcesMedium-term outcomes were to increase:skills to make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding (Common Core State Standards)Increase creativity
  • Long-term outcome is to enable online users to become active creators of digital resources personalized for learning in their own classroom
  • So, let’s talk a little about methodology. I work at a pretty academic institution and I echo Rosanna’s (Flouty) comment from yesterday about how educators should think more about how they talk about their work. To make sure that others in their institutions understand that what we do is rigorous and based in research. DLR Phase 2: toolset definition - talk about research design (idea was to understand how educators pull apart our content, and figure out if digital tools could make it easier) - literature review, environmental scan - Focus groups in California - search find, collect, organize, supplement, teach -identify, analyze, extract, customize
  • CollectSequenceLayerEngageShare
  • DLRP Prototype Testing and iteration - summary of the 3 weeks research - iterative testing of prototype against our outcomes, changes made to the prototype throughout based on teacher feedback. - Data was collected through focused observations, informal interviewing, online surveys
  • So, I, who spend most of my day staring at a screen, got to spend my summer doing this, working everyday with really incredible educators.
  • So, let’s take a look at the prototype. So, if you have a device in front of you, check out this URL and play around as I do.
  • Do some general searching and savingExplore the Mars landing resource set.Users can create their own localized metadata profile for a given asset that persists within their collection and can be extended to learner audiences in formats deemed more accessible.
  • These are organized by our short-term goals
  • what will we build, how we will share it:Currently fundraising to build the projectPlanning on releasing the platform and toolset open sourceHow do students interact with this? What would a student toolset that inspire self-directed inquiry: A new examination of the student user as a growing audience for digital museum resourcesFurther examination of the implications of teacher or user authorship and adaption of Smithsonian digital contentContinued examination of licensing (IP) options and accountability issues as content is shared more broadly in a variety of contextsA strategic approach to partnerships and data-sharingA focused mobile and media strategy in light of new findings
  • After looking at all this research, I am going to end with a completely “scientific” graph that I think summarizes this perspective on our responsibility.So, on the horizontal axis here we have the Usability of a Museum Object in the real world. “Can I get my hands on it, an image of it, a big image of it, can I manipulate it, combine it with others, read, listen, see someone who knows something about it tell me more, can I find other objects that help me understand it, can I make it work for me.”And on the vertical, we have the current and (accept it) the future value of museum object. So, this might look a little different that how we have thought about our stuff in the past, right. Value tended to be more in the realm of its historical importance, rarity, some level of financial desire.
  • Sharing is Caring at the National Gallery of Denmark. If you don’t know about this…movement, I encourage you to check it out.
  • Thank you. I should say that I am only a representative of a really great team at the Smithsonian, Cross and Joftus, and Navigation North. They are all to be acknowledged for their insight and hard work in moving this forward.This is the wiki: go here, send your friends here. All the research for the Digital Learning Resources Project (the toolset) I talked about today is there, the literature review, environmental scan, all the data collection tools, everything is up for you to use. Everything is up there under CC0.
  • Personalized Learning: How to discover the tools that will enable teachers, students, and everyone to find, understand, and adapt museum resources (…or how to accept your responsibility in a digitally-enabled world)

    1. 1. Personalized LearningHow to discover the tools that will enableteachers, students, and everyone tofind, understand, and adapt museum resources (…or how to accept your responsibility in adigitally-enabled world)Darren Milligan @darrenmilliganSmithsonian Center for Educationand Museum StudiesMuseum Computer Network ConferenceSeattle, WashingtonNovember 9, 2012#mcn2012cl21
    2. 2. What Can the SmithsonianDo to Help Young PeopleBe Successful in Their Lives?
    3. 3. What Can My MuseumDo to Help Young PeopleBe Successful in Their Lives?
    4. 4. What Can My ResourcesDo to Help Young PeopleBe Successful in Their Lives?
    5. 5. Photo by Flickr user Herr_Bert, used under a CC BY-NC 2.0 license
    6. 6. What Do Our Users Need?
    7. 7. Photo by Flickr user felix388, used under a CC BY-ND 2.0 license
    8. 8. Photo by Flickr user Angela de Março, used under a CC BY-NC- 2.0 license
    9. 9. “We have ambitious plans to usenew technologies to reach newaudiences. … We have much tooffer students and teachers inart, science, history, education, andculture. We want to give learners ofall ages access to America’streasures and our creative expertswho bring them to life” –G. Wayne Clough Learning Registry Launch, July 22, 2010
    10. 10. “We have ambitious plans to usenew technologies to reach newaudiences. … We have much tooffer students and teachers inart, science, history, education, andculture. We want to give learners ofall ages access to America’streasures, our creative experts whobring them to life,” and enablethese audiences to use our contentto improve their lives. –G. Wayne Clough and Darren Milligan
    11. 11. So? What Do We Do?
    12. 12. 1. create digital inquiryopportunities for learners2. operate more ubiquitously withinthe digital space3. Make/allow/empower them dothe work: expose collectionsalongside tools that foster 21stcentury learning skills
    13. 13. # One:Redefining OurPublishing Model
    14. 14. “WHAT IS THE INTERNET?Todays Internet, in aphysical sense, is acollection of sixty thousandlinked computer networksthat connect more thanthirty million people. Thissystem provides a platformfor people worldwide toshare information. Whenyou connect to theInternet, you become partof a diverse electroniccommunity rich ineducational resources.”
    15. 15. http://smithsonianeducation.org/idealabs/universe/index.html
    16. 16. # Two:Metadata(and Sometimes Content)Here, There, Everywhere
    17. 17. # Three:Digital Learning ResourcesProjectDeveloping aDigital Toolset
    18. 18. Long-term Outcome:enable online users tobecome active creators ofdigitalresources, personalized forlearning in their ownclassroom
    19. 19. Phase 1Teacher engagement(recruiting) and research
    20. 20. Phase 2Assessment, inquiry, andprototype development
    21. 21. Photo by Joe Hobson
    22. 22. http://prezi.com/rpivswlr1jus/scems-prototypes/?auth_key=930463102e3bacd7be8a1ce8c33bf08c284ed167
    23. 23. Phase 3Prototype testingand iteration
    24. 24. Photos by Joe Hobson
    25. 25. scems.navnorth.com
    26. 26. http://scems.navnorth.com
    27. 27. What Did We Learn?
    28. 28. Search and Visualization(Identification)Teachers Prefer:• To search broadly first followed by specifics,• Visual search results: Gallery view, and• Intelligence in searches and results (auto-complete typing, auto-correct spelling, and correlate similar items to user profile)Teacher Behavior:• Use a diversity of web resources/little loyalty(although they go to educational sites more frequently than non-educational sites),• Sharing by emailing link to themselves or a colleague
    29. 29. Authentication, Saving, andStoring (Analyzing)Teachers Prefer:• To save resources that they find useful and will use whatever means available to them to do it, even if the site does not provide this function,• Flexibility to organize and annotate resources according to their own schemas,• Flexibility in the types of viewing methods available: one for whole-class interaction, and one for individual interaction,• The ability to have students use the site and its tools as much as the teacher, and• Content that is aligned, or close-to-aligned with Common Core State Standards• Ability to upload resources from other sources to augment their collections
    30. 30. Instructional Tools(Extracting)Teachers Prefer:• variety of tools,• better visibility of the tools, including prompts and explanations for their use, and• intuitive design and flow between tools and facets of the prototype.• Which tools: all of them ;)
    31. 31. What’s Next?
    32. 32. “…it is our responsibility to carefor the art. I think we do that bestby allowing users to find, shareand build upon our images…” -Merete Sanderhoff, Statens Museum for Kunst
    33. 33. smithsonian-digital-learning.wikispaces.com Thank you Darren Milligan milligand@si.edu @darrenmilligan smithsonianeducation.org @smithsonianedu

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