Web3.0 or The semantic web

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Web3.0 and the semantic web. We have all this data - now what are we going to do with it all?

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Web3.0 or The semantic web

  1. 1. Web3.0 Read, write, execute. This talk is on the Web3.0 - the next evolution of the web - perhaps?
  2. 2. The Intertubes Look back to the origins of the web:
  3. 3. Tim’s dream... - Tim Berners-Lee invented the web. - web server HTTPD - web browser WorldWideWeb - HTML “The dream behind the Web is of a common information space in which we communicate by sharing information. Its universality is essential”
  4. 4. Web1.0 • Online brochures • Text & links • Static broadcast • Very little design web1.0 young, exciting - a testing ground for hyperlinking and sharing information - web 1.0 - online brochures - extension of the print industry - text & links - universities and government - broadcast - here’s all the info I have - self publishing? - very little design - new, testing ground, learning
  5. 5. Web2.0 • Online applications • Blogs • RSS • Social • Data creation • Drop-shadows - web 2.0 - online applications - the web as a platform - blogs - easy self publishing, creating content - RSS - sharing that content - Social - social networking - drop shadows - a distinct design style
  6. 6. Web3.0 • Data, data, data - semantics - meta data - folksonomy - web 3.0 - data - years of data building up now we’re working out exactly how to deal with it - semantics - supplying more information to the content being represented. - meta data - giving further meaning to data by applying tags, keywords and data types - folksonomy -users adding their own meaning to the data.
  7. 7. Semantic Web 1. The semantic web - an intro 2. Microformats 3. Open data 4. Examples I’ll be covering four main topics 1) The semantic web 2) Microfomats 3) Open data 4) Examples
  8. 8. Semantic web The semantic web could be called Web3.0. It’s about the data. It’s about accessing that data and doing something useful with it.
  9. 9. Semantic web the W3C way TBL is the inventor of the web and the director of the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)
  10. 10. Semantic web the W3C way • RDF RESOURCE DESCRIPTION FRAMEWORK a framework for de ning triples of subject, predicate and object • RDFS RDF SCHEMA de ne vocabularies for provding structure to RDF resource • OWL WEB ONTOLOGY LANGUAGE reason about classes and individuals de ned by RDFS and RDF • SPARQL SPARQL PROTOCOL AND RDF QUERY LANGUAGE an RDF query language The semantic web the W3C way is a way paved with Acronyms and hard to implement technologies and languages. RDF - Resource Description Framework -XML framework for describing and interchanging metadata. (resources, properties and statements) RDFS - RDF Schema - defines the vocabulary for giving structure to ontologies in this case RDF - ontology: the study of being or existence and its basic categories and relationships. OWL - Web Ontology Language - an extension RDF. It represents the meanings or terms and the relationships between those terms in a way that aids processing by software SPARQL - SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language - a language to return info from RDF.
  11. 11. Semantic web the practical way The more practical approach to the semantic web is to use technologies and concepts we’re already familiar with.
  12. 12. Semantic web the practical way • Correct Markup • Open APIs / Third-party solutions • Microformats The more practical approach to the semantic web is to use technologies and concepts we’re already familiar with. - Correct Markup - don’t use tables - make sure the HTML elements you use add value to the data you’re representing - Open APIs - Google Open social - one single API to build apps on top of Social sites like MySpace, Orkut, etc - Yahoo Open Search aka Search Monkey. - set of API’s that let third parties modify search results - Reuters Open Calais - does a semantic markup on unstructured HTML documents - recognizing people, places, companies, and events - Microformats - common set of guidelines for applying further structure to HTML documents.
  13. 13. Microformats Microformats. The token nerd picture...
  14. 14. Microformats • Simple, open data formats • Built on existing standards you know & love • For humans first and machines second • Easy! Simple, open data formats Built on existing standards you know & love For humans first and machines second - RDF, etc is for machines. Easy to impliment and interact with
  15. 15. Microformats Microformats are simple conventions for embedding semantics in HTML to enable decentralized development. This is taken from the microformats.org website
  16. 16. Microformats...in English Tiny bits of code added to your HTML to identify specific kinds of data, like people or events. This is actually what it means.
  17. 17. Microformat types • People and organisations • Calendars and events • Opinions, ratings and reviews • Social networks • Tags, keywords, categories • Geo locations Many microformats used to markup specific types of data - including - People and organisations, contact information - Calendars and events, meeting requests, etc - Opinions, ratings and reviews, movie reviews, book reviews - Social networks, how you relate to people online (friend, collegue, etc) - Tags, keywords, categories - folksonomies, etc - Geo locations
  18. 18. People and organisations The humble hCard. the digital business card
  19. 19. People and organisations vCard → hCard A direct mapping from a pre-existing technology: the vCard. Attached to emails, etc
  20. 20. People and organisations BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:3.0 N:Wood;Darren FN:Darren Wood URL:http://www.markerstudio.com ORG:Marker Studio END:VCARD vCard standard format
  21. 21. People and organisations <div class=quot;vcardquot;> <a class=quot;url fnquot; href=quot;http://www.markerstudio.com/quot;> Darren Wood</a> <div class=quot;orgquot;>Marker Studio</div> </div> hCard standard format. vCard + HTML = hCard
  22. 22. Calendars and Events The nobel hCalendar. Your day planner
  23. 23. Calendars and Events iCalendar → hCalendar Mapped directly from the iCal/iCalendar format. Meeting requests
  24. 24. Calendars and Events BEGIN:VCALENDAR PRODID:-//XYZproduct//EN VERSION:2.0 BEGIN:VEVENT URL:http://www.conferenz.co.nz/2nd-digital-media- summit.html DTSTART:20090311 DTEND:20090312 SUMMARY:2nd Digital Media Summit LOCATION:Rendezvous Hotel, Mayoral Drive and Vincent St, Auckland END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR iCalendar
  25. 25. Calendars and Events <div class=quot;veventquot;> <a class=quot;urlquot; href=quot;http:// www.conferenz.co.nz/2nd-digital-media- summit.html quot;>2nd Digital Media Summit</a> <span class=quot;summaryquot;>Digital Media Summit Conference</span>: <abbr class=quot;dtstartquot; title=quot;2009-03-11quot;> March 1</abbr>,at <span class=quot;locationquot;>Rendezvous Hotel, Mayoral Drive and Vincent St, Auckland</span> </div> hCalendar = iCal+HTML
  26. 26. How is this useful? How are microformats useful?
  27. 27. How is this useful? • Data collection • Third party web app integration • Third party desktop app integration Allows data to be captured in a simple and quick way. - browser plugins enable us to save and interact with the data Third party web app integration - services that search for microformatted data - event aggregators - geo locating Third party desktop apps - feed readers - web browsers - email clients?
  28. 28. Examples • http://virel.org/ - search • LinkedIn - hResume, hCard • Yahoo Local - hCard, hCalendar • Realestate.co.nz - hCard, hCalendar • IE8 - support for hAtom • Firefox - plugins available • Safari - bookmarklets
  29. 29. Open Data With data that is free and accessible it’s possible to achieve nearly anything! Open data is what Tim Berners-Lee had in mind when he created the web:
  30. 30. Open Data “Data is a precious thing and will last longer than the systems themselves.” - Tim Berners-Lee “Data is a precious thing and will last longer than the systems themselves.” And to this end we need to make sure that as much of it is available freely and openly.
  31. 31. Open Data • Scienti c research • Data-driven web Open Data is a philosophy and practice requiring that certain data are freely available to everyone, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control. Same ethos as other “Open” movements - Open Source, Open Access. Two major backers: - science nerds - web nerds
  32. 32. Open Data • Scienti c research • Data-driven web Open Data is a philosophy and practice requiring that certain data are freely available to everyone, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control. Same ethos as other “Open” movements - Open Source, Open Access. Two major backers: - science nerds - web nerds
  33. 33. Open Data • Developing apps without the need for a legal team • Low barrier to entry • Exciting new mash-ups What this means online is developing applications becomes infinitely easier. - no need to a legal team to work out copyrights or patents, etc - endless possibilities when we can combine data from tons of dierent sources - anyone can do it if the data is there and usable
  34. 34. Free your data So how do you as a content producer make your data freely available?
  35. 35. Free your data • Make use of Open licensing • Creative Commons • GNU Free Documentation License • Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence Open licensing - there are open licenses for software you may have heard of GPL, BSD, Apache. There are also open licenses for data and content: - Creative Commons - set of licenses to help people share and build upon the work of others - rather than All Rights Reserved it becomes Some Rights Reserved - mainly for creative work (images, text, video, audio) although you can license your s/w under creative commons - GNU Free Documentation License - falls under the copyleft licensing ethos - which means derivative works must be made available under the same or a similar license - principally for works whose purpose is instruction or reference (wikipedia) - ODC PDDL - freely share, modify, and use this work for any purpose and without any restrictions - intended for use on databases or their contents (”data”), either together or individually.
  36. 36. Free your data • Web service / API • RSS/HTML/Microformats • REST • SOAP Create a Web Service. software system designed to support interoperable machine-to- machine interaction over a network. It doesn’t have to complex. Some examples of apis: - RSS/Markup/Microformats - simple, and achievable without any real know-how - there are many tools which can easily aid with the data mining of these simple markup languages. Magpie, SimpleXML, XPath - RESTful API - quickest and easiest API to develop - “Representational state transfer” - runs on top of HTTP - your browser makes a request to a URL and receives a response. - a nifty interface for accessing the calls to backend methods/properties/objects, etc - SOAP - for the hardcore backend systems - a protocol for exchanging XML-based messages over a network.
  37. 37. Examples Some examples of websites that use the techniques and ideas we’ve just covered
  38. 38. http://openstreetmap.org Most map data isn’t free. These guys created their own maps to use for free and to build on. A Wiki World Map. What they say on their edit page: “Dont copy from other maps; Only map places you’ve been; Have fun” Creative Commons licence.
  39. 39. http://everyblock.com filters an assortment of local news by location so you can keep track of what’s happening on your block, in your neighborhood and all over your city, including: - Building permit actions, Crime reports, Grafiti cleaned, Liquor licenses, Property sales, Restaurant inspections, Street condition reports - make full use of open data and API’s
  40. 40. http://zoodle.co.nz New site in NZ. gives heaps of info about a specific property: home's value, local house prices, neighbourhood stats, schools, communities etc. - joint eort between Realestate.co.nz and Terralink
  41. 41. http://www.skittles.com Launched last week, but instead of the wikipedia background they had search.twitter.com/ showing the search result for “skittles” Instead of using the API (both Wikipedia and Twitter have an open API) they’ve opted to use the actual site. This creates a very exciting and unexpected UI.
  42. 42. http://mukuna.co.nz Is a gig listing website that makes use of vast amounts of freely available data. - wikipedia - youtube - google maps - flickr And as an added bonus it makes all that aggregated content available for free in several formats. - Web (Creative Commons) - a RESTful API - Microformats - SMS
  43. 43. http://last.fm A stunning example of creating a vast amount of data as well as using other data. It does two things: - Scrobbling. A small bit of software sits on your computer and as you listen to music it sends the name of the song and artist to the last.fm database - allows for recommendations - music organisation
  44. 44. http://last.fm And collects information about Artists - Info from Wikipedia - Photos from Flickr - Video from Youtube - Event information provided as microformats - UGC
  45. 45. Thanks. darren@dontcom.com http://www.slideshare.net/darren131 CC Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 Generic This talk is on the Web3.0 - the next evolution of the web - perhaps?
  46. 46. Images ( Thanks to Creative Commons) http://www. ickr.com/photos/stollerdos/183613210/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/vormplus/2189643926/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/dunechaser/134672022/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/jvk/104571401/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/adactio/169053620/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/kt/32660952/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/joelanman/366190064/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/oskay/1425036129/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/16038409@N02/2326310839/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/gi/121409547/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/marchnwe/2826888218/ This talk is on the Web3.0 - the next evolution of the web - perhaps?

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