May 1 designing for social

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  • We usually have between 18 – 20 hosts: depending upon the number of attendees and how many people each host can accommodate. Dinner can be entirely provided (cooked or catered) by the host or dinner can be “pot-luck” style, with the host coordinating what each guest will bring.
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  • Observe
    Get close to the customer
    Focus on needs and the job to be done
    Design
    Think about ways to do the job that are simpler,
    more elegant, more accessible, and more satisfying
    Imagination + discipline
    Experiment
    Be ready to fail
    Rapid prototyping
    Evaluate and Learn
    Refine
    DEVELOPMENTAL EVALUATION IS PART OF THE DESIGN PROCESS – NOT AN ADD-ON OR SOMETHING YOU DO AT THE END. IT IS PART AND PARCEL OF EMPATHY, DESIGN THINKING. IT IS A HABIT WE NEED TO DEVELOP FOR ALL OUR WORK.
    Nimble
    Agile
    Design together
    Critical part = ongoing evaluation of what we are doing AND HOW PEOPLE ARE REACTING.
    Integrally embedded in the whole thing
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  • What they see as effective (Jewish education) – concrete examples
    Contributing factors to effectiveness (what makes it effective?)/characteristics of effective (Jewish) education
    Learners
    Teachers
    Subject matter
    Socio-cultural milieu
    What success would look like for the learners (participants will know, feel do, believe)
    What success would like for the community
    What their/their kids passions/interests are; what are they involved in
    What are the obstacles to getting the kind of Jewish education they want?
    What are the “incentives” to participation?
    Vision of excellence
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    Some of you are already using some of these methodologies. I will be asking you to share your experience as we look at each individually
  • Red Cross
    We Use a variation in Con Con – and I use in every other project I facilitate
    Anyone use this technique already? What have you noticed?
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  • Types of observations:
    Non-participant/Passive observation: Keep distance; Be unobtrusive; stance of outsider observation
    Participant observation: Participates in activities; Insider stance
    Goals of observations
    Descriptive observations (initial, general)
    Focused observations (on aspects relevant to research question)
    Selective observation (to purposively grasp central aspects
    Phases of observation planning
    Selection of a setting (where and when)
    Definition of what is to be documented in observation
    Training of observers for standardization
    Anyone use this technique already? What have you noticed?
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  • A carefully planned discussion to obtain perceptions on a defined area of interest in a supportive, non-threatening environment
    Allows program providers to see reality from the participants’ points of view and use the information to plan/improve the program
    Conducted with approximately 7-10 participants by a skilled interviewer in a ‘safe’ environment.’ The discussion is relaxed and comfortable, and often enjoyable for participants.
    No effort to reach consensus -- rather gives voice to multiple perspectives.
    Focus groups are best conducted with groups that have commonalities.
    Planning for focus group interviews:
    Identify goals: articulate types of information you wish to obtain
    Identify participants who are key informants for the process
    Create Interview Protocol (including ‘prompts’)
    Anyone use this technique already? What have you noticed?
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  • Anyone use this technique already? What have you noticed?
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  • Sampels:
    Bootcamp
    Corpus
    Passover U feedback form
    Anyone use this technique already? What have you noticed?
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  • May 1 designing for social

    1. 1. Designing for Social May 1, 2014
    2. 2. Re-Connecting Your name tags are coded with colored dots. (There are four colors) Please seat yourselves according to color code:  EVERYONE at the table should have the same color dot
    3. 3. Re-Connecting  Welcome & Introductions of New Faces  Warm-up  The importance of “Designing for Social”
    4. 4. Re-Connecting Warm-up Describe an experience when an acquaintance became a friend. How did that happen?
    5. 5. ShareFest 1 Scarsdale Synagogue Temples Tremont & Emanu-El  Deep-dive glimpse into congregation’s experience  Key success elements & take-aways  Input from other congregations  Inquiries from other congregations
    6. 6. Scarsdale Synagogue Annual FUNdraiser
    7. 7. Goals of the FUNdraiser: not just to raise money!
    8. 8. GOALS • To build community • To create intimate settings • To make people matter • To remove psychological barriers to attending
    9. 9. To Build Community • FUNdraiser Committee • Intimate setting for dinner • After attendees have dinner in hosts’ homes everyone comes together at the synagogue • Havdalah • Fund-A-Need
    10. 10. To Create Intimate Settings • Dinners are hosted in congregants’ homes for groups of 8 – 12 people • 1 ½ to 2 hours to socialize in an intimate setting with gracious hosts • People may be grouped with friends or with people they don’t know at all
    11. 11. To Make People Matter • Honoree: Jody Glassman, Director of Early Childhood Education Program “Mazel Tots” • Celebration of the 13th year of Mazel Tots: the students and the teachers • Journal – opportunity for people to send a personal message • Younger members matter: this is a celebration of the program that their children attend
    12. 12. Invitation
    13. 13. Journal
    14. 14. To Remove Psychological Barriers • By having dinner in a host’s home, people arrive at the synagogue together • Removes the barrier created by the trepidation of walking in alone to a large event
    15. 15. Evening Format • Dinner in hosts’ homes (6:00 – 8:00pm) • Celebration at Synagogue (8:15 – 11:30) • Dessert buffet, beverages, wine (8:15 – 11:30) • Silent Auction • Havdalah • Live Auction, Fund-A-Need • Dancing and Socializing
    16. 16. How To Make the Dinners Work • Commitment of leadership and Fundraiser Committee • Hosts: Start with Board members, people who are “connectors” • Hosts – some will invite people they know, helping raise attendance • Explain how attendees are “assigned” to hosts
    17. 17. Reverse Side of RSVP Card A highlight of this dinner format has been the opportunity to get to know fellow congregants in a small and informal setting. We will connect each of you with a warm and welcoming host, who is looking forward to meeting and dining with you. Your host will be contacting you prior to the event to discuss details If you have friends with whom you would like to dine, or people you would like to get to know better, please list them below, and we will do our best to accommodate you.
    18. 18. Letter to Hosts Dear Ellen and Scott, Thank you for hosting the dinner portion of our FUNdraiser in your home. Below are the names of your guests with their contact information. Please contact them to let them know that they are invited to join you at your home, to give them your address/directions, to ask them to bring a dish if you are having a “pot luck” dinner and to remind them when to arrive (we recommend 6 pm). We are relying on you to make sure that you and your guests arrive at Scarsdale Synagogue between 8:00 and 8:15pm (at the latest) for the balance of the evening. Remember, you are not serving dessert. We will be having dessert, a silent auction, live auction and entertainment at the synagogue. Wine and a “signature cocktail” will be served, as well as soft drinks, coffee and tea. It is important that everyone arrive no later than 8:30pm so that our program runs smoothly. If you have any questions, please call Donna at 722-4043 or email at donnasuevitale@gmail.com. On behalf of the FUNdraising committee, thank you so much for graciously agreeing to host at your home. You are setting the tone of the evening, which we know will be warm, friendly and fun.
    19. 19. “Thank You” Means “You Matter” Dear Ellen and Scott: On behalf of the Annual FUNdraiser Committee and all of us at the Synagogue, I want to thank you for participating in our FUNdraiser on April 5. By graciously hosting dinner at your home, you kicked off the evening with warm hospitality and a sense of community that carried through the entire event. Thank you for setting the tone for our FUNdraiser. Your presence and generosity at the celebration at the synagogue are greatly appreciated and contributed to making this year’s FUNdraiser an unprecedented success. We surpassed our $40,000 goal for our synagogue operating budget and raised $55,900 for equipment for our new playground. We are delighted that you joined us for this very important evening. It would not have been the same without you! Best regards, •  •  
    20. 20. REVIEW OF GOALS • To build community • To create intimate settings • To make people matter • To remove psychological barriers to attending • And Yes, To raise money
    21. 21. GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR EVENT! Donna Vitale Ruskin Scarsdale Synagogue donnasuevitale@gmail.com
    22. 22. Mission Possible TEN CONSIDERATIONS WHEN DESIGNING FOR SOCIAL EMOTIONS 1. Helping people feel safe/having a buddy 2. Remove awkwardness/structure/ice-breaking 3. Intimacy/transparency 4. Inviting/modeling vulnerability
    23. 23. Mission Possible TEN CONSIDERATIONS WHEN DESIGNING FOR SOCIAL WEAVING THE NETWORK 5. Design with empathy – understand your audience 6. Get to know the interests/skills in the room; invite/empower others to lead/teach 7. Scaffolding for shared interests/needs (get outside the comfort zone)
    24. 24. Mission Possible TEN CONSIDERATIONS WHEN DESIGNING FOR SOCIAL PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS 8. Think on multiple social levels: 1:1; group; person to community 9. Space design – where, what, how. Vibe and structure 10. How to continue connections after. How are you planning for the long term results?
    25. 25. Mission Possible YOUR MISSION, SHOULD YOU ACCEPT IT (it’s not really a choice)
    26. 26. Mission Possible APPLYING DESIGN THINKING TO DESIGNING FOR SOCIAL MISSION Design the Problem Empathize Ideate Get Input Refine & prototype Test Iterate as needed
    27. 27. Mission Possible APPLYING DESIGN THINKING TO DESIGNING FOR SOCIAL MISSION
    28. 28. Mission Possible SHARING & IMPROVING DESIGN (Use modified Critical Friends Protocol to share and improve design ideas of Mission Groups 1 & 2)
    29. 29. Mission Possible CRITICAL FRIENDS PROTOCOL 1. Presentation by Mission Possible team (3 minutes) 2. Clarifying questions from group (3 minutes) 3. Hot/cool feedback from group (4 minutes)
    30. 30. ShareFest 2 430 DeMott Avenue: Central Synagogue of Nassau County Reconstructionist Congregation Beth Emeth  Deep-dive glimpse into congregation’s experience  Key success elements & take-aways  Input from other congregations  Inquiries from other congregations
    31. 31. Lunch: Sustenance & Socializing Get more acquainted with others who share similar issues and interests in other congregations
    32. 32. Mission Possible SHARING & IMPROVING DESIGN (Use modified Critical Friends Protocol to share and improve design ideas of Mission Groups 3 & 4)
    33. 33. Mission Possible CRITICAL FRIENDS PROTOCOL 1. Presentation by Mission Possible team (3 minutes) 2. Clarifying questions from group (3 minutes) 3. Hot/cool feedback from group (4 minutes)
    34. 34. Observe Design Experiment Refine The Design Process
    35. 35. Why evaluate? The purpose of evaluation is to improve not (only) to prove. Daniel Stufflebeam
    36. 36. What Are SMART Goals? •Specific What will participants know, feel, do believe? •Measurable How can we assess success in observable ways? •Action-oriented What will we DO? •Realistic Are the goals achievable? •Timely Are they achievable in the available time?
    37. 37. Formative evaluation Summative evaluation Developmental evaluation
    38. 38. What are Some Concrete Indicators of Effective Programs that are “Designed for Social”? What will success look like… • for individual participants? • for sponsoring institutions? • for the community?
    39. 39. Making Sure You Hit the Mark Choosing the Methodology to Evaluate Your Project
    40. 40. Front End Work: Laying the groundwork for your evaluation • What are the goals of your project? • What do you want to know? • Who are your evaluation audiences? • How will you use the information?
    41. 41. Not everything that counts can be measured… Not everything that can be measured counts. Albert Einstein
    42. 42. • Extract data from written records (e.g., surveys) • Survey individuals or groups (participants, non-participants, parents, teachers, employers, general public, etc.) • Individual interviews • Focus groups • Structured observations Possible methodologies
    43. 43. SAMPLE : After Action Review Chart   Strengths Weaknesses Retain/Change in Future Follow-up Planning Process         Communication         Logistics         Staffing         Schedule/Timing         Program Content         Implementation Learner Impact Organizational Impact
    44. 44. Observation Protocols • Types of observations: o Non-participant/Passive observation o Participant observation • Goals of observations • Descriptive observations (initial, general) • Focused observations (on aspects relevant to research question) • Selective observation (to purposively grasp central aspects • Phases of observation planning • Selection of a setting (where and when) • Definition of what is to be documented in observation • Training of observers for standardization
    45. 45. Focus Group Interviews GOAL: obtain perceptions on a focused topic in a supportive, non-threatening environment METHODOLOGY:  + 7-10 participants  best conducted with groups that have commonalities  skilled interviewer  ‘safe’ environment.’  no effort to reach consensus -- rather give voice to multiple perspectives. PLANNING:  Identify goals  Identify participants  Create Interview Protocol ANALYSIS:  Trace common themes, interesting divergences  Identify areas for further exploration FOLLOW UP:  Thank yous  Sharing findings  Follow up (individual and/or group as appropriate)
    46. 46. Data mining & Document review  Conduct secondary analysis of existing data to answer specific questions (e.g., how many congregants fall in particular demographics; re- analyze findings from recent surveys to answer specific questions (e.g., Measuring Success survey);  Use techniques such as Language Audit
    47. 47. Quick Reflection USES:  Providing feedback to inform future programs  Assessment of impact  Assessment of participants’ experience  Supporting synthesis and reflection by participants Can be administered on site or online (immediately following program/event)
    48. 48. What do you need to know? How (and when) will you measure it? What do you need to know about your project, and how will you measure it?
    49. 49. What do you need to know about your project, and how will you measure it? What do you need to know? How (and when) will you measure it? 1. How does what you proposed match up with what is being delivered on the ground? Where are the breakdowns? What are the obstacles? What changes are needed? 2. How are key stakeholders (learners, parents, educators, leaders, funders) experiencing the project? What is valued/not? What is enhancing and what is difficult/getting in the way? 3. What are the intended and unintended consequences of the project on key stakeholders (in terms of know, do, believe, belong)? How is the impact of the project on the organization? 4. Based on stakeholder responses/actions, what are the key elements that: - need to be nurtured/enhanced? - modified (in what ways?)
    50. 50. What do you need to know about your project, and how will you measure it? What do you need to know? How (and when) will you measure it? 1. How does what you proposed match up with what is being delivered on the ground? Where are the breakdowns? What are the obstacles? What changes are needed? HOW: Annotated observation; after-action review WHEN: During programs/classes/events; weekly? Monthly? After each event? What if some of the key work is in-between events??? 2. How are key stakeholders (learners, parents, educators, leaders, funders) experiencing the project? What is valued/not? What is enhancing and what is difficult/getting in the way? HOW: Annotated observation; quick-feedback surveys/interviews with all types of stakeholders WHEN: During programs/classes/events; weekly? Monthly? After each event? What if some of the key work is in-between events??? 3. What are the intended and unintended consequences of the project on key stakeholders (in terms of know, feel, do, believe)? How is the impact of the project on the organization? HOW: Annotated observation; quick-feedback surveys/interviews/skills demonstrations with all types of stakeholders/after-action reviews WHEN: During programs/classes/events; weekly? Monthly? After each event? What if some of the key work is in-between events??? 4. Based on stakeholder responses/actions, what are the key elements that: - need to be nurtured/enhanced? - modified (in what ways?) HOW: After action review WHEN: Weekly? Monthly? After each event?
    51. 51. Evaluation Planning Worksheet   FOCUS   PROGRAM GOALS   DESIGN CRITERIA   EVALUATION  QUESTIONS INDICATORS BENCHMARKS MILE MARKERS   ASSESSMENT TOOLS   DATA SOURCES COMMUNICATING &  ACTING ON FINDINGS What issue/problem does the program address? What is/are the target population(s) for the program?               What are the program goals? Which of these goals do you want to evaluate? What is important to you to measure or evaluate? What questions are important to answer? e.g.: Do you want to expand the program? Do you want to improve the quality of the program? Are you concerned about the efficiency of the program/program resources? Do you want to assess the effectiveness of the program in achieving its goals? Do you need descriptive information about the program for PR or other reporting purposes? What evidence can you look for that will tell you if the program is in its way to achieving its goals? Are there some goals that are instrumental or secondary to achieving the over-arching goals of the program? [distinguish between inputs, activities, outputs & outcomes] What assessment tools can you use to uncover evidence of goal achievement? [e.g., interviews, surveys, questionnaires, focus groups, community forums, observations, analysis of program records]                         Who/what are the best sources for data collection? How?       When?          Where?          To whom?            By whom?
    52. 52. You’ve Got Your Results – So Now What?
    53. 53. What do you do with:  Positive results?  Negative results? [Fail Forward!]  Neutral/inconclusive results
    54. 54. Use your findings! Refine
    55. 55. 7th Inning Stretch Move to sit in congregational teams
    56. 56. ShareFest 3 Park Slope Jewish Center  Deep-dive glimpse into congregation’s experience  Key success elements & take-aways  Input from other congregations  Inquiries from other congregations
    57. 57. Bringing It Home SITTING IN CONGREGATIONAL TEAMS:  What have we learned?  How will we use it?  Announcements about coming events, next steps

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