Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Legal IT Leaders Think Tank
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Legal IT Leaders Think Tank

2,312

Published on

I delivered this presentation at the Legal IT Leaders Think Tank event on the 18th / 19th May 2010

I delivered this presentation at the Legal IT Leaders Think Tank event on the 18th / 19th May 2010

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,312
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Warm up exercise!
  • No notes
  • Yes, basically each one is or can be cloud based computing.Proves that cloud is already here however most people don’t see these systems as cloud based.Have we invented a new name for something old such as SaaS. Gartner differentiates by calling Cloud XaaS – everything as a service
  • Most firms are already using the cloud. Certainly at Addleshaw Goddard they used a range of cloud services such as Deal Room and Litigation Management systems, sometimes these systems were selected without any IT input or due diligence. Talk about recent case where IT were involved and sent security engineer to assess Data Centre security and security of a scanning facility. Found simple problems with door locks. IT have mixed feelings, some excited by the opportunities – some nervous - is this the new O-Word, will my skills transfer (cloud development). IT need to get to a position where they can advise their business how the cloud can be an advantage to them. IT typically need to know how it works – cloud isn’t about that – it’s about the what it delivers to the business rather than how it works however it needs to be safe and fit in with regulatory standards and client expectation. Business don’t understand it. They can see IT as a blocker as they will almost certainly say no or slow down the process so sometimes they don’t involve IT and procure cloud services themselves. They assume, other large law firms are using the service so it will be fine. They want the benefits such as no installation time, little project management to get up and running, no hassle of having to order equipment, etc. Concerns: Security – physical, encryption, access controls, data loss, theft, etc Data Protection – location of data, who has access, duty of care over the data, etc Regulation – limited regulation of cloud based computing - not really covered by FSA or SRA, Contracts – governing law and jurisdiction – typical internal contracts are under the jurisdiction of the courts of england, may not be the case with the cloud as we see global players based in the US and other parts of the world Clients – clients want to know their assets are being managed as safely as possible. This is new. VMWare – give the example that at ILTA last year only approx 50% of the audience had completed virtualisation or had a virtualisation project underway, IT not Benefits are services can be up and running in a matter of days. Great for fast moving matters Cost / Benefit and Risks are not always clear. Who should do this – IT are well placed to advise working with the business and the risk management team
  • Consumers backup their data, they access their e-mail, they pay for things online, they store their credit card details (paypal) all in the cloud Gartner predicts 2 Billion+ cloud based consumers, it’s likely your staff and clients will be using the cloud at home already if not soon Race for the next big thing is already a media frenzy – recent Radio programme predicing the next Twitter Cloud operating systems – will lower the cost of computers, store all data in the cloud and will eventually run from smart phones attaching to devices wirelessly (monitors, keyboards, mice,etc) The cloud is at the heart of the way we socialise, keep up to date. Our childrens children will be able to see what we were doing in 50 years time People already trust the cloud however lots of horror stories. Talk about Paypal story, and how I improved security.
  • Reduce cost / pay as you go, most cloud providers will let you pay as you use. Amazon, Rackspace, etc have short contracts. Google Apps is £33 per user which includes Outlook, Blackberry, iPhone integration, 25Gb of storage for each person and antivirus / antispam Quicker to get going– most services can be up and running in a matter of minutes. I recently built a linux based web server in less than 15 minutes. Longest wait was the security “call back” before I could deploy the server. Elastic – the equipment can flex as you need it to. More CPU, Memory, Storage – both ways New features without the fuss – Cloud providers upgrade for you so you don’t need to worry about it. They give you advanced notice and they do the testing. Google regularly moving things from their lab (beta) to live and fixing problems. Very fast moving. Less infrastructure – infrastructure is getting more complex to manage – virtualisation, virtual storage, clustering, geographic clustering, Wide Area Network, WAN Optimisation, etc. The cloud means less infrastructure to manage. Do you need to invest in your WAN or your internet connection with the cloud? Less data to manage. Data size is exploding / increasing at an exponential rate, and keeping data under control is a real challenge for firms. Upgrades of infrastructure means copying data. Data needs to be backed up. Do firms want to focus on this or using the data to win business and retail clients?Security – cloud based suppliers under pressure to operate secure facilities. For some firms these facilities will be better. e.g. Servers under the desks for smaller law firms. Also if the data resides in the cloud then it is protected against being lost or stolen on laptop computers and desktops. Business Continuity – if your data sits outside of your offices then in the event you lose an office (or can’t get to it) then your people can continue working wherever there is internet access. This is a major benefit for smaller firms. Cloud engines – Microsoft, Google, Salesforce and others are developing engines to run your applications securely which again means you can get your product to market faster. Ideal for client developments. Talk about how easily Tungle integrated with Google Apps, swapping information seamlessly. Fee-earning opportunities, both providing advice on the cloud (the cloud will replace some outsourcing) but also cloud based tools to interact with clients. Anyone for cloud based VC, Calendar sharing, etc. Authentication – crack the multiple login account issue at last - Open ID
  • Reduce cost / pay as you go, most cloud providers will let you pay as you use. Amazon, Rackspace, etc have short contracts. Google Apps is £33 per user which includes Outlook, Blackberry, iPhone integration, 25Gb of storage for each person and antivirus / antispam Quicker to get going– most services can be up and running in a matter of minutes. I recently built a linux based web server in less than 15 minutes. Longest wait was the security “call back” before I could deploy the server. Elastic – the equipment can flex as you need it to. More CPU, Memory, Storage – both ways New features without the fuss – Cloud providers upgrade for you so you don’t need to worry about it. They give you advanced notice and they do the testing. Google regularly moving things from their lab (beta) to live and fixing problems. Very fast moving. Less infrastructure – infrastructure is getting more complex to manage – virtualisation, virtual storage, clustering, geographic clustering, Wide Area Network, WAN Optimisation, etc. The cloud means less infrastructure to manage. Do you need to invest in your WAN or your internet connection with the cloud? Less data to manage. Data size is exploding / increasing at an exponential rate, and keeping data under control is a real challenge for firms. Upgrades of infrastructure means copying data. Data needs to be backed up. Do firms want to focus on this or using the data to win business and retail clients?Security – cloud based suppliers under pressure to operate secure facilities. For some firms these facilities will be better. e.g. Servers under the desks for smaller law firms. Also if the data resides in the cloud then it is protected against being lost or stolen on laptop computers and desktops. Business Continuity – if your data sits outside of your offices then in the event you lose an office (or can’t get to it) then your people can continue working wherever there is internet access. This is a major benefit for smaller firms. Cloud engines – Microsoft, Google, Salesforce and others are developing engines to run your applications securely which again means you can get your product to market faster. Ideal for client developments. Talk about how easily Tungle integrated with Google Apps, swapping information seamlessly. Fee-earning opportunities, both providing advice on the cloud (the cloud will replace some outsourcing) but also cloud based tools to interact with clients. Anyone for cloud based VC, Calendar sharing, etc. Authentication – crack the multiple login account issue at last - Open ID
  • Mindset and prejudice – one of the largest challenges to overcome is the mindset of the IT industry. A great example of this is a recent conversation with a law firm CIO who said the cloud would never take off because the internet isn’t reliable enough and cited a DC in London flooding. Audit - Security – who has access to my data, physhing, key loggers, hypervisor vulns, random number generator vulnerabilities, physical security, process – ISO27001, personnel, etc still lots of differences between suppliers needs thorough due diligence. Talk about recentaudit, first law firm to review security and IT despite many visits from CIOsRegulation & legislation – current standards don’t go far enough to protect cloud based customers. Needs debate about the best way of ensuring that all cloud providers offer the same secure and consistent service. This may be regulation or legislation.Data Protection – location of data key, cite recent BPO project and model clauses- Data Ownership – cite facebook example where they claimed to own the data in Facebook, user uproarService expectations – service doesn’t always match expectations – cloud driving cost but sometimes service down- Take over / merger concerns – who could eventually end up owning the infrastructure that my data and service sits on- Lock-in and price hike concerns – concerns that the main players will increase their pricing and make it hard to move away despite the evidence to the contrary. Cite Postini services.
  • Security – Both - Talk about need to measure internal security and compare and contrast. Don’t assume it is better or worse, do your due diligence. For many firms the cloud will provide better security. Data loss – Fact - potentially however this depends on the supplier you select and the due diligence you perform on that supplier. The cloud will never take off – Fiction - it already has and it is gaining momentum, the business world is playing catch-up Data location – Fiction. With many suppliers you can choose where your data is and how your data is protected. Amazon EC2. Some providers let you select the physical hardware your services run on. Cloud providers will access my data and invade my privacy –Both - if they did that they wouldn’t be in business long. Smaller suppliers may be tempted, make sure you do your due diligence. There will be horror stories in the future, no doubt. Many clouds – Fact – in the short term there will be public, private clouds, community and hybrid, in the longer term these will reduce as firms grow to trust the public cloud and security / confidence improves My firm require me to know where my data is.... It is your responsibility to set the parameters based on cost / benefit and risk. Don’t get caught out – make sure you include cloud in your strategy
  • Microsoft quote
  • Suppliers wanting to differentiate
  • Cloud Documents– Autonomy already has the infrastructure and is storing many TB of data in the cloud, this is a natural step for them
  • Mobile phones – Google have already stated that their primary focus is the smart phone, they already have excellent integration and more is coming
  • IT has a real opportunity to provide business advice in respect of the cloud – make sure your teams are up to speed and understand how and where it could fit in your organisation There are lots of advantages and opportunities such as the ones we’ve already discussed today but make sure you run a thorough due diligence processes and choose your suppliers carefuly
  • No notes
  • Another LLP provide limited IT equipment, PDA, monitor, keyboard, mouse and charger PDA is his computer and connection to the cloud. It allows him to connect a monitor and keyboard to it wirelessly when he is in proximity of a computer. It is also him authentication device and his social network Set top box includes tv on demand, films on demand, and cloud based games charged by the hour- Auto tweet automatically updates his time sheet and social networking sites
  • Anchor don’t provide IT equipment(performance statistics, client messages) and reminders (travel, tweets, microblogs, news, e-mails and voicemails) Set top box includes tv on demand, films on demand, and cloud based games charged by the hour PDA is her computer and connection to the cloud. It allows her to connect a monitor and keyboard to it wirelessly when she is in proximity of a computer. It is also her authentication device and her social networkAuto tweet automatically updates her time sheet and social networking sitesKey information includes outside of organisation such as clients information
  • His PDA also has a projector which he uses for meetings and for his display screen in the office, projected onto a partition in front of him Everything is wireless – even the electricity No login script, no boot up delays, no computer! Digital photo frames are on every desk to help people customise their hot desk whilst they are there
  • His cloud desktop has access to everything he needs, all via a simple web browser type experience The systems are now fully integrated, making phone calls automatically updates time sheets, crm, twitter, etc
  • The latest research is that the most successful meetings are held face to face, James remembers the end of the 00’ies where the rush was on to cut costs and for as many meetings to be by Video Conference as possible PDA records the meeting – audio, video PDA projects presentation James doesn’t use gesture control to operate the presentation as he still prefers a wireless mouse The cloud presentation includes real time / up to date information from the cloud – not just static slides No IT problems again, James wonders if Anchor LLP still have an IT team or not Auto-tweer
  • James uses the legal cloud wiki to update a contract and marks it for electronic signature by his client E-mail is on it’s way out, only used by those Generation X folk who can’t make the switch to newer collaboration technologies All annotations, comments and changes are stored with the original document to give a full audit trail of the thought process whilst creating the document. Security is applied to this meta data to ensure only Anchor LLP can see it; His desk phone is actually just a dumb device, hooking up to his PDA wirelessly. It means that he doesn’t have to turn his screen off whilst making a call He books a number of meetings himself using the easy to use cloud based meeting booking service He spends 15 minutes researching the interests of the people he is networking with tonight, using social networking tools
  • Google suggests a restaurant based on James’ mood, work rate, friends and contacts in the area and whether James wants company or not. It also factors in his weight into the equation Also prompts to take an umbrella as rain forcast. The PDA is waterproof to 15M as people now take them everywhere with them (even swimming) but James isn’t Anchor LLP know James has left the building based on GPS information his PDA transmits back to the cloud The menu and food ordering is done using his PDA. PDA reads location and displays the correct menu; Accepts party invitation – his PDA is also his personal device too
  • Video Conference from inside his green car, with video displayed on the ViDriveNotes are also displayed on the ViDriveLegislation under review in respect of video conferencing whilst you drive as this is still relatively new, company advise only to do this when it is safe to do so – i.e. When you are stationary.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Cloud Computing:What does it mean for law firms?<br />Dan SimmsLegal IT Leaders Think Tank<br />
    • 2. Cloud Computing – warm-up!<br /><ul><li>Who’s already using at home?
    • 3. Who’s already using for work / professional reasons?
    • 4. Who’s thinking about using Cloud Computing for a project in the next 18 months?
    • 5. Who’s heard of Amazon EC2 and / or S3?
    • 6. Who’s just realised they’re in the wrong session?</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – have I got news for you?<br /><ul><li>The projected value of Cloud computing in 2013 is $150.1 billion (Gartner)
    • 7. When asked .. is cloud computing less secure than on premise approaches 43% said yes, 31% said not sure and 26% said no (IT unmasked blog)
    • 8. In a Gartner survey of mid-market trends in Sept 2009 41% of respondents said they were unfamiliar with cloud computing (Gartner)
    • 9. Forrester’s advice to CFOs – embrace Cloud Computing</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – what is it?<br />“Combination of the Internet and computing so that software, content and data can be stored in remote servers run by other companies and accessed from computers, phones and TVs through the Internet.” Steve Ballmer, Microsoft March 2010<br />
    • 10. Cloud Computing – cloud stack<br />Salesforce<br />Business-Process-as-a-Service<br />Service-as-software<br />Software-as-a-Service<br />Platform-as-a-Service<br />Google App Engine<br />/ VMforce / Cloud.com<br />Infrastructure-as-a-Service<br />Amazon S3<br />Storage<br />Comms<br />Computational<br />Amazon EC2<br />Source: Ovum Cloud Computing Business Benefits and Drivers<br />
    • 11. Cloud Computing – types of cloud?<br /><ul><li>Cumulonimbus …. No …..
    • 12. Public – internet based cloud
    • 13. Community – companies pool / share infrastructure, Google “Government Cloud”
    • 14. Hybrid - multiple internal and/or external providers
    • 15. Private - cloud computing on private networks</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – so is it…?<br /><ul><li>Is it your litigation management system?
    • 16. Is it your online deal room?
    • 17. Is it your e-mail archive system?
    • 18. Is it your records management system?
    • 19. Is it Skype, Paypal, Hotmail, Yahoo, Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, Google, Linked-in?
    • 20. Is it Salesforce?
    • 21. Is it your DR provision?
    • 22. You get the point!</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – where are legal now?<br /><ul><li>Already using it!
    • 23. IT - mixed feelings – excited, nervous – the new O-word?
    • 24. Business – don’t fully understand it but want benefits
    • 25. Some very good reasons to be concerned – Security, Audit, Data Protection, Risk, Regulation, Clients ...
    • 26. Lack of control of location of data and management processes – who has access to my data?
    • 27. Cost / Benefit / Risk not always clear</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – the consumer<br /><ul><li>Consumers love the cloud – new, fast, exciting
    • 28. Gartner - 2 Billion+ cloud consumers in next 2years
    • 29. Race to find the next Twitter – Buzz?
    • 30. Chromium OS – power button to web in a few seconds
    • 31. Gadgets – PDA, Consoles, Set top boxes, Televisions
    • 32. Social interaction – Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, Buzz
    • 33. People already trusting the cloud with private / sensitive information</li></ul>Consumers driving the cloud - “We have this flexibility at home, we want it at work”<br />
    • 34. Cloud Computing – business benefits<br /><ul><li>Reduce cost / Pay as you go
    • 35. Quicker to get going and elastic
    • 36. New features without the fuss
    • 37. Less Infrastructure
    • 38. Less data to manage directly
    • 39. Security (yes, that’s right)
    • 40. Business Continuity
    • 41. Data validation – single record
    • 42. Cloud engines and Integration opportunities
    • 43. Authentication – single login account</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – no fuss upgrades<br />
    • 44. Cloud Computing – challenges<br /><ul><li>Mindset and prejudice
    • 45. Security
    • 46. Regulation, legislation and standards
    • 47. ISO27001, SAS70 don’t go far enough, audit difficult
    • 48. True access control and encryption mandatory
    • 49. Data protection
    • 50. Data ownership
    • 51. Integration
    • 52. Service expectations
    • 53. Takeover / merger concerns
    • 54. Lock-in &amp; price hike concerns</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – fact or fiction<br /><ul><li>The cloud is less secure than my internally hosted system?
    • 55. I could lose all my data hosted in the cloud?
    • 56. It will never take off?
    • 57. With the cloud I will never know where my data is?
    • 58. The internet isn’t reliable enough for the cloud?
    • 59. Cloud providers will access my data and invade my privacy
    • 60. There will be many clouds in the future – private, public, hybrid and community
    • 61. My firm require me to know where my data and infrastructure are hosted</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – Microsoft on the cloud<br />About 70% employees working on cloud-related projects right now; figure will reach 90% within a year<br />&quot;This is the bet for the company,”...&quot;For the cloud, we&apos;re all in.” Steve Ballmer, Microsoft March 2010<br />
    • 62. Cloud Computing – what next?<br /><ul><li>Cloud 2, 3, 4, 5, G-cloud (with app-store!)
    • 63. The great “Cloud Burst” and bounce back
    • 64. The great PKI comeback
    • 65. Cloud standards
    • 66. End to end encryption, driven by government standards and legislation
    • 67. Cloud engine consolidation
    • 68. Client tender responses - security plans
    • 69. Cloud devices – think iPad without the local data</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – next two years<br /><ul><li>Deal rooms and Litigation Management
    • 70. Workflow
    • 71. Virtual learning
    • 72. Business post and fax
    • 73. CRM integrated with the cloud (Linked-in, etc)
    • 74. Service Desk solutions
    • 75. e-mail (Microsoft, Google, etc)
    • 76. Digital Dictation
    • 77. Documents (Word processing and Document Management)</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – next two years<br /><ul><li>Authentication – Open ID, SecurID, etc
    • 78. Time Recording, Payroll, HR systems and Expenses
    • 79. Room Booking
    • 80. Desktop – for strategic and tactical purposes
    • 81. Network Optimisation
    • 82. Purchase Order and Invoice processing
    • 83. Records Management
    • 84. Practice Management movement in smaller firms
    • 85. Move towards accessing the cloud from the desktop to smart phones</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing – conclusion <br />&quot;This is the bet for the company,”...&quot;For the cloud, we&apos;re all in.” Steve Ballmer, Microsoft March 2010<br /><ul><li>It’s here, and it’s here to stay!
    • 86. IT, IT Security and Risk professionals need to provide cloud strategy and leadership
    • 87. Lots of advantages and opportunities ... but ...
    • 88. Thorough due diligence and supplier selection required
    • 89. Proceed with caution ... but proceed &amp; good luck</li></li></ul><li>A day in the life of... 2015<br />Dan SimmsLegal IT Leaders Think Tank<br />
    • 90. Meet James Hall<br /><ul><li>The year is 2015
    • 91. Meet James Hall – associate of Another LLP
    • 92. Another LLP are cloud aficionado&apos;s
    • 93. All core IT systems are cloud based</li></li></ul><li>Rise and shine<br /><ul><li>James prepares for work – he checks his work and private schedule on his (own) dumb tablet.
    • 94. He enables auto-tweet and checks the right filters are on.
    • 95. His media space beeps indicating the 3D video conference is about to start with the overseas office.
    • 96. He finishes off editing the document he was working on last night on his dumb tablet and saves it back to the cloud.
    • 97. He makes sure he has his PDA which is now the most important thing he carries.</li></li></ul><li>Commute<br /><ul><li>James has important information played to him – audio and video.
    • 98. On some days he accesses training material but not today.
    • 99. He is able to access key information from the cloud – not just contact information using voice commands.
    • 100. He thinks about printing an e-mail (old habits die hard) using voice prompts however he remembers how political printing has become since the green tax.
    • 101. He issues the command “book desk”
    • 102. For James, his IT is his PDA, that’s it!</li></li></ul><li>Arrive in the office<br /><ul><li>He drops his PDA onto the charge pad which automatically pairs it with a wireless keyboard, mouse, and telephone and opens his “Google Chromium v3” cloud desktop and enables the projector screen.
    • 103. His PDA can operate using building wireless however most firms just use the 100Mb wireless cloud.
    • 104. He has a nostalgic moment about the days he had time to grab a coffee whilst his computer logged on. What computer he thinks?
    • 105. The digital photograph frames on the hot desk have updated with pictures his family taken from the cloud.</li></li></ul><li>Arrive in the office<br /><ul><li>He catches up with everything - post, e-mail, workflow, performance statistics, sales leads, documents all via the cloud desktop.
    • 106. He calls a couple of the leads and talks over the opportunity, the results being automatically updated in the cloud.</li></li></ul><li>Team meeting<br /><ul><li>James has a face team meeting - gone full circle.
    • 107. His PDA records the meeting audio and video to the cloud, and schedules transcription to text.
    • 108. He uses his PDA to project the presentation onto the meeting room wall.
    • 109. Since Microsoft “Project Natal” Gesture control is all the rage however James still prefers a mouse.
    • 110. The presentation includes live information – not the static slides of days gone by.
    • 111. No IT problems, again!
    • 112. Auto-tweet is updated.</li></li></ul><li>Working practice<br /><ul><li>James updates a contract in the legal cloud wiki and marks it for electronic signature by his client.
    • 113. No e-mail required as all parties using the same system for editing.
    • 114. Comments and annotations stored securely in the cloud forever so there is a full audit trail.
    • 115. He takes three telephone calls using his PDA.
    • 116. James books a number of multiparty meetings using cloud based meeting booking service.
    • 117. He spends 15 minutes researching the interests of the people he is networking with this evening.</li></li></ul><li>Lunch<br /><ul><li>Google suggests a restaurant based on his mood, work throughput, friends and contacts, routine and ... Weight!
    • 118. Also suggests taking an umbrella as rain is forecast, PDA is waterproof to 15m but James isn’t.
    • 119. Building aware James has left based on GPS location.
    • 120. Friends join James as he set an open invitation on PDA.
    • 121. Menu and food order via PDA.
    • 122. Accepted party invitation – PDA now personal and work device, same cloud.</li></li></ul><li>Commute home<br /><ul><li>Video Conference meeting with client from inside his “green” car. Video display on the ViDrive.
    • 123. Notes of the VC also displayed on BMW ViDrive screen.
    • 124. Legislation under review in respect of DriveVC – company policy is to use only when safe to do so.</li></li></ul><li>Cloud Computing - questions<br /><ul><li>Thanks for your time
    • 125. Any questions?</li>

    ×