Science 3 tg draft 4.10.2014

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Science 3 tg draft 4.10.2014

  1. 1. DRAFT April 10, 2014 i 3 3
  2. 2. DRAFT April 10, 2014 i Book Record School: District: Division: Region: Date received by school: Issued to (Name of Pupil) Date Issued Condition Date Returned Condition To the Teacher Write the pupil’s name clearly under the column “Issued to.” Use the following letters in recording the condition of the book: 1. (New Book) 2. (Used Book in Good Condition) 3. (Used Book in Fair Condition) 4. (Used Book in Poor Condition)
  3. 3. DRAFT April 10, 2014 ii Encourage and assist the pupil in repairing damaged textbooks. Take Care of Your Book Dos: 1. Cover your book with plastic or manila paper. Old newspapers and magazines will do. 2. Be sure your hands are clean when you handle or turn the pages. 3. When using a new book for the first time, lay it on its back. Open only a few pages at a time. Press lightly along the bound edge as you turn the pages. This will keep the cover in good condition. 4. Use a piece of paper or cardboard for bookmarks. 5. Paste or tape immediately any torn pages. 6. Handle the book with care when passing from one person to another. 7. Always keep your book in a clean, dry place. 8. When your book is lost, report it to your teacher right away. Don’ts: 1. Do not fold the pages. 2. Do not write on the cover or pages. 3. Do not cut out any picture. 4. Never tear or detach any page.
  4. 4. DRAFT April 10, 2014 iii INTRODUCTION For inquiries or feedback, please write or call: DepEd-Bureau of Elementary Education Curriculum Development Division 2nd Floor, Bonifacio Bldg., DepEd Complex (ULTRA) Meralco Avenue, Pasig City, Philippines 1600 Telefax: (632) 638-4799 or 637-4347 E-mail Address: bee-deped@pldtdsl.net bee_director@yahoo.com
  5. 5. DRAFT April 10, 2014 iv INTRODUCTION Dear Teachers: This Teacher’s Guide for Grade 3, was written in response to the basic goal of education under the K to12 Enhanced Basic Education Program- “to prepare learners to become productive, worthy and competitive young scientists of the country.” This is divided into four units with illustrations describing each unit , representing the whole school year. Each unit has chapter with lessons and activities prepared which are aligned to the teacher’s guide. Learning to develop, keen and accurate observation skills through experiment, knowing more about matter, sense, living things, non-living things around you discovering more about your environment , climate change and other topics about the surroundings, earth and space are all given focus in this l learner’s material. Explore Science and make it useful in your daily life. Teaching Science is having more fun. The Writers/Conceptualizers
  6. 6. DRAFT April 10, 2014 v ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Recognition is given to the following supervisors, administrators, teachers, BEE Staff and experts in Science for their enthusiastic commitment in the development, revision and finalization of the teaching guides and learning materials for Grade 3 under K to 12 Basic Education Program. Arthur DC. Sacatropes Luz E. Osmena, Ed.D. Education Prog. Supervisor Education Prog. Supervisor Region III Region IV-A Michelle G. Hatid-Guadamor, Ph.D. Aiisa C. Corpuz Education Program Supervisor Science Coordinator Division Office, Sorsogon Prov. Division of Tarlac City Region V Region III Jennifer M. Rojo Jennifer A. Tinaja Master Teacher II MasterTeacher I Neogen Elementary School Nueve de Febrero E.S. Districtof Tagaytay City Mandaluyong City Job S. Zape, Jr. John Fitzgerald Secondes Education Program Supervisor Master Teacher I Region IV-A Don Felix Serra Nat’l. Hi-sch San Jaoquin, Iloilo Province Leni S. Solutan Neolita S. Sarabia Master Teacher Principal II Sta. Barbara Elementary School STRIVE Coordinator Division of Iloilo Province Division of Tagbilaran City Romeo C. Ordoňez Master Teacher II/Illustrator Divisoria E.S. Mexico South District Division of Pampanga Susana D. Mota Jemmalyn N. Malabanan Encoders
  7. 7. DRAFT April 10, 2014 vi Appreciation is extended to the following consultants/reviewers for their untiring efforts in sharing their expertise: Evelyn L. Josue Science Educ. Specialist IV UP-NISMED Diliman, Quezon City Pia Campo May R. Chavez Science Educ. Specialist Science Educ. Specialist UP-NISMED UP-NISMED Diliman, Quezon City Diliman, Quezon City Trinidad M. Lagarto, Ed.D. Senior Educ. Prog. Specialist, Anchorperson Curriculum Development Division Bureau of Elementary Education Marilette R. Almayda Director III Bureau of Elementary Education Marilyn D. Dimaano Director IV Bureau of Elementary Education
  8. 8. DRAFT April 10, 2014 vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Title Page i Book Record for the Teacher ii Copyright Page iii How to take care of your Book iv Introduction v Acknowledgement vi UNIT I : Matter Overview Chapter 1 – Solids 1-9 -Characteristics of Solids -Naming /Classifying Different Solids - Describing Solids according to Color - Describing Solids according to Shape - Describing Solids according to Size
  9. 9. DRAFT April 10, 2014 viii - Describing Solids according to Texture Chapter 2 – Liquids 9-14 - Characteristics of Liquids -Naming /Classifying Different Liquids - Describing Liquids according on how they flow - Describing Liquids on how they take the Shape of the container - Describing Liquids on how they occupy Space - Describing Liquids according to Smell Chapter 3 – Gases 15-18 1. Describing that Gases take the Shape of the Container 2. Describing that Gases occupy Space 3. Describing that Gases are Odorless and Tasteless Chapter 4 – Proper Use and Handling of Common Solids, Liquids, and Gases at Home and in School 18-22 -List of Common Products Found at Home and in School 4. Harmful Effects of Common Materials Found at Home and in School 5. Safety Measures in handling Harmful Materials Chapter 5 - Changes in Materials 23-39 - Measuring the Temperature of Materials 6. Measuring the Temperature of Hot/Warm Materials
  10. 10. DRAFT April 10, 2014 ix 7. Measuring the Temperature of a Cold Material 8. Changes in Materials as affected by Temperature 9. What happens to Water when Heated? 10. What happens to Water Vapor when Cooled? 11. What happens to Napthalene Ball when Heated? 12. What happens to the Air inside the Bottle/Balloon when Heated or Cooled? UNIT 2: Living Things and their Environment Chapter 1 - Sense Organs 40-50 13. Identifying the Parts of the Eyes 14. Proper Ways of Caring the Eyes 15. Identifying the Parts of the Ears 16. How the different Parts of the Ear Work? 17. Proper Ways of Caring the Ears 18. Identifying Parts of the Nose and its Functions 19. Proper Ways of Caring the Nose - Identifying the Uses of Tongue 20. Identifying the Parts and Functions of the Tongue 21. Identifying the parts of the Skin and its Function 22. Proper Ways of Caring the Skin Chapter 2 – Animals 50-61 23. Naming Animals around you 24. Parts of an Animal 25. Body Parts Animals Use to Move 26. Classifying Animals according to how they move 27. Body Parts of Animals that they use in getting foods 28. Classifying Animals according to what they Eat 29. Classifying Animals according to their Body Covering 30. Classifying Animals according to their Habitat 31. Useful Animals 32. Importance of Animals according to Use 33. Animals that can Harm People 34. Proper Ways of Caring Pets
  11. 11. DRAFT April 10, 2014 x Chapter 3 – Plants 61-76 - Naming and Describing Plant Parts - Same Plant Parts, different Plants - Different Plant Parts have different Works - Things that come from or made of Plants - Different Uses of Plants - Harmful Plants - Proper Was of Caring Plants - Characteristics of Living and non-living Things Chapter 4 : Heredity: Inheritance and Variation 76-84 - Animals Produce Animals of the same Kind - Physical Traits of People from Different Ethnicity - Physical Traits of Animals of the same Kind - Plants Produce Plants of the same Kind - Growing Plants from other Plant Parts - Basic Needs Humans, Animals and Plants - Things We Need from the Environment - conservation and Protection of the Environment Chapter 5: Ecosystem 85-91 UNIT 3: Force, Motion and Energy
  12. 12. DRAFT April 10, 2014 xi Chapter 1: Moving Objects 103-121 - Describing the Position of an Object relative to another Object -Describing the Location of Objects After it is Moved - Sounds Chapter 2: Electricity 121 - 129 - Sources of Electricity -Uses of Electricity Chapter 3 – Sounds 130- 135 Chapter 4- Electricity 135-148 UNIT 4: Earth and Space Chapter 1: The Surroundings 149-159 - The Surroundings Chapter 2: Weather 159-186 - The Weather Chapter 3: Objects Seen in the Sky 187-210 -Different Objects seen in the Sky
  13. 13. DRAFT April 10, 2014 1 UNIT 1: Matter Chapter 1: Solids There are three states of matter. One of which are solids. Solids have different characteristics which enable us to describe one from the other. Solids maybe described in terms of color, size, shape, texture , weight and volume. Lesson 1 - Characteristics of Solids Duration: 1- 2 days Background Information Solids maybe described in terms of color, size, shape, texture and weight. We use our senses in identifying objects based on their characteristics. We can find various solids in our environment. Let us collect some solids in the garden and be able to identify each object. Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. name different objects around us; and 2. classify the objects based on their characteristics. Procedure Motivation / Presentation Look around you . Ask :Look around you. Name the solid objects that you see? What can you say about the solid objects around you? B. Lesson Proper 1. Divide the class into five groups. Say: Today, we will visit the garden. While in the garden, collect 10 objects. 2. List down the objects based on their characteristics inside the chart below. Copy the chart in your notebook.
  14. 14. DRAFT April 10, 2014 2 Color Size Shape Texture Weight Black White Other color Small Big Round Square Other shape Smooth Rough Heavy Light Note: Give precautionary measures in collecting objects specially things which can cause wounds. Let the pupils fill up the table below: 1. Ask the following questions: a. What objects did you collected in the garden? b. How did you identify the objects? c. Are they the same? Why? 2. Prepare activity cards similar to those shown below? Discuss the things you listed and be able to describe them. Group A List down 5 objects you see in the library and describe the objects. Present them in class. Group B List down 5 objects found inside the room and describe the objects. Present them in class. Group C List down 5 objects found inside your bags and describe the objects. Present them in class.
  15. 15. DRAFT April 10, 2014 3 Assessment List down 2 objects inside the box below which can be classified according to size, shape, color, texture and weight. Things Around Us Assignment Draw 5 objects with different colors. Lesson 2 : Characteristics of Solids according to their color Duration: 1 day Background Information Solid is a state of matter with different colors. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe solids according to their color. Materials pictures or real objects Procedure 1. Review Ask the pupils to name the solids that they can see inside/outside the classroom 2. Motivation / Presentation 1. Let the pupils play a game(???) Pupils group themselves according to the colors of their shirt, shoes, slippers, socks, and bags. Objects at home 1. ( big size) 2. ( round) Objects according to shape 1. (round object) 2. ( Triangle obj.) Objects according to color 1. (black color) 2. ( white color)
  16. 16. DRAFT April 10, 2014 4 C. Lesson Proper 1. Activity a. The teacher asks some pupils to get an object from the box. Each pupil name the object and identify the color. 2. Discussion/Analysis a. What are the objects found inside the box? b. What are the colors of the objects inside the box? c. What characteristics of solid did you observe? 3.Generalization What are the colors of solids? ( red, blue, white, black etc.) What can we say about the colors of solids? (Solids have different colors) Application Form a dyad: Let the pupils choose three (3) objects inside their bag and exchange it with his/her partner. Have them identify the object and its color. Fill the table below. Objects Colors 1. 2. 3. Assessment Look at your own things and tell their color. Solids Color Bag Ball pen Shoes Skirt/Pants Shirt/Blouse Assignment Look for different objects in your kitchen. Make a chart of these objects and their color. Write them in your notebook. Lesson 3: Characteristics of Solids According to Shape Duration: 1 day
  17. 17. DRAFT April 10, 2014 5 Background Information Solids have shapes too. The particles of solids are close together. They move back and forth but the particles do not change places. This is why solids do not change shapes. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to identify solids based on their shapes. Materials pictures or real objects with different shape Procedure A.Review Describe solids based on their color. B.Motivation Have the class sing the song “I Have” to the tune of “Where is Thumb Man.” I have ballpens*, I have notebooks*, I have books*, I have chalk* These things are called solids. (2x) In our room. (2x) (* Use the names of other objects found on your table.) Say: Now, get some objects from your bags. Repeat the song “I Have” by naming the objects you are holding. Ask: 1. What do we call those objects you are holding? (They are all solids.) 2. Do they have a definite/exact shape? (Yes) C .Lesson Proper 1. a. Show pictures of different basic shapes such as a triangle, circle, square, and rectangle. b. Ask the pupils if they know objects with these shapes. c. Let them identify objects with these shapes. 2.Ask the following: a. Were you able to place the objects in their proper boxes? b. How did you group or classify the objects? c. Do they have definite characteristics ? What are these characteristics of the objects you classified?
  18. 18. DRAFT April 10, 2014 6 d. What are the ways of classifying solids? 3. Have the class describe the characteristics of the following objects: Assessment Have the class do the following activity. Study the pictures of different objects. Choose the correct shape in the parentheses. 1. bag (rectangle, round, triangle) 2. ball (rectangle, round, triangle) 3. coin (rectangle, round, triangle) 4. pineapple (rectangle, round, triangle) 5. onion (rectangle, round, triangle) Assignment Let the pupils collect pictures of different objects and make an album of their shapes. Lesson 4: Characteristic of Solids According to Size Duration: 1 day Background Information MATERIALS RECTANGLE TRIANGLE ROUND 1. ball 2. CD 3. tomato 4. cotton 5. atis
  19. 19. DRAFT April 10, 2014 7 Ruler and meter stick are some of the measuring devices used in determining the size of solids. These devices help us to measure the length, width and height of solids. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to : 1. compare solids according to size; 2. classify solids according to size; and 3. use measuring devices in determining the size of solids. Procedure A. Presentation Show and post pictures of different objects on the board. Ask: What are the objects posted on the board? How do these objects different from each other? Add two more boxes to include photos showing the length like photos of a pencil and a broomstick. B.Lesson Proper 1. a. Show a ruler and a meter stick. Ask the class to compare the two measuring devices. Emphasize that a ruler is used to measure short objects while a meter stick is used to measure long objects. Introduce the units of length, width and height. Give example. (e.g. length -2 inches; width 3 meters,: height -3 feet) A good measurement must have the value and the unit.
  20. 20. DRAFT April 10, 2014 8 b. In groups , allow the class to work on the activity. Guide them in accomplishing LM No. 4. Discussion/Analysis a. What are the solids found in your list? b. How are they similar or different? c. How did you classify the solids? Generalization What characteristics of solids did you learn today? Application Draw objects showing different size. Assessment Name objects found in the room. Tell the size of the objects using a ruler or meter stick. Get the exact measurement of each object. Assignment List down objects found at home and in school. Describe their sizes. Lesson 5 : Characteristics of Solids According to Texture Duration: 1day Background Information Solids have different textures. They can be categorized as smooth, rough, hard and soft. Objective At the end of the lesson the pupils should be able to classify solids according to texture. Materials The objects to be observed will depend on the contents of the pupils’ bags. You can include objects like pad paper, sand, pebbles, sandpaper, pineapple peelings, wooden stick, sponge, drinking glass and others. Procedure A. Motivation / Presentation TEXTURE HUNT Ask the pupils to go on a walk around their classroom and let them touch various objects. Ask the pupils to describe the texture. (The descriptions could be : hard, soft, rough, smooth.)
  21. 21. DRAFT April 10, 2014 9 B. Lesson Proper 1. Prepare all the necessary materials beforehand. (handout and different solids). 2. Distribute the handout. Give the pupils 10 minutes to read and discuss the procedure. 3. Remind the class to observe at all times the precautionary measures relevant to the activity. ( Hint: The teacher examines the objects before letting the pupils touch them) 4. Tell the pupils to copy the chart below in their notebooks. 5. Let the pupils observe the different solids. Tell them to write their observations in the appropriate columns in the data table. Name of Solid Texture smooth rough Soft hard 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. After the activity, ask the following questions: a.What characteristics of solids did you specifically observed? b.How did you classify solids? c.How can classifying objects help you in your daily life activities? Assessment Ask the pupils to group the materials according to their texture. Write the name of the solid in the proper box. plastic cup drinking glass ice pencil eraser leaf stone wood metal spoon HARD SOFT ROUGH SOFT Assignment Ask the pupils to bring to class at least ten solids from a place outside their homes. (backyard garden, sidewalk) and identify the solids based on their texture.
  22. 22. DRAFT April 10, 2014 10 Chapter 2 : Liquids Overview Liquid is another state of matter. It has no definite shape but it follows the shape of the container. The particles of liquids move freely than those of solids. The particles slide or roll over each other; this is why liquids have no shape of their own. It has the ability to flow. Liquids occupy space. Some liquids have taste and odor/smell. Lesson 1: Characteristics of Liquids Duration : 1 day Background Information Liquids have the ability to flow. The particles of liquids are far apart. They can move, slide or roll around each other. They can be poured from one container to another. This is what makes liquids flow. Some liquids flow faster while some do not. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe different liquids based on their different characteristics. Materials pictures or real liquids Procedure 1. Review Ask: What are the different characteristics of solids? 2. Motivation / Presentation Show pictures of different liquids. Say: Here are various samples of liquids. Look at them. Can you name them? Ask: What is common among these things? What do we call them? (They are all liquids.)
  23. 23. DRAFT April 10, 2014 11 3. Lesson Proper 1. Teacher should tell the students to go to the canteen and ask the canteen staff to show the different liquids available. (Give some precautionary measures in dealing with liquids which may not be familiar to pupils). Demonstrate the activity first before letting the pupils do it. Have this table be filled up by the pupils. NAME OF LIQUID How objects flow Shape of the container Taste Odor/ smell Space it occupies Soy sauce Condensed milk Water in a plastic bottle Perfume 2. Ask the following questions: a. How did you describe the different liquids ? b. Do liquids have the same or different characteristics? How do they differ or similar from each other ? 3. Prepare activity cards similar to those shown here. Group the class into three and give each group a card. Say: Study your activity card. Discuss the liquids that you listed and be ready to report them in class. Group A List down two liquids you see in the school canteen and write down possible ways of describing them in a piece of cartolina. Present them in class similar below: Name of Objects Ways of describing Liquids (ability to flow, shape,size,volume, taste, odor) Example: Juice Sweet taste, it can flow, takes the shape of the Group B List down two objects found in your kitchen and write down possible ways of describing them in a piece of cartolina. Present them in class similar below. Name of Objects Ways of describing Objects (ability to flow, shape,size,volume, taste, odor)
  24. 24. DRAFT April 10, 2014 12 Assessment Say: List down two (2) liquids found in different places below. Write your answers in the graphic organizer . Do this on your notebook. Things Around Us Assignment Have the pupils cut out three (3) pictures of liquids that can be poured from one container to another. Paste them on their notebook. Group C List down two objects found in your bathroom and write down possible ways of describing them in a piece of cartolina. Present them in class similar below. Name of Objects Ways of describing Objects (ability to flow, shape,size,volume, taste, odor Liquids found in the kitchen 1. 2. Liquids found in the bathroom 1. 2. Liquids found in the school canteen 1. 2.
  25. 25. DRAFT April 10, 2014 13 Session 2: Characteristics of Liquids according to how they flow Duration : 1 day Background Information Liquids have the ability to flow. Some flow slowly and others flow fast when poured from one container to another. They have no definite shape. They just follow the shape of their containers. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe how liquids flow from one container to another. Materials condensed milk, soy sauce, vinegar, shampoo, water oil, 2 spoons, transparent bowl Procedure A. Review Let the pupils show their cut out pictures. Ask: Have you experienced pouring them from one container to another? B.. Motivation / Presentation Ask: If you will pour those liquids in the containers shown on the picture, what will happen to the shape of liquids ? C. Lesson Proper 1. Divide the class into 5 groups. 2. Tell the class to do procedure 1 – 7 in their LM’s. 3. Let the class repeat the procedure using other liquids and tell them to record their observation on the chart following the table in their LM’s. 4. Let the group leader report their observation in class 5. Discuss the activity using the following questions: a. What happened to the different liquids when poured from one container to another container? Do they flow in the same way ? Why? Are the shapes the same as the original container? Why? b. What characteristics of liquids did you observe?
  26. 26. DRAFT April 10, 2014 14 c. What does the activity tells about liquids? 6. Read the situation and let the pupils analyze. Rita poured a small can of condense milk and an evaporated milk from one container to another . Which one will flows fast and slow? Why? Assessment Describe the liquids below on how each one flows when poured from one container to another. Put a check (/) mark in the box if it correctly describes the liquid and (X) mark if not. Name of Liquid Does it flow slowly? Does it flow fast? Does it flow very fast? 1. water 2. soy sauce 3. vinegar 4. shampoo 5. oil 6. Condensed milk Assignment Cut out pictures 3 different liquids from old magazines and describe how they flow. Lesson 3: Characteristics of Liquids on how they take the shape of the container Duration: 1 day Background Information Liquids do not have their own shape . They take the shape of their container. It also occupies space . The space it occupies depends on the shape of its container thus, it has no definite volume. Objective
  27. 27. DRAFT April 10, 2014 15 At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe the liquid according to the shape of the container and the space it occupies. Materials Glass, water Procedure 1. Review Ask: Bring out your cut out pictures. How do these liquids flow? 2. Motivation Say: Look at the glass on the table. What is inside it? What occupies the space in the glass? If i will transfer the liquid into a glass with different shape, will the shape and space occupied by the liquid still looks the same? Why? 3. Lesson Proper Have the class study the following illustration. Ask: If you add more water in the glass, what will happen? Let us find out if liquids can take up space. 1. Set the standards in performing the activity. Remind pupils on cleaning the area after each activity. 2. What happened to the water in a glass when you add more and more water in it ? Why? 3. Ask: Do liquids occupy space? Why ? 4. Read the following situation aloud and have a discussion about it. There are three glasses on the table. The blue glass is filled with milk. The yellow glass is filled with water. The orange is filled with buko juice. What occupies the space in the glasses? Do liquids occupy the same space? Why? Assessment
  28. 28. DRAFT April 10, 2014 16 Given two liquids in each container. Liquids A and B drawn below. Describe the two liquids according to shape and the space it occupies. Liquid A Liquid B Shape of liquid A ______________ Shape of Liquid B ____________ Space occupied by liquid A ____________ Space occupied by liquid B __________ Assignment Cut out 3 different liquids from old newspaper which can be identified according to shape. Lesson 4: Characteristics of Liquids according to their taste and odor or smell of liquids Duration: 1 day Background Information Some liquids have taste and odor. The taste of liquids maybe sweet, sour, salty and bitter. Its odor or smell maybe good or bad. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe the taste and odor or smell of liquids. Materials rubbing alcohol, catsup, juice, vinegar, perfume, soy sauce, water, glue baby oil Procedure A. Review Ask: Do liquids occupy space? Why. B.Motivation / Presentation Ask: What can you say about these liquids? Vinegar, soy sauce, catsup, milk
  29. 29. DRAFT April 10, 2014 17 C. Lesson Proper 1. Prepare the set-up of liquids and let the pupils observe them. 2. Have the pupils describe their characteristics according to taste and smell. 3. Have them record their observations in an activity sheet. 2. a. How did you describe the liquids? b. What is your basis in describing the liquids? c. What characteristic of liquids is observed in the samples provided? 3. Have the class study the following liquids. Let them fill in the column with the characteristics of liquids in the following table. Materials Smell or odor ( good or bad) Taste ( sour,salty,bitter, sweet) 1. alcohol 2. catsup 3. juice 4. vinegar 5. perfume 6. soy sauce 7. water 8.glue 9.baby oil Note : The teacher should provide precautionary measures before letting the pupils taste any liquid. Caution : Never taste poisonous objects. Assessment Underline the correct word/s inside the parenthesis. 1. Perfume has a (good smell, bad smell). 2. The taste of orange juice is (sweet, salty). 3. Vinegar is ( sour, bitter). 4. Honey has (sweet, salty, ) taste. 5. Candies have ( sweet, bitter) taste. Assignment Let the pupils make an album of 10 pictures of different liquids cut out from old magazines. Have them describe the characteristics of each liquid. Chapter 3 : Characteristics of Gas
  30. 30. DRAFT April 10, 2014 18 A gas is another state of matter. It has no definite shape, thus it takes the shape of the container. We cannot see them but we can feel them. In this lesson, you will find the different characteristics of gas. Lesson 1: Characteristics of Gas according to the shape of the container Duration : 1 day Background Information Gases have no definite shape. They take the shape of the container. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe the characteristic of gases according to its shape. Materials 3 Balloons of different sizes and shapes Procedure 1. Review Ask: What are the different characteristics of liquids? B. Motivation / Presentation Show an inflated balloon to the pupils. Tell one of the pupils to blow air in it. Ask : If you will release the balloon from your hand, what will happen to it? Why? C.Lesson Proper 1. Divide the class into 4 groups. Get different shapes of balloons. Blow air into it. Observe what happens to the balloons. 2. Ask: a. What happen to the balloon as you blow air into it? b. What characteristic is shown by the balloon? c. What can you say about the shapes of the balloon ? Assessment Draw 5 balloons with different colors. Describe their shapes. Assignment
  31. 31. DRAFT April 10, 2014 19 List down 5 different gases found in the environment. Lesson 2: Characteristics of gases according to space they occupy Duration: 1 day Background Information Gas has no definite shape and volume. It takes the shape and volume of its container. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe the space occupy by the gases. Materials air fresheners Procedure A.Review B.Motivation/ Presentation Ask: Do you know the content of air freshener? C. Lesson Proper Show the illustration of the different air fresheners. Ask: If more gas is added on these containers, what will happen? 1. Prepare the materials a day before the lesson. Give some precautionary measure in handling the materials before the activity starts. 2. Ask the following questions: a. What is inside the empty glass? b. What happened to the paper towel ? to the Styrofoam? c. What does the activity shows? 3. Tell your pupils in group to blow air into the plastic bag. Add more air into it. What happen to the plastic bag? Assessment Get a plastic bag. Blow air into it. Add more air. Ask: What will happen to the plastic bag? Assignment Bring objects (solids, liquids etc.) found at home for our next lesson. Chapter 4. PROPER USE IN HANDLING COMMON SOLIDs, LIQUIDs, AND GASES FOUND AT HOME AND IN SCHOOL
  32. 32. DRAFT April 10, 2014 20 Overview This chapter presents proper use in handling common solids, liquids, and gases found in school and at home. Classifying materials as hazardous and non- hazardous are included in this chapter. By performing the activities, different process skills of the pupils like identifying, describing ways on the proper use and handling of hazardous materials are given emphasis in the lessons presented. Lesson 1: Common Solids, Liquids, and Gases Found at Home Duration: 2 days Background Information Different materials can be found at home. These maybe solids, liquids or gases. Each material has its intended use. Substances found in the home are important to humans. Objectives At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. Classify the materials found at home as solids, liquids, and gases ; and 2. describe their uses . Materials pictures of common materials found at home Procedure 1. Motivation / Presentation Ask: What are the common materials found in your home? Name as many as you can. Where can you find these materials? What are the things that you want to know about these substances? Use the KWL chart in this activity. 2. Lesson Proper 1. Divide the class into 5 groups. Let the pupils do activity in the LM. 2. Have the groups write in manila paper their answers. They may use the tabular form in activity 1 as guide. Post on the board the manila paper of each group. 3. After all groups have done the activity, one representative in each group will report their findings. Come up with common answers of the pupils. 4. Then, ask the following questions : 1. What can you say about the common materials found in your home? b. How did you classify them ?Are these materials important? Why?
  33. 33. DRAFT April 10, 2014 21 c.Could people live without these materials? Why? d.What do you think would life be without these materials? 2. Discuss with the pupils the following concept : 1. Different materials can be found at home. These materials may be solids, liquids, or gases. 2. Each material has its intended use. 3. Materials found in the home are important to human lives. Assessment Match the picture in column A with column B. Connect the letter to its correct picture using a line inside the box and write down if it is solid, liquid or gas. A B 1. a. Use as food It is ______________ 2. b. Use for cooking It is ___________________ 3. c. Disinfectant It is _________________ 4. d. Use for washing It is ________________ 5. e. Use for killing insects/pests
  34. 34. DRAFT April 10, 2014 22 It is __________________ (Note: You may use/ include any picture of materials found at home, if possible different from those already given/listed by the pupils. The pictures should be placed in column A.) Assignment Remind the pupils to bring empty containers of the following materials: 1. Bleaching liquid 2. Shampoo 3. Pesticide 4. Any toilet freshener 5. Mosquito coil empty box Lesson 2. Harmful Effects of Common Materials Found at Home Duration: 1 day Background Information It is important to encourage pupils to read the labels on products they use to become more “chemically literate” or aware of the hazards to avoid any accident. Keep in mind that most household cleaning products and pesticides are reasonably safe when used as directed, and that the level of toxicity of a product is dependent on the dose of the product used (never use more than the amount listed on the label) and the length of exposure to the product. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to identify the harmful effects of the common materials found at home and in school Materials Pocket chart Procedure 1. Review Call on some pupils to answer these questions: 1. What can you say about the common substances found in your home? Are these substances important? Why?
  35. 35. DRAFT April 10, 2014 23 1. Could people live without these materials? Why? 2. What do you think would life be without these materials? 2. Motivation / Presentation A family in a remote barrio made use of empty mineral water bottles as containers for their washing and drinking water. One day, the father filled in one empty bottle with kerosene to be used in the farm. While preparing other things, he left the bottle with kerosene on top of the table. Unknowingly, his little boy who was playing outside, came in the house, got the bottle and used its content in washing his hands. Suddenly, the little boy felt itchiness and got his hands irritated. Why do you think this happened? What was done wrong? 3. Lesson Proper 1. Let the pupils do Activity 2 in the LM (Group activity) 2. They will write on manila paper the materials in the table. (Refer to the tabular form in activity. Post on the board the manila paper of each group. 3. After the groups have done the activity, one representative in each group will report their findings. Come up with the common answers of the pupils by posting it in the pocket chart. Then ask the following questions : 1. What should you do in order to know if the material is hazardous or not? Why? Give emphasis on its harmful effects when not stored/ used properly. 2. Discuss some undesirable/deadly effects of some materials and emphasize the following concepts : 3. Materials maybe flammable, toxic, poisonous and corrosive to skin when not used properly. 4. Reading product labels is important in order to determine the hazards of materials to man and other living things. Assessment Write the hazards that the following materials may do to people when not used properly: 1. Disinfectant 2. Insecticides 1. LPG 4. Bleaching liquid 1. Muriatic Acid Assignment
  36. 36. DRAFT April 10, 2014 24 List down at least 2 reasons on what should you do in order to avoid accident brought about by the misuse of the materials that are commonly found at home? Lesson 3. Safety Measures in Using and Handling Harmful Materials Duration: 1 day Background Information Precautions are essential for safety in using the materials commonly found at home and in school. Never use more than the amount listed on the label of the product. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe the proper ways in using and handling harmful materials at home and in school. Materials pocket chart, pictures of precautionary measures in handling harmful materials Procedure 1. Review Ask: What should you do in order to know if the material is hazardous or not? Why? 2. Motivation / Presentation Say: If I will give you a liquid material which you do not know , what should you do first ? Why do you have to read the label first? 3. Lesson Proper 1. Let the pupils do activity 3 in the LM (Individual activity). 2. Tell them to write in their notebook. 3. After the class has done the activity, discuss the lesson then ask the following questions: 1. What are the proper ways of handling and using harmful materials found at home? 2. How does a material become harmful to humans and other living things? 3. What should one do in order to avoid accident? Give emphasis to its harmful effects when not used properly. 4. Discuss with the pupils the following concepts: 1. Precautions are essential for safety in using the materials commonly found at home and in school. 2. Never use more than the amount listed on the label of the product. Assessment
  37. 37. DRAFT April 10, 2014 25 Divide the class into 4 groups and let them have a role play on the safety measures in using and handling harmful materials at home or in school. Assignment List down at least 2 materials found in your home and write down the proper way in handling the material that you listed. Write in your activity notebook. Chapter 5: Changes in Materials Overview Matter exists in different forms: It maybe solid, liquid, and gas. These different materials (solids, liquids, and gases) change when heated or cooled. In this chapter, the pupils will learn about the changes that may happen to materials when they are heated or cooled or when there is a change in temperature. Activity 1 provides a simple activity that activates pupils’ prior knowledge and ideas about hot and cold materials. Activities 2 and 3 develop pupils’ skills in using, measuring and reading temperature of materials using laboratory thermometer and help them compare materials of different temperature. Activity 3 gives general ideas/concepts to pupils that when heat is added, the temperature of the material increases; but, when heat is removed, the temperature of the material decreases. These are basic ideas from where the concepts in the succeeding activities will be based and understood. Activities 4 to 8 develop the pupils’ understanding about the effects of the change in temperature on the material. It focuses on the idea that when materials are heated or cooled, they may change their forms: from solid to liquid, liquid to solid, liquid to gas, or gas to liquid, and solid to gas. Other materials expand or contract when heated or cooled. Lesson 1: Is it Hot or Cold? Duration: 1 day Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to tell whether the material is hot or cold. Materials
  38. 38. DRAFT April 10, 2014 26 flashcards/ Pictures or real hot and cold objects, manila paper, marker/pentel pen Procedure A.Motivation/ Presentation 1. Let the pupils do this simple activity: Feel your hands by placing them to your cheeks. What did you feel? (e.g. cold, warm, hot)? Now, rub your hands together for 15 times. Put them again to your cheeks. What did you feel? (e.g. cold, warm, hot)? Why did you feel such? (In this activity, let the pupils understand that in rubbing their hands together, heat is produced and the heat produced makes their hands warm.) So, can you now distinguish hot from cold materials. Today we will consider other materials you are familiar with and tell whether the material is hot or cold. B.Lesson Proper 1. Let the pupils do Activity 1. You may ask them to do the activity by group. (This is a simple activity that aims to activate pupils’ prior knowledge about hot and cold objects/ materials). 2. Give them the needed materials (manila paper, pentel pen, etc…) and instructions in doing the activity. Ask them too to present their output after 10 minutes. 3. During the reporter’s presentation of output, take note of their responses particularly to the questions in the activity. 4. Process pupil’s responses by giving focus to the pupils’ answers to the activity questions. The teacher should be able to solicit students’ prior knowledge or ideas about hot and cold materials. Though their ideas are not completely correct, they must be taken as input to the next lesson/ springboard for the discussion of the next lesson. Assessment
  39. 39. DRAFT April 10, 2014 27 Pupils’ activity outputs may be taken as a form of assessing their knowledge formatively. Take note that such assessment results should not be graded . Its purpose is just for the teacher to determine pupils’ prior knowledge as a springboard for the discussion of the next lesson. Assignment What could be the temperature of hot objects compared to cold objects? Lesson 2: Measuring the Temperature of Hot/ Warm Material Duration: 2 days Background Information A thermometer is used to measure the temperature of a material. The commonly used laboratory thermometer uses fluid, usually alcohol or mercury that rises up or expands when heated. The temperature of the material tells whether the material is hot or cold. It is usually measured in degrees Celsius (0C). Below are some precautionary measures to be observed in using a laboratory thermometer: 1. Level the alcohol (alcohol thermometer) to set it to normal temperature reading. 2. If the laboratory thermometer is not set to normal temperature reading, shake it until it turns to normal temperature reading. 3. Try to use it by getting the temperature reading of tap water. 4. Keep the thermometer in an upright (not tilted) position when taking a reading.
  40. 40. DRAFT April 10, 2014 28 5. The bulb of the thermometer should be surrounded from all sides by the substance of which the temperature is to be measured. 6. The bulb should not touch the surface/ bottom of the container. The temperature of hot/warm water is higher than the temperature of tap water (room temperature). Objectives At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. measure the temperature of tap water and hot/warm water using a thermometer; 2. read the temperature from the thermometer correctly; and 3. compare the temperature of tap water and hot/warm water. Materials 2 beakers/ identical glass containers laboratory thermometer equal amounts of hot/warm water and tap water Procedure 1. Review Yesterday, we identified some materials that are hot and cold. Cite 2 examples of hot materials you found at home. 2. Motivation/ Presentation 1. Show the class 2 containers filled with water. Place them on the table. Label each container as container 1, and container 2. (Note: Container 1 contains warm water and container 2 contains tap water. But you don’t have to tell the class that they contain such.) 2. Call some pupils. Tell them to do this activity: 1. Dip your right hand fingers into container 1 and your left hand fingers into container 2, at the same time. Then ask: What did you feel when you dip your finger in container 1? What did you feel when you dip your finger in container 2? (Pupils answers may vary. Pupils would say that the water in container 1 is hot or warm. But, they might describe what they feel in container 2 differently. Pupils’ descriptions for water in container 2 could be cold, less hot, normal, etc….)
  41. 41. DRAFT April 10, 2014 29 Hence, the teacher should let the pupils realize that their sense of touch would not give accurate measure of how hot or cold the material is, and that a certain device is needed to measure how hot or cold the material is. Then, ask: What is the instrument that measures the hotness or coldness of the material ? (Thermometer) Today, we will investigate and understand more about heat and temperature. We will perform an activity that will help us understand how to use the thermometer and how to measure the temperature of materials using thermometer. We will also compare the temperature of tap water and hot/warm water, and describe the effect of heat on the material. 2. Lesson Proper 3. Orient first the pupils with the parts and kinds of thermometer, the scale used, the proper way of using it, and some precautionary measures in using laboratory thermometer. (Please refer to background information section). 4. In this activity, glass container will be used for warm water. Be reminded that an ordinary bottle cannot be used for boiling water. 5. Briefly, discuss with the pupils the procedure of the activity. 6. Divide the pupils into 5 small groups. Give them the materials needed, and other necessary instructions in accomplishing the task (i.e. time limit in doing the activity, group output reporting/ output presentation, etc…) 7. Solicit some questions from the pupils to clarify some activity concerns before asking them to perform the activity. 8. Let the pupils perform Activity 2. Supervise/ guide them as they do the activity. 9. Let each group report their activity results. 10. Discuss and process their answers to the questions. The following important ideas should be emphasized and understood by the pupils:
  42. 42. DRAFT April 10, 2014 30 1. Thermometer is a device used to measure the hotness or coldness of an object. 2. The normal room temperature ranges from 20 0C - 25 0C. The average room temperature is 23 0C. 3. The temperature of hot/warm water is higher than the temperature of tap water (room temperature) and vice-versa. 4. Heat added to the material increases the temperature of the material. Assessment (Note: Tell the pupils that the diagram is just a portion of the whole thermometer 1. What is the temperature indicated in the thermometer below? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
  43. 43. DRAFT April 10, 2014 31 2. Complete the statement below. 6. The temperature of hot water is ___________________ than the temperature of tap water. Assignment Compare the temperature of ice to the temperature of boiling water? Write your answer on your notebook. Lesson 3: Measuring the Temperature of Cold Material Duration: 2 days Objectives At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. measure the temperature of tap water and cold water using a thermometer; 2. compare the temperature of tap water and cold water ; and 3. read the temperature from the thermometer correctly. Materials 2 beakers/ identical glass containers laboratory thermometer equal amounts of cold water and tap water Procedure A.Review Ask: What can you say about the temperature of ice as compared to the temperature of boiling water? B.Motivation/ Presentation Today, we will be doing an activity that will help you compare the temperature of tap water and cold water, and describe the effect of removing heat from the material. C.Lesson Proper
  44. 44. DRAFT April 10, 2014 32 1. Divide the pupils into small groups. 2. Give them the materials needed. Remind them of the proper way of using laboratory thermometer. 3. Give other necessary instructions in accomplishing the task (i.e. time limit in doing the activity, group output reporting/ output presentation, etc…) 4. Let the pupils perform Activity 3. Supervise/ guide them as they do the activity. 5. Let the group presenter/reporter presents the activity results. 6. Discuss and process their answers to the questions in the activity. The following important ideas should be emphasized and understood by the pupils: 1. The temperature of cold water is lower than the temperature of tap water (room temperature) and vice- versa. 2. Heat when removed from the material lowers the temperature of the material. Assessment The activity output of the pupils may be considered in assessing them formatively. Assignment 1. .What is the temperature of tap water? What is the temperature of cold water? 2. How will you compare the temperature of tap water with that of cold water? (The temperature of tap water is higher than the temperature of cold water, or the temperature of cold water is lower than the temperature of tap water). 3. What is the effect of removing heat from the water? (Heat removed from the water decreases the temperature of the water.)
  45. 45. DRAFT April 10, 2014 33 Lesson 4: What Happens when a Candle Wax is heated or Cooled? Duration: 2 days Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe the candle wax when heated and cooled. Materials small piece of candle wax, big spoon, thick cloth, candle small piece of wood, match Procedure 1. Review Ask the pupils the following questions to recall the idea/concept that heat affects the temperature of the material: 1. What can you say about the temperature of the material when heat is added to it? (Increases) 2. What can you say about the temperature of the material when heat is removed from it? (Decreases) 3. Motivation/ Presentation Now, what do you think will be the effect of the increase or decrease in temperature on the material?............................ If the candle wax is heated or cooled, what do you think will happen to it?.......... This is what we will investigate today. 4. Lesson Proper 1. Divide the pupils into small groups. 2. Orient them with the materials that will be used in this activity. 3. Give some precautionary measures, i.e. do not touch any hot material because you might get burned, etc… 4. Let the pupils do the activity. 5. Discuss answers to the activity questions. Process pupils’ responses to arrive at the correct ideas/concepts.
  46. 46. DRAFT April 10, 2014 34 6. Help the pupils formulate generalization by asking these questions: (a) What happens to the candle wax when heated or when heat is added? and (b) What happens to the melted candle wax when cooled ? Let the pupils understand that: Heat causes a change in the appearance of the material. Initially, the candle wax is solid in form, but when heat is added, it melts. It changes from solid to liquid. However, when heat is removed or when the material is cooled, the melted candle wax becomes solid again. It changes from liquid to solid. 7. The teacher may ask the pupils to cite other examples of materials that change from solid to liquid when heated, or from liquid to solid when cooled. Assessment 1. A butter/ margarine is put in a frying pan over the stove for few minutes. What do you think will happen to the butter/margarine? Why? Assignment None Lesson 5: What Happens to Water When Heated? Duration: 2 days Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe what happens to water when heated. Materials water, iron stand/ring with clamp, tripod, wire gauze bunsen burner/ alcohol lamp, small plastic transparent container, marker
  47. 47. DRAFT April 10, 2014 35 Procedure 1. Motivation/ Presentation Have you observed your mother heating/ boiling water in the kettle? What did you observe while the water is boiling? What does it show? Today, we will do an activity that will help us describe what happens to water when heated. 2. Lesson Proper 3. Divide the pupils into 5 small groups. Give them the materials needed, and other necessary instructions in accomplishing the task (i.e. time limit in doing the activity, group output reporting/ output presentation, etc…) 4. Let the pupils do activity 5. 5. Let the group reporter presents the group output. 6. Check pupils’ answers to the activity questions. Process their responses to correct misconceptions if there are and to arrive at the correct ideas/concepts. 7. Help the pupils formulate generalization by asking: What is the effect of heat on the water? What happens to the water when heated? Let the pupils understand that: Water when heated increases its temperature. It makes water change its form from liquid to gas (vapor) when it starts to boil. Hence, you observed that the amount or level of water is decreased after heating, because some water evaporates as vapor (steam). Water vapor is formed when liquid (water) is changed to gas. 8. Ask the pupils to give other examples of materials that change from liquid to gas when heated.
  48. 48. DRAFT April 10, 2014 36 9. To apply the concept learned, ask: If you want your wet clothes to dry quickly, where should you hang them? Why? Assessment Your mother is boiling water in a kettle for your coffee. What do you think will happen if she leaves the water boiling for a long time? Why? Lesson 6: What Happens to Water Vapor when Cooled? Duration: 2 days Background Information Water vapour is a gaseous form water. It is formed when water starts to boil . When water vapor (gas) is cooled, it is changed to liquid. This can be shown in this simple experiment , when you put ice cubes and salt in the jar, the salted ice in the jar quickly makes the sides of the jar very cold. When water vapor is cooled, it changed to liquid (water droplets). The water droplets that you saw in the outside surface of the jar came from the water vapor in the air that touches the jar. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe what happens to water vapor when cooled. Materials ice cubes, glass jar with lid, tablespoon, table salt (rock salt) Procedure 1. Review Recall: What happens to water when heated? Why? (The teacher should help the pupils recall the idea that when water is heated, it changes its form from liquid to solid.) B.Motivation/ Presentation
  49. 49. DRAFT April 10, 2014 37 When water is heated, it changes its form from liquid to gas. How about when water is cooled, what do you think will happen?..... This is the focus of our lesson today. 2. Lesson Proper 3. Divide the pupils into 5 small groups. 4. Orient them with the materials that they will use in the activity. Tell them to make sure that the bottle is clean and dry. 5. Give them necessary instructions in accomplishing the task (i.e. time limit in doing the activity, group output reporting/ output presentation, etc…) 6. Let the pupils do activity 6. 7. Let the group reporter presents their output. 8. Check pupils’ answers to the activity questions. Process their responses to correct misconceptions if there are and to arrive at the correct ideas/concepts. 9. Help the pupils formulate generalization by asking: What happens to the water vapor when cooled? Let the pupils understand that: When water vapor is cooled, it changes to liquid (water droplets). 10. Give some applications or situations showing that gas is changed to liquid, i.e. the water droplets that collect on a shower door following a hot bath or shower, the moisture that appears on the outside of a cold water bottle or glass, or the droplets and fog that appear on a window during a rain shower. Assignment Bring naphthalene ball if you have at home for our next lesson. Lesson 7: What Happens to Naphthalene Ball when Heated? Duration: 2 days Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe what happens to naphthalene ball when heated.
  50. 50. DRAFT April 10, 2014 38 Materials small piece of camphor crystal or naphthalene ball l, 2 identical colored saucers,piece of stone, piece of cloth Procedure 1. Review/ Motivation We learned from our previous activities/ lessons that when heat is added, a solid material can be changed to liquid, and a liquid material can be changed to gas. Can a solid material be changed to gas when heat is added to it?... Let’s find this out as we perform the activity. 2. Lesson Proper 3. Divide the pupils into small groups. 4. Give them the materials needed. Naphthalene ball crystal is available at the drug store. It is safer to use a camphor crystal than mothball. However, if camphor crystal is not available, a mothball can be used. Use colored saucers instead of white saucer to be able to see the pounded camphor crystal clearly, and get a good observation of the activity. 5. Give some precautionary measures in using naphthalene ball or mothball, i.e. Do not eat the crystal, avoid contact to skin/eyes, use handkerchief to cover your mouth/nose, etc… 6. Let the pupils do the activity. Teacher supervision is much needed. 7. Give them necessary instructions in accomplishing the task (i.e. time limit in doing the activity, group output reporting/ output presentation, etc…) 8. Let the pupils do activity 7. 9. Let the group reporter presents the activity output.
  51. 51. DRAFT April 10, 2014 39 10. Check pupils’ answers to the activity questions. Process their responses to correct misconceptions if there are and to arrive at the correct ideas/concepts. 11. Help the pupils formulate generalization by asking: What happens to naphthalene ball when cooled? Let the pupils understand that: When naphthalene ball is heated, it changes from solid (camphor crystal) to gas (vapor) without passing the liquid form/state. 12. Give some applications or situations showing that solid is changed to gas when heated, i.e. solid toilet deodorizer solid air freshener, incense, naphthalene balls, dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) Assessment Answer the following questions : 1. Did you notice any change in the appearance of the naphthalene in saucer 1 and saucer 2? Why? 2. What does this observation tell you? 3. What is the effect of heat on the naphthalene ball? Assignment None Lesson 8: What Happens to the Air Inside the Bottle/Balloon when Heated or Cooled? Duration: 2 days Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to describe what happens to the air inside the bottle/balloon when it is heated or cooled. Materials glass bottle (with narrow mouth), balloon, 2 small basins, hot water, cold water Procedure 1. Motivation/ Presentation
  52. 52. DRAFT April 10, 2014 40 Have you noticed some vendors selling beautiful and big balloons during fiesta?..... To attract customers, some vendors stand under the heat of the sun for a long time. Can you guess what may happen to some balloons? .... Some balloons may burst. Why did this happen? Today, we will do an activity that would help us describe what happens to the air inside the balloon when it is heated or cooled. 2. Lesson Proper 3. Divide the pupils into 5 small groups. 4. Give them the materials needed, and other necessary instructions in accomplishing the task (i.e. time limit in doing the activity, group output reporting/ output presentation, etc…) 5. With the guidance/supervision of the teacher, let the pupils do the activity. 6. Let the group reporter presents the activity output. 7. Check pupils’ answers to the activity questions. Process their responses to arrive at the correct ideas/concepts. Clarify misconceptions if there are. 8. Help the pupils formulate generalization by asking these questions: (a) What happens to the air inside the bottle/balloon when it is heated?, and (b) What happens to the air inside the bottle/balloon when it is cooled? Let the pupils understand that: As the air inside the bottle/ balloon heats up, air starts to expand making also the balloon to expand. But, when the air is cooled, it causes the balloon to contract/shrink. So here, we could say that addition of heat (increase in temperature) makes the balloon expand, and removal of heat (decrease in temperature) makes the balloon contract/shrink.
  53. 53. DRAFT April 10, 2014 41 9. Ask the pupils to cite other examples of materials that expand when heated or contract when cooled. 10. Applying the concept we learned from the activity, why does the balloon get burst when placed under the heat of the sun for a long time? Assessment As shown in the drawing, what happen to the air balloon when heated? Why? (When air is heated, it expands causing the balloon to rise) Assignment Draw on a bond paper 5 living things found in the environment. Unit Test (Sample Only) A. Direction: Write True if the statement is correct and False if the statement is wrong. _______ 1. A ripe papaya is yellow. _______ 2. Cotton is white. _______ 3. A basketball is brown. _______ 4. A ripe mango is green. _______ 5. Solid is a state of matter that has no definite shape. B. Read each sentence carefully. Choose the correct texture of solid in the parenthesis and write your answer in your notebook. 1. The rambutan’s peeling is (rough, smooth, soft, hard). 2. The cotton is (rough, smooth, soft, hard). 3. The pillow is (rough, smooth, soft, hard). 4. The baby’s skin is (rough, smooth, soft, hard). 5. The surface of the rocks have (hard, soft, smooth, rough. )
  54. 54. DRAFT April 10, 2014 42 C. Study the solids in column A. Match the size of solid in column B. Write the correct size in your notebook. A B Solid Long Short 1. Ampalaya 2. Okra 3. Tape Measure 4. Ruler 5. Paper Clip D. Draw a happy face if the liquid has a good smell and a sad face If the liquid has a bad smell. _______1. fish sauce _______2. perfume _______3. alcohol _______4. soy sauce _______5. cologne 11. Write down how the following liquids flow. Choose the letter of the correct answer and write it on your notebook. _______6. water a. slow b. fast c. very fast _______7. softdrinks a. slow b. fast c. very fast _______8. catsup a. slow b. fast c. very fast _______9. syrup a. slow b. fast c. very fast ______10. shampoo a. slow b. fast c. very fast F. Study the liquids in column A. Write the correct taste of liquid in your notebook. Choose your answer in column B. A B ___1. pineapple juice a. bitter ___2. fish sauce b. salty ___ 3. wine c. sweet
  55. 55. DRAFT April 10, 2014 43 __ 4. vinegar d. sour __ 5. water e. tasteless G.Look at the pictures below. In your notebook, copy the name of the materials and classify them as solid, liquid or gas. object solid liquid gas 1. milk 2. rambutan 3. rain 4. smoke 5. papaya H.Write T if the statement is true or correct and F if the statement is false or not correct. _______1. When you blow your hand air evaporates. _______2. Air takes the shape of the balloon.
  56. 56. DRAFT April 10, 2014 44 _______3. LPG is a kind of gas. _______4. Deodorizer may change its size. ______ 5. Gas occupies space. ______ 6. Smoke is in a solid state. ______ 7. Wind is moving air. ______ 8. When water vapor is cooled it condensed and turns to liquid. ______ 9. Air freshener takes the shape of the container. ______ 10. Mothballs will dissapear if its in a dry place. 1. Study the pictures/symbols on the left. Match them with their characteristics or description on the right. Write the letter of your answer on your paper. 1. a. toxic 2. b. poisonous 3. c. flammable 4. d. harmful mate 5. e. radioactive material
  57. 57. DRAFT April 10, 2014 45 J. Read each sentence carefully. Draw a happy face  if it is a proper way of using and handling common harmful substances, and a sad face  if it is NOT. 1. Keep flammable substances like gasoline and alcohol near the fire. 2. See to it that LPG tank is properly closed after use. 3. Do not play with insecticides /pesticides. 4. Be careful in using kerosene, insecticides, pesticides, and fertilizer. 5. Always wash your hands after using them. 6. Avoid tasting or playing with unknown liquid. 7. Always read labels of chemicals before using them. 8. Unplug electric appliances with wet hands. 9. Unplug electric iron and stove after using them. 10. Keep poisonous chemicals safe in a separate cabinet away from reach of children. 1. Study the pictures below. Describe the temperature of the materials in pictures 1 and 2? (Teacher will provide) Picture 1 Picture 2 Answer ____________________________________________________ 1. If you put a cup of water in a kettle, and place it over the flame in few minutes, what will happen to the water? Why? The water gets ________________ because its temperature ____________________. 2. After few minutes of heating the cup of water in the kettle, what will happen to the water when you remove it from the flame/fire? Why?
  58. 58. DRAFT April 10, 2014 46 The water gets ________________ because its temperature ____________________. 3. What will happen to the water inside the plastic bag when placed inside the freezer of the refrigerator? Answer: ____________________________________________________ 4. What will happen to the mothballs/naphthalene balls when placed in a closet/cabinet for 2 weeks? Answer: ____________________________________________________ 5. What will happen to the balloon when placed in a very cold place? Answer: ____________________________________________________ 6. What will happen to the ice cubes when placed under the heat of the sun? 7. What will happen to the water when placed under the heat of the sun for 30 minutes? 8. What will happen to the soy sauce in the pan when heated?
  59. 59. DRAFT April 10, 2014 47 9.What will happen to the wet clothes after hanging them outside (under the heat of the sun) for 1 day? UNIT 2: LIVING THINGS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT OVERVIEW The world of living things is made up of humans, animals and plants. Living things are alike and different in many ways. You will learn in this unit that living things help or harm one another. Eyes, ears, nose, tongue and skin are the sense organs. Eyes for sight, ears for hearing, nose for smell, tongue for taste and skin for feeling. Plants in the surroundings help make air fresh, clean and healthy. Plants are useful to humans. Plants have parts and have functions. Animals are found in different habitats. Some animals live on land, some in water, while others live both on land and water. Body part s of animals are adapted to their habitats. Some animals are useful to humans. They give food like meat and eggs. Some animals provide substances that are used in making medicine. Healthy parents are more likely to have healthy children. A mother who becomes sick before the baby is born may pass the sickness to the unborn baby. This shows that heredity is one of the causes of poor health. Heredity means the passing of a certain characteristics from the parents to their children. Chapter 1: Sense Organs Lesson 1: The Eyes Duration: 2 days Background Information
  60. 60. DRAFT April 10, 2014 48 Our eyes help us to see. It has different parts that work together so we can see things around us namely cornea, iris, pupil, lens, retina and optic nerve. Each has specific function. We should take care of our eyes in many ways. Read and work under good light. When reading, raise your eyes from the page once in a while. Do not read in a moving car or vehicle. Do not rub your eyes with dirty fingers or dirty handkerchief. Wash the eyes by opening and closing them in the water. The use of sharp or pointed objects may harm the eyes. Be careful when using pair of scissors, knives, and sticks. Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. identify the parts of the eyes; and 2. identify proper ways of caring the eyes. Materials a big poster of the parts of the eyes Procedure A.Motivation / Presentation Let the pupils stand and get a partner and say:  Look at the eyes of your partner. Draw the parts that you see. Give the pupils 10 min to do it.  Compare your drawing with your partner.  What do you want to know about your eyes? B. Lesson Proper 1. Let the pupils do Activity 1. Give them 10 minutes to do the activity. 2. Using the enlarged picture of the human eye posted on the board, ask the following questions :  Compare your labelled parts of the eyes which you did in the activity and the labelled parts in the enlarged picture.( The pupils are expected to have the same labelled parts which they did in the activity compared to the enlarged picture of the human eyes)  What are the parts of the eyes that we can see? (The parts of the eyes are the cornea, pupil and the iris.)  What are the inner parts of the eyes that you cannot see in a mirror? (Lens, retina, and optic nerve.)  What is the work of each part of the eye?  The cornea serves as the transparent covering of the eye.  The pupil serves as the opening where light enters.
  61. 61. DRAFT April 10, 2014 49  The lens focuses light and projects the image on the retina.  The retina is where the image that is seen is focused.  The optic nerve sends messages to the brain.  How do we able to see objects? (We can see objects whenever there is light. Light is needed in order to see things. The light from a source falls into the object and then reflected to our eyes. Thus, we are able to see the object.)  How would you feel if you have your poor eyesight? ( I would feel difficulty in seeing all things around me) 3. Let the pupils do activity 2. Give them 5 minutes to do the activity. 4. After doing activity 2, ask the following questions :  Which pictures do not show proper ways of caring the eyes? (The pictures showing reading in a dark room and watching very near the television)  Why do we have to avoid these practices? (These practices can harm our eyes. Reading in the dark makes the eyes work harder and become tired.)  Which pictures show proper way of caring the eyes? (The pictures showing wearing sunglasses on a sunny day and using goggles when swimming.)  Why are these practices good to do? (Wearing sunglasses protects the eyes from too much light. Wearing goggles gives protection from particles in water that may cause irritation of our eyes.)  Why should we need to take care of our eyes? (Our eyes help us see things around us. It helps us to learn about the things around us. Our eyes need to be taken cared of to maintain good eyesight until old age.)  What are other ways of taking care of our eyes?  Avoid placing pointed objects near the eyes.  Read with sufficient light.  Eat foods rich in vitamin A such as green and yellow vegetables.  Do not read while riding in a moving vehicle.  Rest your eyes after reading for a long period.  Avoid rubbing the eyes. When dirt gets in or when it is itchy, use clean running water to rinse the eyes.  What should you do if you notice any problem with your eyes? (Consult a doctor who is an eye specialist, if you have problem with your eyes.) Assessment I. Match column A with column B. Write the letter before each number. A B _____1. Cornea a. Focuses light and projects the image on the retina _____2. Pupil b. Sends messages to the brain
  62. 62. DRAFT April 10, 2014 50 _____3. Lens c. The transparent covering of the eye _____4. Retina d. Where the image that is seen is focused _____5. Optic nerve e. The opening where light enters II. Put a [] on the box if it shows a proper way of caring the eyes and put a [x] if it is not.  1. Reading with sufficient light  2. Rubbing eyes with hands when itchy  3. Resting eyes after reading for a long period  4. Looking at the Sun directly  5. Consult a doctor when having eye problem Assignment 1. Find out who wears eyeglasses in your family. Ask the reasons why they are using eyeglasses. 2. Is playing computer games for a long period good to your eyes? What should you do to take care of your eyes? Lesson 2: The Ears Duration: 3 days Background Information None Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. identify the parts of the ears and its function, and 2. identify proper ways of caring the ears Materials a big poster of the parts of the ears Procedure A. Review Ask:
  63. 63. DRAFT April 10, 2014 51  What sense organ would you use to see the parts of your ears?  Would you be able to study the parts of the ears without your eyes? Why? B. Motivation / Presentation Let the pupils stand, get a partner and say:  Look at the ears of your partner. Draw the parts that you see. Give the pupils 10 min to do it.  Compare your drawing with your partner.  What do you want to know about your ears? C. Lesson Proper 1. Let the pupils do activity 3. Give them 10 minutes to do the activity. 2. Using the enlarged picture of the ears posted on the board, ask the following questions:  Were you able to name correctly the parts of the ear that you draw.  What are the parts of the ears that you see? (The part of the ear that I can see are the pinna, and the opening of the ear canal)  What are the parts of the ear that you cannot see? (The rest of the ear canal, ear drum, the three little bones- hammer, anvil and stirrup, cochlea, and auditory nerve.)  What is the work of each part of the ears? 3. Let the pupils do activity 4. Give them 10 minutes to do the activity 4. Using the enlarge picture of the ear, let the pupils trace the path of sound as it enters the pinna. 5. Explain the path of sound from pinna to the brain. Ask the following questions:  Why do you think the pinna and the eardrum are shaped like a funnel? (The shape of the pinna helps in collecting the sound and focusing it towards the ear canal.)  What happens to the eardrum when sound reaches it? (The eardrum vibrates as sound hits it. From here the sound is amplified.)  What happens to the amplified sound from the eardrum? (The amplified sound pass through the three small bones - hammer, anvil and stirrup. The cochlea detects the vibration and sends the message to the brain through the auditory nerve.)) pinna Ear canal Eardrum 3 small bones cochlea nerve
  64. 64. DRAFT April 10, 2014 52 6. Let the pupils perform activity 5. Give them 10 minutes to do the activity. 7. Ask the pupils the following questions :  What are the proper ways of caring the ears which you marked check in your activity? (The proper ways are: using clean cloth in wiping the outer ear and having a doctor check the ears for any problem.)  Why are these ways good to do for our ears? (The ears should only be cleaned in the outside using a clean cloth. It is not proper to insert objects inside the ear to avoid damaging it. Whenever there is a problem about the ears, it is best to consult a doctor.  What are ways that you should avoid? (Listening to loud music and inserting sharp objects in the ear.)  Why do you have to avoid doing these? (Sharp objects could hurt the ears especially the inner parts like the eardrum. Listening to very loud music may affect hearing.)  What other ways do you do to take good care of your ears?  Never put anything inside the ear  Avoid very noisy places.  Listen to not too loud radio or music, even when watching television  Consult a doctor when there is a sudden loss of hearing . Assessment I. Match column A with column B. Write the letter before each number. A B _____1. Pinna a. Transmit sounds to the auditory nerve _____2. Ear canal b. Sends message to the brain _____3. Eardrum c. Collects sounds _____4. Cochlea d. Where sound travels from pinna to the ear drum _____5. Auditory nerve e. Vibrates when sound hits it II. Put a [] on the box if it shows a proper way of caring the ears and put a [x] if it is not.  1. Avoiding noisy places
  65. 65. DRAFT April 10, 2014 53  2. Consulting a doctor when there is a problem about the ears and hearing  3. Cleaning the inside of the ears with cotton buds  4. Turning the volume high when listening to music  5. Using earmuffs when in a place with loud sounds. Assignment 1. Why are the ears important? 2. What can happen if the sense of hearing is impaired? Lesson 3: The Nose Duration : 2 days Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. identify the parts of the nose and its function; and 2. Identify proper ways of caring the nose. Material big Picture of a nose Procedure Review Post the enlarge drawing of the ear. Ask: Why are our ears important? Trace the path of sound as it enters the outer ear to the inner ear and then to the brain for interpretation. Motivation/Presentation Ask the following questions:  How can you tell what your mother is cooking?  What sense organ do you use in smelling?  Can you tell the parts of your nose? What do you like to study about your nose? (Post questions on the pocket chart. Lesson Proper 1. Let the pupils do activity 6. Give them 10 minutes to do the activity. 2. After doing activity 6, ask the following questions:  Look at the drawing of your classmates. Do you have the same drawing of the nose?  What are the parts of the nose that we can see? (The part of the nose that we see are the two holes of the nose called the nostrils.)
  66. 66. DRAFT April 10, 2014 54  What are the inside parts of the nose? (The nasal cavity and inside it are the nerve cells.)  What is the function of each part of the nose?  The nostrils receive the scents carried by air. Hairs are present on the nostrils which filter the air that gets through your nose.  The nasal cavity secretes mucus which further cleans the air.  The nerves in the nasal cavity send messages to the brain which interprets what we have smelled.  What can happen if the sense of smelling is impaired? (You will not be able to smell the odor or scents of things.) 3. Let the pupils do Activity 7. Give them 10 minutes to do the activity 4. Ask the pupils the following questions :  What are the proper ways of caring the nose which you marked check in your activity? (The proper ways are: covering the nose while passing by a dusty road and using a clean handkerchief or cloth in cleaning the nose)  Why do you have to care for your nose?  Which are NOT the proper ways to do in your nose? (Using sharp objects to clean the nose and blowing hard.)  Why do you have to avoid doing these? (It can harm the nose.)  What are other ways of taking care of your nose?  Not inserting small objects inside the nose  Seek doctors help when an object is inserted in the nose Assessment I. Match column A with column B. Write the letter before each number. A B _____1. Nostrils a. Carries the messages to the brain so the person will know what he smelled _____2. Nasal cavity b. Opening of the nose _____3. Nerves c. Secretes a sticky mucus which trap dust, dirt and germs carried by inhaled air II. Put a [] on the box if it shows a proper way of caring the nose and put a [x] if it is not.  1. Inserting small objects inside the nose  2. Consulting a doctor when there is discomfort with our nose  3. Cleaning the inside of the nose with sharp objects  4. Covering the nose when passing a dusty road  5. Blowing the nose hard when with colds
  67. 67. DRAFT April 10, 2014 55 Assignment Answer the questions below: 1. Why is the nose important? 2. What can happen if the sense of smell is impaired or does not function well? Lesson 4: The Tongue Duration: 3 days Background Information None Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. describe the uses of the tongue; and 2. identify the parts and function of the tongue. Materials big picture/ illustration of the tongue, flow chart of how the parts of the tongue function, real food samples (ex. kalamansi, salt) Procedure A. Review What are the parts of a nose? B. Motivation/ Presentation Call a pupil. Blindfold him/her and let him/her taste the kalamansi juice. Let the pupil guess what the liquid is. (The class will tell whether the answer is correct) Remove the blindfold as soon . Ask the pupil:  How did you know that it was kalamansi juice? ( It tastes sour.)  What did you use to taste it?( My tongue.) Ask the class: Do you know how our tongue functions? C. Lesson Proper 1. Tell the class to bring out their mirrors. Let them do activity 8 in their LM individually first. Remind them to be careful in using and handling a mirror. 2. After answering the activity, divide the class into groups. Let the class compare and discuss their answers. Tell them to report their answers to the class.
  68. 68. DRAFT April 10, 2014 56 3. Ask 1-2 members of the group to report their work in class. Discuss the answers to the activity. (You may use a big picture / an enlarged illustration of the parts of a tongue.) 4. Lead the pupils in developing these concepts:  Tongue is the sense organ that helps us taste all things we place inside our mouth.  The tongue has taste buds and nerves. 5. Discuss thoroughly how the tongue functions as stated in the activity. (You may use the pupil’s enlarged flow chart. ) 6. Let some pupils taste certain foods to demonstrate how the tongue functions. 7. Let the class check their answers to the activity. 8. Tell the class to do activity 9 in their LM. Check the answers to the activity. Let the pupils explain their answers. 9. Discuss with the class the following concepts:  Eating very hot food can scald the tongue.  It is proper to consult a doctor when the tongue has sores.  Use a tongue scraper to clean the tongue so as not to damage the taste buds.  Brushing teeth is important to avoid infection of the tongue and gums and prevent tooth decay. Assessment Ask: What are the parts of a tongue and their functions? What’s the importance of caring the tongue? Assignment The tongue needs to be cleaned from time to time. How do members of your family clean their tongue? Write their responses on your notebook. Lesson 5: The Skin Duration: 2 days Background Information None Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1.describe the uses of the skin; 2. identify the parts and function of the skin; and 3. show proper ways of caring for the skin. Materials big picture / Enlarged illustration of the parts of the skin, magnifying glass
  69. 69. DRAFT April 10, 2014 57 Procedure A. Review What are the parts of the tongue? How does the tongue works? B. Motivation/ Presentation Place familiar objects with different shape, textures and thickness inside the pouch. Let some pupils identify these objects by a: touching using gloves and b: touching without using gloves) Ask: In which situation ( a or b ,can you easily identify the objects? Why? What sense organ is involved in this activity? C. Lesson Proper 1. Distribute magnifying glass to the class. Discuss briefly the proper use of a magnifying glass. 2. Tell the pupils to do activity 10 as a group. 3. Tell the class to choose a leader to discuss the parts and function of the skin found in the LM. 4. Check the answers to the activity. 5. Discuss the following concepts:  Using magnifying lens, we can see tiny hairs and openings on our skin.  The skin is the outer covering of our body.  The skin protects the body from losing too much water, injuries and infection.  The skin helps maintain body temperature.  The skin consists of two layers:  Epidermis: outer layer of the skin on the surface on which dead skin cells are found.  Dermis: inner layer of the skin which contains blood vessels, nerves, sweat glands and oil glands.  The sweat glands open to the surface of the skin through the pore.  The oil glands keep the hair and skin soft and moist.  The skin has nerve endings that sense touch, pain, pressure, and temperature.  The nerves send messages to the brain which interprets the message and we feel the objects. 6. Discuss also how the skin works. 7. Tell the pupils to do activity 11 in their LM individually. 8. Check and discuss the answers to the activity. Let the pupils explain their answers. 9. Tell the class:  It is good to take a bath everyday to avoid body odor.  Walking barefoot can harm the skin of your feet.  Wear clean clothes for personal hygiene.
  70. 70. DRAFT April 10, 2014 58  Drink plenty of water to make the skin fresher. Assessment What are the parts and functions of the skin? How do we take care of the skin? Assignment Name animals found in the community.
  71. 71. DRAFT April 10, 2014 59 Chapter 2 : Animals Overview The pupils studied about their sense organs in Chapter 1 of Unit II. They described the parts and functions of the sense organs of the human body and they were encouraged to practice good health habits to take care of their eyes, ears, nose, tongue and skin. From a lesson on the human body, the pupils will now move to a lesson on the other living thing in their environment, the animals. In chapter 2, pupils will learn that they share many things in common with animals by describing animal body parts and their functions. The pupils will also be able to classify animals based on some observable characteristics like body covering, food they eat, how they move, and their habitat. Furthermore, pupils should also be made to realize the importance of animals to humans by identifying their usefulness. However, they should also learn that there are also animals that could bring harm because they carry disease or they could inflict injuries. Finally, the pupils must be able to describe ways of proper handling of animals. This is important because it promotes animal welfare and prevention of injuries and fatal accidents. Process skills involved in the activities include observing, communicating (writing), describing and classifying. Lesson 1: Animals in the Environment Duration: 1 day Background Information There are different kinds of animals. Different kinds of animals live in different places. Some animals live in land and some live in water and some live on both places. Animals such as chicken, goat, sheep, pig, and cow can be found in a farm. Animals like lion, tiger, elephant, and giraffe can live in the wild or in the zoo. Animals such as the different fishes, whale, and stingray live in bodies of water. Some of the animals (cat, dog, and rabbit) live in the house because they are pets. Objective At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to identify common animals found in the environment Materials Pictures of animals Procedure A. Review
  72. 72. DRAFT April 10, 2014 60 Ask the pupils:  Look around. What do you see? What sense organ do you use to see things around you?  Listen. What do you hear? What sense organ do you use to hear? B. Motivation/Presentation 1. Let the pupils sing the song “Old McDonald had a Farm.” Old McDonald had a Farm E – I – E – I – O And on his farm he had some chicks, E – I – E – I – O With a chick, chick here And a chick, chick there, here a chick, there a chick, Everywhere a chick, chick. Old MacDonald had a farm, E – I – E – I – O (Replace the animals with the following:) Duck – quack, quack Cat – meow, meow Pig – oink, oink Cow – mooo, mooo Frog – ribbit, ribbit Bird – chirp, chirp Horse – neigh, neigh Bee – bzzz, bzzz 2. Ask the pupils to recite the names of the animals mentioned in the song. 3. Explain to the pupils:Many kinds of animals live in the same environment with humans. Lesson Proper 1. Let the pupils do Activity 1. Give them 10 minutes to answer the activity. 2. After 10 minutes, use pictures a – f of Activity 1 to identify the animals. 3. Post the pictures on the board one by one. 4. Ask one pupil to write below the picture the name of the animal. 5. Ask the class to describe the animal in the picture. The following questions may be asked to help the students in describing the animals.  Where can you find it?  Is it big? Is it small?  Can we keep it as a pet? 6. Post the pictures h – k of Activity 1 on the board. 7. Ask question in the activity sheet. 8. Write the pupils’ answers on the board.
  73. 73. DRAFT April 10, 2014 61 9. The following questions may be asked to help the pupils in describing the animals they listed as answers to question g.  Where can you find it?  Is it big? Is it small?  Can we keep it as a pet? 10. Ask the class to give other examples of animals and where the animals can be found. Ask the class to give a generalization. Examples:  There are different kinds of animals.  Different kinds of animals live in different places.  Some animals can be kept as pets, some help us in the farm, some provide us with food, some animals are helpful to plants, while some are pests. Some animals can be dangerous to smaller animals, plants, and people. Assessment Complete the table by listing different kinds of animals found in different places. Animals found in the House Animals found in the Farm Animals found in the Zoo Animals found in the River and Ocean Assignment Each group will bring a picture of a frog, horse and bird for the next activity. Lesson 2: Body Parts of Animal Duration: 2 days Background Information There are different kinds of animals. They have body parts which they use for movement, eating, protection and adaptation to habitat. Some animals have similar body parts which can be used as bases for classifying them into groups. Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. identify the parts of some animals; and 2. group animals according to their body parts.
  74. 74. DRAFT April 10, 2014 62 Materials Large pictures of frog, horse , bird showing the body parts Procedure A. Review Relate the lesson on animals in the environment to the lesson on body parts of an animal. Ask the students: What animals do you have at home? What animals do you find in your garden? B. Motivation / Presentation 1. Write on the board the lyrics of the song “My Toes, My Knees.” My Toes, My Knees My toes, my knees, my shoulder, my head My toes, my knees, my shoulder, my head My toes, my knees, my shoulder, my head Let us clap our hands together. 2. Let the pupils sing the song “My Toes, My Knees.” 3. Ask the pupils to read and encircle parts of your body mentioned in the song. 4. Ask the class the question:  If we have these body parts - toes, knees, shoulder and head, what about the animals, do they also have these parts? Can you name animals which have these body parts? C. Lesson Proper 1. Let the pupils perform Activity 2 – Parts of an Animal. 2. After the pupils finished answering the activity, facilitate the processing of the activity. 3. Post on the board the large pictures of a frog, a horse and a bird. Ask the pupils to write on the board answers to the activity. 4. Ask question no. 4, “What body parts are common in a frog, a horse and a bird?” 5. After the pupils have answered, explain to the class that there are similarities and differences of body parts of many animals. 6. Ask the class to give a generalization. Generalization can be:  Animals have body parts which makes them similar or different from each other. Assessment (The pupils may be grouped together to answer the assessment.) Complete the table below by listing animals described in each column. The pupils can write as many answers as possible.
  75. 75. DRAFT April 10, 2014 63 Assignment Group together animals that have the same body parts dove dog maya bangus bee fly cow crocodile eagle goat tilapia spider butterfly carabao turtle Lesson 3: Classifying Animals according to Body Parts and their Uses Duration: 2 days Background Information Different animals use different parts of their body for movement. Having different body parts make the animals move in different ways. The horse and giraffe have long legs which they use for walking or running fast. Some have legs that are not very long but they can also walk or run very fast. The cheetah runs the fastest and the pronghorn follows in speed. Other animals like rabbits and kangaroos have bigger hind legs which aid in jumping. The legs of carabaos, dogs, horses and cows make them walk, run, gallop, or jump. Birds have wings for flying. Birds have a pair of legs and feet with sharp claws for clinging to branches of trees. Fishes have fins and tail for swimming. The long and strong legs of frogs enable them to jump while the webbed feet of ducks help them swim. Earthworms have pairs of bristles that help them crawl and cling to the walls of their burrows. Monkeys have long arms, legs, and tails that help them climb and swing from tree to tree. Millipedes and centipedes have many small legs to help them crawl. Crabs and lobsters use their legs in crawling and swimming. Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to: 1. describe how animals move; and 2. Identify the body parts that enable animals to move; Animals with 2 legs and wings Animals with 6 legs and wings Animals with 4 legs and horns Animals with gills and fins
  76. 76. DRAFT April 10, 2014 64 Materials picture/ video of animals Procedure A.Review Show a picture of an animal and ask the pupils to name its body parts. Ask the questions “What are these body parts for?” B.Motivation/Presentation Guessing Game: The class will play a guessing game. Tell the class the following instructions: a. One pupil will pick a piece of paper with the name of an animal written on it. b. The pupil should not tell the name of the animals instead he or she will act out how the animal moves. c. The rest of the class will raise their hands and guess the name of the animal. d. The first pupil to raise hand and guess the correct animal will earn a prize. e. Each pupil shall have at least 5 animals to name correctly. C.Lesson Proper Day 1 1. Let the pupils do Activity 3. Give them 10 minutes to do the activity. 2. Write the names of the animals on the board following the format and sequence of questions 1 and 2 of Activity 3. 3. Ask one pupil to identify the movement of each animal in question 1. 4. Do these for animals a – j of question 1. 5. Ask one pupil to identify the body part/s used by the animal for movement in question 2. 6. Do these for animals a – j of question 2. 7. Discuss to the class that animals have body parts that help them move. 8. Ask them to relate the body parts of animals to their movement. Questions for discussion:  The frog has flexible or springy legs. What movement can it make? What are other animals that show this movement? Do these animals have the same kind of legs? (Animals with flexible or springy legs can jump.}  Butterflies can fly. What enables them to fly? What other animals have these body parts and make them fly?  What kind of movement can an animal without legs make? Example: snake
  77. 77. DRAFT April 10, 2014 65 (Animals without legs like the snake can crawl with their body.)  What kind of movement can animals with legs make? Examples: spider, bird, duck (Animals with legs can walk, run, and crawl with their body.) 9. Ask the class to give a generalization. Examples:  Animals have body parts that enable their movement.  Animals move in different ways. Day 2 1. Let the pupils do Activity 4. Give them 10 minutes to do the activity. 2. Write the table on direction number 2. 3. Post the picture of each animal on the board. 4. Ask one student to write the name of the animal posted on the board on the correct column corresponding to the movement the animals make. 5. Let the pupils read the group of animals that walk or run, jump or hop, swim, fly, and crawl. 6. Discuss to the class that animals can be classified based on how they move. 7. Let the pupils make generalizations:  Animals can be grouped together based on their means of movement. Assessment Choose an animal without legs and an animal with legs. Observe the body parts that these animals use to move from one place to another. Draw the animals in your notebook. Show the part or parts that they use to move. Assignment Ask the pupils to draw their pets in their assignment notebooks. What is the food of your pet? Lesson 4: Body Parts of animals for food getting and for eating Body Covering of Animals Habitat of different animals Duration:4 Days Background Information Animals have body parts for food getting. Frogs and lizards use their long tongues to catch insects for food. Cows, carabaos, and horses have big and flat teeth to chew grass. Tigers, cats, and dogs have long and sharp teeth to tear food apart. Some insects like bees have proboscis to suck nectar from flowers. Chimpanzees and monkeys use their hands in getting food. Ostrich and
  78. 78. DRAFT April 10, 2014 66 chicken use their beaks and bills in getting food. Grasshoppers and spiders make use of their legs to get food. Different animals eat different types of food. Some animals have teeth and some others do not. Some animals have different types of teeth for food- getting. Some animals have sharp teeth or incisors for gnawing like the rats, hamsters, and rabbits. These incisors grow continuously. They are worn down through constant gnawing. When gnawing is prevented, the incisors grow so long that the animals cannot eat and die of hunger. The cats and dogs have smaller incisors but bigger canine teeth. These canine teeth are also called fangs. They use their fangs for tearing meat and their molars for chopping the meat into smaller portions so they would be small enough to swallow. The horses, sheep, and cows have more closely spaced and even – sized teeth. These work well in clipping off grasses and plant leaves. Animals have body parts which they use to protect themselves from weather and their enemies. All animals have skin to protect their bodies from different kinds of weather. Turtles, crabs, and lobsters have shells or carapace for protection from hard objects and attacks from enemies. Birds have feathers for protection from different weather conditions. Fish have scales to protect themselves. Insects have feelers or antennas that help them find their way. Cockroaches come out at night and use long feelers in the dark. Porcupines have spikes all over their body for protection against attackers. Some animals like polar bears have thick hair or fur for protection against cold weather. Cows, deer and carabaos have horns for protection against enemies. Some parts protect animals. The turtle hides inside its shell if it is in danger. The thick furs of polar bears protect it from the very cold climate in areas with snow. The habitat is the specific environment or place where an animal lives. There are different kinds of habitats. There are animals that live on land like cows and dogs. There are animals that live in water. There are different kinds of fish. They have gills for breathing under water and fins for swimming. Some live underground like ants, worms, and moles. Others live in high places like birds. They have wings for flying. There are those animals that can live on both land and water. These are the turtles, frogs, and crocodiles. Animals that live in the forest include lions, tigers, deer and large birds. There are animals that also live in the farm. These are the cows, carabaos, chickens, and goats. Some live in the house as pets. These are the dogs, cats, and rabbits. Objectives At the end of each lesson, the pupils should be able to:

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