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Enhancing the formative assessment environment through the use of mobile technologies
 

Enhancing the formative assessment environment through the use of mobile technologies

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A practitioner research study from the iPad Project at York St John University investigating how mobile technologies can enhance the formative assessment environment of a second year Initial Teacher ...

A practitioner research study from the iPad Project at York St John University investigating how mobile technologies can enhance the formative assessment environment of a second year Initial Teacher Education module. This presentation was delivered at UCISA’s Effective use of Mobile Technologies to enhance Learning, Teaching and Assessment event (2014).

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  • Good Afternoon everyone, my name is Daniel Mackley and I’m a Technology Enhanced Learning Advisor from the York St John University.I was due to be joined by two of my colleagues today Anita Backhouse and Ian Wilson, both senior lecturers in Initial Teacher Education but unfortunately due to teaching commitments the couldn’t be with us.The case study that I’m going to present today is an investigation into how mobile technology (iPads in this study) could be used to enhance the formative assessment environment of a second year undergraduate primary Initial Teacher Education (ITE) science module.
  • This investigation was an 8 month practitioner research study which was conducted between October 2012 and March 2013. It was collaboration between the tutors, the second year undergraduate students and myself as a TEL advisor.Practitioner Research (also know as practitioner led inquiry or action research)is conducted by an individual or group that assumes a dual role, both as a practitioner (or provider of service)s and as researcher.  It is typically carried out for the purpose of advancing the practice. Which in this instance is the formative assessment activities on the 2nd Year ITE science module.This investigation was part of an institution wide initiative to explore the potential benefits of using iPads for group and collaborative learning activities. 20 iPads were made available from the Learning and Teaching Development team for staff to use in their Teaching, Learning and Assessments.
  • Ok, during this study we looked at the following questions:Could the use of mobile technology applications could enhance the peer-review and feedback process? In particular the tutors had established that the element of peer engagement could be strengthenedin the review and feedback process. Could a practitioner-research approach enhance the students’ pedagogical awareness and engagement with peer-review and feedback?Data was collected and analysed from observation and discussion notes and questionnaires across the period of the study.
  • Ok, so moving on to the organisation of the investigation.The module has 140 student participants in 5 teaching groups. Each teaching group was split into 5 sub-groups of 6 students
  • Ok, so this is the formative assessment model for the module. Throughout the delivery of this module each student sub-group are asked to participate in the following learning activities:An interactive science display for a primary schoolclassroom on a given topic (for example, exploring the topic Materials)A 10 minute science related assembly – requiring a presentation to the remainder of the teaching group suitable for a specified age-range in a primary schoolA 30 minute ‘mini’ science lesson with the remainder of the teaching group as participantsFor each of these activities the sub-group was required to produce a rationale explaining the relevant educational theory and pedagogy.Group activities on the module are assessed formatively using a combination of peer, self and tutor feedback. An overall judgement is derived from a dialogic approach involving all group members and the tutor.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ok, so let’s take a look at the first formative assessment activity, the science-themed classroom display. For this the students used an app called Notability. For those of you who has never come across Notability in the past it’s primarily used as an note-taking application. Put it has the functionality to allow you to sketch ideas and annotate images and documents.*** Notability costs £1.99 from the App store.*** Dropbox is a free application
  • Ok, so this is the formative assessment model for the module. Throughout the delivery of this module each student sub-group are asked to participate in the following learning activities:An interactive science display for a primary schoolclassroom on a given topic (for example, exploring the topic Materials)A 10 minute science related assembly – requiring a presentation to the remainder of the teaching group suitable for a specified age-range in a primary schoolA 30 minute ‘mini’ science lesson with the remainder of the teaching group as participantsFor each of these activities the sub-group was required to produce a rationale explaining the relevant educational theory and pedagogy.Group activities on the module are assessed formatively using a combination of peer, self and tutor feedback. An overall judgement is derived from a dialogic approach involving all group members and the tutor.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ok, so let’s take a look at the first formative assessment activity, the science-themed classroom display. For this the students used an app called Notability. For those of you who has never come across Notability in the past it’s primarily used as an note-taking application. Put it has the functionality to allow you to sketch ideas and annotate images and documents.*** Notability costs £1.99 from the App store.*** Dropbox is a free application
  • Here’s an example of one of the classroom displays produced by a group of students. Previously, feedback on the science-themed displays was written in a school exercise book attached to the display it’s self. Live demonstration of Notability – go through the process.Listen to the rationale sheet being read out by the tutorOpen Notability and create a new fileTake a photo of the displayImport the photo into NotabilityAdd comments and feedback using the tools available in NotabilityTo ensure anonymity the students named the files with the iPads unique reference number – previously students had recgonised each others hand writingFiles were saved to dedicated folder in DropboxThe Dropbox folder was then shared with the students who created the displayThis feedback was then discussed with the tutor during the dialogic discussion
  • Here’s an example of one of the classroom displays produced by a group of students. Previously, feedback on the science-themed displays was written in a school exercise book attached to the display it’s self. Live demonstration of Notability – go through the process.Listen to the rationale sheet being read out by the tutorOpen Notability and create a new fileTake a photo of the displayImport the photo into NotabilityAdd comments and feedback using the tools available in NotabilityTo ensure anonymity the students named the files with the iPads unique reference number – previously students had recgonised each others hand writingFiles were saved to dedicated folder in DropboxThe Dropbox folder was then shared with the students who created the displayThis feedback was then discussed with the tutor during the dialogic discussion
  • An example of one of the Notability files produced by the students. Sections of the display have been captured, text boxes inserted for comments and arrows used to emphasise the specific aspect being referred to.15-20 separate feedback files were produced for each science-themed display
  • Ok, so now we are going to look at the other two formative assessment activities. At the start of every teaching session a sub-group of students with either deliver a 30 min science lesson or a science-themed school assembly to the remainder of the teaching group.Previously, the students had provided written feedback on paper. They were asked to describe two things they liked about the session and one suggestion for improvement. (2 stars and a wish).The module tutors (Anita and Ian) designed statement that the student audience could use to feed back their opinions on the quality of the lessons and feedback. StatementsThe assembly was presented confidentlyIt was pitched at the right level for the childrenThere were definite links to scienceEach statement had 4 possible responses, strongly agree, agree, disagree and strongly disagree.For this activity, initially an application called e-Clicker was used by the students to provide feedback on the lessons and assemblies. E-Clicker is made up of two components, e-Clicker presenter used by the tutors to author the statements and deliver the activity and e-Clicker audience used by the students to view and answer the questions.*** e-Clicker Presenter: £10.49*** e-Clicker Audience: Free*** Socrative Teacher: Free*** Socrative Student: Free
  • This slide shows the outcome in eClicker. The students felt that whilst eClicker was easy and clear to interpret the results they preferred being able to add feedback comments so an alternative application was sourced and we moved to Socrative as a preferred option. Socrative, however, does not provide the instant analysis the eClicker has but the advantage of being able to add comments was felt by the students to outweigh the disadvantage of the lack of presentation of the results.
  • At the of the assessment activity results from all activities were discussed with the tutor.
  • Group and tutor in discussion about the peer feedback.
  • Students’ level of engagement with peer review and feedback increased significantly when using the iPads (100% engagement when iPads were used);The students became critical reflectors of the technology and of the peer assessment process; - This was particularly evident when the students shared their concerns and frustrations on using the e-Clicker application for providing feedback on the science themed assemblies and lessons. The students reported that they would have liked to be able to provide written feedback when answering the questions in order to justify their responses. The group of students also expressed concern over the lack of explanation when they received feedback that was either ‘disagree’ or ‘strongly disagree’. However, the students felt that receiving peer feedback had less impact on the quality of their own work. This was interesting but not surprising because if you look at other research around peer-assessment the findings are similar. One other interesting finding was that the students appreciated the amount of feedback received (particularly on the science theme display activity where between 15-20 separate feedback files were produced), Initially, the module tutors had some as they felt students might become overwhelmed with the amount of feedback provided, but this proved to be unfounded.
  • The impact of the investigation then led to several other disciplines (Geography, Mathematics and the Professional Module) in the ITE programme are now engaging with iPad to enhance their own learning, teaching and assessment.
  • This will allow the students to get the feedback they want.Students are now asked to incorporate a QR code to that links to the rationale for display. As mentioned earlier, the rationale sheet was read out by the tutor before the students started the activity, this often had to be read out several times and slowed down the process down – reducing the time set aside for other activities in the teaching session. By creating a QR code the students
  • Mention the blog – talk about the wider project and the other projects that are running.

Enhancing the formative assessment environment through the use of mobile technologies Enhancing the formative assessment environment through the use of mobile technologies Presentation Transcript

  • Enhancing the formative assessment environment through the use of mobile technologies Anita Backhouse, Ian Wilson & Daniel Mackley York St John University
  • Context • The investigation was part of an institution wide initiative to explore the potential benefits of using iPads for group work and collaborative learning activities • An 8 month practitioner research study; • A collaboration between tutors, second year undergraduate students and the Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Adviser;
  • Investigation • Could the use of mobile technology applications enhance the peer-review and feedback process? • Could a practitioner-research approach enhance the students’ pedagogical awareness and engagement with peer-review and feedback? Data was collected and analysed from observation and discussion notes and questionnaires across the period of the study.
  • Organisation • 140 student participants in 5 teaching groups • Each teaching group was split into 5 subgroups of 6 students • 20 iPads (with applications)
  • The Formative Assessment Model Science-themed classroom display Peer assessment and feedback using Notability Science-themed school assembly 30 min science lesson Peer assessment and feedback using eClicker or Socrative Peer assessment and feedback using eClicker or Socrative -
  • The Formative Assessment Model Science-themed classroom display Peer assessment and feedback using Notability Science-themed school assembly 30 min science lesson Peer assessment and feedback using eClicker or Socrative Peer assessment and feedback using eClicker or Socrative -
  • An image is taken of the display and imported into Notability ready to be annotated. After annotation the file is saved as a pdf and exported to Dropbox.
  • The Formative Assessment Model Science-themed classroom display Peer assessment and feedback using Notability Science-themed school assembly 30 min science lesson Peer assessment and feedback using eClicker or Socrative Peer assessment and feedback using eClicker or Socrative -
  • The Formative Assessment Model Science-themed classroom display Peer assessment and feedback using Notability Science-themed school assembly 30 min science lesson Peer assessment and feedback using eClicker or Socrative Peer assessment and feedback using eClicker or Socrative -
  • Key Findings • Students’ level of engagement with peer review and feedback increased significantly when using the iPads (100% engagement when iPads were used); • The students became critical reflectors of the technology and of the peer assessment process; • The students valued the impact that giving feedback had on their own assessment attitudes and practice.
  • Impact • 87% of students made use of peer assessment and feedback with children during their second year placement • Several other disciplines in the ITE programme are now engaging with iPad to enhance their own learning, teaching and assessment • Students are now using the iPads and other technology in other modules as a result of being involved in the investigation.
  • Future plans • Students to create their own success criteria for the assembly and lesson activities • Students are now asked to incorporate a QR code to that links to the rationale for display • Students to provide support to their peers on the use of the technology and applications.
  • Questions?
  • References and acknowledgements Big Nerd Ranch (2012) eClicker Presenter (version 1.0.13) [Mobile application software] Available from: http://itunes.apple.com [Accessed 30 September 2012] Big Nerd Ranch (2012) eClicker Audience (Version 1.0.4) [Mobile application software] Available from: http://itunes.apple.com [Accessed 30 September 2012] Gingerlabs (2012) Notability (Version 4.42) [Mobile application software] Available from: http://itunes.apple.com [Accessed 30 September 2012] Socrative (2013) Socrative Teacher [Mobile application software] Available from http://www.socrative.com [Accessed 15 March 2013] Socrative (2013) Socrative Student [Mobile application software] Available from http://www.socrative.com [Accessed 15 March 2013] Vu, T. T. and Dall'Alba, G. (2007) Students’ experience of peer assessment in a professional course. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 32 (5), pp. 541-556. Many thanks to Abi Sowerby, Naomi Richardson, Louise Connelly, Beth Millar, Mollie Benefer, Bryony Cunningham, Rachel Rawcliffe and Nicole King for allowing us to show their work.
  • Contact Details Daniel Mackley Technology Enhanced Learning Advisor York St John University d.mackley@yorksj.ac.uk @danielmackley http://blog.yorksj.ac.uk/ipadproject