Reflections on the Value Proposition for Information Quality <br />Hints, tips, and Jedi Mind tricks for getting managemen...
<ul><li>Alice
“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”
The Cheshire Cat
“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to”
Alice
“I don't much care where…”
The Cheshire Cat
“Then it doesn't matterwhich way you go…”
Alice
“…so long as I get somewhere…”
The Cheshire Cat
“Oh, you're sure to do that ifyou only walk long enough…”</li></ul>Alice in Wonderland<br />
<ul><li>What is it we are selling?
Information as an Asset
Good Decisions, based on sound information
Vision of the future?
How are we selling it?
Bringing your IQ/DQ programme to Market
Reframing the discussion for a crowded market place
Selling Information Quality
Perspectives on Information Quality
Tell me a Story…
How stories of success and peril can win hearts and minds.</li></ul>Outline of Presentation<br />
<ul><li>Is Information recognised as an Asset?
How is it integrated / accounted for?</li></ul>The Asset<br />
<ul><li>Fact
IT often does not want to raise a red flag since they know that they will be blamed for it
Business management wants to believe that their IT departments are top notch and that their systems are first rate
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Reflections On The Value Proposition For Information Quality

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This presentation explores the value proposition for Information Quality and what IQ professionals can do to build a compelling case for action in their organisations to tackle the Information Quality challenges in good times and in bad.

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  • When we reflect on our objectives and our alignment, we need to be sure we are seeing the full picture…
  • The value proposition of the ‘photographers studio’ has evolved over time. From a studio you went to, they forked off into Wedding photographersCamera shopsCamera shops evolved a value proposition based on knowledge and service, and developed a value delivery system that enabled them to defend against 1hour photo development, instamatic cameras, digital cameras etc. The key thing was to truly understand the key resulting experience that their customers wanted and give that to them, and communicate that that is what was being given.See Lanning’s book for more details (although it is a few years old at this stage, the case studies on photography stores are well worth a look).
  • The value proposition of the ‘photographers studio’ has evolved over time. From a studio you went to, they forked off into Wedding photographersCamera shopsCamera shops evolved a value proposition based on knowledge and service, and developed a value delivery system that enabled them to defend against 1hour photo development, instamatic cameras, digital cameras etc. The key thing was to truly understand the key resulting experience that their customers wanted and give that to them, and communicate that that is what was being given.See Lanning’s book for more details (although it is a few years old at this stage, the case studies on photography stores are well worth a look).
  • Reflections On The Value Proposition For Information Quality

    1. 1. Reflections on the Value Proposition for Information Quality <br />Hints, tips, and Jedi Mind tricks for getting management buy-in<br />
    2. 2. <ul><li>Alice
    3. 3. “Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”
    4. 4. The Cheshire Cat
    5. 5. “That depends a good deal on where you want to get to”
    6. 6. Alice
    7. 7. “I don't much care where…”
    8. 8. The Cheshire Cat
    9. 9. “Then it doesn't matterwhich way you go…”
    10. 10. Alice
    11. 11. “…so long as I get somewhere…”
    12. 12. The Cheshire Cat
    13. 13. “Oh, you're sure to do that ifyou only walk long enough…”</li></ul>Alice in Wonderland<br />
    14. 14. <ul><li>What is it we are selling?
    15. 15. Information as an Asset
    16. 16. Good Decisions, based on sound information
    17. 17. Vision of the future?
    18. 18. How are we selling it?
    19. 19. Bringing your IQ/DQ programme to Market
    20. 20. Reframing the discussion for a crowded market place
    21. 21. Selling Information Quality
    22. 22. Perspectives on Information Quality
    23. 23. Tell me a Story…
    24. 24. How stories of success and peril can win hearts and minds.</li></ul>Outline of Presentation<br />
    25. 25. <ul><li>Is Information recognised as an Asset?
    26. 26. How is it integrated / accounted for?</li></ul>The Asset<br />
    27. 27. <ul><li>Fact
    28. 28. IT often does not want to raise a red flag since they know that they will be blamed for it
    29. 29. Business management wants to believe that their IT departments are top notch and that their systems are first rate
    30. 30. Transparency is still lacking
    31. 31. Is this an IT problem? What about?
    32. 32. Poorly articulated requirements
    33. 33. Poor acceptance testing
    34. 34. Poor data creation processes
    35. 35. … and more?</li></ul>Distrust and not Caring<br />
    36. 36. “But it’s supposed to be bigger”<br />
    37. 37. <ul><li>Fact
    38. 38. Data and the quality of data is not managed as rigorously as are most other assets and activities
    39. 39. A characterization of the state of data quality awareness and responsiveness
    40. 40. People are generally aware of problems with data
    41. 41. People consistently underestimate, by a large amount, the extent of the problem
    42. 42. People have generally no idea of the cost of the problem to the organization
    43. 43. People have generally no idea of the potential value in fixing the problem</li></ul>Trust and Caring… <br />
    44. 44. Communicate<br />Socialize<br />Decisions<br />Analyze<br />Feedback<br />Knowledge<br />Enhanced Compliance<br />Increased Effort<br />Contextualize<br />Feedback<br />Information<br />Feedback<br />Data<br />Increased Value<br />Connecting Good Data to Good Decisions<br />
    45. 45. The objective is to merge the interests of senior leaders and quality leaders into a single, cohesive agenda that moves the organization forward<br />
    46. 46. When we reflect on our objectives and our alignment, we need to be sure we are seeing the full picture…<br />
    47. 47. Selling Information Quality<br />How do we create the ‘common cause’ in a crowded market?<br />
    48. 48. Build Trust and Success<br />Information Quality<br />Reframing the Market Place<br />
    49. 49.
    50. 50. Define the entity “Football”<br />
    51. 51. IQ Impact/Opportunity<br />A generic strategy map, based on Kaplan & Norton<br />Getting on the Map<br />
    52. 52. A Value Delivery System<br />Value Proposition<br />How resulting experiences will be provided<br />How resulting experiences will be communicated<br />Reduced costs of compliance<br />All information required readily available with clear lineage and auditability<br />Improved time/ability to respond to regulatory requests or investigation<br />???<br />‘Early warning’ of issues likely to attract regulator<br />???<br />Quality built in, less risk of error and more timely awareness of problems<br />Compliant at lower cost<br />???<br />Joined up organisation thinking, right hand knowing what left hand is doing<br />View of customer record consistent across organisation <br />Not winding up in court for harassment of customers<br />???<br />???<br />
    53. 53. Value Propositions evolve<br />Polaroid Pogo<br />Digital Camera<br />Polaroid Instamatic<br />Box Brownie<br />
    54. 54. Value Propositions evolve<br />Memory sticks, card readers, printers, printing booths, photo albums<br />Film, advice, photo albums<br />Polaroid Pogo<br />Film, advice, spare parts, developing<br />Digital Camera<br />Film(?), advice, photo albums<br />Polaroid Instamatic<br />Box Brownie<br />
    55. 55. SCE (Successful Change Event)‏<br />D (Dissatisfaction with status quo)‏<br />V (Vision of future)‏<br />F (First Steps)‏<br />R (Resistance to change)‏<br /><ul><li>To trigger change you must
    56. 56. Understand the problem
    57. 57. Present the solution in an understandable way
    58. 58. Have clear first steps that solve the immediate problem while laying foundations for next steps.</li></ul>Formula for Change <br />
    59. 59. = Smelly Gym Socks<br />A rose by any other name?<br />
    60. 60. In real life, unlike in Shakespeare, the sweetness of the rose depends upon the name it bears. Things are not only what they are. They are, in very important respects, what they seem to be.<br />Hubert H. Humphrey<br />
    61. 61. Compliance Problems getting you down?<br />Buy a data profiling tool and all your troubles will be over. Trust me....<br />
    62. 62. In Data/Information We Trust <br />
    63. 63. Wrap up<br />
    64. 64. <ul><li>'Information as an Asset' needs to be communicated
    65. 65. Trust (internal and external)
    66. 66. requires clear communication.
    67. 67. A culture of caring for information and information consumers requires communication
    68. 68. Communication happens through language…
    69. 69. Keep shouting loud enough in a language your audience doesn’t understand and you get nowhere
    70. 70. Change happens through communication
    71. 71. Understanding dissatisfaction
    72. 72. Communicating vision of future
    73. 73. A shared vision, with stories of success, builds trust.
    74. 74. An understanding of the Value Proposition builds credibility.</li></ul>Communication is key…<br />
    75. 75. A quick case study<br />What is the value proposition for this company?<br />
    76. 76. Ferguson v British Gas [2009] EWCA Civ46<br />British Gas continued to bill a customer (Ferguson) after they had switched to another provider.<br />Passed details to collections agency, were commencing legal action etc.<br />Customer had no outstanding debt and was no longer a BG customer<br />Court of Appeal held that:<br />Companies can be liable for harassment in cases like this<br />The absence of a “controlling mind” is not a defence. “The Computer made us do it” will not wash.<br />Apart from liability under the Protection from Harassment Act, it was also highlighted that people in this situation could take a complaint to Trading Standards as well.<br />Poor information quality can get you sued.<br />
    77. 77. Value Proposition<br />Value Proposition<br />How resulting experiences will be provided<br />How resulting experiences will be communicated<br />Reduced costs of compliance<br />View of customer record consistent across organisation<br />Ensure notifications about inaccuracy in customer data are investigated and corrected quickly<br />Run Consistency checks on customer data on a regular basis<br />Ensure training and organisation culture support quick response to inconsistencies or inaccuracies in customer data. <br />Not winding up in court for harassment of customers<br />Publish a consistency report for management<br />Track accuracy reports and actions at management meetings<br />Be able to compete on higher standard of customer care.<br />Publish case studies on how well we are doing.<br />Present at Conferences<br />???<br />
    78. 78. Questions?<br />

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