How long...

3,592
-1

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,592
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
178
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Good afternoon everyone.As part of one of my goals this year I will be creating a matrix for learning development. today I would like to share some of the exploration materials I located. The two types of learning development investigated were Instructor led learning and eLearning. Both ILT and ELearning development were examined at three levels and I will describe the criteria for all three as we move through today’s presentation. So after we review some of my findings on how long it takes to develop learning, I will discuss some key tips on how to manage our time and effectively deliver the products to our clients.
  • The first type of learning we will review is Instructor Led Training. Instructor-Led Training can include the following tasks:Front end analysisDesignLesson plansHandoutsWorkbooksPowerPointScheduled time with SME to determine and review content and learning objectives.
  • Instructor-Led Training also comes in three levels and the time to create learning varies on the severity of development needs.ILT training, Simple learning content, possible repurposing of learning source material, with minimal learning support materials. ILT training, average project for creating corporate ILT class with well documented deliverables (Lesson Plan, Handouts, Workbooks, PowerPoint Visuals)ILT training, Complex subject matter, very custom, extended time spent on formatting classroom deliverables
  • Here we are looking at a chart that describes the breakdown of hours for each of the tasks required in the development of a basic ILT. Let’s take a look and the three time hogs in the development of ILT:Instructional design comes in first but very close toPowerPoint development or other visual development at 16%The next task or activity that holds a higher time is the Front end analysis.The analysis phase is the building block of a training program. The basis for who must be trained, what must be trained, when training will occur, and where the training will take place are accomplished in this phase. The product of this phase is the foundation for all subsequent development activities.
  • Now let’s take a look at eLearning and the three levels of eLearning development.
  • The first level of elearning development is what we call Basic. A basic elearning course could possible contain:Content pagesTextGraphics and maybe simple audio or simple video, Test questions. NOTE: PowerPoint-to-eLearning often falls into this category. Basically pages with assessment
  • As we can see from the matrix for a typical Level 1 (basic) elearning course it takes 79 Hours of development!
  • Following the some of the same tasks and activities associated with ILT, there is a significant increase in the amount of hours of development for Instructional design from 6.4 hours to 10.88.Creating a level 1 elearning module also includes tasks like the use of authoring tools like Adobe Connect, Captivate and Presenter. However in order to develop sound and audio other tools will also be in use during the development like Adobe Photoshop Sound booth and other content develop tools.
  • Level 2 eLearning development or also know as Interactive learning, requires the same amount of time as Level 1 eLearning content plus 25% (or more) interactive exercises, allowing learners to perform virtual “try it” exercises, liberal use of multimedia (audio, video, and animations).
  • 127:1 – eLearning output, Rapid development through templated interactions, simple animation, efficient or low-end media production184:1 – eLearning output, Most typical (average) Level 2 projects267:1 – eLearning output, advanced and custom interactions, embedded simulation activities and lots of media
  • Again we are breaking down the hours required per task or activity the time spent on each activity has almost doubled from a level 1 or basic elearning module.Storyboarding at a level 2 course is twenty hours of development.Storyboards are walkthroughs of the behavior of each major interaction of an activity.   They are also key to the Fluid design process in helping us understand the user experience of components in various contexts.  We create storyboards for several "contexts of use" identified for the components.  The Fluid storyboards typically cover more than the behavior of the component (what happens leading up to the use and after the use of the component) since it is important for us to understand the entire context and experience a user will have with a component.  You can also think of them as serving as a lightweight specification.
  • Ok so we are now at Level 3 eLearning, just a note it is clear to see that as we increase the intensity of the learning and activities so has the time spent to design, develop and deploy the eLearning module.Level 3 eLearning is highly interactive, possibly simulation or serious game-based, use of avatars, custom interactions, award-winning caliber courseware
  • Levwel 3 eLearning is an are where we have not touched on yet, this includes heavy animation and also games like jeopardy…
  • eLearning output, templated interactions, templated games and simulations, efficient simulation development practices (rapid development)eLearning output, Most typical (average) Level 3 projectseLearning output, complex projects, advanced learning simulations and games, extensive media production  NOTE: Several respondents listed times greater than 2000+ hours of development per finished hour (very advanced learning simulations and games)
  • Let’s take a look at the provided comparison chart based on type of learning being developed and level. To some it up, here at CPG we fall into the Average:ILT take between 43 and 60 hoursBasic eLearn module takes from 70 to 100 hoursLevel 2 eLearning from 184 to 210 hoursAnd Level 3 t again we have not yet had the opportunity to explore this type of eLearning but the average time in effort takes 490 to 550 hours
  • So know that we have identified how long it takes to create learning, how does this apply to our day to day activities and how do we get it all done.
  • Ultimately the benefit of effective 'time management' is that you will not waste time and effectively accomplish the goals and requirements in delivering effective, professional learning.On a more mundane day-to-day level it means keeping promises, increasing productivity and staying (more or less) on target.Record and analyze what you spend your time doing for a week. If it's sending emails, for example, would it be worth investing some time in learning to type? However, being efficient (doing things well) doesn't necessarily mean you are effective (doing the right things)...Time management tips are good, but a thorough system is better and regular practice crucial. Many of the people we work with enjoy David Allen's 'Getting Things Done'. What is important is that you find a system that works for you and conduct regular reviews (e.g. 30-minute plan Monday morning, review Friday afternoon with ten-minute system checks twice a day) and be disciplined in sticking to it.It is tempting to be a busy fool, and although I have never worked with anyone who has reduced their effectiveness by planning how best to use their time, there have been many who were panicked into thinking they didn't have enough time to plan.The higher up the 'ladder' (tip nine: Get perspective) you can go the more you will be motivated and the clearer the importance of any individual task will be.Make one list and put everything you want to do on it so you trust the list and are not distracted by other matters  not listed (e.g. picking up your kids). Make each item a single actionable thing (e.g. 'call John', not 'sort finances'). Consider ordering your lists by location, importance, energy and urgency. A simple colour system is a quick way to do this. Example locations: 'Computer', 'Computer no net', 'With secretary', 'In town', 'On phone – private', 'On phone – public', 'Braindead', etc.Do one thing at a time. There is no such thing as effective multi-tasking – only dividing attention and switching quickly between tasks. The problem with the former is you make mistakes and need to repeat things and with the latter that there is 'pick-up time' with each switch, making it less efficient than 'batching'. Do one thing at a time and chunk together similar tasks in a given period.I don't recommend having a daily to-do list as stuff will come up which you will have to move around, and this could make you feel disheartened. It's better to have one overall evolving time management list. If you do opt for a daily list build in 'slack time'/'crumple zones' to account for what comes up. For many professions as much as 70% of their time is needed for slack - measure yours one day to see.You can't manage time, you can manage what you have said yes to and within what timeframes. When people are overwhelmed it is because of their commitments and not the clock on the wall. Be impeccable with your commitments to yourself and others and be clear about everything you have committed to.Rushing into things means you will have a high repeat rate as you will do the wrong things (as defined by your medium/long term commitments - job title, values, etc.). It's tempting to jump in when the in-tray is full, but the carpenters recommendation to 'measure twice, cut once' will save you time in the long run: to do this you will often need to get centered. While counter-intuitive, training your attention through meditation, mindfulness and slowing down is also highly beneficial to getting more done.For what reason are you doing everything you do in a single day? Know how every action contributes to a project or long term goal, matches a job role or values and, ultimately, why you are on the planet.The higher up the 'ladder' (tip four: Get perspective) you can go the more you will be motivated and the clearer the importance of any individual task will be.Empty your email inbox using the GTD recommended 'do it (less than 2 min), drop it (not important), delegate it or defer it (with time frame and reminder)' method. Differentiate between reference/storage and 'to do' areas and don't use one for the other.Do the hardest most important thing first to get your day going. From the saying, 'Eat a live frog first thing in the morning and the rest of the day will be easy', and Brian Tracey's classic time management book named after this. Finding ways to overcome procrastination is crucial for effective time management – these can be quite individual – strategies range from breaking tasks down, to self reward, to energising breathing to personal 'get going' mantras. Developing a habit is key.Time often isn't the problem; it's managing pesky human things like energy and mood. If you're tired and grumpy you may not do the things you need to succeed. Find ways to manage your energy and mood (e.g. sleep, diet, sufficient rest and inspiration). The term 'time management' is misleading in many ways.If you can't say no or ask for help (includes delegation for managers) you will be overwhelmed. These emotional and embodied skills are not straightforward for many people.Doing things from a sense of choice will energise you and lead to better relationships more than doing things resentfully because you 'have to.' If a task doesn’t connect to something important to you then don’t do it.  
  • If you want to make better use of your time, begin my learning exactly how you are spending it now. A good way to pinpoint and stop time leak is to keep a detailed diary of your daily activities for a week or two. Once you compare the record of what you have done, as revealed in your diary, with what you planned to do, as outlined by your appointments and to-do entries, this system will be a real eye opener. It will reveal how much you are letting situations; events and other people control your time instead of being in command of your schedule.more at http://www.citehr.com/138659-aids-time-management.html#ixzz1BWfqh6Hukey point to effective time management is to have clearly defined goals. Written them down and keep them visible. Once you set your goals and have prioritized them, assign them specific time duration and list all those activities leading toward accomplishing these goals. Divide your goals in to three classifications. 1. Daily Goals 2. Company goals 3. Personal Goals.more at http://www.citehr.com/138659-aids-time-management.html#ixzz1BWg7XDXVGoal setting and planning go hand in hand. Convert your goals into actions by listing all the necessary steps to accomplish your goals and putting yourself on a definite time schedule.more at http://www.citehr.com/138659-aids-time-management.html#ixzz1BWgKus9zWhen you prioritize, consider your personal life goals as well as your business aims. Some matters are urgent, but relatively unimportant (for example, returning a phone call from your alumni club president). Others are highly important, but not urgent (starting work on a presentation you have to give next month). Others are extremely important and urgent (buying a present for your significant other's birthday).more at http://www.citehr.com/138659-aids-time-management.html#ixzz1BWgTduEUIt is estimated that managers are interrupted an average of six times per hour. Every time your concentration is broken, you spend a certain amount of time reorienting yourself. Isn't this a waste of time? You can prevent interruptions when your realize their causes and how much time they consume.Not all interruptions are time wasters. You can turn interruptions into productive meetings. When co-workers interrupt with a matter you know will need attention, ask them to see you later or bring the matter up at one of your regular meetings. Or, instead of co-workers bringing you problems, have them bring you solutions. If you have a voice mailbox full of messages write them all down and prioritise calls according to their order of importance, just like regular tasks.more at http://www.citehr.com/138659-aids-time-management.html#ixzz1BWgiWjatMuch valuable time is spent attending meetings that are not always productive for every attendee. Before confirming your attendance at the next meeting ask yourself if you really have to attend.If you are hosting the meeting you can use several techniques to turn your time into a productive session for everyone involved. First and foremost, have a defined agenda. Know what the meeting is supposed to accomplish and list steps to guide you through. If you issue the agenda ahead of time, everyone involved should be better prepared and make their contribution at the right moment. Decide how long the meeting should last, not just the starting time. This will help everyone stick to an agenda. If you have limited time, hold stand-up meetings. You'll be surprised how fast these meetings are wrapped up.more at http://www.citehr.com/138659-aids-time-management.html#ixzz1BWgt89R8Keep the people who work with you informed. If you don't, people will interrupt you more often and turn to you for decisions, information, or help. When giving information, sending or receiving messages, take 100% of the responsibility to be sure that the communication is understood. Communication can be a "push" or a "pull" process. Decide what you want to push out to others to keep them informed. Also decide on a strategy that others can use to pull information, as they need it.more at http://www.citehr.com/138659-aids-time-management.html#ixzz1BWh1TIao
  • From my experience there have been many tools that have helped me along,
  • Does anyone have any questions?Thank you for your time.
  • How long...

    1. 1. How Long Does it Take to Create Learning?
    2. 2. Instructor-Led Training (ILT)Development Benchmark
    3. 3. Development of Instructor-Led Training (ILT)Overall Times and Ranges 82:1 High Range (average) 43:1 Complex Projects, Often very Custom, Extended time spent on formatting during production Average Most Typical, ILT Development Projects 22:1 Low Range (average) Rapid Development, Simple Content, Possible repurposing from existing source material minimal material, print-based learning support materialsSource Citation: Chapman, B. (2010). How Long Does it Take toCreate Learning? [Research Study]. Published by Chapman AllianceLLC. www.chapmanalliance.com
    4. 4. Development of Instructor-Led Training (ILT)Itemized Development Tasks – How much time is spent in each area through the development process?Snapshot: Average time allocation by task and time spent (all respondents)Number ofhours ofdevelopmenttime in eachtask, per 5.36 6.84 5.06 3.38 4.83 6.76 3.42 2.88 3.45 1.01 = 43 hoursfinished hour(people hours) Based on average of 43 development hours, per finished hour of ILT NOTE: Times reflect time spent by all members of the development team including: instructional designers, writers, subject matter experts (SME), graphic artists, project managers, etc.
    5. 5. Level 1 - eLearningDevelopment Benchmark
    6. 6. Development of Level 1 - eLearningHow is Level 1 eLearning Defined? Level Definition Level 1 eLearning (Basic) Content pages, text, graphics, perhaps simple audio, perhaps simple video, test questions. NOTE: PowerPoint-to-eLearning often falls into this category. Basically pages with assessment. Level 2 eLearning Level 1 plus 25% (or more) interactive (Interactive) exercises (allowing learners to perform virtual "try it" exercises), liberal use of multimedia (audio, video, animations) Level 3 eLearning Highly interactive, possibly simulation or (Advanced) serious game based, use of avatars, custom interactions, award winning caliber courseware 6
    7. 7. Development of Level 1 - eLearningOverall Times and Ranges 125:1 High Range (average) 79:1 Complex Projects, Difficult to Produce, more Media Production Average Most Typical, Level 1 Development Projects 49:1 Low Range (average) Rapid Development, Simple Content, Specialized Authoring Tools (includes simple PowerPoint to eLearning projects)
    8. 8. Development of Level 1 eLearning Itemized Development Tasks – How much time is spent in each area through the development process? Snapshot: Average time allocation by task and time spent (all respondents)Number ofhours ofdevelopment time ineach task,per finishedhour 7.87 10.88 9.03 8.66 3.49 5.47 13.42 5.12 5.08 5.59 3.43 0.96 = 79 hours(peoplehours) NOTE: Times reflect time spent by all members of the development team including: instructional designers, writers, subject matter experts (SME), graphic artists, authors, media producers, project managers, etc.
    9. 9. Level 2 - eLearningDevelopment Benchmark
    10. 10. Development of Level 2 - eLearningHow is Level 2 eLearning Defined? The following definitions were used to collect survey data… Level Definition Level 1 eLearning (Basic) Content pages, text, graphics, perhaps simple audio, perhaps simple video, test questions. NOTE: PowerPoint-to-eLearning often falls into this category. Basically pages with assessment. Level 2 eLearning Level 1… plus 25% (or more) interactive (Interactive) exercises (allowing learners to perform virtual "try it" exercises), liberal use of multimedia (audio, video, animations) Level 3 eLearning Highly interactive, possibly simulation or (Advanced) serious game based, use of avatars, custom interactions, award winning caliber courseware VERY IMPORTANT: It is important to understand that these definitions were written to be relatively broad by design. Having conducted similar surveys for many years, we’ve found that defining the exact framework of each level makes it virtually impossible for survey respondents to reply (unless their courses just happen to match the definition completely). By allowing for some interpretation, we have found that these guidelines yield the desired results, especially since respondents are also allowed to list low range, average, and high range based on further characteristics of learning content development.
    11. 11. Development of Level 2 - eLearningOverall Times and Ranges 267:1 High Range (average) 184:1 Advanced and custom interactions, Embedded simulation activities and lots of media Average Most Typical, Interactive eLearning Projects – Level 127:1 2 Low Range (average) Rapid Development through Templated Interactions. Simple Animation, Efficient or low-end Media Production
    12. 12. Development of Level 2 eLearning Itemized Development Tasks – How much time is spent in each area through the development process? Snapshot: Average time allocation by task and time spent (all respondents)Number ofhours ofdevelopment time ineach task,per finishedhour 17.36 24.69 20.88 22.39 11.29 11.59 32.20 11.88 11.74 10.96 7.41 1.63 = 184 hours(people Based on average of 184 development hours, per finished hour of Level 2 eLearninghours) NOTE: Times reflect time spent by all members of the development team including: instructional designers, writers, subject matter experts (SME), graphic artists, authors, media producers, project managers, etc.
    13. 13. Level 3 - eLearningDevelopment Benchmark
    14. 14. Development of Level 3 - eLearningHow is Level 3 eLearning Defined? The following definitions were used to collect survey data… Level Definition Level 1 eLearning (Basic) Content pages, text, graphics, perhaps simple audio, perhaps simple video, test questions. NOTE: PowerPoint-to-eLearning often falls into this category. Basically pages with assessment. Level 2 eLearning Level 1… plus 25% (or more) interactive (Interactive) exercises (allowing learners to perform virtual "try it" exercises), liberal use of multimedia (audio, video, animations) Level 3 eLearning Highly interactive, possibly simulation or (Advanced) serious game-based, use of avatars, custom interactions, award-winning caliber courseware VERY IMPORTANT: It is important to understand that these definitions were written to be relatively broad by design. Having conducted similar surveys for many years, we’ve found that defining the exact framework of each level makes it virtually impossible for survey respondents to reply (unless their courses just happen to match the definition completely). By allowing for some interpretation, we have found that these guidelines yield the desired results, especially since respondents are also allowed to list low range, average, and high range based on further characteristics of learning content development.
    15. 15. Development of Level 3 - eLearning NOTE: Several respondents listed timesOverall Times and Ranges greater than 2000+ hours of development per finished hour (very advanced learning simulations and games) 716:1 High Range (average) 490:1 Complex Projects, Advanced Learning Simulations and Games, Extensive Media Production Average Most Typical, Highly Interactive Courses, 217:1 Simulations and/or Games (Level 3) Low Range (average) Templated Interactions, Games and Simulations, Efficient Simulation Development Practices (Rapid Development)
    16. 16. Development of Level 3 eLearning Itemized Development Tasks – How much time is spent in each area through the development process? Snapshot: Average time allocation by task and time spent (all respondents)Number ofhours ofdevelopment time ineach task, 42.97 61.97 53.22 64.53 30.46 26.61 86.39 31.51 32.19 30.61 20.96 8.59per finishedhour = 490 hours(people Based on average of 490 development hours, per finished hour of Level 3 eLearninghours) NOTE: Times reflect time spent by all members of the development team including: instructional designers, writers, subject matter experts (SME), graphic artists, authors, media producers, project managers, etc.
    17. 17. Comparison ChartsDevelopment Ratios and Costs
    18. 18. Development Ratios - SummaryILT, Level 1 eLearning (Basic), Level 2 eLearning (Interactive), Level 3 eLearning (Advanced) Rapid Average Advanced, Development, Typical Project Complex, More Simple Projects Media Instructor-Led Training (ILT) 22:1 43:1 82:1 Level 1 eLearning (Basic) – Content Pages and 49:1 79:1 125:1 Assessment Level 2 eLearning (Interactive) – Level 1, plus 25%+ 127:1 184:1 267:1 interactive exercises Level 3 eLearning (Advanced) – Simulations, Games, 217:1 490:1 716:1 Award Winning type
    19. 19. Time Management resources for Trainers? 19
    20. 20. Let’s take a look at the video 20
    21. 21. Let’s Review… Get efficient  Get centered Get systematic  Get perspective Get inspired  Get (it) out of your head Get specific (list)  Get empty Get focused  Eat that frog Slack off  Get human Manage your  Say "no“ ask for help commitments  Choose 21
    22. 22. Something to help you… Find out where your time goes Establish Goals Learn how to plan your activities Prioritize your activities Keep interruptions to a minimum Take control of time at meetings Improve your communication skills 22
    23. 23. Tools you can use… Microsoft Outlook Checklists Project Management tools (Project, Planview etc.) Activity Log Prioritization Matrix SMART Goal Setting 23
    24. 24. Thank You. 24
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×