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    D sharp capstone presentation D sharp capstone presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Sell the Cell Project Dan Sharp Capstone Project EDAM 5039
    • Overview
      • 10 th grade General Biology
        • This is a class for struggling readers
        • Reading levels range from 1 st grade to 6 th grade
      • Curricular Unit
        • Cell Biology – Cellular Organelles
      • Project
        • “Sell” the Cell
    • Purpose
      • Students often find studying cell parts to be boring and irrelevant to them
      • This project strives to develop relevance and engage students in an authentic activity
      • Students were tasked with “marketing” the cell like you would sell a house or a car
    • Objectives
      • Student-centered :
      • This unit had minimal teacher-led instruction. Direct instruction was limited to individual and small group conferencing.
    • Objectives
      • Learning and Doing :
      • Students were attempting to convince potential “buyers” of the merits of the features of the cell.
      • Students were not simply asked to memorize a chart of the structures and functions of the cellular organelles to reproduce on a pencil-and-paper test.
    • Objectives
      • Using information :
      • Students were tasked with presenting the information in a way that showed the importance of each organelle to the overall functioning of living organisms.
    • Objectives
      • Facilitator :
      • The role of the teacher was to aid the student in producing a quality project. This was accomplished through ongoing progress monitoring through observation, student reporting, and individual and group conferencing.
    • Objectives
      • Flexible groups :
      • Initially students were placed into groups of four. Within each group students divided up the organelles to be studied.
      • After initial research students were temporarily regrouped into peer “expert” groups based on the organelles they had studied.
      • Students then rejoined their original group and shared the information they had gleaned about their organelles. They then proceeded to plan their “marketing” campaign.
    • Objectives
      • Multiple instructional and learning modalities :
      • In this project students learned individually, with peers, and conferenced with the teacher(s).
      • They used print, media, and the internet as sources of information.
      • They created videos, posters, and PowerPoints as part of the marketing campaigns.
    • Objectives
      • Collaboration :
      • Students collaborated within their assigned groups, as well as with students from other groups in their “expert” subgroups.
      • Collaboration within marketing groups was the most challenging aspect of this project for most of the groups.
    • Objectives
      • Performance-based assessment:
      • Formative assessment included teacher observation, progress conferencing, and daily group progress reports which were journaled via a shared Googledoc.
      • The summative assessment was based on the marketing pitch the group presented to a panel of “experts” (a local real estate agent, a business teacher, and two AP biology students)
    • Objectives
      • Multiple sources of information, including technology :
      • Students were provided a wide range of print and visual media resources of information
      • Most solely utilized the internet to gather their information.
      • A listing of high-quality sites for learning about cellular organelles were supplied
    • Objectives
      • Technology fully integrated into the classroom :
      • Students each had access to a laptop computer in the classroom
      • Podcasting software, digital video cameras, and video editing software was available.
      • Googledocs was used by all groups of students to share information within their marketing groups and expert groups.
    • Objectives
      • Using a variety of types of information to complete authentic projects :
      • Students used a variety of resources for gathering information.
      • While the authenticity of “marketing” a cell was a bit contrived, researchers often need to “sell” the importance of what they are studying to receive funding for their research
    • Objectives
      • Students acting as professionals in the discipline :
      • While biologists may have to “sell” their research to obtain funding, relating the project to the marketing of a car or a house carries more real-life meaning and utility for this student population
    • Timeline
      • Days 1-2
        • Project introduction
        • Setting up Googledocs accounts
        • Group organization
        • Organelle selection within groups.
    • Timeline
      • Days 3-6
        • Research and gathering information
        • Entries made to shared Googledocs report progress each day
        • Day 6 was focused on having students collaborate in expert panels with students from other groups who were studying the same organelles
    • Timeline
      • Days 7-13
        • Planning and preparing presentations. Additional research as needed
        • Days 8, 10, and 12 entry added to their Googledoc journal to report progress
    • Timeline
      • Day 14
        • Rehearsal of presentations
      • Day 15
        • Presentations
      • Day 16
        • Debrief / Celebration day
    • Project Components
      • Inquiry
        • The overall structure of the project was designed to encourage students to inquire into the structure and function of organelles and to determine how they are essential to life so that they could effectively “sell” the cell
        • The project was open-ended enough for students to pursue a deeper knowledge of organelle structure and function.
    • Project Components
      • Projects
        • The unit was entirely project-based.
        • Instruction and assessment were all centered on producing a product to inform and persuade an authentic audience of the importance of the cell.
    • Project Components
      • Technology
        • All students had their own laptop with internet access.
        • Googledocs was used to record group progress, combine research findings, and prepare presentations.
        • Wikis, podcasts, Glogsters, Animoto, videos, and other web 2.0 tools were available for students to utilize in creating their presentations.
    • Project Components
      • Dynamic, Flexible Grouping
        • Initial groupings were made to ensure that each group had at least one member who was stronger academically and at least one student who had demonstrated a level of proficiency with technology.
        • Students also worked in subgroups with peers from other project groups within the class who were working on the same organelles.
    • Project Components
      • Authentic Teaching and Learning
        • All students at some point in their lives will need to be able to market something
          • their own abilities in a job interview, a vehicle or home, or something similar.
        • The hope was that this real-life, meaningful application would result in student engagement in learning the biology content of cellular organelle structure and function
          • a topic which has not generated significant student engagement in the past in my experience.
        • Presenting their marketing campaign to an “expert” panel added to the authenticity of the project.
    • Resources
      • Each student had the use of a laptop and all of the associated technologies.
        • Googledocs, Wiki, podcasts, Glogster, Animoto, videos, and other web 2.0 tools were available for students to utilize in creating their presentations.
      • Quality websites were suggested as follows:
        • The Virtual Cell
          • Brown University Center for Computer Graphics and Scientific Visualization.(1998). In The Virtual Cell Website . Retrieved December 1, 2010, from http://www.ibiblio.org/virtualcell/
        • Biology4Kids
          • Rader, A. (2010). Cells. In Biology4Kids . Retrieved December 1, 2010, from http://www.biology4kids.com/
        • Molecular Expressions
          • Davidson, M. (2005). Cell Biology and Microscopy. In Molecular Expressions . Retrieved December 1, 2010, from http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/cells/index.html
    • Desired Outcomes
      • Meet curriculum objectives and state standards related to cellular organelles.
        • 3.3.10.A Explain the structural and functional similarities and
        • differences found among living things.
        • 3.3.10.B Describe and explain the chemical and structural basis
        • of living organisms.
            • Identify the specialized structures and regions of the cell and the functions of each
      • Engage students sufficiently that they will retain some of the information until they take the science PSSA next year.
    • Desired Outcomes
      • For the students to experience success in an authentic project.
        • In the time I have worked with these students it has become very clear that they do not expect success in anything academically-related.
        • I wanted to see them be able to produce a product that they could present with pride and confidence to an audience of professionals.
    • Desired Outcomes
      • The following rubrics were used for each group to assess themselves, for group conferencing with the teacher, and for summative assessment.
    • Information Rubric Total Points for Structure and Function Points Chloroplast Cell wall Cilia and flagella Mitochondria Lysosome Golgi apparatus Ribosome Endoplasmic reticulum Nucleus Cell membrane Comments Function Structure Organelle
    • Information Rubric (continued)
      • Advanced (4 points)
        • Includes more than two images of the organelle which demonstrate its structure and function; The structure of the organelle is described in greater detail than what is presented in the textbook; The function of the organelle is clearly explained with more detailed information than what is in the textbook
      • Proficient (3 points )
        • Includes two images of the organelle which demonstrate its structure and function;
        • The structure of the organelle is described in at least as much detail as what is presented in the textbook; The function of the organelle is clearly explained with at least as much detail as is in the textbook
      • Basic (2 points)
        • Includes at least one image of the organelle which demonstrates its structure and function; The structure of the organelle is described but with less detail than what is presented in the textbook; The function of the organelle is explained but with less detailed information than what is in the textbook
      • Below Basic (1 point)
        • Includes no images of the organelle which demonstrate its structure and function;
        • The structure of the organelle is described with little information or is not described at all; The function of the organelle is explained with little detail or is not described at all
    • Collaboration Rubric Total Score Journal entries are incomplete and/or late Some journal entries were incomplete or late All journals were completed by the due dates All journal entries are complete, detailed, and submitted by the due dates Journal Entries Most members are not treating others with respect Some members are not treating others with respect Most members are treating each other with respect All members are treating each other with respect Respect Most members are not communicating within the group Some members are not communicating within the group Most members are communicating regularly and clearly within the group All members are regularly and clearly communicating within the group Communication Most members are not contributing to the project Some members are not contributing equally to the project All members are contributing to the project All members are giving their best effort in completing the project Contribution Score Below Basic (1 point) Basic (2 points) Proficient (3 points) Advanced (4 points) Category
    • Marketing Rubric Total Score Technology was not used or was not used effectively At least one technology is used effectively in the campaign At least two different technologies are used effectively in the marketing campaign At least three different technologies are effectively used in the marketing campaign Use of Technology The marketing campaign is not very creative The marketing campaign is somewhat creative The marketing campaign clearly demonstrates a creativity The marketing campaign clearly demonstrates a high level of creativity Creativity There is no clear theme of the marketing campaign The theme of the marketing campaign is present The theme of the marketing campaign is evident and understandable The theme of the marketing campaign is very clear, understandable, and attention-grabbing Theme Score Below Basic (1 point) Basic (2 points) Proficient (3 points) Advanced (4 points) Category
    • Desired Outcomes
      • These rubrics enabled students to know what was expected of them and to evaluate their work as they went along as well as just prior to their presentations.
      • The best feedback on the success of the project occurred during the debriefing day at the end. The general consensus was that they did not like the project while they were doing it because it seemed like a great deal of work, but that now that they were finished with it they were proud of what they had completed.
    • Desired Outcomes
      • Academically, I do not think that the amount of time that the project took was commensurate with the amount of the curriculum that was covered, but there was a definite pay off for the students completing what was a difficult project for them.