1
Undergraduate Studies
ePortfolio
Danielle Smith
Psychology, 2010
Personal Statement
I am applying to Argosy University, Washington D.C. Doctorate of Psychology in Clinical Psychology prog...
Personal Statement Cont.
While preparing for the first semester I discovered that I could not attend the program and work ...
Resume
Danielle Smith
8536 Charnwood Ct. Manassas, VA 20111
danielle.smith75@gmail.com
307-277-6025
SKILLS Successful lead...
Resume Cont.
VOLUNTEER SERVICE VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS QUARTERMASTER
Voted by members of VFW;
Recorded and maintained all...
Reflection
While attending Argosy I have learned a
lot about where I come from and the
influences I have had on my life an...
Table of Contents
Cognitive Abilities: Critical Thinking and Information Literacy –
Vicarious traumatization and Army ment...
Critical Thinking and Research Skills
Running head: VICARIOUS TRAUMATIZATION 1
A Study of Vicarious Traumatization and Arm...
Abstract
Abstract
The effects of combat therapy on US Army mental health therapist (combat
therapists) in a deployed locat...
References
References
Creamer, T. L., & Liddle, B. J. (2005). Secondary traumatic stress among disaster mental health work...
References Cont.
Reference
Life events checklist (LEC) - National Center for PTSD Retrieved 7/27/2010, 2010, from
http://w...
Communication Skills
Running head: INTERNSHIP 1
Internship at the Washington D. C. Veterans Affairs Hospital, Trauma Servi...
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can arise from a traumatic event.
Military personnel, w...
Internship Start Up
What population to work with and why
Have interest in military population and can connect on
persona...
Counseling Techniques
Restatement
Shows the client you understand what they are saying by telling
them what you just hea...
Supervision
Importance of supervision
Ability to ask questions and alternate views
Get feedback on work performing
Who...
Self Care
Exercise
Regular schedule exercise can reduce stress
Using a journal
Work through information heard and main...
Conclusion
 Benefits of internship as undergrad student
Learn skills taught in class
See how skills are applied in real...
References
References
Baird, B.N. (2005). The internship, practicum, and field placement handbook: A guide for the helping...
Ethical & Diversity Awareness
Interpersonal Effectiveness
Running head: COUNSELING COMPETENCIES 1
Counseling Competencies ...
• Aware of different cultures and respect those
differences
• Aware of own cultural influences, values, biases.
Comfortabl...
• Social impact on others
• Unaware how race, culture, or ethnicity affect
vocational choices, psychological disorders
• U...
• Continue learning areas already familiar with by
attending lectures, conferences, or classes
• Volunteer at locations th...
References
References
Argosy University, 2010. Doc sharing: Cultural competency personal assessment, Retrieved April, 20, ...
Foundations of Psychology
Applied Psychology
Running head: 12 ANGRY MEN 1
12 Angry Men and the Social-psychological Princi...
Groupthink
Groupthink is when people in a group agree with the other members so
they do not cause conflict.
 The movie 12...
Cognitive Dissonance
The last juror has a inner conflict between his beliefs, views, and
attitudes. He is unable to vote g...
References
References
Kenrick, D. T., Neuberg, S. L., & Cialdini, R. B. (2007). Social psychology: Goals in interaction. P...
My Future in Learning
Learning is a lifelong process. My plan to
continue learning is to complete graduate school.
Once I ...
Contact Me
Thank you for viewing my
ePortfolio.
For further information, please
contact me at the e-mail address
below.
da...
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  1. 1. 1 Undergraduate Studies ePortfolio Danielle Smith Psychology, 2010
  2. 2. Personal Statement I am applying to Argosy University, Washington D.C. Doctorate of Psychology in Clinical Psychology program. Ultimately I want to work as a mental health provider for the Department of the Army, assisting soldiers through the daily rigors of military life. By investigating this field as well as through my own professional experience in the Army, I have found a doctorate in psychology is the most effective way to accomplish my goal. Currently, I am in the last semester of my Bachelor’s degree in Psychology at Argosy University, Washington D.C. and will complete all requirements to graduate on November 6, 2010. While on active duty in the Army I worked my way through an associates degree, deployments to Bosnia and Kosovo did not discourage me from taking classes and I finished my degree in 2003. I had to take a three year break while I was stationed in Germany because of the mission I was performing, but I got back to work when I returned to the United States. After completing my associates degree I chose to go into the helping profession. The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq moved soldiers back and forth, the toll it took urged me to start working towards a bachelor’s degree in social work. I found the difference between social work and history classes to be uplifting. Psychology is a type of marriage between the two subjects, giving me the openness of social work and the structure of history that I needed to excel. I worked hard for my education, even while in Iraq I was enrolled in classes. I have attended multiple colleges to accommodate the Army’s plan and my desire to receive an education, but have found Argosy University, Washington D.C. to be an environment where I thrive.
  3. 3. Personal Statement Cont. While preparing for the first semester I discovered that I could not attend the program and work full time because of scheduling conflicts. Not being around military communities and the inability to attend school forced me to make a change, so I moved to Virginia. Several Psychologists and Social Workers in my Army reserve unit suggested that I look at different Psychology degrees because of my training in the mental health field with the Army. I found Argosy, which has a strong history and research-practitioner based instructors that work in the field. After attending a few classes I realized that not only is psychology the field I want to be in, but Argosy University, Washington D.C. is where I want to be. The courses are challenging yet exciting and motivates me to learn more. The small classes allow for stimulating questions and concrete answers with real life experiences. I have found that an actual scenario is the best way for me to completely understand a concept. The instructors are knowledgeable in current psychological issues and willing to share these topics with students. The instructors want to teach as much as I want to learn. The PsyD program at Argosy University would provide a comfortable learning environment and a rigorous curriculum. A doctorate in psychology will also allow me to work with soldiers. I am determined to complete my education and will work hard while representing Argosy University. My field experience in mental health from my Army training will be an asset in the classroom by providing a different prospective. I hope to deploy as a mental health technician with my reserve unit someday and with an education from Argosy University I am better equipped to do so.
  4. 4. Resume Danielle Smith 8536 Charnwood Ct. Manassas, VA 20111 danielle.smith75@gmail.com 307-277-6025 SKILLS Successful leader, equally effective as member of a team. Highly organized able to multi-task and accomplish objectives. Professional demeanor and attention to detail. EXPERIENCE/TRAINING ARMY RESERVES - Mental Health Team Leader 12/2005 - Current Work in and out patience facilities; Conduct intake interviews; Facilitate group therapy sessions and group classes; Coordinate, prepare, and present annual training to command groups; Create treatment plans under licensed professional oversight; Teach training classes to over 40 personnel COVENANT INSURANCE GROUP-Client Services 04/2006 - 09/2009 Customer Service Representative; Compile multiple quotes from insurance agencies for client presentation; Analyze information and produce reports for Medicare and monthly finance reports; COBRA administrator, Wyoming insurance producer license ARMY - Administrative and Training Clerk 04/1994 - 12/2005 Create and maintain personnel and training database and records; Produced monthly reports and processed personnel requests; Organize training events with outside agencies; Deployed to Bosnia (1996), Kosovo (2000), Iraq (2004); E-5 rating with 11 years as supervisor with an honorable discharge from active duty
  5. 5. Resume Cont. VOLUNTEER SERVICE VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS QUARTERMASTER Voted by members of VFW; Recorded and maintained all meeting minutes, monthly financial reports, and quarterly financial audits; Maintain all documents verifying membership eligibility VOLUNTEER SERVICES Washington D. C. Veterans Affairs Hospital, Trauma clinic – 96 hours; American Red Cross – 20 hours AWARDS AWARDS Commendable ratings on 4 Inspector General inspections; Awarded 3 Army Achievement medals for 12 months without any late reports; Secret Security Clearance EDUCATION AND TRAINING ARGOSY UNIVERSITY CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY Washington D.C. Buies Creek, NC BA Psychology, AA in Government / History, GPA 3.91/4.0, 11/2010 GPA 3.65/4.0. 05/2003 UNITED STATES ARMY TRAINING: Combat Life Saver Course / CPR, 2009; Certificate of Training: Mental Health Specialist, 2007; Army Substance Abuse training, 2003; Primary Leadership Development Course-leadership training, 1999; Certificate of Training: Administrative Specialist, 1994 COMPUTER SKILLS Microsoft Office – Word, Excel, Access, Power Point, Outlook; multi-lined phone system; fax, copy, scanner; type 40 words per minute
  6. 6. Reflection While attending Argosy I have learned a lot about where I come from and the influences I have had on my life and how I view the world. Having the opportunity to create my own research project made me think more critically about articles that I read and the validity of the information. I have learned so many different psychological concepts that apply to everyday life and want to delve deeper into the theories behind them. While I have had many occasions to write papers in APA style and increase my professional writing style, I have not had the opportunity to improve presentation skills. Learning about different cultures and the ethical guidelines of the APA and ACA have been the largest gain of competencies.
  7. 7. Table of Contents Cognitive Abilities: Critical Thinking and Information Literacy – Vicarious traumatization and Army mental health workers Research Skills - Vicarious traumatization and Army mental health workers Communication Skills: Oral and Written – Internship at Trauma Services Ethics & Diversity Awareness-Counseling Competencies Foundations of Psychology – 12 Angry Men Applied Psychology – 12 Angry Men Interpersonal Effectiveness – Counseling Competencies
  8. 8. Critical Thinking and Research Skills Running head: VICARIOUS TRAUMATIZATION 1 A Study of Vicarious Traumatization and Army Mental Health Providers Deployed Danielle Smith Argosy University, Washington D.C.
  9. 9. Abstract Abstract The effects of combat therapy on US Army mental health therapist (combat therapists) in a deployed location assigned to a prevention team or restoration clinic were examined. Combat therapists from four combat stress control units, totaling 200 soldiers, were given questionnaires before, during, and after deployments to assess the VT symptoms levels and changes throughout their deployment. There was an increase in symptoms throughout the deployment with stronger ratings among prevention team members, combat therapists with trauma history, prior deployments, and civilian trauma therapy jobs. This study recommends further investigation into the effects of combat therapy and to design a program for combat therapists, while deployed, to lessen these effects.
  10. 10. References References Creamer, T. L., & Liddle, B. J. (2005). Secondary traumatic stress among disaster mental health workers responding to the September 11 attacks. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 18(1), 89-96. Combat exposure scale (CES) - National Center for PTSD Retrieved 7/27/2010, 2010, from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/ces.asp Derogatis, L. R. (1975). Symptom checklist-90-revised. Retrieved 7/27/2010, from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=loh&AN=09129056&site=ehost-live. Hoge, C. W. (2004). Combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, mental health problems, and barriers to care New England Journal of Medicine, 351(1), 13 - 22. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa040603 Hung, B. (2008). Behavioral health activity and workload in the Iraq theater of operations. U.S.Army Medical Department Journal, 39-42. Jenkins, S. R., & Baird, S. (2002). Secondary traumatic stress and vicarious trauma: A validational study. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 15(5), 423. Impact of events scale - revised (IES-R) - National Center for PTSD Retrieved 7/30/2010, 2010, from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/ies-r.asp
  11. 11. References Cont. Reference Life events checklist (LEC) - National Center for PTSD Retrieved 7/27/2010, 2010, from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/life_events_checklist.asp McCann, I. L., & Pearlman, L. A. (1990). Vicarious traumatization: A framework for understanding the psychological effects of working with victims. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3(1), 131-149. doi:10.1007/BF00975140 Pearlman, L. A. (2003). Trauma and attachment belief scale. Retrieved 7/27/2010, from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=loh&AN=16123017&site=ehost-live. Pearlman, L. A., & Mac Ian, P. S. (1995). Vicarious traumatization: An empirical study of the effects of trauma work on trauma therapists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 26(6), 558-565. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.26.6.558 Perceived threat scale - National Center for PTSD Retrieved 7/27/2010, 2010, from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/perceived-threat.asp Prior stressors scale - National Center for PTSD Retrieved 7/27/2010, 2010, from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/prior-stressors.asp PTSD checklist (PCL) - National Center for PTSD Retrieved 7/27/2010, 2010, from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/ptsd-checklist.asp
  12. 12. Communication Skills Running head: INTERNSHIP 1 Internship at the Washington D. C. Veterans Affairs Hospital, Trauma Services Danielle Smith Argosy University, Washington, DC
  13. 13. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can arise from a traumatic event. Military personnel, while in combat, experience life threatening situations everyday. When these situations happen the body reacts in physiological ways called the fight or flight response. Adrenalin is released into your blood stream, respiratory rate increases, blood flows to the extremities to provide more energy, pupils dilate, awareness intensifies, sight sharpens, impulses quicken, and the perception of pain diminishes. All of these reactions prepare the soldiers to act on possible threats. When the fight or flight response does not turn off it has the potential to cause permanent damage to the body. This short video will demonstrate how easily the fight or flight response can occur for a soldier. Try to put yourself in the situation that the soldiers are in and discover how your body reacts to the situations. Stress: Constant stress puts your health at risk - MayoClinic.com Retrieved 10/21/2010,from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/stress/SR00001
  14. 14. Internship Start Up What population to work with and why Have interest in military population and can connect on personal level What goals to accomplish while at internship site Learn counseling skills & issues that effect military VA Hospital, Washington D.C Attended volunteer orientation Selected to work with Psychiatrist in Trauma unit Briefed by department supervisor Scheduled two days a week, six hours a day
  15. 15. Counseling Techniques Restatement Shows the client you understand what they are saying by telling them what you just heard Paraphrasing Saying what the client said in your words so they know you understand Reflection of feelings Let the client know you can tell how he or her feels by their statement Active listening Not just hearing, but understanding what is being said
  16. 16. Supervision Importance of supervision Ability to ask questions and alternate views Get feedback on work performing Who was supervisor Dr. Mehta – Psychiatrist Mrs. Burton – Licensed Clinical Social Worker How often met with supervision Worked daily with Dr. Mehta Met least 3 times a week with Mrs. Burton
  17. 17. Self Care Exercise Regular schedule exercise can reduce stress Using a journal Work through information heard and maintain confidentiality of client Talking to professional Discuss how client issues effect you
  18. 18. Conclusion  Benefits of internship as undergrad student Learn skills taught in class See how skills are applied in real life situations  Issues of internship as undergrad student No hands on experience Limited to only one disciple in the Trauma Services unit
  19. 19. References References Baird, B.N. (2005). The internship, practicum, and field placement handbook: A guide for the helping professionals. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Brady, J., Guy, J., Poelstra, P., and Brokaw, B. (1999). Vicarious traumatization, spirituality, and the treatment of sexual abuse survivors. A national survey of women psychotherapists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 30(4), 386 Exercise: Rev up your routine to reduce stress - MayoClinic.com Retrieved 2/19/2010 from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/exercise-and-stress/SR00036 Knight, C. (1996). A study of MSW and BSW students’ perceptions of their field instructors. Journal of Social Work Education and Supervision, 32, 399-414. Pearlman, L., and MacIan, P. (1995).Vicarious traumatization: An empirical study of the effects of trauma work on trauma therapist. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 26(6), 558-565.
  20. 20. Ethical & Diversity Awareness Interpersonal Effectiveness Running head: COUNSELING COMPETENCIES 1 Counseling Competencies Assessment: Personal Assessment Danielle Smith Argosy University, Washington D.C.
  21. 21. • Aware of different cultures and respect those differences • Aware of own cultural influences, values, biases. Comfortable with differences • Respect other’s religious/spiritual beliefs and values, and aware how they affect worldviews • Value bilingualism do not view as an impediment • Aware of institutional barriers for minorities General Awareness
  22. 22. • Social impact on others • Unaware how race, culture, or ethnicity affect vocational choices, psychological disorders • Unaware of immigration issues that leave major scars that can influence the counseling process • Not familiar with latest findings about mental disorders of various ethnic and racial groups • Unaware of potential bias in assessment instruments • Not familiar with community resources Need More Work
  23. 23. • Continue learning areas already familiar with by attending lectures, conferences, or classes • Volunteer at locations that service minorities to gain knowledge of my social impact, vocational choices, and immigration issues • Find articles about different psychological disorders in different ethnic groups • Take course in psychological assessments to learn about potential biases Plan of Action
  24. 24. References References Argosy University, 2010. Doc sharing: Cultural competency personal assessment, Retrieved April, 20, 2010 from http://myeclassonline.com/re/DotNextLaunch.asp?courseid=3997869 Arredondo, P., Toporek, R., Brown, S. P., Sanchez, J., Locke, D. C., Sanchez, J., & Stadler, H. (1996). Operationalization of the multicultural counseling competencies. Journal of Multicultural Counseling & Development, 24(1), 42-78. Welcome - association for multicultural counseling and development Retrieved April 20, 2010 from http://www.amcdaca.org/amcd/default.cfm
  25. 25. Foundations of Psychology Applied Psychology Running head: 12 ANGRY MEN 1 12 Angry Men and the Social-psychological Principles Danielle Smith Argosy University, Washington D.C.
  26. 26. Groupthink Groupthink is when people in a group agree with the other members so they do not cause conflict.  The movie 12 Angry Men show how the social psychological principle of groupthink happens without an outward influence.  The movie starts with the end of a boys trial for murder. The juror must agree unanimously if the boy is guilty or innocent.  The first vote shows groupthink when six jurors automatically raise their hands while five slowly raise theirs.  The last five jurors do not want to cause conflict in the group and agree with the majority.  The last juror does not know and votes not guilty so that the case can be discussed.
  27. 27. Cognitive Dissonance The last juror has a inner conflict between his beliefs, views, and attitudes. He is unable to vote guilty without discussing all aspects of the case. He finds it hard to be responsible for a young boy’s without any discussion. He is able to break away from the group think concept because of his inner conflict.  The five jurors that were slower to vote guilty are given another chance to ask questions and be sure of their vote  One juror writes down questions and is asked who side he was on, his response is that he is not loyal to one or the other. His inner conflict allows him to break away from group think as well.  Several jurors discover that their own personal views are shadowing their view of the young boy and can finally break away from group think  One by one each juror decides in their own way that there is not enough evidence to convict a young boy and be responsible for his death.
  28. 28. References References Kenrick, D. T., Neuberg, S. L., & Cialdini, R. B. (2007). Social psychology: Goals in interaction. Pearson. Rose, R. (Writer), & Lumit, S. (Director). (1957). 12 Angry Men [Motion Picture]. United States: MGM Studio.
  29. 29. My Future in Learning Learning is a lifelong process. My plan to continue learning is to complete graduate school. Once I am working in the field I will learn life lessons from other professionals, clients, mentors, and even family and friends. You never stop learning and if you think you know it all there is always someone who can teach you more. I plan to listen to those around me and apply new lessons to my life.
  30. 30. Contact Me Thank you for viewing my ePortfolio. For further information, please contact me at the e-mail address below. danielle.smith75@gmail.com
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