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Maslow Poetry

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I used poetry to introduce students to Maslow, and Maslow to get students to explore poetry. It was a day of self reflection and analysis. My use of Maslow stresses the need to have a safe, …

I used poetry to introduce students to Maslow, and Maslow to get students to explore poetry. It was a day of self reflection and analysis. My use of Maslow stresses the need to have a safe, belonging environment if students are to succeed academically.

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  • 1. This is Just to Say by William Carlos Williams
     
    I have eaten
    the plums
    that were in
    the icebox
     
    and which 5
    you were probably
    saving
    for breakfast.
     
    Forgive me
    they were delicious 10
    so sweet
    and so cold.
  • 2. Abraham Maslow
  • 3.
  • 4. Survival
  • 5.
  • 6. Survival
  • 7. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night by Dylan Thomas
      Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
    Though wise men at their end know dark is right, Because their words had forked no lightning they 5Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
    Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, 10And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. 15
    And you, my father, there on the sad height, Curse, bless me now with your fierce tears, I pray. Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
  • 8. Fire and Ice by Robert Frost
      Some say the world will end in fire,Some say in ice.From what I've tasted of desireI hold with those who favor fire.But if it had to perish twice, 5I think I know enough of hateTo say that for destruction iceIs also greatAnd would suffice.
  • 9.
  • 10. On Feeling Safe by George Eliot
    Oh the comfort of feeling safe with a person;having neither to weigh thoughts,nor measure words,but to pour them all outjust as chaff and grain together, 5knowing that a faithful handwill take and sift them,keeping what is worth keepingand with a breath of kindness,blow the rest away. 10
  • 11.
  • 12. We Real Cool by Gwendolyn Brooks
    THE POOL PLAYERS.
    SEVEN AT THE GOLDEN SHOVEL.
    We real cool. We
    Left school. We
    Lurk late. We
    Strike straight. We
    Sing sin. We 5
    Thin gin. We
    Jazz June. We
    Die soon.
  • 13. America by Walt Whitman
    Centre of equal daughters, equal sons,All, all alike endear’d, grown, ungrown, young or old,Strong, ample, fair, enduring, capable, rich,Perennial with the Earth, with Freedom, Law and Love,A grand, sane, towering, seated Mother,Chair’d in the adamant of Time.
  • 14. No Man is an Island by John Donne
    No man is an island entire of itself; every manis a piece of the continent, a part of the main;if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europeis the less, as well as if a promontory were, aswell as any manner of thy friends or of thine 5own were; any man's death diminishes me,because I am involved in mankind.And therefore never send to know for whomthe bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
  • 15.
  • 16. A Dream Deferred
    by Langston Hughes
    What happens to a dream deferred?Does it dry upLike a raisin in the sun?Or fester like a sore--And then run?Does it stink like rotten meat?Or crust and sugar over--like a syrupy sweet?Maybe it just sagslike a heavy load.Or does it explode?
  • 17. When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer
    by Walt Whitman
    When I heard the learn’d astronomer,When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure themWhen I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much, applause in the lecture-roomHow soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,Till rising and gliding out I wander'd off by myself,In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,Look'd up in perfect silence at the stars.
  • 18.
  • 19. First Fig by Edna St. Vincent Millay
    My candle burns at both ends;It will not last the night;But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends--It gives a lovely light!
  • 20. What is Success by Ralph Waldo Emerson
      To laugh often and love much;To win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children;To earn the approval of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends;To appreciate beauty;To find the best in others;To give of one’s self;To leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition;To have played and laughed with enthusiasm and sung with exultation;To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived…This is to have succeeded.
  • 21. The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost
    Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel bothAnd be one traveler, long I stoodAnd looked down one as far as I couldTo where it bent in the undergrowth.Then took the other, as just as fair,And having perhaps the better claim,Because it was grassy and wanted wear;Though as for that the passing thereHad worn them really about the same.And both that morning equally layIn leaves no step had trodden black.Oh, I kept the first for another day!Yet knowing how way leads on to way,I doubted if I should ever come back.I shall be telling this with a sighSomewhere ages and ages hence:Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--I took the one less traveled by,And that has made all the difference.
  • 22. Survival
  • 23. This is Just to Say by William Carlos Williams
     
    I have eaten
    the plums
    that were in
    the icebox
     
    and which
    you were probably
    saving
    for breakfast.
     
    Forgive me
    they were delicious
    so sweet
    and so cold.