Using NASA Data to Improve Young Adults' Climate and Science Literacy

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  • Place a comma between “hands-on” and “simpler.”
  • The Module 4 headline does not match the title in slide #4. Remove the word "to" before the word "Change." Initial cap "E" in the word "eruptions."
  • Initial cap the “A” in “Are” in the Module 1 title, the “I” in “Is” in the Module 3 title. Delete “to” in the Module 4 title. Initial cap the “C” in “Can in the Module 5 title. Delete “the” before the word “Scientists” in the Module 6 title, and initial cap the “A” in the word “Are.” GLOBAL QUERY: WHAT HAPPENED TO THE COLON AFTER THE WORD “Investigations” IN THE SUBHEAD? THERE SHOULD BE A COLON IN ALL CASES ON ALL SLIDES.
  • Initial cap the “A” in “Are” in the reversed-out subhead. In question 2, the article “the” should be removed and it should be rewritten ad “Earth’s system.” GLOBAL QUERY: WHAT HAPPENED TO THE COLON AFTER THE WORD “Investigations” IN THE SUBHEAD? THERE SHOULD BE A COLON IN ALL CASES ON ALL SLIDES.

Transcript

  • 1. CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida Climate Science Investigations (CSI): South Florida (SFL)Using NASA Data to Improve Young Adults’ Climate and Science Literacy Principal Investigator: Julie Lambert, Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University Co-Investigators: Robert Bleicher, Ph.D., California State University, Channel Islands Brian Soden, Ph.D., University of Miami Funded through NASA NASA Innovations in Climate Education (January 1, 2011 – December 31, 2013)
  • 2. Julie Lambert, Ph.D. Florida Atlantic University Brian Robert Soden, Ph.D., Univ Bleicher, Ph.D., California ersity of Miami State University, Channel Islands Shane Forsythe, Web Designer/Alana ProgrammerEdwards,Ph.D. studentin Geosciences Suzanne Smith Sundburg, Scienc e Writer/Editor (Camera Shy)Graduate ResearchAssistants: Anne Henderson Kevin Leichtman
  • 3. Overall ObjectiveDevelop and pilot online interactive modules that teach high schooland undergraduate students how to analyze and use NASA and otherdata to address the public’s questions and commonly heldmisconceptions about climate change.Total time: Approximately 9 weeks for entire curriculum.Pilot Audience:Undergraduate – Weather and Climate Courses at University of MiamiHigh School – Environmental Science Courses in Broward, Miami-Dade, Monroe, and Palm Beach Counties CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 4. Storyline SequenceModule 1 What Are the Foundations of Climate Science?Module 2 Is Earth Really Warming?Module 3 Is There Evidence of a Warmer Earth?Module 4 What Causes Climate Change?Module 5 How Can Climate Change Impact Earth?Module 6 Do Scientists Agree and What Are the Unknowns? CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 5. Instructional Approach for Each Module (Except Module 1 on the Fundamentals) • Module Overview – Learning Objectives • Pre-Assessment on Content Knowledge and Views • Introduction • Investigations Using time series and geospatial data Variety of supporting hands-on, simpler lesson plans/activities http://www.coe.fau.edu/faculty/lambert/ • Climate Scientists’ Explanations • Scientific Argumentation Practice • Post-Assessment
  • 6. Module 1. What Are the Foundations of Climate Science?Learning Objectives:• Explain the nature of scientific inquiry.• Explain the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry.• Differentiate between weather, climate, and extreme weather events.• Compare and contrast the layers of Earth’s atmosphere.• Explain the relationship between Earth’s energy budget and the global average temperature of Earth.• Differentiate between the natural greenhouse effect and an enhanced greenhouse effect. CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 7. Module 2. Is Earth Really Warming?How Temperature Is MeasuredTemperature Change Over TimeTemperature Change OverGeographic Space Local Versus Global Urban Versus Rural CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 8. Module 3. Is There Evidence of a Warmer Earth? The retreat of Pedersen Glacier, Alaska.Melting Ice Summer 1917Sea Level RiseWeather ExtremesIncreased Water Vapor Summer 2005Changes in Precipitation/DroughtChanges to Ecosystems CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 9. Module 4. What Causes Climate Change?Natural Causes of Climate Change Earth’s Orbital Variation Solar Variation Volcanic EruptionsChanges in Greenhouse Gas Concentration The Carbon Cycle & CO2 Fossil Fuels and Energy UseClimate Models Natural Factors Human Factors CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 10. Module 5: How Can Climate Change Impact Earth?Temperature Change ProjectionsPrecipitation Projections Floods and DroughtsSea Level RiseWeather ExtremesSpecies and Ecosystem LossOcean AcidificationEffects on Human HealthKey Impacts of Climate Change for South Florida CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 11. Module 6: Do Scientists Agree and What Are the Unknowns?A Brief History of the ResearchThe Probability, Uncertainty, and the“Preponderance of Evidence”Types of Climate Change Deniers and TheirArgumentsWhat Are the Unknowns and Risks of Inaction?How Do We Communicate About ClimateChange? CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 12. Introduction
  • 13. Scientific Argumentation a disagreement between scientific explanations (or claims) with data (or evidence) being used to justify (or rationalize or support) each position. Adapted from Sampson, Grooms, & Walker (2011)A scientific argument isn’t an argument as much as it is a process that scientists follow toguide their research activities. Scientists identify weaknesses and limitations in others’arguments with the ultimate goal being to refine and improve explanations andexperimental designs. This process is known as evidence-based argumentation. CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 14. Alignment of Learning Goals and Misconceptions (Myths/Skeptics’ Clams) CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida
  • 15. Once students have created an argument, they can go and review the arguments of their classmates, comment on those arguments, and rate them. When you select a claim here, Arguments for or against this claim appear here.
  • 16. Publication:Lambert, J., Lindgren, J. & Bleicher, R. (2011). Assessingelementary science methods students’ understanding aboutglobal climate change.Published online in the International Journal of ScienceEducation, November 17, 2011.(http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09500693.2011.633938)Where we are now:Completing Module 1 for piloting in February.Writing content and developing data interface for Module 2.Ongoing — developing assessment items and argumentation claims. CSI: South Florida Climate Science Investigations: South Florida