Designing Virtual Realism - AEA Chicago, 2009
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Designing Virtual Realism - AEA Chicago, 2009

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The real world is rarely flat and devoid of texture, yet our virtual designs often do little to mirror what lies beyond the monitor. Tasteful use of lighting, shadows, gradients, and more traditional ...

The real world is rarely flat and devoid of texture, yet our virtual designs often do little to mirror what lies beyond the monitor. Tasteful use of lighting, shadows, gradients, and more traditional arts such as photography, oil, water color, pencil and charcoal can help us mimic the world around us. Learn why using realistic textures and media can make your designs leap off the screen.

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    Designing Virtual Realism - AEA Chicago, 2009 Designing Virtual Realism - AEA Chicago, 2009 Presentation Transcript

    • Designing Virtual Realism AEA Chicago, October 2009 Dan Rubin Sidebar Creative
    • Why?
    • Because of the environment.
    • No, not that environment.
    • Look & Feel
    • Let’s relate this to UI design.
    • Interface Product design = design
    • Products are designed for intuition.
    • Photo: Luiz Fernando Pilz (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/249448)
    • Photo: Ivaylo Georgiev (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/426359)
    • Affordance
    • ...the term affordance refers to the perceived and actual properties of the thing, primarily those fundamental properties that determine just how the thing could possibly be used. Don Norman
    • Affordance isn’t guaranteed...
    • Context is important.
    • Photo: David Ritter (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/941686)
    • Photo: Craig Jewell (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/945272)
    • Aesthetic- Usability Effect
    • Attractive things work better. Donald Norman http://jnd.org/dn.mss/emotion_design_attractive_things_work_better.html
    • Good usability is inherent in good design because people think well designed things work better. Mark Boulton
    • Finding inspiration.
    • Some interfaces already do this.
    • We can create illusions.
    • http://silverbackapp.com
    • http://delicious-monster.com/
    • Classics
    • Ramp Champ
    • ConvertBot
    • Sometimes, we can also use textures.
    • Two-second texture test.
    • Photo: Peter Zelnik (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1170873)
    • Photo: Kriss Szkurlatowski (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1165285)
    • Photo: David Thomson (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1172713)
    • Photo: Dedy Ong (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1161259)
    • Photo: Roberto Ribeiro (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1173672)
    • Photo: David Ritter (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/941686)
    • My interface doesn’t need to be pretty!
    • I beg to differ.
    • Create texture by adding noise.
    • In Photoshop: Filter → Noise → Add Noise…
    • Incorporate art and texture.
    • Shoot your own photos.
    • Use your scanner.
    • Or combine a few methods.
    • Designing Virtual Realism AEA Chicago, October 2009 fin. http://aneventapart.com/2009/chicago/slides/ twitter: @danrubin ©2009 Dan Rubin » http://sidebarcreative.com