Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Compression: Images (JPEG)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Compression: Images (JPEG)

  • 841 views
Published

Compression: Images (JPEG)

Compression: Images (JPEG)

Published in Technology , Art & Photos
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
841
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
73
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 426 Back Close Compression: Images (JPEG) What is JPEG? • JPEG: Joint Photographic Expert Group — an international standard since 1992. • Works with colour and greyscale images • Up to 24 bit colour images (Unlike GIF) • Target photographic quality images (Unlike GIF) • Suitable for many applications e.g., satellite, medical, general photography...
  • 2. 427 Back Close Basic JPEG Compression Pipeline JPEG compression involves the following: • Encoding • Decoding – Reverse the order for encoding
  • 3. 428 Back Close Major Coding Algorithms in JPEG The Major Steps in JPEG Coding involve: • Colour Space Transform and subsampling (YIQ) • DCT (Discrete Cosine Transformation) • Quantisation • Zigzag Scan • DPCM on DC component • RLE on AC Components • Entropy Coding — Huffman or Arithmetic We have met most of the algorithms already: • JPEG exploits them in the compression pipeline to achieve maximal overall compression.
  • 4. 429 Back Close Quantisation Why do we need to quantise: • To throw out bits from DCT. • Example: (101101)2 = 45 (6 bits). Truncate to 4 bits: (1011)2 = 11. Truncate to 3 bits: (101)2 = 5. • Quantisation error is the main source of Lossy Compression. • DCT itself is not Lossy • How we throw away bits in Quantisation Step is Lossy
  • 5. 430 Back Close Quantisation Methods Uniform quantisation • Divide by constant N and round result (N = 4 or 8 in examples on previous page). • Non powers-of-two gives fine control (e.g., N = 6 loses 2.5 bits)
  • 6. 431 Back Close Quantisation Tables • In JPEG, each F[u,v] is divided by a constant q(u,v). • Table of q(u,v) is called quantisation table. • Eye is most sensitive to low frequencies (upper left corner), less sensitive to high frequencies (lower right corner) • JPEG Standard defines 2 default quantisation tables, one for luminance (below), one for chrominance. E.g Table below ---------------------------------- 16 11 10 16 24 40 51 61 12 12 14 19 26 58 60 55 14 13 16 24 40 57 69 56 14 17 22 29 51 87 80 62 18 22 37 56 68 109 103 77 24 35 55 64 81 104 113 92 49 64 78 87 103 121 120 101 72 92 95 98 112 100 103 99 ----------------------------------
  • 7. 432 Back Close Quantization Tables (Cont) • Q: How would changing the numbers affect the picture E.g., if we doubled them all? Quality factor in most implementations is the scaling factor for default quantization tables. • Custom quantization tables can be put in image/scan header. JPEG Quantisation Example • JPEG Quantisation Example (Java Applet)
  • 8. 433 Back Close Zig-zag Scan What is the purpose of the Zig-zag Scan: • To group low frequency coefficients in top of vector. • Maps 8 x 8 to a 1 x 64 vector
  • 9. 434 Back Close Differential Pulse Code Modulation (DPCM) on DC Component • Another encoding method is employed • DPCM on the DC component. • Why is this strategy adopted: – DC component is large and varies, but often close to previous value (like lossless JPEG). – Encode the difference from previous 8x8 blocks – DPCM
  • 10. 435 Back Close Run Length Encode (RLE) on AC Components Yet another simple compression technique is applied to the AC component: • 1x63 vector (AC) has lots of zeros in it • Encode as (skip, value) pairs, where skip is the number of zeros and value is the next non-zero component. • Send (0,0) as end-of-block sentinel value.
  • 11. 436 Back Close Huffman (Entropy) Coding DC and AC components finally need to be represented by a smaller number of bits (Arithmetic coding also supported in place of Huffman coding): • (Variant of) Huffman coding: Each DPCM-coded DC coefficient is represented by a pair of symbols : (Size, Amplitude) where Size indicates number of bits needed to represent coefficient and Amplitude contains actual bits. • Size only Huffman coded in JPEG: – Size does not change too much, generally smaller Sizes occur frequently (= low entropy so is suitable for coding, – Amplitude can change widely so coding no real benefit
  • 12. 437 Back Close Huffman (Entropy) Coding (Cont) • Example Size category for possible Amplitudes: ------------------------------------------------- Size Typical Huffman Code for Size Amplitude 0 00 0 1 010 -1,1 2 011 -3,-2,2,3 3 100 -7..-4,4..7 4 101 -15..-8,8..15 . . . . . . -------------------------------------------------- • Use ones complement scheme for negative values: i.e 10 is binary for 2 and 01 for -2 (bitwise inverse). Similarly, 00 for -3 and 11 for 3.
  • 13. 438 Back Close Huffman Coding DC Example • Example: if DC values are 150, -6, 5, 3, -8 • Then 8, 3, 3, 2 and 4 bits are needed respectively. Send off Sizes as Huffman symbol, followed by actual values in bits. (8huff , 10010110), (3huff , 001), (3huff , 101), (2huff , 11), (4huff , 0111) where 8huff . . . are the Huffman codes for respective numbers. • Huffman Tables can be custom (sent in header) or default.
  • 14. 439 Back Close Huffman Coding on AC Component AC coefficient are run-length encoded (RLE) • RLE pairs (Runlength, Value) are Huffman coded as with DC only on Value. • So we get a triple: (Runlength, Size, Amplitude) • However, Runlength, Size allocated 4-bits each and put into a single byte with is then Huffman coded. Again , Amplitude is not coded. • So only two symbols transmitted per RLE coefficient: (RLESIZEbytehuff, Amplitude)
  • 15. 440 Back Close Example JPEG Compression
  • 16. 441 Back Close Another Enumerated Example
  • 17. 442 Back Close JPEG Example MATLAB Code The JPEG algorithm may be summarised as follows, im2jpeg.m (Encoder) jpeg2im.m (Decoder) mat2huff.m (Huffman coder) m = [16 11 10 16 24 40 51 61 % JPEG normalizing array 12 12 14 19 26 58 60 55 % and zig-zag reordering 14 13 16 24 40 57 69 56 % pattern. 14 17 22 29 51 87 80 62 18 22 37 56 68 109 103 77 24 35 55 64 81 104 113 92 49 64 78 87 103 121 120 101 72 92 95 98 112 100 103 99] * quality; order = [1 9 2 3 10 17 25 18 11 4 5 12 19 26 33 ... 41 34 27 20 13 6 7 14 21 28 35 42 49 57 50 ... 43 36 29 22 15 8 16 23 30 37 44 51 58 59 52 ... 45 38 31 24 32 39 46 53 60 61 54 47 40 48 55 ... 62 63 56 64]; [xm, xn] = size(x); % Get input size. x = double(x) - 128; % Level shift input t = dctmtx(8); % Compute 8 x 8 DCT matrix % Compute DCTs of 8x8 blocks and quantize the coefficients. y = blkproc(x, [8 8], ’P1 * x * P2’, t, t’); y = blkproc(y, [8 8], ’round(x ./ P1)’, m);
  • 18. 443 Back Close y = im2col(y, [8 8], ’distinct’); % Break 8x8 blocks into columns xb = size(y, 2); % Get number of blocks y = y(order, :); % Reorder column elements eob = max(y(:)) + 1; % Create end-of-block symbol r = zeros(numel(y) + size(y, 2), 1); count = 0; for j = 1:xb % Process 1 block (col) at a time i = max(find(y(:, j))); % Find last non-zero element if isempty(i) % No nonzero block values i = 0; end p = count + 1; q = p + i; r(p:q) = [y(1:i, j); eob]; % Truncate trailing 0’s, add EOB, count = count + i + 1; % and add to output vector end r((count + 1):end) = []; % Delete unusued portion of r y = struct; y.size = uint16([xm xn]); y.numblocks = uint16(xb); y.quality = uint16(quality * 100); y.huffman = mat2huff(r);
  • 19. 444 Back Close Further Information Further standards: • Lossless JPEG: Predictive approach for lossless compression (why?), not widely used • JPEG 2000: ISO/IEC 15444 – Based on wavelet transform, instead of DCT, no 8 × 8 blocks, less artefacts – Often better compression ratio, compared with JPEG
  • 20. 445 Back Close Further Information References: • http://www.jpeg.org • Online JPEG Tutorial • The JPEG Still Picture Compression Standard • The JPEG 2000 Still Image Compression Standard