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Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
Classroom Management Workshops
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Classroom Management Workshops

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  • 8:30-8:35 am
  • Darren: 8:35 – 8:40
  • 8:40 – 8:45DarrenBefore we begin, we like to remind you of the norms we have used as a way of working together. Please take a moment to think about what each one looks like to you. (Pause to allow them time to read slide). We want to acknowledge that we look at your feedback from the meetings. We have noticed a minor pattern that some people think that the meetings could be accomplished in a shorter time. It’s important for us to go slow in order to go fast and spend time reflecting so we’re prepared to have those conversations with our PTs. Darren-put in your own wordsThe concept is that we want to importance of practicing and interacting with each other in these meetings so we can have deep conversations with our PTs so they can grow in their teaching so students can achieve. Maria Chavez
  • 8:45 – 8:50DarrenAt your tables you have 3 X 5 cards, please write a classroom management success you have had this school year. Once you have finished writing please share with your neighbor.
  • Darren: 8:50 – 8:52
  • Darren: 8:52 – 8:54Think of your favorite middle or high school teacher. Preferably for the grade that you currently teach. Why was that teacher your favorite?
  • Darren8:54 – 9:10Challenge: without talking, line up by birthday in a horseshoe.Get in line by birthday and month without speaking.Review each persons birthday by having them call out their birthdayExplain that they’re going to discuss their favorite teacher. Break into groups of four, give them time to discuss.Share who their favorite teacher was and how she/he built relationshipsThey’ll be returning to these same groups of five later on. Ask them to thanks their partners and return to their seats.We did this as an easy way to make random groups of five. We’re going to make groups of five.When you’re finished sharing, the wall. Once everyone’s finished, we’ll return to our seats.
  • Araceli: 9:10 – 9:11Relationships are one of the most important things in Classroom Management. The better you know your students and the better they know each other, the more unity your class will have.
  • Araceli 9:11 – 9:16(2:14) Mrs. SmithSecondary Classroom Mgmt  Getting Off to a Good Start Visit the Classroom  Building Positive RelationshipsHow does the teacher make the students feel like part of the class community? Would these strategies work in your class?Students names are on the wall to know who the class is next to the mission statement.Discuss in trios.
  • 9:16 -9:36 Araceli You will have 8 minutes to read the Introduction on pages 56-57 and assigned Module. You will need to form a group of four and number off within your group 1-4.Each person will read assigned Module. Ones-will read Module 12, Twos-will read Module 13, Threes-will read Module 14, Fours-will read Module 14.Form a group of four and number off within your group.1s will read Module 122s will read Module 133s will read Module 144s will read Module 15As you read highlight key points that stand out to you. After the reading you will have a 10 minutes to debrief specific relationship building strategies from your section within your table groups.18 mins.
  • Araceli 9:36-9:39As we have gathered from Mrs. Smith’s video clip and the reading building relationships is a critical piece of classroom management. Modules 12 and 13 were about taking personal interest in students and using equitable and positive classroom behaviors.Balance between dominance and cooperation. Kids shouldn’t be scared of the teacher. The Teacher should have students cooperating on class rules and have control over the class. The more you know your students, the better you can understand and help get them engaged.Think of a success you have had building relationships with your students. Take 1 minute and share your success at your table.
  • Araceli 9:39-9:54Why is it important to build student relationships? By understanding how other students think and feel, this fosters a basis for community. Community isn’t only built in cooperative learning environments, but in everyday interactions between students. Students that work cooperatively learn to value others worth and develop compassion and acceptance.Return to your groups of four (birthday groups) and find a spot in the room. Have five to 5 minutes to find things that you have in common but are unique, pick three things that you have in common but you think other groups may not have. Be ready to share at least one of these for everybody.Then share out what your group has in common that other groups don’t.
  • Araceli 9:54-10:01Connections among students. Class community building is important because all students bring their own strengths to the table. Take a few minutes, at groups (share ways to build relationships with students or among student in order to build community.)Whole group share out-share a couple of community building ideas
  • Araceli 10:01-10:11Now that we have had the opportunity to discuss the three types of relationships we are going to create an action plan for relationships.You will need to fill in first row of the Relationship building action plan. What are your next steps to build relationships from Teacher to Student, Student to Student and Student to Class or School that you might be taking on Monday, next week, month or next year?Think about each relationship type you are building. Take one activity you have heard or seen or thought of and include action plan. Take a moment and write it individually and then, we will be asked to share one idea as a whole group.Teacher – StudentStudent – StudentStudent – Class (community)Fill in the first row of the Teacher: Student, Student: Student and Student to Class or School Relationship Action Plan.
  • 10:11-10:21Darren
  • 10:21-10:22Darren
  • 10:21-10:22DarrenDuring break find follow the directions on the card. Introduce yourself to somebody, etc.
  • 10:21-10:22DarrenDuring break find follow the directions on the card. Introduce yourself to somebody, etc.
  • 10:21-10:22DarrenDuring break find follow the directions on the card. Introduce yourself to somebody, etc.
  • 10:22-10:37DarrenWarm DemanderMarzanno calls this a Balance between dominance & cooperation, but we prefer the term warm demander. Dominance refers to the teachers authority while cooperation refers to the students input into the class. Marzanno suggests that neither one of these aspects are extremes but that there is a balance of these two aspects much like the warm demander.
  • Araceli: 10:37-10:38Management is a system. Typically we think of this system in terms of Rules, procedures, rewards & consequences. One part that is typically left out of this equation is the relationship aspect. Before break we discussed the importance of building relationships to help students be engaged and encourage positive behavior.This equation would fall apart if these students weren’t working together.
  • 10:38-10:39Araceli Why rules? What are they? Set of expectations for student behaviors. Help students to understand what is expected of them. Rules are different than procedures. Procedures are routines that help the class run smoothly whereas rules are much more broad. Many of your schools use PBIS where some very simple rules are stated, keep that in mind as we continue today and how might use those effectively in your class.
  • 10:39-10:434 minutesYou will have four minutes to write your Classroom Rules on the action plan for Rules (in the handout)
  • 10:43-10:44AraceliTake a moment and read the Harry Wong quote. It’s critical to explicitly state the rules many students don’t know how they need to behave in the classroom. We need to teach students rules and not assume they already know how to behave a certain way.
  • 10:44-10:55Araceli You will be reading the General Classroom Behavior article on pages 9-12 in the Handbook for Classroom Management that works book. You will 5 minutes to read individually and highlight key points that stand out to you. Then, you will have an opportunity to debrief at your group tables for 5 minutes. Comments or questions about the reading? 10 mins totalHighlight key points and that stand out for you from this reading and be prepared to share an insight with your table.
  • 10:55- 10:56Araceli Rules need to be simple and positively stated. Set student expectations.Tell students how you want them to behave as opposed to how you don’t want them to behave.
  • 10:56-10:57Araceli A rule is only a rule when you are willing to enforce it. What are you willing to enforce? Many teachers have a rule, “Keep hands, feet & objects to yourself.” However when items get thrown, erasers, pencils, etc. if it isn’t enforced, then students learn that rules don’t need to be followed.Some teachers involve the class when they create rules in order to get buy in from their students and build community at the same time.
  • Araceli 10:57-11:02Beginning of the Year Classroom Mgmt Establishing Classroom Procedures & Rules  View a Teaching Example (Rulemaking)Video clip of Ms. Patron, a 3rd grade teacher, from NY on creating classroomrules. Set the scene: At the beginning of the school year it is extremely important to establish classroom rules and procedures. After setting rules and procedures, we can move forward with differentiated instruction and focus on lesson delivery rather than dealing with rules and procedures through out the school year. After winter break, students may need a review of classroom rules and procedures. Video clip of Ms. Patron, a 3rd grade teacher, from NY on creating classroomrules. As you watch the video, take a look how she has her students take ownership of the classroom rules. Think about how you may generate class discussion among your students regarding in forming of rules. How you may do this next year?
  • 11:02-11:04AraceliVideo clip of Ms. Patron, a 3rd grade teacher, from NY on creating classroomrules. Elbow Partner-Share: 2 mins Key points of video clipHow Ms. Patron had her students take ownership of the classroom rules?How might you generate class discussion among your students in forming of rules? And how you may do this next year?
  • 11:04-11:06AraceliThis is an example of a high school teacher clearly posting his classroom expectations. Alec Kerins from San Jose High SchoolAlec Karen (Araceli’s notes)
  • 11:04-11:06AraceliMellissa Duran, Hoover
  • 11:04-11:06Araceli Art teacher. Julie Van Duarc from Trace.
  • 11:04-11:06Araceli Generic rules. Positively stated. You’ll notice the difference between these and the Positive, Behavior Intervention and Support schools.
  • 11:04-11:06Araceli First grade teacher. Vicki Foshay.Schallenberger.
  • 11:06-11:13AraceliYou have read the Marzano reading pp.9-12 regarding RulesFor your reference as you re-write your classroom rules, on pages 11-12 in the Marzano book there are some examples of Teacher & Student Rights and Rules. Turn the page to Action Plan for Rules-in your hand outYou will have 5 minutes to revise your classroom rules. After you have revised your classroom rules, you will have few minutes to discuss your revisions at your table groups.
  • Darren11:13-11:14
  • Darren: 11:14-11:15Procedures are simply a method or process for how things are to be done in the classroom.“The number one problem in the classroom is not discipline, but lack of routine” Harry Wong
  • Darren:11:15-11:20Set the scene: Ms. Petrone is setting up procedures on the first day of school that she will use throughout the school year. Ms. Petrone on Procedures.: Beginning of the Year Classroom Management. View a Teaching Example. (Procedures).As you watch the video, think about what she needed to set up these procedures.2 mins-Talk to an elbow partner about any A-has, what planning she had to do, anything you would do differently.
  • Darren: 11:20-11:24Using the “What procedures do we need?” handout, highlight the procedures that are currently working well in your class. Prioritize the top 3 that you need to change or implement to make your class run more smoothly.Here are a few examples of procedures that some teachers use.
  • 11:20-11:24DarrenA hall pass from Willow Glen High School’s Teacher from Jim Bernstein
  • Darren11:20-11:24The weekly calendar is posted so that students will know what is assignments are discussed in class during the week. It can include homework as well.
  • Darren11:20-11:24Student binders are color coded for easy identification. Mellissa Duran WGHS. Mellissa Duran also uses these types of binders and has the table get out everyone’s binder every day to add any handouts, even if the student is absent.
  • 11:20-11:24DarrenMelissa Duran at Hoover organizes note books & papers to return to students
  • 11:20-11:24DarrenTable names in Julie Van Dewarks art class at Trace.
  • 11:20-11:24Darren Pic from Willow Glen High SchoolThis is the daily agenda that is posted on the board via the projector. The agenda is then archived in wiki and emailed to the students.
  • 11:20-11:24Darren“The number one problem in the classroom is not discipline, but lack of routine” Harry WongGive Me 5- procedure used by one of the teachers we observed to get students attention:1.Eyes are on me2. Ears are listening 3. Mouth is quiet4. Hands are empty5. Body is still
  • 11:20-11:24DarrenVicky’s classroomAnother example of group baskets Students learn color names and spelling
  • 11:20-11:24DarrenAnother procedure of snack and back packs storage
  • 11:20-11:24DarrenExample of what Vicky says….1. When I say one, you are going to push in your chairs and stand quietly behind your desk.2. When I say two, you are going to walk quietly and stand in line on your number.3. When I say three, we are going to walk out the door and go to recess.Students are assigned a number at the beginning of school year.
  • Darren 11:24-11:34Find a partner. Play ROCK, PAPER, SCISSOR. The winner will share a classroom procedure learned 1st the challenger will share second.If no problem over the procedure to play rock paper scissor arises, then ask the question “ How many of you had an issue, with the way that you play rock paper scissor? Do you play rock paper scissors in your classroom? Do you teach your students how to play?For instance in my class we play…Rock, Paper, Scissors can be used as a system to solve conflict between students or to determine who goes first or second, etc.This activity can be a quick and easy way to problem solve between students.
  • 11:34-11:39Darren 5 minutes-Using the “What procedures do we need?” (last page handout),highlight the procedures that are currently working well in your class. Prioritize the top 3 that you need to change or implement to make your class run more smoothly. Come up with things that are not on the list.
  • Darren11:34-11:39 5 minutes-Using the “What procedures do we need?” (last page handout),highlight the procedures that are currently working well in your class. Prioritize the top 3 that you need to change or implement to make your class run more smoothly. Come up with things that are not on the list.
  • Darren 11:39-11:4910 mins.What procedures do you already have in place? Why are they working?Share at your table.
  • Darren11:49-11:51
  • Darren11:51-11:52Rules and Procedures must be taught and re-taught throughout the year. If students are no longer following the rules and procedures then the teacher must think…. Are these rules still important to you then they need to be re-taught and re-enforced. If they are no longer important than your rules and procedures should be revised. If something doesn’t work, change it. These rules aren’t set in stone.
  • Darren11:52-11:54Look at the second to the last page on your handout, choose one of the procedures that you highlighted from a few minutes ago.Write down 3 – 5 simple steps to that procedure, include what it will look and sound like. You may want to include cues for students to follow. For example, when Ms. Bauer’s class, her cues for moving to the rug. Her cues were non-verbal, one finger meant stand up, two fingers meant push in your chair, three fingers meant move to the rug and sit, “Crisscross, applesauce.”
  • Darren11:54-11:59Look at the second to the last page on your handout, choose one of the procedures that you highlighted from a few minutes ago.Write down 3 – 5 simple steps to that procedure, include what it will look and sound like. You may want to include cues for students to follow. For example, when Ms. Bauer’s class, her cues for moving to the rug. Her cues were non-verbal, one finger meant stand up, two fingers meant push in your chair, three fingers meant move to the rug and sit, “Crisscross, applesauce.”
  • Darren11:59-12:04Look at the second to the last page on your handout, choose one of the procedures that you highlighted from a few minutes ago.Write down 3 – 5 simple steps to that procedure, include what it will look and sound like. You may want to include cues for students to follow. For example, when Ms. Bauer’s class, her cues for moving to the rug. Her cues were non-verbal, one finger meant stand up, two fingers meant push in your chair, three fingers meant move to the rug and sit, “Crisscross, applesauce.”
  • 11:30-12:30
  • Darren12:30-12:35Give away booksDarren12:35-12:55If we have time cover (6 slides) from Rewards up to Group Recognition Slide
  • Darren12:55Araceli-Elementary Teachers relocate to room 133 or 333 upstairsCaring, interested, authentic. What did you find out during the break? Write down
  • 1:00-2:00Darren introduces Ed end by 2:00Araceli introduces Vicki end by 2:00http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxPVyieptwA
  • 2:00-2:10 BreakAraceli &Darren
  • Darren 2:10-2:11Take a few moments and on an index card, Write the last homework assignment.Write why you do your job or put extra effort into your job. I won’t ask you to share, so your answer doesn’t have to be perfectly worded. Just think independently for a few moments and jot it down.We’re going to come back to it in a few minutes.A crucial element of classroom management is the rewards system you put in place. It can take many forms and may be elaborate or simple but should recognize and reinforce positive behaviors – thereby minimizing unwanted behaviors.
  • Darren 2:11-2:13Think Cupcakes:Have Vicky tell her story about her cupcake apron.Explain that while this technique will not necessarily work for everyone, each person must create their own authentic technique, the idea is the same. That when Vicky wants to see behaviors change she gets out her cupcake apron and students immediately know to monitor their behaviors.The system needs to be consistent and taught over and over again. The system also has to be authentic and work for the individual teacher.Authenticity. This is what worked for Vicki. When things aren’t working, think cupcakes. Try something new. Be authentic. What works for you may not for somebody else. What’s worked for years may not work next year.
  • Darren: 2:13-2:16Research re: extrinsic rewards and adults. What’s your experience with offering rewards to students? Think, pair, share with a partner about the role of extrinsic vs. intrinsic reward systems in a class. What some of the benefits of each might be.
  • Darren: 2:18-2:20
  • Darren: 2:20-2:27Lynn Bauer at Reed awards Preferred activity time.Keeps tally of things & good behavior that she likes and when she feels like it she’ll give them good time. Each tally point is one minute.Share with partner one to two strategies you use to recognize your students.
  • Darren: 2:27-2:42Get back together with your birthday groupRead the number you were assigned according to your birthday group5 mins to read10 mins to share in your birthday groupTeacher ReactionTangible RewardsDirect CostGroup ContingencyHome Contingency
  • Darren: 2:13-2:16Is it for money?Research on adults and kids tends to bear out that intrinsic rewards work better for rote, non creative exercises. Extrinsic rewards – work better for creative thinking.
  • Darren 2:16-2:18Think about the Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic rewards. What motivates you to do your job?Why do we play Angry Birds & Farmville?Why do we play games?What is the motivation?Is it extrinsic or intrinsic?Daniel Pink, author of Drive, says we are motivated by three factors: autonomy, mastery and purpose.Autonomy. I’m able to be self directed in directing the birds and firing them away. When I shoot and how I shoot the birds is totally up to me.Mastery. At each level I get better and better. By starting off with easy levels and getting progressively more difficult I’m able to monitor my progress by myself. I can look back and realize I’ve made progress. I have a visual representation.Purpose. I hate green pigs. They should never have stolen those eggs.When all three of these items are in store, then we become engaged in the activity.Come back to what you wrote on the index card about why you do your job or why you put extra effort into it?
  • Darren: 2:42-2:43Be with it, be aware.Be proactiveOccupy the entire roomNotice potential problemsDon’t turn your back on students.
  • Darren 2:43-2:44You may not really need consequences if the system of rules, procedures & rewards is set up correctly. However, sometimes, things may go wrong.ProximityTeacher LookTalk privately with studentCause the least disruption possible. When I yell, “Johnny, step away from the fish tank. What do the res of the students do?”Refer to the rulesRefer to the school discipline policy.Change your rules, change your procedures.
  • Darren 2:44-2:46A reasonable consequence is one that follows logically from the behaviorThe best logical consequence teaches students to choose between acceptable and unacceptable actions.What do consequences say about what you believe. Does writing standards say that writing is a punishment? Do timeouts for not doing work work as rewards for those students? Personal relationships are critical here for understanding why students are not following classroom rules to help them make a better choice.
  • Today we’re going to explore in paint how we feel when we’re late getting picked up from preschool
  • Today we’re going to explore in paint how we feel when we’re late getting picked up from preschoolWhat is the student’s control over the situation? What can they change? What can you change?
  • Darren 2:46-2:48Melissa Duran at Hoover uses assignments to helps students make responsible choices without causing too much disruptions. Each of these consequences are specific to the action and require a parent signature to help inform parents about student behaviors.
  • Darren 2:48-3:00Think of two ideas that might work for you in your classroom and write each idea on a separate sheet of paper.
  • Darren 2:48-3:00Think of two ideas that might work for you in your classroom and write each idea on a separate sheet of paper.
  • Darren3:00-3:01Thank your partners and come back to your seats.
  • Darren 3:01-3:02Araceli and I will be passing out the evaluations. We appreciate and value your feedback. Think about your next steps regarding your action plan.
  • Transcript

    • 1. +CLASSROOMMANAGEMENT Presented By: Darren Battaglia and Araceli Castillo SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 2. + AGENDA1. Welcome2. Relationships3. Rules and Procedures4. Engagement5. Rewards and ConsequencesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 3. + Norms Be present Be involved Be respectful
    • 4. + SHARE Writea classroom management success you have had this school year on a card SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 5. + Outcomes:  Understand and apply classroom management as a system.  Create an action plan for using rules, procedures and building student relationships.  Use engagement strategies to prevent unwanted behaviors.SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 6. + Great Educators in History DIRECTIONS EXAMPLE  Who was your favorite teacher and why?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 7. + SHARE Lineup in a horse shoe by birthday. Shareyour memory with your group. What did that teacher do to build relationships? SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 8. +RELATIONSHIPS SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 9. + Getting off to a Good Start! Video First Day of SchoolSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 10. + Teacher : Student  All read pp. 56-57  JIGSAW:  Module 12: Demonstrating Personal Interest pp. 59-62  Module 13: Behaving Equitably pp. 63-66  Module 14: Exhibiting an Assertive Connection pp. 67-70  Module 15: Being Aware of the Needs pp. 71-76SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 11. + Teacher : Student  Taking Personal Interest in Students  Using Equitable & Positive Classroom Behaviors  Balanced Dominance & CooperationSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 12. + Student : Student Relationships  What’s the difference?  Human Bingo  Think, Pair, Share  Ice breakersSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 13. + Student : Class Relationships  Class meeting  Compose a chant  Photo wall/collage  Mural  Mission statementSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 14. + Action Plan for Relationships  Write an activity to improve each type of relationship (page 4)  Describe next steps: tomorrow, next week, month & yearSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 15. + BREAKSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 16. +SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 17. +SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 18. +SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 19. +SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 20. + Teacher as a Warm Demander  Read “The Teacher as a Warm Demander”  Be ready to share one insight from the reading at your tableSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 21. + Management is a systemSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 22. + RULES SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 23. Action Plan for Rules Write your classroom rules+ on the action plan. SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 24. Rules:“The function of a rule is to prevent or encourage behavior by clearly stating+ student expectations.” Harry Wong SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 25. + Rules Read General Classroom Behavior Pages 9-12 • How are rules established in various classrooms?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 26. + The 6 Rules for Rules:  Simple  Positively stated  Behavioral objectives (Doing Verbs)  Always true  Easily observed  Physically doableSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 27. + What will you enforce?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 28. + Rule makers Video of rules being made, Ms. PatronSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 29. + Rule makers Share: 2 mins • Key points • How did Ms. Patrone have her students take ownership of the classroom rules? • How might you generate discussion on forming rules in your class?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 30. + EXAMPLESSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 31. + EXAMPLESSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 32. + EXAMPLESSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 33. + EXAMPLESSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 34. + EXAMPLESSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 35. Action Plan for Rules Re-write your classroom rules+ using the 6 rules for rules. SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 36. +SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 37. +PROCEDURES SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 38. + Procedures Video of procedure Ms. PatronSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 39. + What procedures do we need?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 40. + ExamplesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 41. + Examples:SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 42. + Examples:SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 43. + ExamplesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 44. + ExamplesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 45. + ExamplesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 46. + ExamplesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 47. + ExamplesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 48. + ExamplesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 49. + ExamplesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 50. + ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORSSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 51. + What procedures do we need?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 52. + Procedures Highlight procedures that are working in your class Prioritize top 3 that you need to change or implement Come up with procedures that are not on list Share at your table groupSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 53. + Self- Reflection  Think about a typical day.  What procedure works really well?  Be ready to share.SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 54. + Teaching Procedures Effectively  Break them into 3 – 5 simple steps  Teach the visually, orally & kinesthetically  Check for understanding  Practice, reinforce, periodically reviewSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 55. The most difficult behavior for a child to do is the one he has never seen. A. HarrisSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 56. + Action Plan – Procedures  Write one new procedure  Include it in your action plan  How might you implement it?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 57. + Procedure: Passing out textbooks Step Looks like Soundslike Table monitors  One student  Quiet and the walk to the back from each table rest of the stands up and shelf & pick up walks quietly to students are books the back of the listening to the classroom lesson Place one  One student textbook (quietly) passes out one textbook per in front of each student student Table monitor  All students are  All students walks back to seating at are ready to seat assigned seats learn SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 58. + Action Plan – Procedures  Write one new procedure  Include it in your action plan  How might you implement it?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 59. + LunchSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 60. + Welcome Back  http://www.teachertube.com/viewVide o.php?video_id=7672  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lul UvYfRl_cSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 61. + Elementary Teachers  Pack and StackSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 62. +ENGAGEMENT Presented By: Ed Hodges and Vicki Foshay SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 63. + BREAKSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 64. + REWARDS &CONSEQUENCE S SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 65. + SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 66. + Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic rewards  Do they work?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 67. + Individual Recognition  Students of the month  Tickets for drawings  Student store  Cupcakes  JobsSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 68. + Group Recognition  Preferred activity time  Attendance & Behavior Charts  Marbles in a jar  Table pointsSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 69. + Jigsaw 1. Teacher Reaction pgs. 40-42 2. Tangible Rewards pgs. 43-44 3. Direct Cost pgs. 45-46 4. Group Contingency pgs.47-49 5. Home Contingency pgs. 50- 52SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 70. + Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic rewards  Do they work?  Motivation?SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 71. + SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 72. + Be aware…SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 73. + When things go wrong…SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 74. + Criteria of Effective ConsequencesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 75. +SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 76. + “Today, we’re going to explore in paint how we feel when we’re late getting picked up from preschool.”SJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 77. + Criteria of Effective ConsequencesSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 78. + Closure  Think of two ideas that might work for you in your classroom  Write each idea on a separate sheet of paperInspiring and Preparing ALL Students to Succeed in a Global Society
    • 79. + Snow Ball Fight!  Crumple up paper into a snow ball  On the signal, begin throwing your snowballs!  At the second signal, stop & pick up two snowballs around you  Forming a group of 2 – 3 people, take turns sharing and discussing the snowball ideas with your groupInspiring and Preparing ALL Students to Succeed in a Global Society
    • 80. + “Education is not about filling a bucket, but lighting a fire” William YeatsSJUSD Division of Instruction
    • 81. + Closure  Evaluations  Next StepsInspiring and Preparing ALL Students to Succeed in a Global Society
    • 82. + Images  Clevercupcakes, Homemade agave sweetened marshmallow topped cupcake, http://www.flickr.com/photos/clevercupcakes/3245835028/  Clevercupcakes, Giant baby naming cupcake, http://www.flickr.com/photos/clevercupcakes/3785413314/sizes/s/in/phot ostream  Kelly Sue, Henry Leo’s 1st birthday cupcake, http://www.flickr.com/photos/kellysue/2831068087  Oliver Wagemann, Total Relaxation, http://www.flickr.com/photos/glimeend/4859663048/sizes/z/in/photostrea m/  Dangerous Weapon, http://www.flickr.com/photos/akb778/2966594650/sizes/m/in/photostream /SJUSD Division of Instruction

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