Coral Disease Outbreak Ahihi 011409

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Coral disease (white syndrome) outbreak of Montipora capitata (rice coral) in protected area on Maui

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Coral Disease Outbreak Ahihi 011409

  1. 1. `AhihiKina`u Natural Area Reserve <br />Coral Disease Outbreak Investigation <br />Maui, Hawai`i<br />Russell Sparks, DAR Education Specialist<br />Skippy Hau, <br />DAR Aquatic Biologist<br />Coral Disease Researcher <br />Greta Aeby, PhD.<br />Danielle Kornfeind,<br />DOFAW Ranger<br />
  2. 2. `AhihiKina`u Coral Disease Outbreak Investigation<br />January 14, 2010<br />Montipora White Syndrome<br />Progressive Tissue Loss Disease<br />Species affected: Montiporacapitata<br />Probable Cause: Pathogenic<br />Discovery by UH graduate students Megan Ross & Yuko Stender<br />Photos by Danielle Kornfeind, Linda Castro, and Skippy Hau<br />
  3. 3. Disease Front<br />Tissue loss –<br />recent mortality; progressive algal growth<br />Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown<br />
  4. 4. Progression of the disease can be observed originating from the base of the colony to the tops of the branches in this example. The distinct white band adjacent the reddish-brown live coral is newly exposed skeleton where the tissue has been lost. When the coral dies, the algae quickly move in (within days) to occupy the empty space. The progressive density of the algae indicate the direction and rate of speed of the disease. This outbreak will be studied and monitored.<br />
  5. 5. Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown<br />Disease Front<br />Tissue loss –<br />recent mortality; progressive algal growth<br />
  6. 6. Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown<br />Live coral polyps are visible<br />Tissue loss –<br />progressive algal growth<br />Disease Front – white skeleton exposed<br />No tissue – empty calices (coral cups) <br />
  7. 7. Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown, <br />This one is paling (bleaching)<br />Tissue loss –<br />recent mortality; exposed skeleton & empty calices (cups)<br />
  8. 8. Tissue loss – white skeleton visible - <br />recent mortality; progressive algal growth<br />Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown<br />
  9. 9. Tissue loss – white skeleton visible - <br />recent mortality; progressive algal growth<br />Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown<br />Dark red/purple – <br />Endolithichypermycosis<br />Naturally occurring internal fungus overgrowth under stress of disease<br />
  10. 10. Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown<br />Tissue loss –<br />recent mortality; progressive algal growth<br />Disease Front<br />
  11. 11. Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown<br />Tissue loss –<br />recent mortality; progressive algal growth<br />Disease Front<br />
  12. 12. Healthy Coral – <br />reddish brown<br />Tissue loss –<br />recent mortality; exposed white skeleton<br />Progressive algal growth<br />
  13. 13. Coral bleaching, disease & marine invasives reporting network <br />Report unusual events of bleaching, disease or COTS to:<br />www.reefcheckhawaii.org/eyesofthereef.htm<br />808-953-4044<br />or<br />EOR site coordinators<br />Kauai: Paul Clark<br />SOS@saveourseas.org<br />Big Island: Linda Preskitt<br />preskitt@hawaii.edu<br />Maui: Darla White <br />Darla.J.White@hawaii.gov<br />

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