Course studies book 2012 13 (final draft 012412)
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Course studies book 2012 13 (final draft 012412) Course studies book 2012 13 (final draft 012412) Document Transcript

  • 2012-2013Student Guide and Course of StudiesWinchester High School80 Skillings RoadWinchester, Massachusetts(781) 721-7020
  • 1THE WINCHESTER HIGH SCHOOLMISSION STATEMENTThe mission of Winchester High School is to provide, for all of its students, an opportunity to achieve excellence in learning, specifically to foster: Critical thinking Clear and effective communication Intellectual creativity A sense of personal, civic and social responsibility, and The ability to apply these essential skills and knowledge to life situationsEXPECTATIONSACADEMIC EXPECTATIONSThe Winchester High School graduate is able to communicate effectively.The Winchester High School graduate is able to acquire, integrate and apply essential knowledge.The Winchester High School graduate is able to analyze, interpret and evaluate information effectively.The Winchester High School graduate is able to make intellectual and practical connections between and among different disciplines.The Winchester High School graduate is able to understand and apply technology to his/her learning experience.The Winchester High School graduate works to acquire an informed global perspective.CIVIC AND SOCIAL EXPECTATIONSThe Winchester High School student demonstrates self-respect and an appreciation of diversity.The Winchester High School student participates responsibly as a member of the student body.GOALSOur school goals are:1. to educate the complete individual, and2. to provide the student with the knowledge, skills, and values needed to enrich his/her own life and be a responsible member of society, and3. to be a school that demonstrates leadership and innovation in education and is a matter of pride and value for the Town of Winchester.STATEMENT OF COMMITMENT TO POLICY OFNON-DISCRIMINATIONWinchester High School provides equal educational opportunity for all students and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, nationalorigin, sexual orientation, or disability. Students have equal access to admission to school courses, extracurricular activities, and employment opportunities.Students who believe they have been victims of discrimination are hereby notified that grievance procedures are available to them and that they shouldcontact the principal for more information. Counseling services are available to help students address their individual needs.GRADUATION REQUIREMENTSStudents must earn a minimum of 110 credits to be eligible for graduation.The following courses must be taken and passed:Subject No. of YearsEnglish...............................………...4 (including 1 semester of Writing Lab)Social Studies.......................……… 2 years of World History and 1 year of American HistoryScience.....................................…… 2 years: 1 Biology, 1 Physical Science (i.e. Chemistry or Physics)Mathematics..........................………2 yearsWellness…………...............………4 yearsFine or Applied Arts*............……...1 yearFive credits must be earned in Fine or Applied Arts. All courses taken outside of the English, Math, Science, Social Studies, and Foreign Languagedepartments qualify for the Fine Arts and applied requirement.
  • 2The following assumptions will govern the above requirements:With the exception of the double-period Humanities and the American Studies offerings, no course may be utilized to satisfy more than one requirement. A full-year course will receive 5.0 credits. All Freshman, Sophomores, and Juniors are expected to carry a full academic load. Exceptions require the approval of a principal or an assistantprincipal. A full academic load is defined as 6 courses per semester. Seniors enrolled in two or more AP courses may take a lesser academic load. Seniors not enrolled in two or more AP courses may take a lesser academic load during 2ndsemester, with parental and administrative permission.Additionally, the student must have a 2.5 GPA or better and be in good academic standing. A lesser academic load is defined as five courses per semester.INFORMATION FOR TRANSFER STUDENTSFor complete information concerning the process for transfer students, including the documents required, go to the Winchester Public Schools Web site:www.winchester.k12.ma.us and look under “Guidance”.Transcripts from other schools will be evaluated by the Guidance Department in conjunction with the assistant principal. Incoming students must providefull documentation from the sending school which includes an official transcript, withdrawal form, health and immunization record, and disciplinary record.In addition, students transferring from other Massachusetts public schools must provide their MCAS scores. In order to maintain consistency and equity inthis process, the following guidelines will be adhered to:A. When a student enters Winchester High School, he/she will be awarded credit based on the interpretation of his/her guidance counselor afterreviewing the student’s previous schools transcript(s).B. Students will be required to meet Winchester High School graduation course requirements to be eligible to earn a Winchester High Schooldiploma. The Guidance Department, in consultation with department directors/coordinators, will determine whether any courses must be madeup prior to graduation. In accordance with the Massachusetts Department of Education mandate, all students must also earn passing scores on theMCAS examination to be eligible for a high school diploma.C. Transfer students’ grades from their previous school(s) are not used in the GPA calculations from Winchester High School.D. In the case of students entering during a grading period, the following guidelines will apply:1. If the student enters during the first half of the marking period, the teacher will take the grade from the prior placement intoconsideration and will assign the grade.2. If the student enters during the second half of the marking period, the student may, at the teacher’s recommendation and withpermission of department head and administrator, be graded on a pass/fail basis.E. Students transferring in should bring their health and attendance records with them and may be held accountable for their cumulative absences.All grades are letter grades and are used in all classes. Appropriate weight is given each grade to determine the grade point average.COURSE CHANGE POLICYRequests for schedules changes after the start of school will only be granted if: A student did not pass a class that was a prerequisite for another class. Summer school coursework necessitates a change in the student’s schedule. Completion of a level change form for all level changes (required) A course change is necessary for a grade 12 student to fulfill a graduation requirement An error has been made inputting a student’s course choices Authenticated health reasonThroughout the school year level changes can only be made with the completion of a level change form. Level changes will not be allowed during thelast two weeks of 1st, 2ndand 3rdquarters. After the third quarter, students will not be allowed to drop a course to a lower level.Students may drop a class to add a study hall while still maintaining a minimum load of 30 credits/six courses. Students who wish to withdraw from aclass within the first two weeks of a course must see their guidance counselor for proper paperwork. The student must continue to attend the class until a newschedule has been issued. If a student does not follow proper procedure, he/she will receive a failing grade. Students who withdraw after the first two weeksof a course will receive a “W” for that class. Students who withdraw after the sixth week of a class will receive a WF (withdraw fail), WP (withdraw pass),or WM (withdraw medical).Unless extenuating circumstances exist, any other schedule changes will not be made after the start of school.
  • 3CREDITS/COURSE WEIGHTING FOR GPAWinchester High School uses a two-leveled grade-weighting system. Courses taken at the College Level are assigned the weight listed in right columnbelow, and those taken at the Advanced Placement (AP) or Honors level are assigned weights listed in the left column.Course weighting used to determine grade point average::Grade Earned AP & Honors CollegeA+ (97 - 100) 4.5 4.0A (93 - 96) 4.2 3.7A- (90 - 92) 4.0 3.5B+ (87 - 89) 3.8 3.3B (83 - 86) 3.5 3.0B- (80 - 82) 3.2 2.7C+ (77 - 79) 2.9 2.4C (73 - 76) 2.5 2.0C- (70 - 72) 2.2 1.7D+ (67 - 69) 1.9 1.4D (63 - 66) 1.5 1.0D- (60 - 62) 1.2 0.7F (0 – 59) 0 0The values found in the chart above are used to calculate the student’s grade point average (GPA). Full year courses are weighted twice as much as semestercourses. The level of the course (AP/honors/college) can be found in the course descriptions which begin on page 7.A brief definition of the levels follows:Advanced Placement (AP): Advanced Placement courses are designed by the Educational Testing Service (a division of the College Board) to allowstudents the opportunity to complete college-level studies during secondary school. AP course offerings are for the most educationally advanced studentsand may be taken only by permission of the appropriate Director/Coordinator. Students choosing these courses should be achieving grades of at least anA- or B+ in the Honors sequence.Honors: These courses are designed for educationally advanced students. They are extremely rigorous, demanding of the student a high degree ofmotivation and past achievement. These courses, when taken in appropriate sequence, are preparatory for the Advanced Placement courses. Studentsdesiring to remain in this sequence should be earning grades of B or better.College: These courses are designed for the majority of students who intend to pursue their education beyond high school. They provide the commonlearning necessary to prepare a student for the demands of a college curriculum.Additional Information:1. Credit shall only be given to courses that are in the Course of Studies Booklet, with the exception of Independent Study.2. Credit may be granted for experiences that are considered to be academic in nature with prior approval of the administration.3. Credit shall not be granted for enrichment activities such as field trips, exchange trips, or internships.4. Only courses receiving a letter grade with a corresponding numeric value will be used in calculating Grade Point Average. Courses receivingPass/Fail will not be used in the calculation.5. Independent Study courses are graded and must have the prior approval of the director/coordinator of the appropriate department, the guidancecounselor, and a high school administrator.SUMMER SCHOOLThe main purposes of summer school are:1. Upgrading of poor marks to meet prerequisite requirements.2. Earning credit for subjects failed.3. Acceleration/Enrichment (with PRIOR administrative approval).Administrative approval of summer school courses for remediation is not automatic. In reviewing eligibility for summer school, the Principal will considerboth the student’s record of attendance in the course failed, as well as the number of hours and the content of the summer school course proposed forremediation. Except where extenuating circumstances exist, students must have been enrolled and attending classes in a course for the entire academic yearin order to qualify for summer school.Procedure for Obtaining Course ApprovalA student must receive written permission from the administration, prior to registering for any course in order to receive credit for the course.1. The “Course Approval Form” is obtained from the Guidance Department.2. The student completes the Course Approval Form, attaches a course description to it and submits it to the appropriate academic departmentdirector for his/her signature.3. After obtaining the signature of the department director, the student must obtain the signature of an administrator (principal or assistant principal).4. After all signatures have been obtained, the student must bring the signed form back to the Guidance Department where it will be kept on file.5. Upon completion of the course, it is the student’s responsibility to have an official transcript of the course grade mailed to the W.H.S. GuidanceDepartment. No credit will be awarded until the official transcript is received.Grades from summer school will be recorded separately on the permanent record cards and labeled “Summer Study”. The original grade for the subject willnot be changed (if there is one) nor will the summer school grade be included when determining the student’s grade point average (GPA).
  • 4EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICESGuidanceBecause of the wide variety of opportunities at Winchester High School, as well as the diversity of entrance requirements of thousands of schools andvocations, it is imperative that the student seek the advice and assistance of his/her guidance counselor in selecting the courses that are appropriate to thestudents and parent’s expectations.Our primary goal is to counsel students so that they can attain their highest level of understanding in educational achievement, occupational choices andpersonal development.The guidance counselors present classroom group guidance seminars with material designed to meet the developmental needs appropriate to students at eachspecific grade level..The Guidance Office strongly encourages students to make appointments to discuss any issues which might arise.A few important facts are listed below:A. Guidance and counseling services are available to all students and parents.B. Counseling assignments are based on an alphabetical division of students.C. Students may make appointments with their assigned counselor by signing up in the appointment book in the Guidance Office. Except in cases ofemergency, students may only schedule appointments during academic blocks (study halls). Appointments may also be made before or afterschool, with the consent of the student’s guidance counselor.D. Parents may make appointments with their child’s guidance counselor by contacting the counselor directly.E. General information is available in the Guidance Office and on the department’s website about post-secondary educational opportunities,scholarship information, career materials, computerized college search services and numerous other materials.F. The Guidance Department’s monthly newsletter, The Guide, is posted on the department’s website. It is available through the PFA as well. TheGuide provides information on upcoming events sponsored by the Guidance Department, as well as timely information about admissions testing,scholarships and other events and programs of interest to the W.H.S. community.G. Each year the Guidance Department joins with other Middlesex League high schools to co-sponsor an evening college fair at a central location.Several hundred colleges are represented at this event to which all W.H.S. students and parents are invited.H. Results of intelligence, aptitude, reading and interest tests may be reviewed with a counselor as an aid in planning and exploring educational andcareer possibilities.Special EducationThe Special Education program at Winchester High School provides support for students who have been identified through a CMR 28:00 (Chapter 766)team evaluation. Students are referred for an evaluation by the Teacher Resource Team. Each student has an Individualized Educational Program (IEP)with specific goals and objectives tailored to his/her disability. Plans are reviewed and rewritten on an annual basis. Students receive services through thefollowing settings and in general education classrooms:Learning Center 4 - Service delivery in LC4 comes in the form of an extensive classroom support and can include the implementation of modifiedcurriculum. Our focus is to assure inclusion in general education classes for all students while providing each child with individualized instruction.In-program specialized instruction is provided individually and in small groups. Students meet with special education teachers and support personnelwho are trained to meet the needs of the students enrolled in Achieve.1stFloor Learning Center – LC1 is a multifaceted program that serves students who have been identified with language based disabilities.In-program service delivery is comprised of language arts support classes, both individual and small group support. Staff works to assiststudents in preparing them to become fully successful in general education classes while academic support is provided based on class work within LC1.Students must meet a specific criterion in order to be considered for the LC1.2ndFloor Learning Center - Students receive academic support and remediation of skill deficiencies in LC2, while fully included in generaleducation courses at Winchester High School. Students are assigned to small groups and work with specialists who are trained to assist withindividual needs as identified by educational plans.3rdFloor Learning Center – Students work to overcome personal challenges to attain emotional health, social skills and behavioral control in LC3.Staff works to assist students in preparing them to return to full-time participation in general education classes while academic support is providedbased on class work within LC3. Curriculum instruction is tailored to individual student needs. Counseling and regular emotional supports areintegral parts of the program, along with close home-school communication. Students must meet specific criteria in order to be considered for LC3.In addition to the special education programs at Winchester High School, students may also be recommended to receive support services from the schoolpsychologist or other specialists. Recommendations for such services are made through the CMR 28:00 (Chapter 766) team.
  • 5OTHER STUDENT SUPPORTSClinical Counselor - The school’s clinical counselor is available to support students who are experiencing social and/or emotional adjustment issues.Students may self-refer or may be referred by other members of the school community.ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) - The ESOL services are available for students whose primary language is not English. Students in needof ESOL services are referred through their guidance counselor. A referral can be made by the student, the family, a teacher or a staff member. The goal ofESOL program is to provide overall support and to assist the student’s movement into a full, mainstream program.Excel - The Excel Program is a regular education program designed to intervene with students who are at risk for school failure. Students in the programcharacteristically present with problems related to academic and social/emotional issues that have in some way begun to impede their success in school.Issues related to personal growth and development, self-advocacy, attendance, and academic underachievement are addressed in the program. The studentsare able to develop a better sense of self and become more successful in school through academic monitoring, acquiring organizational skills, individual andgroup counseling, home-school communication, teacher consultation and ongoing assessment. Excel has three main components, a three-credit Sociologyclass that replaces the history requirement for freshman, sophomores and seniors, academic support and counseling. Referrals into the Excel Program maycome from teachers, administrators, guidance counselors, the Child Study Team, parents--or the students themselves. Students are admitted to the programfollowing an application and interview process with the Excel staff.504 - Section 504 is an Act which prohibits discrimination against persons with a handicap in any program receiving Federal financial assistance. The 504Act defines a person with a handicap as anyone who:1. Has a mental or physical impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities (such as caring for one’s self, performing manualtasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning and working.)2. Has a record of such an impairment or is regarded as having such an impairment.The intent of Section 504 on schools is to “accommodate” for differences within the regular educational environment. Winchester High School hasdeveloped procedures and safeguards for students under Section 504 and recognizes a responsibility to avoid discrimination in policies and practicesregarding its personnel and students. A student’s eligibility is determined by a team at Winchester High School. For further information regarding Section504, parents may contact the Secondary Student Services Coordinator.Instruction of Homebound Students - Home instruction of pupils unable to attend school because of physical disability shall begin as soon as possibleafter it has been established that the childs absence will extend over a period of more than fourteen (14) consecutive school days. Such home instructionwill cease upon the childs return to school. Parents should call the school counselor for the necessary forms and to arrange for home instruction.It is the responsibility of the teacher to provide assistance with make-up work not covered by the above instructional arrangements.Home Schooling - Parents may choose to educate their children at home without using the public school system. According to state law, parents mustsubmit their proposed curriculum to the Superintendent (or his/her designee) for approval.EARLY GRADUATIONIn some instances, students with parental consent may choose the option of graduating a full year in advance of their class. This option is open to allstudents provided the following procedures are adhered to:1. The student, through their counselor, must request the early graduation at the end of the sophomore year or during the first semester of the junioryear.2. The counselor will hold a meeting with the student, the parent, and the principal to discuss options, what the decision may mean in terms of futuregoals, and whether the decision is appropriate, based on the students prior academic record. Should the student and his/her parent(s) decide tocontinue this process, the parent will submit in writing a formal request for early graduation to the principal.3. If early graduation is agreed upon, the work necessary to complete the diploma requirements will be determined either in the meeting mentionedabove, or in a meeting held before the close of the first semester of junior year. The requirements for early graduation will be included in awritten plan to be signed by the student, parent, principal, and guidance counselor.4. Upon completion of all agreed-upon work by the student, a diploma will be granted.OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIESVocational Education OpportunitiesWinchester is one of 12 communities that are served by the Northeast Metro Tech High School in Wakefield. Admission to Northeast typically takes placeat the end of 8th grade, when students apply from their respective communities. The 9th grade year is an exploratory year, during which students have anopportunity to sample a variety of vocational opportunities. Students may also apply to Northeast after the 9th grade, although their choices are limited bythe number of vacancies in the vocational department to which they are applying. Applications are due by March 1, 2012 for the 2012-2013 school year;please call Northeast Admission Office at (781) 246-0810, Ext. 1651 to receive an application.There are two additional ways in which students may be admitted to another vocational school. Parents may apply to other vocational schools in the areawho have “school choice”. Under the school choice regulation, students are accepted under a lottery system and if accepted, Winchester funds the tuition atthe school. In the second option, students from Winchester may be eligible to attend a vocational school outside of the Northeast Metro Tech High School,if they apply in grade 10 for a vocational choice which is not offered at Northeast. For additional information regarding vocational education, parents and/orstudents should speak with the Winchester High School guidance department.
  • 6Independent StudyIndependent Study is a program that Winchester High School offers for 11thand 12thgrade students. This program broadens the curriculum by offeringstudents an opportunity to pursue an area of academic interest under the guidance of an advisor who has special skills in that field. Independent studyprojects may not replicate the existing curriculum at Winchester High School. Specialized topics contained within existing courses may be pursued at theadvanced level after the student has taken the appropriate prerequisites. NOTE: Honors credit will not be given for Independent Study.It is important that students understand the workload for an independent study course is equal to a course offered at the high school. Students takeresponsibility for their own learning in an independent study course.Proposal Submission Process Your proposal: A Proposal form must be completed by the student and clearly indicate the topic, the process for learning, the times and placesof learning, and specific activities that will be used for evaluation of the Independent Study course. All of these decisions should be worked outbetween the student and his/her advisor. Submission of Your Proposal: Proposals should be submitted in the semester prior to the semester for which they are proposed. The finaldeadline for full year and first semester proposals is two weeks after the first day of school. The final deadline for second semester proposals isthe last day of school prior to midterm examinations. Retroactive proposals are not accepted. Student Responsibilities: A student taking Independent Study is individually responsible, by definition, for completing work on time, meetingwith the advisor, and keeping the advisor informed of progress in completing the independent study. Students are solely responsible for adheringto quarter and semester deadlines, as well as any deadlines set by the advisor. Work must be submitted according to these deadlines. Grading and Credits: Grades are weighted at the CP level and will be part of a student’s GPA. Credit is determined by the amount of time astudent spends learning. Credit is awarded for semester (2.5 credits) and/or full year (5 credits). One semester, 2.5 credits, is equal to 72 hours ofwork. Withdrawal: A student may withdraw from Independent Study only by following the normal withdrawal process for regular courses as outlinein “Withdrawal Policy” on page 2.Community Service-LearningCommunity Service-Learning is a teaching and learning methodology that blends meaningful service to the community with curriculum-based learning sothat each enriches and enhances the other. Through service-learning, students build knowledge, character, and civic skills, and they improve academic skillby applying what they learn in school to the real world. Community service-learning is an area that has been singled out in several national reports onexcellence as an integral part of the education process. A growing number of faculty offer courses at the high school that utilize community service-learningas a teaching tool. Students interested in taking such a class should contact Kristen Ritchie, the Connect & Commit Community Service-Learning ProgramDirector, at x1999 or kritchie@winchester.k12.ma.us.Work Study/Internship OptionA Work Study/Internship option is available for selected students (generally juniors or seniors). To participate in Work Study, a student must locate a jobthat provides a learning experience, takes place (at least partially) during school hours, attain the approval of his/her guidance counselor, assistant principal,parent or guardian, and have demonstrated a strong work ethic. The approval for work study will be made on an individual basis. Credit for Work Studywill be granted on an individual basis (up to 10 credits per year).HIGHER EDUCATION INFORMATION(For Students Planning to Attend a Four-Year College or University After High School Graduation)Winchester High School uses the Admissions Standards Policy adopted in 1996 by the Massachusetts Board of Regents of Higher Education as a minimumeligibility guide to course selections for students planning to attend a four-year college or university. In some instances, Winchester High School’srequirements exceed the course work required by the Board of Regents, so that students may be eligible for admission to the most selective colleges.Minimum Required College Preparatory Course work for Admission to Massachusetts State Colleges and University of MassachusettsEnglish 4 coursesMathematics 3 courses(Algebra I & II, Geometry, Trigonometry, or comparable course work. U. Mass, Amherst admission into Engineering,Management, and Computer Science requires the completion of 4 courses.)Sciences 3 courses (including 2 lab courses)Social Studies 2 courses of World History and1 course of United States HistoryForeign Language 2 courses in a single languageElective Subjects 2 courses(Arts, Humanities, Computer Sciences, or the above subjects)Some competitive colleges may have additional requirements.Criteria for College AdmissionCollege admission requirements vary widely from school to school. As a guideline, colleges and universities usually consider the following factors: Academic Record (grades received and levels of courses)-Standing in class (WHS uses deciles, rather than rank)-Grade Point Average (GPA) Results of College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Examinations(Some colleges require or prefer the ACT rather than the SAT and Subject Tests.)-SAT Reasoning Test-SAT Subject Tests Writing Sample Teacher/Counselor Recommendations Extracurricular Activities (including work experience.)
  • 7COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY DEPARTMENTARTThe Art Program consists of courses that develop students creative abilities and visual communication skills. Students will participate in hands-on artstudio, photography lab and computer lab activities that explore the use of a wide variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional art materials.Through individualized and group instruction, art teachers stress the importance of experimentation and balance this with the more guided development oftechnical skills with specific art materials. The thirteen courses currently being offered by the Art Department have been designed to sharpen students’critical and creative thinking skills and to increase students’ confidence in their own creativity. All courses fulfill the Fine and Applied Arts graduationrequirement.0601 PHOTOSHOP I (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Fulfills one-half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement.)Students will explore the potential of the computer as a visual arts tool. Under the direction of an art instructor, students will use Adobe PhotoShop.The skills that are developed in this course have both fine art and commercial art applications. Students who enroll in this course should have basiccomputer skills.0614 ART, NEW MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY: ADOBE CS5 (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Prerequisite: Photoshop 1 with B or better) (Fulfillsone-half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement)This course covers the techniques and tools specific to making unique works of art with a variety of new media through project based inquiry.Students will have the opportunity to create a digital portfolio using the multifaceted program Adobe CS5 in the Mac Lab. Components of theprogram include Photoshop, Illustrator, In Design, Flash Animation and Dreamweaver. Students will also use software such as Garage Band, FinalCut Pro and I-Movie. There will be opportunities to explore all the equipment in the Mac Lab including green screen for video editing, digitalcameras and scanners. Students are encouraged to incorporate traditional art making processes into their digital work. This course is designed for theadvanced computer user..0635 COMPUTER ANIMATION I (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Fulfills one half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement.)(Prerequisite: Students who select this course should have a strong comfort level using the PC or Macintosh computer and should be able todemonstrate Adobe Photoshop skills and other abilities with advanced software. Completion of any art course or computer course at WHS isrecommended before taking Computer Animation I.)This course will allow students to enter the creative world of digital animation through Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects software and otherhands-on experiences. As the director and producer, students will discover how the principles and concepts of animation are applied to the creation oftheir own multimedia animation that may integrate sound, music, photography, drawings, video clips, text and other imagery. As students begin todevelop production techniques they will focus on creativity, individuality, originality in the formation of their storyline and concept. Animationinvolves electronic drawing and manipulation of graphics, creating and adjusting frame types, sequencing and regulating timing, adding transitions forscenes, tweening objects for movement, adding special effects, editing and revising frames, and creating front and ending matter. For major animationprojects, students will present ideas in a well planned and written format for discussion with the teacher for prior approval. This course will require avariety of outside work, including: reading and writing assignments, research, or other assigned projects. Students will maintain an animation portfoliofor assessment and presentation for each quarter.0636 COMPUTER ANIMATION II (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Fulfills one half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement.)(Prerequisite: Computer Animation I with a minimum grade of B)The primary goal for continuing students will be to produce advanced digital animations that are creative, imaginative, and have meaningful plots. Asdirectors and producers, students will continue to develop their production techniques and will apply the fundamental principles of animation to theirwork. Through the use of Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects software animation productions may integrate sounds, music, photography,drawing, video clips text and other sources of imagery in a highly imaginative manner. Collaborative projects can be developed to focus on specificthemes that are unique, artistic, and spontaneous. To be considered as exemplary, students must complete at least one additional animation projectthat demonstrates exceptional work. This course will require a variety of outside work, including: reading and writing assignments, research, or otherassigned projects. Students will maintain an animation portfolio for assessment and presentation for each quarter.0600 SCULPTURE (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (This course fulfills one-half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement.)This half year course is offered to students who enjoy working with 3-D materials. The emphasis is on the development of technical skills andcreativity while using a variety of form building materials; clay, plaster, wood, foam core, found materials and wire. This course will also reinforceand broaden the student’s understanding of the elements and principals of art and design through creative problem solving and critical thinking.0613 HONORS SCULPTURE (H) (10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Prerequisite: Sculpture 1 with a B or better) (This course fulfills one half the Fineand Applied Arts Graduation Requirement)This semester long course focuses on advanced techniques, materials, and concepts of 3-Dimensional art. This course is designed for students who areinterested in learning more about traditional materials (clay, stone, plaster, wood) and processes such as mold making and alternative finishingprocesses for ceramic work. Students will have opportunities to use observation of nature and the human forms as subject matter for their work. Therewill be collaborative ceramic building projects and students will also be instructed on the wheel.
  • 80606 STUDIO ART I (CP) (9,10,11,12) Y 5.0 (This course fulfills the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement.)Studio Art I is appropriate for all 9-12 grade students. Realistic drawing skills are not necessary to achieve success in this course. This hands-on studiocourse offers instruction in the fundamentals of two-dimensional and three-dimensional art. Studio Art I provides exposure to a wide range of mediaincluding drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed-media, digital art and sculpture. This course also offers exposure to art history that supports studioart activities. Both old and new world materials, processes and technologies will be explored. Students will also be introduced to glaze mixing andalterative ceramic firing techniques. Studio Art I is a prerequisite for Studio Art II.Upon completion of this course students should: have developed their drawing and design skills have developed technical skills in the use of art materials used in the process of drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture and mixed-media.Some of these materials are pencil, paint, pastel, pen and ink, printmaking, collage, clay, wood, wire and found objects. have developed a broader understanding of how artists combine skill in the use of art materials with the creative process in order to communicateideas and feelings.0607 STUDIO ART II (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Studio Art I) (This course fulfills the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement.)This course is for students who wish to continue their exploration of art as a means of visual expression. Students will work with an exciting variety ofart materials throughout the year. The emphasis is on individualized instruction which addresses the artistic interests and specific educational needs ofeach student. In addition to improving their drawing and design skills, students will also be encouraged to communicate their own ideas and feelings.Areas of concentration include drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and mixed-media. Materials include pencil, paint, pastel, pen and ink,collage, watercolor, clay, wood, wire, and found objects. The art experiences offered in Studio Art II have both fine and commercial art applications.Studio Art II may be elected in grades 10, 11, and/or 12 each year for a total of 15 credits.0611 DRAWING AND PAINTING (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (This course fulfills one half the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Reguirement.)This half year course focuses on the techniques, materials and concepts specific to 2-D media. Students will develop their technical skills and creativitywhile exploring a variety of subject matter such as portraiture, figure drawing, still life and landscape. Students will balance observational study withimages culled from digital sources as well as their imagination as we experiment with different styles like abstract, surreal, conceptual andrepresentation art. A variety of materials will be used from charcoal and acrylic paint to mixed and digital media. The course will also investigate thedifferent ways artists have interpreted drawing and painting from the Renaissance to contemporary periods. Students will maintain a sketchbookthroughout the semester to generate ideas and complete homework assignments.0608 HONORS ART (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: B+ in Studio Art II)This course is for students who have taken at least one year of Studio Art II and who have identified art as an area in which they have strength andabundant interest. Some students who elect this course should regard the course as the first year of a two year process to complete an art portfolio forart school and/or college admission. A wide range of two-dimensional and three-dimensional art materials will be explored in a structured studiosetting. Artistic independence will increase as the year progresses. The course includes field trips to museums and galleries, and visiting artist and artschool presentations.0609 SENIOR HONORS ART (H) (12) Y/Double – 10.0 (Prerequisite: Honors Art and Approval of Director of Art)The Senior Honors Art course provides a double period of studio art each day for seniors who have demonstrated exceptional ability and interest invisual art. Most Senior Honors Art students have taken a minimum of two years of Studio Art II and/or one year of Honors Art and are expected tohave a working understanding of the principles of design and the elements of art. The production and preparation of art work for the student portfoliois the primary involvement for many Senior Honors Art students in the first semester. The emphasis for each project, however, is on the exploration ofideas and experimentation with art materials. Students receive individualized instruction in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture and mixed-media. The course includes field trips to museums and galleries, visiting artist and art school presentations and participation in an end-of-the-yearThesis Honors Art Exhibit.0605 HONORS PHOTOGRAPHY (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: B in Photography II) (This course fulfills the Fine and Applied Arts Graduationrequirement.)This course is for students who have completed Photography I and II and who want to pursue photography as a potential career path as well as a meansof personal artistic expression. The Photography Program at Winchester High School has recently expanded to include digital photography. Digitalcameras and state-of-the-art computers and software are available to Honors Photography students. This full year course in photography will linktraditional black and white photography, color photography, and digital image making. This link will make it possible for students to learn and achieveat very high levels while using state-of-the-art technology that they will find in post-graduate programs.Another objective of the course will be the development of a portfolio that consists of a concentration of work, that is, a series of images that areconnected by a common subject, theme and/or visual element. This portfolio concept will be used to challenge students to push an idea or visual themeas far as they can. The portfolio will also be used for college or art school admission as well as for exhibitions and competitions.0603 PHOTOGRAPHY I (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (This course fulfills one-half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement.)This course offers instruction in basic black and white photography. Students will have full access to a high quality photographic darkroom within theArt Department both during and after school. The course will combine the technical aspects of basic black and white photography with concerns aboutthe photographic image as art. Students will learn how to use a 35 mm manual camera, photographic enlargement and printing techniques, filmdeveloping and alternative photographic techniques including solarization, photograms, pin hole camera shooting, and double-exposing.
  • 90604 PHOTOGRAPHY II (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Prerequisite: B in Photography I) (Fulfills one-half of the Fine and Applied Arts GraduationRequirement)This course will provide the opportunity for students who have taken Photography I to explore advanced printing techniques, including color printprocessing.While the course will focus primarily on darkroom printing techniques, students will also experiment in alternative photographic processes such as theuse of different format cameras, Polaroid imaging and emulsion transfers, cyan-o-type, daylight printing paper and digital imaging. The photographicimage as fine art will be a central concern. Students will be expected to build a photographic portfolio.0612 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY CP (10, 11, 12) S 2.5Students will learn all phases of digital photography, from exposure/capture to the final output as a printed image and/or a digital image for webpresentation. Students will learn the basic camera skills necessary to create successful photographs such as exposure, focus, white balance, and depthof field.Students will also learn “digital workflow” and this includes downloading their photographs to the computer and editing, processing and preparingthem for output using Adobe Photoshop CS2. Students will learn how to make prints using photo inkjet printers and will be able to optimize theirphotographs for use on the Internet. Students will learn how to present their work using PowerPoint and will study the work of other artists both insideand outside the field of photography. Digital cameras will be available for students to borrow during the course.COMPUTER EDUCATION0640 21st CENTURY COMPETENCIES FOR REAL WORLD APPLICATIONS (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5Creativity, self direction, collaboration and authentic engagement will allow the students to have a deeper understanding of a topic of interest. Studentswill take an active role in defining the topic and project for this cross discipline project based course. There are endless resources available online forour students today. Currently, students are consumers of entertainment when they navigate the internet. During this course, the student will expandand enhance their proficiency level while tapping into the endless wealth available on line and will develop the 21st century savvy necessary for themto be competitive with their global peers. Students will learn iPods are not just for music, use wikis and blogs as both a consumer and a creator,connect with experts in the field, interactivity of the web, use of individualized portals, video on demand, effective navigation and searches, globalethics and much more is to be uncovered during this semester long course. This transformational course will have the students looking at their on lineexperience through a totally difference lens. The standards found in the following documents will be used to benchmark the proficiency level for thiscourse MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for Grades 9-12 Technology Literacy Standards, P21 Partnership and ISTE NETS forStudents.0635 COMPUTER ANIMATION I (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Fulfills one half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement)This course will allow students to enter the creative world of digital animation through Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects software and otherhands-on experiences. As the director and producer, students will discover how the principles and concepts of animation are applied to the creation oftheir own multimedia animation that may integrate sound, music, photography, drawings, video clips, text and other imagery. As students begin todevelop production techniques they will focus on creativity, individuality, originality in the formation of their storyline and concept. Animationinvolves electronic drawing and manipulation of graphics, creating and adjusting frame types, sequencing and regulating timing, adding transitions forscenes, tweening objects for movement, adding special effects, editing and revising frames, and creating front and ending matter. Students will alsohave to incorporate the use of a green screen (a technique known as chroma key) in their animation projects. For major animation projects, studentswill present ideas in a well planned and written format for discussion with the teacher for prior approval. This course will require a variety of outsidework, including: reading and writing assignments, research, or other assigned projects. Students will maintain an animation portfolio for assessmentand presentation for each quarter.0636 COMPUTER ANIMATION II (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Fulfills one half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement.)(Prerequisite: Computer Animation I with a minimum grade of B)The primary goal for continuing students will be to produce advanced digital animations that are creative, imaginative, and have meaningful plots. Asdirectors and producers, students will continue to develop their production techniques and will apply the fundamental principles of animation to theirwork. Through the use of Macromedia Flash and Adobe After Effects software animation productions may integrate sounds, music, photography,drawings, video clips, text and other sources of imagery in a highly imaginative manner. Students should aim to utilize the green screen in one of theirprojects. Collaborative projects can be developed to focus on specific themes that are unique, artistic, and spontaneous. To be considered as exemplary,students must complete at least one additional animation project that demonstrates exceptional work. This course will require a variety of outside work,including: reading and writing assignments, research, or other assigned projects. Students will maintain an animation portfolio for assessment andpresentation for each quarter.0630 INFORMATION PROCESSING & COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (CP) (9, 10, 11,12) S 2.5This hands-on, one-semester course has been designed to help students develop computer and keyboarding skills that are needed for collegepreparation and personal use. Students will learn how to complete a variety of computer projects, including basic word processing for composingpersonal letters and school reports with graphics, use of the Internet as a communication and research tool, introduction to desktop publishing for pagelayout and design, use of scanning and digital camera hardware for manipulation of graphic images, and integrated projects and slide shows. Inaddition, students will have instruction and practice time for building keyboarding speed and accuracy, designing spreadsheets and databases, andlearning other useful software applications. This is an excellent sixth course to carry as nearly all work is covered in class. The Departmentrecommends that all students enroll in a computer course before graduation.
  • 100631 WEB DESIGN I (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Fulfills one-half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement)Have you ever wondered how Web pages on the Internet are made? Do you want to have the skills to create interesting Websites? This course teachesthe basics of building and maintaining a site on the World Wide Web. We work with Web graphics created by Adobe Photoshop, MacromediaFireworks, Flash & Dreamweaver MX. You will learn the basics of HTML code, creative design concepts and tricks of the trade. Students willmaintain a portfolio of projects for assessment. The knowledge of the Internet language is especially helpful for further studies and career paths in thisarea.0632 WEB DESIGN II/Dreamweaver MX (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Prerequisite: Web Design I with a minimum grade of a C- or prior approval of theteacher.) (Fulfills one-half of the Fine and Applied Arts Graduation Requirement)Macromedia Dreamweaver MX, Flash, Fireworks and Adobe Photoshop are our continued focus. Students will work in teams or independently tocreate advanced Websites that are designed for aesthetics and function with introductory interactivity. Students will learn the HTML and CSS(cascading style sheets) to construct their website. Find a client and build the site; you have potentially earned an advanced grade. One major segmentof this course will be the maintenance and enhancement of the Winchester Public Schools Websites. Get your FTP skills developed as we transfer filesto the WWW. Students will be encouraged to maintain an Internet-based portfolio. (NOTE: Some students may be able to select this course without theprerequisite—prior approval is required.) The knowledge of the Internet language is especially helpful for college studies and career paths in this area.0633 INDEPENDENT COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5This course will offer an opportunity, to specific students which are self-motivated, to complete an independent computer project. The entire programis individualized, as students will be expected to plan and to develop challenging and unique computer projects. Some suggested topics may include:learning a programming language, learning advanced software such as Adobe Photoshop V.6, Adobe After Effects, Macromedia Flash, or developing aportfolio of electronic painting/drawing, authoring a comprehensive Website, finding an on-line tutorial for a specific topic, completing an in depthcomputer research project for integration in a core subject area as well as developing other creative, challenging, and independent computer work.Student projects are pre-approved by the instructor and a weekly journal is required for documenting work and communicating with the instructor.Students will be expected to present a summary of specific results for assessment. This is an excellent sixth course to carry as nearly all work iscompleted in class.0634 INTRO TO SPORTS, RECREATION/ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5Ever wonder what goes on behind the scenes of the fascinating world of sports professional careers, and the fast-paced recreation/entertainment showswe watch and read about everyday? This course is an introduction and survey of these exciting fields. By observation and marketing analysis we willstudy concepts and strategies and the role of ecommerce. Students will discover how these exciting industries generate such popularity. The followingkey areas will be examined and explored as part of the curriculum: marketing strategies and tools, economics of the industry, advertising andpromotion ideas, promotion campaigns, product licensing, agents and personal managers, merchandising, safety and security, advertising, visualmerchandising, human relations, the sales process, sales promotion, merchandising, designers, market research, organizational management,economics, careers, marketing trends, customer relations. Students will work on various business plans, which include commercial production, eventpromotion, and the duties of a sports agent. Students will research, discuss, present, and work in small cooperative learning groups as well as completeoutside reading and homework. This course is an excellent elective for potential college business majors and other related sport management studies.0641 DEVELOPING MOBILE APPLICATIONS FOR IPHONE, IPAD AND ANDROID DEVICES (H) (10,11,12) S 2.5Creating Appplications With FlashHow often have you had an idea for an iPhone or iPad app but didn’t know where to start? In this course, students will learn the basics of mobileapplication development using Flash CS5, ActionScript 3, and Photoshop. Projects will focus on software architecture, interface layout, and multi-modular real-time user interaction. The course will teach students to build iOS apps and games from initial prototyping all the way up to deployment.This honors level course has a Web Design I requirement.ENGLISHA students assignment to English each year is determined by consistent quality of performance during the preceding year and teacher and counselorrecommendations.1. Honors English in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 is offered to students who have demonstrated consistent ability to operate at a high level and topersevere. Placement in grade 9 is determined by the mastery level demonstrated in the middle school English program. Students mustmaintain a B (not B-) average to remain in the Honors sequence. They must earn a grade of A- or an A to move into the Honorssequence from the CP level. These are the prerequisites for Honors English.2. Advanced Placement English in Grade 12 is offered to a select group of students who have demonstrated that they can assume a high level ofpersonal responsibility for their work. Advanced Placement candidates must have revealed ability to work consistently at a sophisticatedcognitive level, to manipulate details in an imaginative way, and to write excellent critical analyses.The selection process will involve three criteria:a) Students must apply for this course and submit work in support of their application. Only those with grades of B or better in Honorsor A- or better in CP are eligible to apply.b) Students must be recommended for this course by their current teacher.c) Students applications must be approved by a committee of English teachers and by the Director of English.3. All sophomores take Writing Laboratory during the first semester of the sophomore year. Successful completion of this course is arequirement for graduation. Students who fail Writing Lab must retake the course, and this can be done only at Winchester HighSchool.
  • 114. For the English requirement, American Literature is offered either as a full year course or as a semester course in conjunction with Speech orCreative Writing. Possible combinations to fulfill the English requirement are: 127/128 The Hero’s Journey/American Fiction, 127/125 TheHero’s Journey/Creative Writing, and 124/128 Speech and Debate/American Fiction. However, a student may not take the first semester ofSpeech and Debate and the second semester of Creative Writing sequentially to fulfill a full year English requirement.5. For elective credit only a student may select Creative Writing or Speech and Debate without the Literature component.6. An individualized, diagnostic/prescriptive, remedial reading tutorial is provided as English classroom support for students in grades 9-12.Admission is through teacher recommendation. Credit will be awarded based on the number of sessions scheduled per cycle (not to exceed five),with prior approval of the English Director.7. Selected summer reading is assigned as a requirement for all English courses.8. Successful completion of a research paper is a requirement for some junior and senior literature courses.Courses Available by GradesA. Grade 90104 Grade 9 English (H) Y 5.00103 Grade 9 English (CP) Y 5.00102 Foundations of Literature (CP) Y 5.0B. Grade 10FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER0107 Writing Laboratory (H) 0108 American Humanities (H) Y 5.00106 Writing Laboratory (CP) 0109 American Dream (CP) Y 5.00105 Foundations of Writing (CP) 0110 Exploring American Literature (CP) Y 5.00125 Creative Writing (CP) S 2.50126 Creative Writing (H by contract) S 2.5C. Grades 11 and 120116 Survey of British Literature (H) Y 5.00115 Survey of British Literature (CP) Y 5.00147 American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Approach (CP) Y/Double 10.00148 American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Approach (H by contract) Y/Double 10.00113 Literature and Composition I (CP) Y 5.00143 Journalism and Non-Fiction I (CP) Y 5.00145 Journalism and Non-Fiction II (CP) Y 5.00121 Shakespearean and Modern Drama (CP) Y 5.00122 Shakespearean and Modern Drama (H by contract) Y 5.00127 The Hero’s Journey (first semester) (CP) S 2.50128 American Fiction (second semester) (CP) S 2.50123 Critical Reading and Writing for College (CP) Y 5.00124 Speech and Debate (first semester) (CP) S 2.50125 Creative Writing (second semester) (CP) S 2.50126 Creative Writing (second semester) (H by contract) S 2.5D. Grade 120119 Advanced Placement English (Survey of World Literature) (H+) Y 5.00117 Masterpieces of World Literature (CP) Y 5.00118 Masterpieces of World Literature (H by contract) Y 5.00142 Literature and Film (CP) Y 5.00114 Literature and Composition II (CP) Y 5.00111 Humanities (CP) Y/Double 10.00112 Humanities (H by contract) Y/Double 10.0Course DescriptionsGrade 90104 GRADE 9 ENGLISH (H) (See Prerequisite) Y 5.0In this course, exposure to a wide range of literature is intended to increase students awareness of the power and variety of language, broaden theirexperience, provide a foundation for the in-depth exploration of upper English courses. Careful reading of short fiction, novels, non-fiction, poetry anddrama encourages the development of analytical skills. The emphasis is on interpretation, with special attention to literary terms and concepts, themeand figurative language. Expository writing assignments, based on the literature, stress clarity, evidence and specific detail. Complex writing toolssuch as tone, diction and voice are taught to develop each student’s writing style. Instruction in research methods, process, and organization preparesstudents for writing research papers. Creative writing includes short fiction and poetry. Grammar review focuses on usage, and vocabulary units focuson recognizing and using words in context.
  • 120103 GRADE 9 ENGLISH (CP) Y 5.0Grade 9 CP English focuses on developing reading and writing skills and fostering enjoyment of reading and writing. Students read short fiction,novels, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. The emphasis is on analysis, through an understanding of the elements of fiction and of literary devices;synthesis, through discovering themes; and connection, through comparison with other works of literature and with students own experience.Expository writing assignments correspond with the reading assignments and emphasize clarity, evidence, and specific detail. Students also have theopportunity to do some creative writing of short fiction and poetry. Grammar lessons focus on usage, while vocabulary lessons focus on using wordsin context. Instruction in research methods, process, and organization prepares students for writing research papers.0102 FOUNDATIONS OF LITERATURE (CP) Y 5.0This grade 9 course is designed to improve students reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills to assist students in learning in all academic contentareas; to help students in dealing with the everyday world in which they live; and to increase the students language experiences. The focus in readingboth fiction and non-fiction is on comprehension and inferential reasoning. Students learn to recognize an authors bias and credentials and thedifference between fact and opinion. Discussions of reading assignments emphasize characterization, setting, style, theme, and vocabulary. Studentsidentify main ideas, supporting details, fact, opinion, sequence of events, and relationships in the writings of authors such as Hemingway, Steinbeck,Poe, White, Paulsen and Shakespeare.Grade 10WRITING LABORATORY (H (See Prerequisite), CP) S 2.5The Writing Laboratory, a one-semester expository writing course, is offered with each of the three Grade 10 literature courses. The focus is on theprocess of writing, a focus that is reinforced by writing in all literature courses thereafter. Students write the following kinds of essays: persuasion,comparison-contrast, cause and effect, and literary analysis. Focus correction areas are thesis, evidence, paragraphing, sentence structure, and wordchoice. Peer editing, spot conferencing, and revision are important aspects of Writing Lab. Students read pieces by professional writers, using themfor inspiration, for models of good writing, for strengthening critiquing skills, and for analysis. Much of the writing, editing and revision is done onwireless laptop computers.0107 WRITING LABORATORY (first semester) (H) (See Prerequisite) S 2.50108 AMERICAN HUMANITIES (second semester) (H) (See Prerequisite) S 2.5In this literature course, students read American works of recognized literary merit by authors such as Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Poe, Hawthorne,Whitman, Twain, Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, Hemingway and Salinger. The goals of the course are to help develop good readers, to help students to useliterature as tools in understanding themselves and others, to help students use literature to gain an insight into the cultural backgrounds represented inthe literary works, and to review and practice writing skills learned in Writing Lab. In-depth discussions focus not only on the literary conventions, butalso on the intellectual, philosophical and social forces which defined each era of American life. Frequent analytical papers and essay tests with anemphasis on character, theme and style are required.0106 WRITING LABORATORY (first semester) (CP) S 2.50109 AMERICAN DREAM (second semester) (CP) S 2.5The literature course defines, traces, and evaluates the theme of the American Dream through representative American literary works. The goals of thecourse are to help develop good readers, to help students to use literature as tools in understanding themselves and others, to help students use literatureto gain an insight into the cultural backgrounds represented in the literary works, and to review and practice writing skills learned in Writing Lab.Students read and discuss novels, short stories, plays, and poetry as they determine the historical and social factors which contributed to the changingdefinition of the American Dream from the age of Puritans to the present time. Most writing is expository and evolves from reading assignments.Students are expected to work independently as well as in small groups. Evaluation is based on oral presentations, quizzes, compositions, and essayexaminations. Students read authors such as Bradford, Edwards, Hawthorne, Whitman, Twain, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Miller, Wilson, and Salinger.0105 FOUNDATIONS OF WRITING (first semester) (CP) S 2.50110 EXPLORING AMERICAN LITERATURE (second semester) (CP) S 2.5The literature course is designed to lead to improvement in reading skills for both fiction and non-fiction and to an appreciation of literature through astudy of 20th century American fiction, poetry and drama of authors such as Miller, Salinger, Vonnegut, Hemingway, Wilson and Krakauer. ChangingAmerican ideas are discussed as well as changing literary styles. Students participate in discussions of assigned readings and write short expositoryessays, practicing the skills they learned in Writing Lab.Grades 11 and 120116 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE (H) (See Prerequisite) Y 5.0In this course students read many of the masterpieces of British literature, becoming acquainted with the political, economic, and cultural forces whichinfluenced the writings as well as the developments in literature. The class format includes occasional lectures, frequent class discussions of workassigned, the preparation of numerous critical essays and the completion of a research paper. Literature selections include such authors as theanonymous Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, the Romantic poets, Dickens, Hardy, Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, and Eliot. Papers and projects are bothanalytical and creative.0115 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE (CP) Y 5.0During the first semester, students study the historical and cultural backgrounds of the Anglo-Saxon era, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and theEnlightenment. Students read authors such as the Beowulf poet, Malory, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Swift. During the second semester, students studythe historical and cultural backgrounds of the Romantic, Victorian, and modern periods. They read novels, short stories, poetry and drama of authorslike Dickens, Hardy, Wordsworth, Col-eridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, and Conrad. Evaluation of students is based on class participation, analyticalessays, creative projects and oral presentations. All students practice research skills.
  • 130147/0148 AMERICAN STUDIES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH (CP or H by contract) (See Prerequisite) Y/Double 10.0This new double credit course for juniors offers an interdisciplinary approach to the examination of Modern America. Through a study of Americanhistory, literature, music and art, this course will enrich the depth of a student’s understanding of American culture, especially in the twentieth century.The thematic approach includes a focus on a number of different themes including Race in America, Prosperity and Depression, TechnologicalInnovation and Change in America, and Protest. Students will examine the works of major American writers such as Crane, Fitzgerald, Hemingway,Hughes, Hurston, Morrison, Carver and Kingston. They will also explore the roots and development of American art and music during this same timeperiod. Papers and projects are both analytical and creative. A major term paper is a requirement of this course. Students may elect to work at thehonors level in this course by meeting the requirements of the English department for honors level work.0113 LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION I (CP) Y 5.0The focus of this course is the continued development of students reading, writing and critical thinking skills. During the year, students read literatureand non-fiction related to a central theme, in order to improve comprehension and deepen an appreciation for literature. Among the authors read areKeyes, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Gibbons, Keller, Cormier and Poe. Vocabulary and grammar are taught within the context of these works, and thereare regular comprehension and vocabulary quizzes. Paper assignments related to the students’ experiences and readings include critical essays,creative and autobiographical projects and a research presentation. Written exercises and essays focus upon supporting conclusions with specificevidence, developing clarity of written expression, and writing for specific audiences.SPEECH AND DEBATE/AMERICAN FICTION0124 SPEECH AND DEBATE (first semester) (CP) S 2.5 Can also be taken as an elective first semester.Speaking experiences introduce the student to a variety of forms, including persuasive speaking, public speaking, debating, group discussion,interviewing skills and public readings. Emphasis is on researching a topic, outlining material, creating specific speech formats, and overcomingnervousness. Additional speech experience comes through dramatic presentations and improvisations.0128 AMERICAN FICTION (second semester) (CP) S 2.5American Fiction: Why do people tell stories? What is an American story? The focus of this course is the development of critical thinking andinferential reading skills through the study of American Literature. Through expository writing assignments students will analyze novels, short stories,plays, satire, poetry and media. Recent classes have included works by Kurt Vonnegut, Mark Twain, Zora Neale Hurston, Tim O’Brien, TennesseeWilliams and contemporary American essay writers. The vocabulary development is based on assigned readings with a focus on understandingvocabulary in context. Students will participate in class discussions and complete weekly reading and writing assignments. Also there is a majorindependent, creative project.THE HERO’S JOURNEY/CREATIVE WRITING0127 THE HERO’S JOURNEY (first semester) (CP) S 2.5The Hero’s Journey will investigate the age old cycle of the hero through contempory literature. Using Joseph Campbell’s model from The Hero withthe Thousand Faces, both fiction and non-fiction works will be used to identify the elements of the journey in works by: Cormac McCarthy, JohnKrakauer, Jack London, Raymond Chandler and Nancy Kress. The cycle of the journey will provide the foundation for looking at the idea ofexistenitialism and other “codes” of the hero. All students will analyze and write about various classic “heroes” of comtemporary literature. Studentswill participate in class discussions and complete weekly reading assignments, as well as write essays and complete creative projects0125/0126 CREATIVE WRITING (second semester) (CP or H by contract) (See Prerequisite) S 2.5 Can be taken as an elective second semester.This course will include the writing of poetry, fiction, and drama; a study of literary terms and concepts; close reading and analysis of literary samplesin each genre; close reading and critiquing of each students own work; and related writing, such as journals and self-portraits for college applications.Students selecting this course should be competent writers who enjoy writing, want to improve their writing skills, want to become better readers ofliterary writing, and are interested in a close and honest observation of their own experience, both real and imaginative. Students may elect to work atthe honors level in this course by contract.THE HERO’S JOURNEY/AMERICAN FICTION0127 THE HERO’S JOURNEY (first semester) (CP) S 2.5The Hero’s Journey will investigate the age old cycle of the hero through contempory literature. Using Joseph Campbell’s model from The Hero withthe Thousand Faces, both fiction and non-fiction works will be used to identify the elements of the journey in works by: Cormac McCarthy, JohnKrakauer, Jack London, Raymond Chandler and Nancy Kress. The cycle of the journey will provide the foundation for looking at the idea ofexistenitialism and other “codes” of the hero. All students will analyze and write about various classic “heroes” of comtemporary literature. Studentswill participate in class discussions and complete weekly reading assignments, as well as write essays and complete creative projects0128 AMERICAN FICTION (second semester) (CP) S 2.5American Fiction: Why do people tell stories? What is an American story? The focus of this course is the development of critical thinking andinferential reading skills through the study of American fiction. Through expository writing assignments students will analyze novels, short stories,plays, satire, poetry and media. Recent classes have included works by Kurt Vonnegut, Mark Twain, Zora Neale Hurston, Tim O’Brien, TennesseeWilliams and contemporary American essay writers. The vocabulary development is based on assigned readings with a focus on understandingvocabulary in context. Students will participate in class discussions and complete weekly reading and writing assignments. Also there is a majorindependent, creative project.
  • 140123 CRITICAL READING AND WRITING FOR COLLEGE (CP) Y 5.0The primary objective of this course is to reinforce and improve those reading, writing, speaking and listening skills required for success in college.During the year students read fiction and non-fiction in selected thematic units to develop comprehension and improve critical reading skills. Theselection of thought provoking choices in literature will help students’ stretch the boundaries of their abstract thinking. Essential expository writingskills are reinforced with the preparation of the personal college essay and literary analysis essays. Students will also practice basic research skillsneeded for college. Class discussions and oral presentations encourage fluency in oral communications. A comprehensive review of English grammarand usage and emphasis on reading-based vocabulary are integral to the course. Some of the literature studied include the works of Old Man and theSea, Fahrenheit 451, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. Bless Me Ultima and Brave New World.0142 LITERATURE AND FILM (CP) Y 5.0This full year course for seniors will explore the topics of gender, human identity and the psychology of human beings through classics of literature andfilm. Literature will include, The Stranger, The Metamorphosis, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Oedipus Rex, I am Legend and the stories of Phillip K. Dick.Films will include works of Alfred Hitchcock, Martin Scorsese and Christopher Nolan. All students will learn the basic elements of the medium offilm as well as analyze and write about the issues explored in the literature and the course as a whole. Since this course has a limited enrollment offifty students, students must be recommended by their current English teacher and approved by the course teacher.0143/0145 JOURNALISM AND NON-FICTION I and II (CP) Y 5.0Journalism has been called everything from “the first draft of history” to “literature in a hurry.” This course concentrates on the writing, reading,analytical and technical skills required to produce high-quality non-fiction. Students will produce newswriting, non-fiction essays, opinion pieces andjournals, while learning how to gather reliable information, conduct interviews, and write effectively on a deadline. After polishing, some pieces willbe submitted for publication in local and national media outlets, including The Red and Black. Authors studied include Douglass, Johnson, Capote,Thompson and Woodward and Bernstein.As the course progresses, students will analyze the way non-fiction authors use literary devices to recreate lived experience. Using literature fromacross several genres including biography, essay, editorial and drama, the course will explore the line between fiction and non-fiction and describe theconsequences that ensue when the two intersect. Students will read the essayists Franklin, Pepys and Thoreau as well as the novelists Hemingway,Ellison and Achebe. With “reality” dominating popular culture, understanding how to read and write non-fiction is essential.0121/0122 SHAKESPEAREAN AND MODERN DRAMA (CP or H by contract) (See Prerequisite) Y 5.0This full-year course for juniors and seniors will cover William Shakespeare’s comedies, such as Midsummers Night’s Dream and Twelfth Night.Various moderns such as Chekhov, Ibsen, Albee, Beckett, Shepard and Stoppard will also be studied. We will explore the actors craft throughexercises, improvisations, scene work and character analysis. Work on scenes will develop sensitivity to text, and skills in creative interpretation.Testing will be based on performance of monologues and collaboration in scenes from the works studied. Students will also keep journals, write shortpapers and an original play. Students may elect to work at the honors level in this course by contract.0124 SPEECH AND DEBATE (CP) S 2.5 Can also be taken as an elective first semester.Speaking experiences introduce the student to a variety of forms, including persuasive speaking, public speaking, debating, group discussion,interviewing skills and public readings. Emphasis is on researching a topic, outlining material, creating specific speech formats, and overcomingnervousness. Additional speech experience comes through dramatic presentations and improvisations.0125/0126 CREATIVE WRITING (CP or H by contract) (See Prerequisite) S 2.5 Can also be taken as an elective second semester.This course will include the writing of poetry, fiction, and drama; a study of literary terms and concepts; close reading and analysis of literary samplesin each genre; close reading and critiquing of each students own work; and related writing, such as journals and self-portraits for college applications.Students selecting this course should be competent writers who enjoy writing, want to improve their writing skills, want to become better readers ofliterary writing, and are interested in a close and honest observation of their own experience, both real and imaginative. Creative Writing is open to:sophomores, juniors, and seniors as a one-semester elective course. Students may elect to work at the honors level in this course by contract.Grade 120119 ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH (Survey of World Literature) (H+) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: at least B average in Honors British Literature oran A- or better in CP British Literature. Students must be recommended by their teacher and apply for this course. Approval of the Director of Englishis required.)In AP English strong, well-motivated students read, discuss, and analyze selected examples of Greek, medieval, Renaissance and nineteenth andtwentieth century “classics" while also exploring the social, intellectual and philosophical forces which shaped each authors sensibility. Works studiedare by authors such as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Dante, Shakespeare, Voltaire, Swift, Melville, Goethe, Austen, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Tolstoy,Dickinson, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, Garcia Marquez, Faulkner and Yeats. Through critical analysis and discussion students sharpen their awareness oflanguage and the writers craft and increase their sensitivity to literature, which enables them to understand better both themselves and the world inwhich they live. Analytic and persuasive papers focus students on the study and practice of expressing their ideas in honest, effective language whichdemonstrates an understanding of the relationship between style, tone, and audience. Analysis of Shakespearean critical commentary is required. Thiscourse prepares students for the CEEB Examination in English Literature and Composition given annually in May.0117/0118 MASTERPIECES OF WORLD LITERATURE (CP or H by contract) (See Prerequisite) Y 5.0This course presents some of the literary masterpieces which comprise an important part of our knowledge of the global world we live in today.Through selected readings and active participation, students search for universal themes which reflect and give insight into the human condition. Theliterary, historical, cultural and aesthetic value of each work is emphasized through the incorporation of music, film, art and various online resources.Students contribute to class discussion and submit expository writing related to their reading. They read works of authors such as Sophocles,Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Achebe, Paton and Ondaatje. Students may elect to work at the honors level in this course by contract.
  • 150114 LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION II (CP) Y 5.0Like its counterpart, Literature and Composition I, this course emphasizes the continued development of a students comprehension, writtenexpression, and critical thinking skills. However, the junior course is not a prerequisite for this course. During the year, students study fiction andnon-fiction related to a central theme, using works of such authors as Stephen King, William Shakespeare, Jon Krakauer, Sandra Cisneros, JRRTolkien, and others. Vocabulary and grammar are taught within the context of these works, and there are regular comprehension and vocabularyquizzes. Verbal skills are stressed through class discussion, reading and major dramatic project. Writing assignments include critical essays andcreative short stories designed to strengthen students’ ability to write with detail, purpose and clarity.0111/0112 HUMANITIES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH (CP or H by contract) (See Prerequisite) Y/Double 10.0Humanities is a double-credit course for seniors in the literature, history, art and music of Western civilization. Organized chronologically andinterdisciplinary in approach, Humanities emphasizes especially the classical and medieval periods, the Renaissance, and selected aspects of thenineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students study the works of many of the major writers, artists and composers of the Western tradition. Papers andprojects are both analytical and creative. Students taking Humanities must have a "C" average or better in their previous high school English courses.Students may elect to work at the honors level in this course by meeting the requirements of the English department for honors level work. Humanitiesfulfills the Fine and Applied Arts requirement as well as the senior English requirement.FOREIGN LANGUAGEWinchester High School offers a fully articulated Foreign Language sequence of French, Italian, Latin and Spanish in compliance with theNational Standards and the Massachusetts Frameworks. As of 2012-13, we offer Mandarin I, II and III. Emphasis in all Foreign Languageclasses is on the development of the four basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as on familiarity with theculture and people of the countries where each language is used. In Latin the focus is on reading and writing the language and oralcommunication is primarily in English while in the modern foreign language classes, the target language is used as appropriate for each level. Inaddition to the daily exposure to language and culture in the classroom students will go regularly to the departmental language lab to furtherpractice and refine their language skills and enhance their knowledge of the culture of the language they are studying. Twenty-first CenturySkills are embedded in all foreign language courses.Prerequisites and Requirements for sequential courses: A minimum end of the year average of C- is required for advancement to the next level in all foreign language courses. Teacher approval is also aprerequisite. All first and second level year courses are CP level. In the third year of the language students will choose whether to take honors or CP. Thischoice will be made in the spring when students sign up for courses. Teacher approval is also a prerequisite. In order to sign up for 3 honors astudent must have a solid B in the second year and be recommended by his/her teacher. In order to sign up for 4 honors, a student must have asolid B in the third year honors class and be recommended by his/her teacher. Should the final grade drop below a solid B, the student will beenrolled in the CP level. Introduction to Italian Language and Culture and Introduction to Spanish Language and Culture are offered at the CP level. These classes arereserved for upper classmen (grades 11 and 12). Advanced Placement courses are available in French Language and Culture, Italian Language and Culture, Spanish Language and Culture, andLatin (Vergil). The minimum requirement for recommendation is a B+ or better in the third year of Latin and the fourth year of French, Italianand Spanish. In addition to teacher recommendation, a written and speaking sample may be required and final approval must be given by theDirector of the department.There are exchange programs in French and Spanish, usually made available to students in the upper levels of the language. In addition, other travelopportunities are available on a regular basis to Italy. Each year, seniors studying Italian who have demonstrated responsible behavior have the opportunityto take an educational trip to Italy during a school vacation.FRENCHEmphasis on all levels is on the development of the four basic language skills; listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as, on familiarity with theculture and people of francophone countries. French is the primary means of communication in the classroom. The following is a summary of the workcovered in the French program at Winchester High School.0201 FRENCH 2 (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0French 2 is an exciting mix of francophone cultures, literature, film and text. Students build upon their basic grammar and vocabulary foundation withcommunicative activities in listening, reading, writing, and speaking. The Allez, Viens! program, Level 2 (Holt, Rinehart, and Winston) includesvideo, language labs, and web sites to take students “on location.” French 2 students will see “La Boum.” They will read African short stories andcorrespond with French speakers via e-mail.0203 FRENCH 3 (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0This curriculum is built upon the Allez, Viens! program, Level 3 (Holt, Rinehart, and Winston) which emphasizes francophonie around the world.Students will study Europe, Northern Africa, and Canada through arts, literature, and film and cultural text. To continue to build upon the grammarand vocabulary foundation of the previous years of study, students will also use video, language labs, and web sites. They will read Histoire d’uneRevanche and see several French films
  • 160204 FRENCH 3 (H) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0This curriculum is built upon the Allez, Viens! program, Level 3 (Holt, Rinehart and Winston) which emphasizes froncophonie around the world.Students will study Europe, Northern Africa, and Canada through arts, literature, and film and cultural text. To continue to build upon the grammar andvocabulary foundation of the previous years of study, students will also use video, language labs, and web sites. They will read Histoire d’uneRevanche and see several French films.French 3 CP and French 3 Honors usually meet in the same sections. Honors requirements include additional sections on tests and quizzes, additionalprojects and additional literature assignments.(See guidelines in introduction to department offerings) As an Honors course, it is an intensive course that is taught almost exclusively in French anddemands a high level of motivation on the part of the students.0243 FRENCH 4 (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0In this course, students expand their knowledge of French language and culture with the Bravo text. In addition, they will read the classic LePetitPrince and see the film. They will read and write poetry and see “Jean de Florette” and “Manon des Sources.” In the first semester students willfollow a radio program, “Suivez la Piste.” Upon successful completion of French 4, students can go on to French 5 or AP French.0205 FRENCH 4 (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0In this course, students expand their knowledge of French language and culture with the Bravo text. In addition, they will read the classic LePetitPrince and see the film. They will read and write poetry and see “Jean de Florette” and “Manon des Sources.” In the first semester students willfollow a radio program, “Suivez la Piste.” Upon successful completion of French 4, students can go on to French 5 or AP French.French 4 CP and French 4 Honors usually meet in the same sections. Honors requirements include additional sections on tests and quizzes, additionalprojects and additional literature assignments. (See guidelines in introduction to department offerings) As an Honors course, it is an intensive coursethat is taught almost exclusively in French and demands a high level of motivation on the part of the students.0226 FRENCH 5 (CP) (12) Y 5.0French 5 is a thorough grammatical review course based on the text Une Fois Pour Toutes. Students read Six Contes de Maupassant and Les Jeux SontFaits (Sartre) or “L’Etranger” (Camus) and various articles from the French press. They will see and analyze several films while reviewing Frenchhistory. They will also listen to the radio program, “Poursuite Inattendue.” The course places greater emphasis on development of speaking andreading skills. (See prerequisite guidelines)0206 FRENCH 5 (H) (12) Y 5.0French 5 is a thorough grammatical review course based on the text Une Fois Pour Toutes. Students read Six Contes de Maupassant and Les Jeux SontFaits (Sartre) or “L’Etranger” (Camus) and various articles from the French press. They will see and analyze several films while reviewing Frenchhistory. They will also listen to the radio program, “Poursuite Inattendue.” The course places greater emphasis on development of speaking andreading skills. (See prerequisite guidelines)0207 ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH LANGUAGE CULTURE (AP) (12) Y 5.0The AP course requires summer reading and prepares the student for the Advanced Placement examination in French language. It will include the basiccurriculum of French 5 plus the intensive speaking, listening, reading, and writing practice necessary for success on the AP exam. Successfulcompletion of this course is the equivalent of a third-year college French conversation and composition class. (See prerequisite guidelines)ITALIAN0230 ITALIAN 1 (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0Italian 1 stresses the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing through a new communicative based text, Avanti con I’ltaliano. Verb tensesinclude the present and past with emphasis on personal expression. By the end of the year the students should be able to read simple passages andcommunicate in simple topics pertaining to life. Students will have the opportunity to view at least three classic Italian films to enhance understandingof language and appreciation of cultural differences.0231 ITALIAN 2 (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0This course provides all the elements for a full communicative second course. It features cultural material in dialog and narrative forms. After areview of year one, additional vocabulary and verb tenses are learned. The core text, Prego, provides a strong review of basic grammatical structuresand development of more advanced grammar. The development of oral skills is stressed focusing on real life situations with readings, videos, songsand skits. Students will have the opportunity to view at least three classic Italian films to enhance understanding of language and appreciation ofcultural differences.0232 INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE I (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0This course will include the four language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking using the Forza I textbook. Students will learn basiclanguage for communication and make connections in the fields of culture, geography, music, cuisine and history. Students will have the opportunity towatch three classic Italian films. Students who pass this course may continue with Introduction to Italian Language and Culture II CP. This course hasa limited enrollment and priority is given to students in grades 11 and 12 (reserved for upperclassmen). This course is offered on alternate years. (It isnot offered in 2012-13.)
  • 170239 INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 2 (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0This is a continuation of Introduction to Italian Language and Culture I using the Forza II textbook. Students continue to improve their listening,speaking, reading and writing skills. They will have the opportunity to watch three classic Italian films.0233 ITALIAN 3 (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0This course continues to develop students’ speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Basics are reviewed before progressing to more advancedskills. The textbook and ancillaries used are the Sentieri program, a student-friendly approach which includes authentic materials about contemporaryItaly. Students will acquire confidence in using Italian. Students will have the opportunity to view at least three classic Italian films to enhanceunderstanding of language and appreciation of cultural differences.0234 ITALIAN 3 (H) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0The text Prego provides a strong review of basic grammatical structures and development of vocabulary and more advanced grammar. The study of theverb tenses is expanded and studied in depth. The development of oral skills is stressed focusing on real life situations with readings, videos, projectsand skits. As an honors course, it is taught almost exclusively in Italian and requires strong motivation on the part of the students. This course beginsthe preparation for Italian 4 Honors (see prerequisite guidelines for Honors weighting). Students will have the opportunity to view at least three classicItalian films and will listen to a number of Italian songs to enhance understanding of language and appreciation of cultural differences. Students willwork on the development of writing skills through essays, emails and projects.0244 ITALIAN 4 (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0Italian 4 continues to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills using the multimedia Sentieri program. The emphasis shifts from grammarand involves more readings, discussions and reflections about Italian culture. Geography and civilization across a 2000 year time line include Italiancontributions to world culture. Students will have the opportunity to view at least three classic Italian films to enhance understanding of language andappreciation of cultural differences.0242 ITALIAN 4 HONORS (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0This course is designed for students who have earned a B+ in Italian 3 Honors. Successful completion of this course will prepare these students for APItalian in the senior year. In this course, students will further expand their knowledge and usage of Italian language, culture, history and geography.The emphasis continues on the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing as they apply previously learned information as well aslearn more complicated grammatical structures. Reading and writing will include critical analysis of contemporary and classical Italian authors andcontemporary issues and themes. Students will have the opportunity to view at least three classic Italian films to enhance understanding of languageand appreciation of cultural differences.0248 ITALIAN 5 (CP) (12) y 5.0Italian 5 continues to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills using a variety of materials. The emphasis continues to shift fromgrammar and involves more readings, discussions and reflections about Italian culture. Contemporary aspects of the culture will be studied anddiscussed. Students will have the opportunity to view at least three classic Italian films to enhance understanding of language and appreciation ofcultural differences.0245 ITALIAN 5 (H) (12) Y 5.0This course is designed for students who have earned a B in Italian 4 Honors. In this course, students will further expand their knowledge and usage ofItalian language, culture, history and geography. The emphasis continues on the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing asthey apply previously learned information as well as learn advanced grammatical structures. Reading and writing will include critical analysis ofcontemporary and classical Italian author and contemporary issues and themes. Students will have the opportunity to view at least three classic Italianfilms to enhance understanding of language and appreciation of cultural differences.0236 ADVANCED PLACEMENT ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (H) (12) Y 5.0Course requires summer reading and work in the language as well as a strong commitment from the student. It is the equivalent of a university levelcourse and prepares the students for college placement tests as well as the Italian SAT II’s. It will include listening, speaking, literature, history,geography and writing practice for the AP Exam. (See prerequisite guidelines.)LATIN0216 LATIN I (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0Latin I begins the Cambridge Latin series with an introduction to the language, culture, traditions and daily life of the ancient Romans living inPompeii and Britain in the 1stcentury A.D. The emphasis is on the reading of Latin but the other language skills of speaking, writing, and listening areincluded as well. By following the life of an actual Pompeian family through readings the students will become familiar with the grammar, syntax, andwritten expression of the Romans and the Latin vocabulary will enable them to make connections between Latin and English and the modern RomanceLanguages. Slides and other realia will help students to visualize the life of the Romans and they will have the opportunity to investigate aspects of theancient culture through quarterly projects.0217 LATIN II (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0Latin II continues the story begun in Latin I, taking the characters to Alexandria and back to Britain. There will be an ongoing review of first-yeargrammar and the introduction of new grammatical material and the opportunity to develop increasingly sophisticated reading skills. Work on wordderivations is continued to help with English vocabulary building. There is more emphasis placed on reading for comprehension and translating bycontext. Students will investigate the influence of the Roman culture around the world and its impact on life in the modern world.
  • 180219 LATIN III (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0In Latin III students will conclude the story begun in Latin I by completing Unit 4 of the Cambridge Latin series. The readings will continue toincrease in sophistication and will move the students into excerpts from real Latin authors such as Pliny, Catullus and Vergil. Much of the setting isRome but there will also be travel to other parts of the Roman Empire such as Bithynia, Ephesus and Sicily. Cultural topics include Romangovernment, law and marriage customs. Advanced grammar will be introduced in order to prepare students for the additional focus on Latin literaturein Latin IV or AP Latin.0220 LATIN III (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0In Latin III students will conclude the story begun in Latin I by completing Unit 4 of the Cambridge Latin series. The readings will continue toincrease in sophistication and will move the students into excerpts from real Latin authors such as Pliny, Catullus and Vergil. Much of the setting isRome but there will also be travel to other parts of the Roman Empire such as Bithynia, Ephesus and Sicily. Cultural topics include Romangovernment, law and marriage customs. Advanced grammar will be introduced in order to prepare students for the additional focus on Latin literaturein Latin IV or AP Latin.(Refer to introduction to department offerings for criteria for Honors/College weighting).0246 LATIN IV (CP) (12) Y 5.0This course will consist of reading the works of poets determined by class interest. The choices offered will be Vergils Aeneid or selections fromCatullus and Ovid. The Aeneid option will consist of portions of Books I, II, IV, VI, X, and XII in Latin with the remainder of the poem being read inEnglish. The Catullus/Ovid option will include selections from the Metamorphoses and Amores of Ovid and numerous poems of Catullus. The basicobjective of this course is progress in reading, understanding, and interpreting the Latin in the original. Students will be expected to:1. translate accurately the poetry from Latin into English.2. demonstrate a grasp of the grammatical structures and vocabulary used by the poets.3. analyze the stylistic devices and literary techniques used by the poets.4. exhibit an understanding of the political, social and cultural background of the poems.0221 LATIN IV (H) (12) Y 5.0 (See Prerequisite Guidelines)This course will consist of reading the works of poets determined by class interest. The choices offered will be Vergils Aeneid or selections fromCatullus and Ovid. The Aeneid option will consist of portions of Books I, II, IV, VI, X, and XII in Latin with the remainder of the poem being read inEnglish. The Catullus/Ovid option will include selections from the Metamorphoses and Amores of Ovid and numerous poems of Catullus. The basicobjective of this course is progress in reading, understanding, and interpreting the Latin in the original. Students will be expected to:1. translate accurately the poetry from Latin into English.2. demonstrate a grasp of the grammatical structures and vocabulary used by the poets.3. analyze the stylistic devices and literary techniques used by the poets.4. exhibit an understanding of the political, social and cultural background of the poems.Latin IV C1 and Latin IV Honors usually meet in the same sections. Honors requirements include additional sections on tests and quizzes, additionalprojects and additional literature assignments.(See guidelines in introduction to department offerings) As an Honors course, it is an intensive course that is taught almost exclusively in Latin anddemands a high level of motivation on the part of the students.0222 ADVANCED PLACEMENT LATIN (AP) (12) Y 5.0 (See Prerequisite Guidelines)This course will consist of readings in Latin literature as prescribed by the AP syllabus. Half of the year will be dedicated to Vergil’s Aeneid, with theother half focused on Caesar’s Bellum Gallicum. Substantial sections of each work will be read in Latin; each entire work will be read in English.The course is designed to expand students’ skills in translation, analysis and interpretation of original Latin literature in preparation for the APexamination. Students will be expected to:1. Translate Latin accurately.2. Demonstrate a grasp of grammar and vocabulary.3. Analyze style and literary technique.4.  Develop an understanding of political, social and cultural aspects of the literature.MANDARINChina is a country with over 1.3 billion people who speak either Mandarin or Cantonese dialect. Unlike English and the romance languages, Mandarinuses characters that represent various words. When speaking, the words are distinguished by individual tones. Learning Mandarin requiresintensive effort and practice, both in and out of the classroom.0250 MANDARIN 1 (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0Beginning Mandarin is offered to students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12, who are recommended by their foreign language teachers. These are studentswho have demonstrated consistent ability to operate at a high level and persevere. The purpose of this introductory course is to help students developthe beginning level of Chinese proficiency across the three communicative modes (interpersonal, interpretive and presentational). This course is abeginner’s course for those who do not speak Chinese. Students will learn to communicate in various situations. In addition to the language, studentswill learn about different aspects of Chinese history, culture, economics, etc.
  • 190251 MANDARIN II (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0Mandarin II is a continuation of Mandarin I and continues on the Integrated Chinese Level One/Part One book. The goal of the course is for studentsto be able to communicate meaningfully in real-life situations in both spoken and written Chinese. Besides the course-book, additional supplementaryand authentic materials will provide students with the cultural and linguistic heritage of the Chinese language.0252 MANDARIN III (CP)Mandarin Chinese III will continue to develop the four language skills. The course uses Integrated Chinese Level Two/Part One textbook, spiralingand reinforcing knowledge learned from previous levels. Through a focus on immersion, students will as much as possible, develop real-life speakingand listening skills. Students will first learn the spoken language and then progress to the more complex written expressions. In order to facilitateunderstanding of the relationship between Chinese culture and its language, students will learn modern Chinese perspective, especially regardingintercultural interactions.0253 MANDARIN III (H)Mandarin Chinese III will continue to develop the four language skills. The course uses Integrated Chinese Level Two/Part One textbook, spiralingand reinforcing knowledge learned from previous levels. Through a focus on immersion, students will as much as possible, develop real-life speakingand listening skills. Students will first learn the spoken language and then progress to the more complex written expressions. In order to facilitateunderstanding of the relationship between Chinese culture and its language, students will learn modern Chinese perspective, especially regardingintercultural interactions.Mandarin III Honors and Mandarin III CP usually meet in the same sections. Honors requirements include additional sections on tests and quizzes,additional projects and additional literature assignments.SPANISHEmphasis in all levels is on the development of the four basic language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - as well as on familiarity with theculture and people of Hispanic America and Spain. Spanish is the primary means of communication in the classroom. The following is a summary of thework covered in the Spanish program at Winchester High School.0210 INTRODUCTORY TO SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE I (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0This course will include the four skills of listening, speaking reading and writing with an emphasis on learning basic language for communication andmaking connections in the fields of culture, geography, music, ,cuisine and history of Spanish speaking countries. Students who successfully completethis course may continue with Spanish II Language and Culture the following year. This course has a limited enrollment and priority is given tostudents in grades 11 and 12. This course is offered on alternate years.0218 INTRODUCTORY TO SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 2 (CP) (10, 11,12) Y 5.0This is a continuation for those students who have passed Introductory Spanish Language and Culture I. (It is not offered in 2012-13)0208 SPANISH 1 (CP) (9, 10) Y 5.This course covers the material of grade 7 and 8 Spanish. It will begin the new Descubre textbook series which emphasizes the four language learningskills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. The program is multimedia and offers many on-line activities.0209 SPANISH 2 (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0Students successfully completing Spanish 7 and 8 or Spanish I at the high school will enter Spanish 2. Students will continue the Descubre series whichwill guide students towards functional communicative proficiency and a fuller appreciation of the role of Hispanic cultures in a global context.0211 SPANISH 3 (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0Students in Spanish 3 will complete Paso a Paso Book 2 at mid-year and begin Paso a Paso Book 3 2nd semester. The course continues to study theSpanish language and culture by means of the four language skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening.0212 SPANISH 3 (H) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0This is an intensive course that is taught almost exclusively in Spanish and demands a high level of motivation on the part of the student. The coursecontinues to study the Spanish language and culture by means of the four language skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening. Students inSpanish 3H will complete Paso a Paso Book 2 at mid-year and begin Paso a Paso Book 3 2nd semester. (See department introduction for criteria forCollege/Honors weighting).0247 SPANISH 4 (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0Students will finish Paso a Paso Book 3. They will also do a unit on the movie El Norte. It is a proficiency-based course with the objective ofimproving oral communication, linguistic skills, and knowledge of literature. Upon successful completion of Spanish 4, students may go on to Spanish5 CP with recommendation of teacher.0213 SPANISH 4 (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0Students will finish Paso a Paso Book 3. They will also do a unit on the movie El Norte. It is a proficiency-based course with the objective ofimproving oral communication, linguistic skills, and knowledge of literature. Upon successful completion of Spanish 4, students may go on to Spanish5 Honors or AP Spanish.
  • 0223 SPANISH 5 (CP) (12) Y 5.0The course covers advanced grammar (stressing the subjunctive) and reading comprehension. In addition, students will read two major works inliterature. They will also be working on videos and other projects that will help students develop their oral proficiency, written expression and culturalawareness.0214 SPANISH 5 (H) (12) Y 5.0The course covers advanced grammar (stressing the subjunctive) and reading comprehension. In addition, students will read two major works inliterature. They will also be working on videos and other projects that will help students develop their oral proficiency, written expression and culturalawareness.Spanish 5 CP and Spanish 5 Honors usually meet in the same sections. Honors requirements include additional sections on tests and quizzes, additionalprojects and additional literature assignments. (See guidelines in introduction to department offerings) As an Honors course, it is an intensive coursethat is taught almost exclusively in Spanish and demands a high level of motivation on the part of the students.0215 ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH (AP) (12) Y 5.0The AP course prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Examination in Spanish language and will include readings of Spanish and LatinAmerican literature plus the intensive speaking, listening, reading and writing practice necessary for the AP exam in language. (see prerequisiteguidelines)MATHEMATICSThe Mathematics Department offers a four-year sequence of courses for all students, which accommodates students with varied background and aptitude inMathematics. Curricula for our courses are constantly being updated and designed with input from the NCTM standards, the Massachusetts Frameworksand the College Boards; we believe, however, that all students should be taught many skills, concepts and applications that go beyond the expectations ofthese standards. Our goals are to lead our students into higher-level critical thinking and problem solving as well as to enable our students to applypreviously learned mathematical concepts and skills into new situationsThe Winchester High School graduation requirement for Mathematics is two years but the Math Department encourages all students to continue with thestudy of Mathematics throughout their four years. We believe this will better prepare them for college and their future careers.We believe in a variety of instructional methods, which are not only appropriate to the material being taught but also appropriate to individual learningstyles. Both colleges and the business world are expecting high school students to be more technology literate. By using graphing calculators and computersthe math department addresses this demand. These technology tools are used for exploration and investigation as well as for the development and extensionof mathematical topics. Technology provides a dynamic approach to the learning of Mathematics. A graphing calculator is an integral part of all coursesbeyond Algebra 1 and Geometry.Within the Mathematics Department there are many levels of study. Prerequisites and levels of study are indicated in the individual course descriptions.Placement in courses is based on the student’s grades, the recommendation of the teacher, performance on department exams, and student/parent input.Students and parents are always strongly encouraged to appeal any decisions which they feel is not in the student’s best interest.20
  • Year Courses:0404 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS 1 (CP) (9) Y 5.0This course is designed to help the student develop a better understanding of basic mathematical concepts. Topics in probability, statistics, pre-algebraand geometry will be emphasized as well as the application of arithmetic skills. Throughout the year student learning will be enhanced and reinforcedthrough the use of calculators and computers. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be recommended for Mathematical Application2, or an Algebra or Geometry course.0405 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS 2 (CP) (10) Y 5.0This second course will focus on enhancing the students’ problem solving techniques and practice with applications. The topics of probability,statistics and geometry will be further developed. Students will be introduced to some of the concepts and skills of Algebra 1. Upon successfulcompletion of this course, students may be recommended for Math Applications 3 or an Algebra or Geometry course.0431 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS 3 (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Pass Applications 2)This course will focus on enhancing the students’ problem solving techniques and practice with applications. The topics of probability, statistics andgeometry will be further developed. Students will continue to do some of the concepts and skills of Algebra 1. Upon successful completion of thiscourse, students may be recommended for an Algebra or Geometry course.0406 ALGEBRA 1 (CP) (9) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in grade 8 Pre-Algebra)This is a first course in Algebra, using modern techniques and technology as an approach to problem solving. Algebraic structure and language as wellas the development of basic skills will be emphasized. Algebraic topics include variables, linear equations and inequalities, the real number system,factoring, exponents, radicals, polynomials, rational expressions, graphs, systems of equations and an introduction to quadratic functions. Topics inprobability and statistics will also be part of the course. Students successfully completing this course should follow with a Geometry course.0407 ALGEBRA 1A (CP) (9) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Pass Mathematical Applications or Grade 8 Mathematics)This course is designed to cover the first half of a traditional Algebra 1 curriculum. The basic operations and skills of Algebra are taught along withthe proper use of algebraic methods and language. Topics include solving linear equations and inequalities, operations with integers, polynomials andcoordinate graphing. Numerous examples are given to develop the required skills. A unit on probability and statistics will also be included. Uponcompletion of this course the student may continue with Geometry, then, complete the sequence with Algebra 1 B.0408 ALGEBRA 1B (CP) (11,12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Pass Algebra 1A or a D in Algebra 1)This course is a continuation of the Algebra 1A course, further developing and reinforcing algebraic skills and concepts. Topics will include fractionalexpressions, factoring, powers and roots, polynomials, graphs, systems of linear equations and an introduction to quadratic functions. More topics inprobability and statistics will be included. Students may then continue with an Algebra 2 course.21
  • 220428 ALGEBRA 1C (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Pass Algebra 1B)This course is a continuation of the Algebra 1B course, further developing and reinforcing algebraic skills and concepts. Topics will include fractionalexpressions, factoring, powers and roots, polynomials, graphs, systems of linear equations and an introduction to quadratic functions. More topics inprobability and statistics will be included. Students may then continue with an Algebra 2 course.0401 GEOMETRY (CP) (10, 11) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Pass Algebra 1 or 1A with recommendation from teacher)The major concepts of the traditional Geometry curriculum will be covered in a concrete manner, with less emphasis on abstract concepts and proofs.Practical applications, informal language, exploration, constructions, and experiments will be the basis for the course. It is a stimulating approach forstudents who have demonstrated a need for a less abstract, approach to geometry. Topics include lines, angles, triangles, polygons, circles, perimeter,area, volume, Pythagorean Theorem and an introduction to the coordinate plane.0402 GEOMETRY ADVANCED (CP) (9, 10, 11) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in Algebra 8)This Geometry course is designed to have each student develop the skills and concepts of visualization and spatial reasoning; to represent and analyzethe characteristics and properties of two and three dimensional shapes and their relationships. It includes identifying and describing, moving andtransforming geometric objects along with argument and proof. Right triangle trigonometry, circumference, area and volume will also be studied.There will be an emphasis on using algebraic skills to solve applications and analytic problems. Calculators and computers are used to enhance themathematical understanding and improve problem-solving skills.0403 GEOMETRY (H) (9, 10) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Advanced Algebra 8)This is an in-depth course designed for those students who have already displayed an aptitude in mathematics. It will cover all the traditional topics ofEuclidean Geometry with particular emphasis on inductive and deductive reasoning. Formal geometric language, theorems, constructions and proofswill be emphasized. Algebraic skills and technology will be incorporated throughout the course. Calculators and computers are used to enhance themathematical understanding and improve problem-solving skills.0410 ALGEBRA 2 (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in both Algebra 1 and Geometry)This course further develops and reinforces the basic skills of first year Algebra and extends these skills and concepts into the traditional topics ofAlgebra 2. The course explores and develops the concept of mathematical functions, including linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Othertopics include polynomials, exponents, radicals and an introduction to complex numbers. Applications and problem solving using technology will beintegrated into the course.0411 ALGEBRA 2 ADVANCED (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in both Algebra 1 and Adv. Geometry)This course further explores and develops the concepts and skills of Algebra 1. Powers, roots, polynomials and other special functions (quadratic,exponential and logarithmic) are studied as tools for modeling real-world situations. Problem solving, which may incorporate geometry concepts, isstressed throughout the course. Calculators are used to enhance the mathematical understanding and improve problem-solving skills.0412 ALGEBRA 2 (H) (10, 11) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in both Algebra 1 (H) and Geometry (H) or permission of mathematics director)This is a rigorous course that explores and develops the concept of mathematical functions, including linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, andtrigonometric functions. This course will include a unit on conic sections. Mathematical modeling and applications using technology will be anintegral part of this course.0413 ALGEBRA 3 (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of C– or better in Algebra 2)Students who have completed Algebra 2 will continue with this course. Topics will include the further study of functions, including polynomial,exponential, and logarithmic functions, the nature of graphs, matrices, and trigonometry and its applications. Some topics from probability andstatistics will also be introduced.0414 PRE-CALCULUS ADVANCED (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of C+ or better in Algebra 2 Adv. or B or better in Algebra 3)Students will continue their study and analysis of functions: linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic. Right triangle trigonometrywill be expanded to include circular functions, with applications. Complex numbers, polar coordinates, analytic geometry and conic sections will alsobe included. Emphasis is on applications and problem solving with the aid of graphing calculators.0415 PRE-CALCULUS (H) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in Algebra 2 (H) or permission of mathematics director)This course seeks to develop the analytical ability of the student through the study of functions: linear, polynomial, rational, and exponential. Majoremphasis is on the creation and analysis of graphs. Topics also include the study of conic sections, sequences and series, polar coordinates, andparametric equations. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Calculus BC course.0427 SENIOR PRE-CALCULUS (CP) (12) Y5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in Algebra 2 Adv. Or C- or better in Algebra 3…must be a senior)Students will continue their study and analysis of functions; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic. Right triangle trigonometrywill be expanded to include circular functions, with applications. Complex numbers, polar coordinates, analytic geometry and conic sections will alsobe covered. Students will prepare for the Accuplacer Exams.
  • 230419 AP STATISTICS (AP) (11,12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Pre-Calculus Adv, Grade of C or better in Pre-Calculus (H) or B orbetter in Honors Algebra II and completion of summer work packet by the first day of school)This course covers exploring data, sampling and experimentation (planning and conducting a study); anticipating patterns (exploring randomphenomena using probability and simulation); and statistical inference (estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses). The use of graphingcalculators is an integral part of the course, allowing the student to explore a variety of approaches to a problem. This course will prepare students forthe Advanced Placement Statistics exam given in May. All students are required to take the AP exam.0423 CALCULUS (H) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Adv Pre-Calculus or Grade of D in Pre-Calculus H)The content of this course in differential and integral calculus is a rigorous HS level calculus course. The topics range from limits and continuitythrough derivatives and their applications to integrals and their applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus withconcepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The use of graphing calculators is an integral partof the course, allowing the student to explore a variety of approaches to a problem.0424 AP CALCULUS AB (AP) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of B+ or better in Adv Pre-Calculus or Grade of C- or better in Pre-Calculus (H) andcompletion of summer work packet by the first day of school is required for all students)The content of this course in differential and integral calculus is a rigorous HS level calculus course. The topics range from limits and continuitythrough derivatives and their applications to integrals and their applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus withconcepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The use of graphing calculators is an integral partof the course, allowing the student to explore a variety of approaches to a problem. All students taking the AP course are required to take the exam.0426 AP CALCULUS BC (AP) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisites: Grade of B or better in Pre-Calculus (H), completion of summer work packet by the first dayof school; and permission of the Mathematics Director.)Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB using a more theoretical approach. It covers all of the topics of Calculus AB, and in addition will coverthe calculus of parametric, polar, and vector functions, tests for convergence and divergence of series, and Taylor and Maclaurin series. The courseemphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically,and verbally. The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of the course, allowing the student to explore a variety of approaches to a problem.This course will prepare students for the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam given in May. All students are required to take the exam.ELECTIVE COURSES0422 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE (AP) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in Honors ALGEBRA 2, grade of A- or better in Algebra 2Adv., Grade of B- or better in Pre-Calculus Adv or Grade of C- or better in (H) Pre-Calculus.) This course must be taken concurrently with anothermath course. It does not satisfy the math requirement of WHS or most colleges. Completion of summer work packet by the first day of school isrequired.This is an introductory computer science course with Computer Programming utilizing the programming language of JAVA. The major topics includecomputer concepts, control structures, functions, arrays, pointers and strings and an introduction to object oriented design and implementation. Allstudents are required to take the exam0419 AP STATISTICS (AP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Honors ALGEBRA 2 or Grade of B or better in Pre-CalculusAdv or Grade of D or better in Pre-Calculus (H) and completion of summer work packet by the first day of school)This course covers exploring data, sampling and experimentation (planning and conducting a study); anticipating patterns (exploring randomphenomena using probability and simulation); and statistical inference (estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses). The use of graphingcalculators is an integral part of the course, allowing the student to explore a variety of approaches to a problem. This course will prepare students forthe Advanced Placement Statistics exam given in May. All students are required to take the exam0400 MCAS PREP MATH (CP) (10) S 1.25 Second SemesterThis course meets three times a cycle and is taken by those 10thgraders who are determined to need additional math instruction in preparation for themath MCAS exam. This course is always taken in addition to another math class.0440 OC – Computer Science Programming (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Grade of 5 on the AP Computer Science A exam; and approval of theDirector of the Mathematics Department)This is a course in advanced programming using Java and/or other programming languages. Students will complete required homework/exams. Thismay be taken Pass/Fail or for a letter grade.0451 OC – Differential Equations (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A grade of 5 on the AP Calculus BC Exam; and approval of the Director of theMathematics Department)This is an advanced course in the study of differential equations in Calculus. Students will complete online homework/exams. May be taken Pass/Failor for a letter grade.0452 OC – Discrete Mathematics (H) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A grade of B+ or better in Algebra 2 Honors; must be taken concurrently withanother math course; approval of the Director of the Mathematics Department)This course is an introduction to a variety of topics in Discrete Mathematics. Students will complete online homework/exams. May be taken Pass/Failor for a letter grade.
  • 240453 OC – Linear Algebra (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A grade of B+ or better in Honors Pre-Calculus; must be taken concurrently with APCalculus BC or have completed an AP Calculus AB/BC course; approval of the Director of the Mathematics Department)This course is an introduction to a variety of topics in Linear Algebra. Students will complete online and/or written homework/exams. May be takenPass/Fail or for a letter grade.0454 OC – Mathematical Problem-Solving I (H) (10, 11, 12) S 2.5. (Prerequisite: A grade of B+ or better in Algebra 2 Honors; must be takenconcurrently with another math course; approval of the Director of the Mathematics Department)This is a course in the art of problem-solving. Students will complete online and/or written homework/exams. May be taken Pass/Fail or for a lettergrade.0455 OC – Mathematical Problem-Solving II (H) (11, 12) S 2.5 (Prerequisite: Completion of Mathematical Problem-Solving I; must be takenconcurrently with another math course; approval of the Director of the Mathematics Department)This is an advanced course in the art of problem-solving. Students will complete online and/or homework/exams. May be taken Pass/Fail or for aletter grade.0456 OC – Multivariable Calculus (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A grade of 5 on the AP Calculus BC Exam; approval of the Director of theMathematics Department)This is an advanced course in the study of Calculus. Students will complete online homework/exams. May be taken Pass/Fail or for a letter grade.0457 OC – Multivariable Statistics (H) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A grade of 5 on the AP Statistics Exam; approval of the Director of the MathematicsDepartment)This is an advanced course in the study of Statistics. Students will complete online homework/exams. May be taken Pass/Fail or for a letter grade.0458 OC – Probability (H) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A grade of 4 or 5 on the AP Statistics exam and a grade of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus AB exam ortaking one of these concurrently; approval of the Director of the Mathematics Department)This is an advanced course in the study of Probability. Students will complete online homework/exams. May be taken Pass/Fail or for a letter grade.MUSICAll courses provide credits towards the Fine and Applied Arts Requirement0700 CHORUS (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 A full-year course; no audition required.Concert Chorus will perform choral literature from a variety styles and periods. No audition is required. Attention is given to the development andimprovement of sight-reading skills, muisc theory, and healthy singing techniques. Occassional after school rehearsals apply; sometimes performswith other chorus sections. Performance attire will be purchased/ordered at the beginning of each school year; students will be able to use the sameuniform for all four years of high school. Concert Chorus members are expected to perform in all scheduled concerts and events.0720 CHORALE (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 A full-year course, by audition held in the spring.Chorale is designed for treble voiced students who possess advanced musical skills. The size of this ensemble is based on auditions and the balanceof sections (Soprano I, Soprano II, Alto I, Alto II). The group performs choral literature from a variety of styles and periods. Attention is given toadvanced sight-reading skills, music theory, aural training and healthy vocal techniques. Occasional after school rehearsals and/or sectionals apply;and Chorale sometimes performs with others WHS choral groups. Performance attire will be purchased/ordered at the beginning of each school year;students will be able to use the same uniform for all four years of high school. Chorale members are expected to perform in all scheduledconcerts/events and attend all dress rehearsals.0702 ORCHESTRA (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 A full-year course.Orchestra includes all 9thgrade orchestral players along with students from other grades. Strings students may enroll without audition; wind, brass,piano and percussion players audition for the director of the ensemble. Orchestra performs a variety of orchestral literature, primarily arrangementsfrom the Romantic period. The course includes fundamentals of theory, sight-reading, and musical form. Occassional after or before school rehearsalsapply. Students wear concert attire as determined by the director. Orchestra members are expected to perform in all scheduled concerts and eventsand will periodically combine with Symphony or Sinfonietta for major works.0703 ORCHESTRA/HONORS (H) (9, 10, 11,12) Y 5.0 A full-year course. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.See above description of Orchestra. Honors students are graded on a more rigorous scale and complete a performance project each semester orcomplete advanced projects in music theory in preparation for the AP Music Theory Exam to be taken Junior or Senior year. It is recommended, butnot required, that students also take lessons on their instrument.0705 SINFONIETTA (CP) (10,11,12) Y 5.0 A full-year course. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.Sinfonietta is primarily for string players who have skills beyond an intermediate level. Other instrumentalists may be admitted. Sinfonietta performsintermediate and advanced string orchestra literature, from 1600 to present. The course includes fundamentals of theory, sight-reading, and musicalform. Occassional after or before school rehearsals apply. Students wear concert attire as determined by the director. Sinfonietta members areexpected to perform in all scheduled concerts and events and will periodically combine with Orchestra or Symphony for major works.
  • 250706 SINFONIETTA/HONORS (H) (10, 11,12) Y 5.0 A full-year course. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.See above description of Sinfonietta. Honors students are graded on a more rigorous scale and complete a performance project each semester orcomplete advanced projects in music theory in preparation for the AP Music Theory Exam to be taken Junior or Senior year. It is recommended, butnot required, that students also take lessons on their instrument.0708 SYMPHONY (CP) (10,11,12) Y 5.0 A full-year course. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.Symphony is for players of all orchestral instruments who have skills beyond an intermediate level. String players need instructor’s approval; wind,brass, piano and percussion players audition. Symphony performs intermediate and advanced literature primarily from the Classical period in itsoriginal form. The course includes fundamentals of theory, sight-reading, and musical form. Occassional after or before school rehearsals apply.Students wear concert attire as determined by the director. Symphony members are expected to perform in all scheduled concerts and events and willperiodically combine with Orchestra or Sinfonietta for major works.0709 SYMPHONY/HONORS (H) (10, 11,12) Y 5.0 A full-year course. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.See above description of Symphony. Honors students are graded on a more rigorous scale and complete a performance project each semester orcomplete advanced projects in music theory in preparation for the AP Music Theory Exam to be taken Junior or Senior year. It is recommended, butnot required, that students also take lessons on their instrument.0707 CONCERT BAND (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 A full-year course.Concert Band is open to wind, brass and percussion players without audition, and performs concert repertoire from a variety of styles. Studentparticipation in the fall Marching Band season is optional although students will learn this repertoire in the fall. All students participate in townparades and community events. Students wear concert attire as determined by the director and will need lace up black dress shoes. Basic work inmusic theory is included. Concert Band members perform in all scheduled concerts and combine with Jazz Band for some performances.0727 CONCERT BAND HONORS (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 A full year course.See above description of Concert Band. Honors students are graded on a more rigorous scale than C1 students. Participation in the fall Marching Bandseason, including Wednesday evening rehearsals, is required and students complete a project in performance, composition, theory or music history inthe spring. The class includes the study of music theory fundamentals and sight singing.0728 JAZZ BAND (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 A full-year course, by audition only.Jazz Band is open by audition to students who play flute, sax, trumpet, trombone, guitar, bass, piano and drums. This advanced ensemble performsrepertoire from a variety of jazz styles. Student participation in the fall Marching Band season is optional although students will learn this repertoire inthe fall and all students participate in town parades and community events. Students wear concert attire as determined by the director and will need laceup black dress shoes. Basic work in music theory and improvisation is included. Jazz Band members perform in all scheduled concerts and combinewith Concert Band for some performances.0704 JAZZ BAND (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 A full-year course, by audition only.See above description of Jazz Band. Honors students are graded on a more rigorous scale than C1 students. Participation in the fall Marching Bandseason, including Wednesday evening rehearsals, is required and students complete a project in performance, composition, theory or music history inthe spring. The class includes the study of music theory fundamentals, jazz harmony and improvisation.0711 OCTETS (H) (10, 11, 12) Y 2.5 A full-year course, by audition only. Prerequisite: By audition only.An advanced A cappella ensemble which sings popular music in eight-part harmony. Priority is given to students with advanced sightreading andvocal technique skills. Octets members must be active members in good standing in Choir. Rehearsals are in the afternoon or evening. Instruction inmusic theory and basic arranging is included. Occassional extra rehearsals apply. Students wear concert attire as determined by the director. Studentsin this ensemble can expect an active performance schedule.0722 CHOIR (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 A full-year course, by audition only. Prerequisites: #700 Concert Chorus, #720 or #721 Chorale or instructorapproval, and a successful audition.Choir is designed for upperclassmen. They will perform choral literature from a variety styles and periods. (Sophomores may be placed in this chorusif needed to balance the Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass sections.) Attention is given to intermediate and advanced sight-reading skills, music theory, andhealthy singing techniques. Occasional after school rehearsals apply; sometimes performs with other chorus sections. Performance attire will bepurchase/ordered at the beginning of each school year; students will be able to use the same uniform for all four years of high school. Choir membersare expected to perform in all scheduled concerts and events.0723 CHOIR/HONORS (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 A full-year course, by audition only. Prerequisites: #700 Concert Chorus or Instructor approval, and asuccessful audition.Choir Honors is designed for advanced Juniors and Seniors. They will perform choral literature from a variety styles and periods. Attention is given toadvanced sight-reading skills, music theory, and healthy singing techniques. Occasional after school rehearsals apply; sometimes performs with otherchorus sections. Students wear concert attire as determined by the director . Choir members are expected to perform in all scheduled concerts andevents.
  • 260724 CHAMBER SINGERS (H) (10, 11, 12) Y 2.5 A full-year course, by audition only. Prerequisite: By audition only.Chamber Singers is an advanced A cappella ensemble which sings a variety of music, such as madrigals and vocal jazz. Priority is given to studentswho have developed advanced sightreading and vocal technique skills. Students in Chamber Singers must be active members in good standing inSachem Chorus.. Rehearsals are in the afternoon or evening. Instruction in music theory topics is included. Students in this ensemble can expect anactive performance schedule. Occassional extra rehearsals apply. Students wear concert attire as determined by the director.0710 AFTER SCHOOL CHORUS (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 2.5 A full-year course; Prerequisite: Instructor approval.After school chorus is primarily for students whose membership in a band or orchestra precludes them from enrolling in chorus during the classday. Other students may enroll with permission of the instructor. Students work on intermediate sight-reading skills, vocal techniques and choralrepertoire. Class meets directly after school 2 afternoons a week and occasionally at other times for rehearsals combined with other groups. Studentswear concert attire as determined by the director. After School Chorus members are expected to perform in all scheduled concerts and events. Otherstudents may enroll with permission of the instructor.0729 SONGWRITING AND ARRANGING (CP) (10, 11, 12) S 2.5 One SemesterThis course is designed for students who play guitar, piano and other instruments but who might not have music reading and notation skills. Studentswork individually and collaboratively on a variety of songwriting and arranging projects. Basic skills in music theory, recording and notation are alsoincluded. Students assemble a portfolio of projects during the semester.SCIENCEThe Science Department encourages students to enroll in a science course every year. Outstanding courses are offered in each of the major scientificdisciplines; Biology, Chemistry and Physics. All courses require students to do independent work, such as homework and studying for tests. A variety ofteaching methods and laboratories are employed in all science classes to insure maximum understanding of Science concepts.Important- Students who wish to take AP courses in their senior year should have demonstrated excellence in their prior Biology, Chemistry and Physicsclasses, two of which must have been taken at the Honors level as specifically indicated in the course description for each AP class. Admission to APclasses requires the approval of the current Science teacher and the Director of Science. Juniors who wish to take Anatomy & Physiology or Biotechnologyat the honors level must take Physics concurrently if they have not yet taken a Physics course.Note: All freshmen will be required to take Biology at the Honors and or College Prep (CP) level. There are two CP level courses, “Biology” and“Principles of Biology”; with Principles classes designed to focus closely on the state frameworks and frequently spend extra time preparing students for theMCAS tests. In their sophomore year, students will take Chemistry at the Honors or CP levels, and in their junior year, students will take Physics at theHonors and CP levels. In their senior year, students will have their choice of elective courses, including AP Biology, AP Chemistry or AP EnvironmentalScience, AP Physics, Anatomy & Physiology, Forensic Science, Environmental/Marine Science, Bioengineering, Biotechnology and Ethics.It is considered best educational practice for all students to have completed a course of study which includes the three basic sciences, Biology, Chemistryand Physics, before adding any elective courses to their program of studies.0503 BIOLOGY (H) (9) Y 5.0 (Note: Students are selected for the Honors Biology program by scoring well on an entrance exam and demonstratingexcellence in both their Science and Math classes in eighth grade. While all students who wish to take the entrance exam may do so, students who arein higher-level eighth grade Science and Math courses will have a better chance to qualify for Honors Biology. Students and parents will be informedof dates and times for the entrance exam by notice sent home with the student.)Honors Biology is a comprehensive biology course provided for college preparatory students who have shown strong evidence of aptitude for, andinterest in, science. The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the chemical, functional, and structural characteristics ofliving organisms. Topics studied include the structure of cells, cell theory, evolution and gene theory. Included also are the major themes of tissues andorgans, ecology and population dynamics, reproduction, metabolism and growth. Laboratory work is designed to develop an understanding of thescientific process, as well as an understanding of biological concepts. Topics studied are consistent with the Massachusetts Frameworks for LifeScience, but will not necessarily cover all the topics necessary for success in the Biology SAT II test without significant independent student work.0504 BIOLOGY (CP) (9) Y 5.0In this course, Biological concepts are developed through an examination of the structure and function of living organisms. Through lectures,discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory experiences, the student develops an understanding of the interactions that exist between living organismsand their environment. Laboratory exercises stress the use of investigative procedures that play an important role in the construction of biologicalknowledge. Many of the topics covered in this course are the same as those covered in Biology (H), but at a less sophisticated level. Topics studied areconsistent with the Massachusetts Frameworks for Life Science.0511 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY (CP) (9) Y 5.0This is a student centered, activity based, course designed to help the student develop an appreciation for the living things that exist in the student’senvironment. Through discussions, demonstrations, group activities, and laboratory experiences, the student develops an understanding of the structure,function of living things and their interactions between each other and their environment. Throughout the year, student learning is reinforced throughthe use of structured laboratory work and activities. The biology topics that are studied are consistent with the Massachusetts Frameworks for LifeScience.
  • 270505 CHEMISTRY (H) (10, 11) Y 5.0 (Note: Students are selected for the Honors Chemistry program by scoring well on an entrance exam anddemonstrating excellence in both their Science and Math classes in ninth grade. While all students who wish to take the entrance exam may do so,students who are in higher-level ninth grade Science and Math courses will have a better chance to qualify for Honors Chemistry. Students and parentswill be informed of dates and times for the entrance exam by notice sent home with the student.)This course is a rigorous, quantitative treatment of chemistry for college preparatory students. Students electing this course should demonstrate strongaptitude and interest in science and interest in, science as well as strong mathematical and verbal skills. Topics are covered in depth and utilizesophisticated problem-solving techniques. Topics may include: atomic structure; the bonding and geometry of molecules; the study of gases andkinetic molecular theory; quantitative analysis; stoichiometry; energy in chemical reactions; solution concentration; acid/base chemistry; and reactionsinvolving oxidation/reduction. Laboratory work is designed to develop an understanding of the scientific process, as well as an understanding of thechemical concepts covered. Topics studied are consistent with the Massachusetts Frameworks for Chemistry, but will not necessarily cover all thetopics necessary for success in the Chemistry SAT II test without significant independent student work.0506 CHEMISTRY (CP) (10, 11) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1)This college preparatory course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of chemistry as a physical science and the role that chemistryplays in society. Included is the study of atomic and molecular structure; the mole; chemical properties of elements and compounds; acids and bases;and chemical bonding. The laboratory program enables students to gain a deeper understanding of the nature of chemistry. The curriculum of thiscourse is designed to focuses on critical thinking, decision-making, and the development of laboratory skills. Topics studied are consistent with theMassachusetts Frameworks for Chemistry.0513 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY (CP) (10, 11) Y 5.0This is a student-centered, activity-based, course designed to develop an understanding of chemistry. Concepts for study will include the properties ofelements and compounds, acid-base reactions, atomic and molecular structure, and the interactions of matter and energy. Activities will involve criticalthinking, decision-making, and the building of laboratory skills.0507 PHYSICS (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A grade of "B" in Algebra II Advanced or Honors or demonstrated aptitude in mathematics andrecommendation of the current Science teacher)Students who elect this course will be involved in the study of some of the fundamental and important principles of Physics. Topics to be studiedinclude most of the following: Kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, and waves. Emphasis will be placedon the quantitative treatment of these topics involving the integration of mathematical skills with the concepts of Physics. The student will pursue asignificant amount of laboratory work, and will be engaged in an intensive amount of problem solving. The topics are covered in a manner consistentwith the Massachusetts Frameworks for Physics. The course includes most of the topics covered in the SAT II Physics test. However, studentswishing to complete all topics covered in the SAT II Physics exam will have to spend a significant amount of time preparing on their own to be fullyprepared.0508 PHYSICS (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Algebra B (CP) completed, or being taken concurrently.)A college preparatory course, Physics (CP) involves the student in the study of the basic concepts of physics. Among the topics included in the courseare Newtons Laws of Motion, gravitation, momentum, energy; electricity, magnetism, sound, light, and optics. This course is designed for studentswhose background in mathematics is less advanced than required for Physics (H). Topics studied are consistent with the Massachusetts Frameworks forPhysics.0512 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS (CP) (11,12) Y 5.0This course explores how the principles of physics play a key role in everyday life. Students will learn how sports, transportation, art, music, light, andelectronics relate to physics. A variety of teaching techniques will be employed: Hands-on activities, labs, worksheets, the Internet, anddemonstrations. Some simple algebra will be required; all necessary problem-solving strategies will be modeled extensively. Topics studied areconsistent with the Massachusetts Frameworks for Physics.0500 ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY (AP) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Demonstrated excellence in Biology, Chemistry and Physics, two of whichmust have been taken at the Honors level; approval of the current Science teacher and the Director of Science. Honors Physics may be takenconcurrently with this course.)The goal of Advanced Placement Biology is to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and analytical skills necessary todeal critically with the rapidly changing science of Biology. The AP Biology course is designed to meet the objectives of a college introductoryBiology course. Students accepting the challenge of an Advanced Placement course must be highly motivated to learn, as the course will require eachstudent to actively participate in all lectures and laboratory activities that are conducted during the year. Reading requirements for the course arerigorous and require a daily commitment (1-2 hours) in order to stay current in the class. Due to time limitations, each student will be required tocomplete a substantial amount of work during the summer and independently during the school year.At the completion of this course, students who have met the above criteria will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Biology exam. In order toprepare, tests and quizzes throughout the year will consist of multiple choice and free response questions similar to those on the exam. Many collegesand universities accept results of the AP examination as evidence of competency in collegiate level introductory Biology. The standard accepted forcompetency differs from school to school. This course is highly recommended for all student who may major in Biology, other Sciences, or alliedhealth fields.
  • 280501 ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY (AP) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Demonstrated excellence in Honors Chemistry and in either HonorsBiology or Honors Physics or both; approval of the current Science teacher and the Director of Science. Honors Physics may be taken concurrentlywith this course.)The Advanced Placement Chemistry course is designed to be a rigorous course that examines many of the topics encountered in the general chemistrycourse usually taken during the freshman college year. Significant areas to be studied include atomic and molecular structure; states of matter;chemical bonding; stoichiometry; solutions; equilibrium; chemical kinetics; thermodynamics; acid/base chemistry, oxidation-reduction reactions; anddescriptive chemistry. Laboratory experiments include acid-base titration, electrochemistry, synthesis and identification of compounds, andapplications of LeChatelier’s Principle. All experiments will require the safe use and understanding of simple and advanced laboratory apparatus andtechniques.Due to time limitations, each student will be required to complete a substantial amount of work during the summer and independently during the schoolyear. At the completion of this course, students who have met the above criteria will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Chemistry exam.Many colleges and universities accept results of the of the AP examination as evidence of competency in collegiate level introductory Chemistry. Thestandard accepted for competency differs from school to school.0528 ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (AP) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Demonstrated excellence in Biology, ChemistryAnd Physics, two of which must have been taken at the honors lever; approval of current science teacher and Director of Science. Honors PhysicsMay be taken concurrently with this course.)Environmental science is one of the most important sciences of our time: For global climate change and sustainable energy development to massspecies extinction and habitat loss, the short and long term impact humans are having on the biosphere is evident. The goal of AP environmentalscience is to provide students with the understanding, skills and context needed to identify and analyze this impact. Students will evaluate potentialrisks associated with human effect on the biosphere and examine alternative solutions for dealing with problems. This interdisciplinary course willinvestigate issues not only from the scientific lens, but also from economic, political and sociological perspectives.0502 ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS (AP) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Demonstrated excellence in Biology, Chemistry and Physics, the latter twoof which must have been taken at the Honors level; approval of the current Science teacher and the Director of Science. Calculus must be takenconcurrently (or already have been taken). Taking the Calculus BC course is strongly recommended.Advanced Placement Physics focuses on Newtonian mechanics, taught at the level of an intensive, calculus-based freshman college Physics course.Other topics introduced in the course may include some of the following: modern physics (including relativity, and atomic structure), thermodynamics,mechanical waves, electricity, magnetism and optics. Much emphasis is placed on the integration of mathematical skills with the solving of Physicsproblems.Due to time limitations, each student will be required to complete a substantial amount of work during the summer and independently during theschool year. Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement C Mechanics Exam in the year the course is taken. Many colleges anduniversities accept results of the of the AP examination as evidence of competency in collegiate level introductory Physics. The standard accepted forcompetency differs from school to school.0523/0524 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (CP or H) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics and approval ofcurrent Science teacher. Physics may be taken concurrently.)Anatomy and Physiology is an in depth course for seniors that focuses on the structures and functions of the human body. Each of the body’s elevenorgan systems is studied in detail. The theme of homeostasis is frequently revisited to unify the coursework, and various diseases and disorders areinvestigated as examples of what happens when homeostasis is lost. Lab activities are an integral part of the course. This course may be taken forHonors or CP credit. Honors or CP credit will be based on the student’s chosen commitment to the depth and breadth of lab work, exams, homework,and research projects.0525/0526 BIOENGINEERING, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND ETHICS (CP or H) (12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology, Chemistry,and Physics and approval of current Science teacher. Physics may be taken concurrently.)BB&E is a full year course that will investigate the new technologies that are increasing available to scientists and the ethical implications of usingthem. Students will learn and perform molecular techniques such as DNA isolation, restriction enzyme digestion, polymerase chain reaction, andbacterial cloning. Students will become proficient in the proper use of the tools and equipment of biotechnology labs, and will learn how scientistsapply these tools and skills in genetic engineering, drug discovery, and stem cell research. Students will also explore and debate current issues such asgenetic engineering, genetically modified food products, genetic screening, and stem cell research.0517/0519 FORENSIC SCIENCE, PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC SCIENCE (CP or H) (11,12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology,Chemistry, and Physics, or approval of Science Director. Physics may be taken concurrently.)Forensic Science is an introduction to some of the specialized fields of Forensic Science, the principles of Science and Technology upon which theyare based, and the application of these principles to various analyses of crime scene evidence. Forensic Science includes all areas of scientificendeavor, such as medicine, psychology, geology, physics, chemistry and biology. Topics such as arson, blood typing and blood spatter analysis,entomology, pathology, chromatography, fingerprinting, soil analysis, DNA fingerprinting, hair and fiber analysis, hand writing analysis andtoxicology will be studied in this course.0521/0522 ENVIRONMENTAL & MARINE SCIENCE, PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL & MARINE SCIENCE (CP or H) (11, 12) Y 5.0(Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, or approval of Science Director. Physics may be taken concurrently.)Environmental & Marine Science is a full year, activity-oriented course that will investigate important environmental issues of our world and explorethe oceans and waterways of our planet. Environmental science topics will include recycling, habitat loss, species extinction, pollution, invasivespecies, climate change, and renewable energy. Marine science topics will include ocean currents and weather, scuba diving and deep-sea explorations,waves and tsunamis, ocean chemistry, and in-depth units on the many types of marine habitats and organisms.
  • 29SOCIAL STUDIESThe Social Studies Department has a commitment to providing a strong background in human history. As the current Massachusetts History and SocialScience Frameworks so aptly states: “Historical time is the lens through which we see change and continuity in human affairs. History allows us to knowour place in time, the first mark of educated citizens. To know ourselves and others, we compare our lives with those people in other eras and othercircumstances. Ignorance of history isolates us from human realities, a mortal weakness in a democratic society, leaving us prey to mere nostalgia, orcensored versions of the past spread by partisan interests...” .In addition to history, the social sciences are introduced through Psychology courses, Economics electives and Senior Seminar electives. An AdvancedPlacement course in the History of the United States is provided for students in grades eleven or twelve who desire a rigorous college equivalent experience.Advanced placement courses are also offered for eligible juniors and seniors in Economics and Psychology.The Social Studies Department also participates in two multidisciplinary course offerings. One is the Senior Humanities program in which students engagein an integrated study of Western Civilization through the examination of art, literature, history, and music. The other program is a Junior American Studiesprogram in which students explore America since the Civil War through an examination of history, literature, music and art.0345 WORLD HISTORY I (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) Y 5.0The World History course is unleveled and a requirement for graduation. This course is a skill based, thematic overview of human history from theorigins of modern civilizations through the Scientific Revolution. Students will examine global interactions on three continents along the Silk Road, theemergence of the World’s major religions and their impact on regions and social networks, the development of modern societies in Europe, Asia andAfrica, and the growth of modern political ideologies leading to revolution and dramatic changes in the organization of groups and nation states.Students will develop their critical thinking skills, their analytical writing skills and their ability to engage in authentic learning activities relating totheir study of World History. All students will develop their ability to read and understand the significance of primary and secondary documents in thestudy of history. All students in World History I will also participate in the National History Day research process.0307 WORLD HISTORY II (H) (10,11,12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A “B” grade in World History I Honors and/or the recommendation of the Ninth GradeSocial Studies Teacher)This rigorous course is a continuation of the World History course students began in ninth grade. The topics will cover the time frame of 1800 to thepresent time. Content will include the industrial revolution in Europe, the revolutions of 1848, the unification of Italy and Germany, the Opium Warsand European domination of China, the changes in government and expansion of Japanese economy following its opening to Western influences, theFirst World War, the Russian and Chinese Revolutions, the rise of dictators and World War II, the end of colonialism in Africa and Asia, and LatinAmerica in the 20th century. There will be a number of experiences in reading primary and secondary sources and there will be an emphasis onwriting short descriptive and analytical papers. Students also participate in the National History Day program in this honors course.0306 WORLD HISTORY II (CP) (10,11,12) Y 5.0Beginning with Europe in the industrial revolution this course will continue the story of world history through to the present time. Besides Europe inthe last two hundred years, students will study the various revolutions that impacted both the West and East, the First World War, the rise of dictatorsand the resulting Second World War, the end of colonialism around the world, and recent developments in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Writing,investigation, inquiry, and library skills will be integral parts of the student’s development in this course.0305 FOUNDATIONS OF WORLD HISTORY II (CP) (10,11,12) Y 5.0This course is designed to meet the needs of students who learn best with a slower paced coverage of content and who have had limited success inprevious social studies courses. The content will cover the period of world history from Napoleon to the present and will focus on developments inEurope, Africa, Asia and Latin America during the last two centuries. The activities will stress the use of individual and small group learning and willemphasize reading material appropriate for the student, audio-visual resources, and skill development. The course will build upon what was learned inthe ninth grade.0313 UNITED STATES HISTORY AP (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Must receive permission of Department Director)The variety of historical interpretations of the major themes of American History forms the backbone of this course. A wide range of historicalreadings provides students with the information to write a number of analytical papers. Since the course prepares for the Advanced PlacementExamination, only those juniors and seniors with outstanding academic records are considered as applicants. It is expected that students enrolled in thecourse will take the Advanced Placement Examination in the year the course is taken. Students applying for the course are approved by the Director ofSocial Studies after recommendations of social studies teachers. The course will serve as the third year of the social studies requirement or it may betaken in the senior year after completing the World and American History sequence.0310 AMERICAN HISTORY, RECONSTRUCTION TO THE PRESENT (H) (11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: A "B" grade in World History II, Honorsand/or the recommendation of the tenth grade social studies teacher.)This course is the third year of the social studies graduation requirement. The course is designed for students who are seeking a challenging approachto the study of American history. There will be emphasis on reading and writing, including the examination of original as well as interpretativesources. A major term paper is a requirement of this course. Students will investigate a number of different themes shaping America between 1865and the present. The roots of twentieth century thought as evident in the events and legislation of the period of Reconstruction and the IndustrialRevolution will begin the course. The examination of Progressive era, Imperialism and World War I will follow. In addition, students will study theGreat Depression and its impact on America and the world, World War II, and America since 1945. A combination of social, economic and politicalthemes will encourage students to develop a better understanding of America’s emergence as the sole super power in the world as we enter the 21stcentury.
  • 300309 AMERICAN HISTORY, RECONSTRUCTION TO THE PRESENT (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0This course is the third year of the social studies graduation requirement. This course is designed for college bound students who will be expected tofurther refine skills in reading and writing that demonstrate their understanding of the material and illustrate the ability to make connections betweenvarious historic events and their lives today. Original as well as interpretive sources are used in this course. A major term paper is a requirement of thiscourse. Students will investigate a number of different themes shaping America between 1865 and the present. The roots of twentieth century thoughtas evident in the events and legislation of the period of Reconstruction and the Industrial Revolution will begin the course. The examination of theProgressive era, Imperialism, and World War I will follow. In addition, students will study the great Depression and it impact on America and theworld, World War II and America since 1945. A combination of social, economic and political themes will encourage students to develop a betterunderstanding of America’s emergence as the sole super power in the world as we enter the 21st century.0308 FOUNDATIONS IN AMERICAN HISTORY, RECONSTRUCTION TO THE PRESENT (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0This course is the third year of the social studies requirement. This course is designed for students who can benefit from a variety of approaches tolearning, a slower pace, or who have met limited success in previous social studies courses. Students will be expected to further refine skills in readingand writing. This skill development is an important component of this course. Original as well as interpretive sources are used in this course. Studentswill investigate a number of different themes shaping America between 1865 and the present. The roots of twentieth century thought as evident in theevents and legislation of the period of Reconstruction and the Industrial Revolution will begin the course. The examination of the Progressive era,Imperialism and World War I will follow. In addition, students will study the Great Depression and its impact on America and the world, World WarII and America since 1945. A combination of social, economic and political themes will encourage students to develop a better understanding ofAmerica’s emergence as the sole super power in the world as we enter the 21st century. A research paper is a requirement of this course.0147 AMERICAN STUDIES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH (CP) (11) Y/Double 10.00148 AMERICAN STUDIES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH (H) (11) Y/Double 10.0This new double credit course for juniors offers an interdisciplinary approach to the examination of Modern America. Through a study of Americanhistory, literature, music and art, this course will enrich the depth of a student’s understanding of American culture, especially in the twentieth century.The thematic approach includes a focus on a number of different themes including Race in America, Prosperity and Depression, TechnologicalInnovation and Change in America, and Protest. Students will examine the works of major American writers such as Crane, Fitzgerald, Hemingway,Hughes, Hurston, Morrison, Carver and Kingston. They will also explore the roots and development of American art and music during this same timeperiod. Papers and projects are both analytical and creative. A major term paper is a requirement of this course. Students may elect to work at thehonors level in this course with the recommendation of their sophomore social studies teacher.0315 MICROECONOMICS (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5This course stresses the general concepts and analytical models of economics and how they can be used not only to explain events but also to helpindividuals, groups, or nations decide how best to improve their welfare. Semester one emphasizes micro economic analysis, considering theories ofproduction, value, price, and economics of the firm, and functional distribution under varying conditions of the market. Semester two emphasizesmacro economic analysis. Topics considered include national income analysis, money and banking, economic growth and stability, unemployment,inflation, and the role of government in the economy. This course may be elected for either or both semesters and may be taken for CP or honorscredit.0317 MACROECONOMICS (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5This course stresses the general concepts and analytical models of economics and how they can be used not only to explain events but also to helpindividuals, groups, or nations decide how best to improve their welfare. Semester one emphasizes micro economic analysis, considering theories ofproduction, value, price, and economics of the firm, and functional distribution under varying conditions of the market. Semester two emphasizesmacro economic analysis. Topics considered include national income analysis, money and banking, economic growth and stability, unemployment,inflation, and the role of government in the economy. This course may be elected for either or both semesters and may be taken for CP or honorscredit.0346 AP ECONOMICS (AP) (11,12) Y 5.0This college level introduction to economics stresses the general concepts and analytical models of economics and how they can be used not only toexplain events but also to help individuals, groups, or nations decide how best to improve their welfare. This course will move through thefundamental concepts of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory quickly and thoroughly. Students will examine micro economic analysis, themarket forces of supply and demand, theories of production, value, price, and the economics of the firm, and functional distribution under varyingconditions of the market. This course will examine these fundamental concepts of macroeconomic theory quickly and thoroughly. The secondsemester emphasizes macroeconomic concepts, including national income analysis, money and banking, economic growth and stability,unemployment, inflation, and the role of government in the economy. Since this course prepares for the Advanced Placement Examination inMacroEconomics, only those juniors and seniors with outstanding academic records are considered as applicants. It is expected that students enrolledin the course will take the Advanced Placement Examination in the year the course is taken. Students applying for the course are approved by theDirector of Social Studies after recommendations of social studies teachers.0319 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5This first semester course is designed to introduce students to a certain set of basic ideas in the field of psychology. The focus of the course is toanswer the questions: What is psychology? When, where and how did psychology get started? What fundamental ideas are the foundation of modernpsychology? Topics covered include developmental psychology, the brain and the nervous system, altered states of consciousness, sensation andperception, psychoanalysis, behaviorism, cognitive and humanistic psychology. This course may be taken before or after the second semester course.0320 ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5This second semester course is designed to introduce students to an additional set of ideas in the field of psychology. The focus of the course is toinvestigate a variety of issues that modern psychologists study. As in the first semester, additional emphasis is placed on the personal side ofpsychology, and the specialized vocabulary. Topics covered include current issues in the areas of experimental psychology, developmentalpsychology, social psychology, and abnormal psychology. This course may be taken before or after the first semester course.
  • 310342 AP PSYCHOLOGY (AP) (11, 12) Y 5.0This course is designed to provide students with a rigorous introduction to the field of psychology. The focus of the course is to answer the questions:What is psychology? When, where and how did psychology get started? What fundamental ideas are the foundation of modern psychology? Topicscovered include developmental psychology, the brain and the nervous system, altered states of consciousness, sensation and perception,psychoanalysis, behaviorism, cognitive and humanistic psychology. The course will also investigate a variety of issues that modern psychologistsstudy, including current issues in the areas of experimental psychology, developmental psychology, social psychology, and abnormal psychology.Since this course prepares for the Advanced Placement Examination in Psychology, only those juniors and seniors with outstanding academic recordsare considered as applicants. It is expected that students enrolled in the course will take the Advanced Placement Examination in the year the course istaken. Students applying for the course are approved by the Director of Social Studies after recommendations of social studies teachers.SENIOR SEMINAR SERIESSenior Seminar Series is going to replace Senior Focus. This offering will be a series of one semester courses offered to seniors examining a number of areasof interest to faculty members in the Social Studies Department. The offerings will include Senior Focus I, Senior Focus II, An Introduction to Sociology,An introduction to Political Philosophy, The American Political System, From Watergate to the Present, U.S. Women’s History, and The Service LearningProject. Students will have the opportunity to sign up for courses offered in the Fall semester and courses offered in the spring semester. These semesterofferings will involve discussion, research, reading and the development of writing and critical thinking skills, as well as hands on active learningexperiences. The Senior Seminars are offered for CP or Honors credit, depending on the recommendation of a student’s junior Social Studies teacher. Thecurrent offerings are:0323/0333 SENIOR FOCUS, FALL SEMESTER (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5Besides an examination of various issues that impact our democratic society in the 21stcentury, students will examine other contemporary non-Westernsocieties from an Asian, African, or Latin American perspective. An examination of social justice will be an important part of this course. The goal ofsocial justice is the" full and equal participation of all individuals in a society that meets their needs." This course will examine issues such as poverty,race, lack of education, and other issues that deeply affect an individual’s ability to participate in society. In addition to a study of these controversialand very current issues, students will be given the opportunity to truly affect change by participating social action projects These projects will allowstudents to work with and learn about social organizations throughout our area that actively promote social justice. These projects are meant to fosterthought about the topics discussed as well as reinforce the idea that students are able to contribute to change in a meaningful way. Students areexpected to participate in class discussions, read a variety of articles and write a series of short papers on controversial topics examined in the course.Students may elect to take one or both semesters of Senior Focus..0324/0334 SENIOR FOCUS, SPRING SEMESTER (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5During the second semester of Senior Focus, students will consider other contemporary and Global issues of our time. Additional themes revolvingaround social justice will be an important part of this course. The goal of social justice is the" full and equal participation of all individuals in a societythat meets their needs." This course will examine issues such as poverty, race, lack of education, ableism and other issues that deeply affectindividual’s ability to participate in society. In addition to a study of these controversial and very current issues, students will be given the opportunityto truly affect change by participating in social action projects These projects will allow students to work with and learn about social organizationsthroughout our area that actively promote social justice. These projects are meant to foster thought about the topics discussed as well as reinforce theidea that students are able to contribute to change in a meaningful way. Students are expected to participate in class discussions, read a variety ofarticles and write a series of short papers on controversial topics examined in the course. Beginning this year, there will be a service learningexperience, designed by students, as a requirement of this course. Students may elect to take one or both semesters of Senior Focus.0325/0335 SOCIOLOGY - PERSPECTIVES ON SOCIAL INTERACTION (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5This course provides a broad overview of group behavior and group thought and how those concepts apply to everyday life. Major theories andperspectives are presented, including sociological development, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure. Students explore theinfluence of social class and social institutions such as religion, education, government, economy and the family. Students will also conductsociological research and examine sociology as a science.0326/0336 AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5The Introduction to Philosophy course will take a look at a number of the great intellectual achievements of Western civilization. Starting with thephilosophies of ancient Greece, we will take a journey through western civilization and study how man has answered questions such as: What is thenature of being? Is our perception a reality or an illusion? And, What is mans purpose on earth? Philosophers studied will include Socrates, Plato,Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Locke, Hegel, Kant, Nietzsche, and a selection of others.0327/0337 U.S. POLITICS & GOVERNMENT (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5This course is an introduction to how the American government works and how it changes to meet the needs of each generation. Using primarydocuments and a wide range of multimedia sources, students will look at the policies and processes that impact their world. Go beyond the threebranches of government and how a bill becomes a law to debate controversial topics, question the role of our leaders, learn about your rights, andponder if you really do have what it takes to Rock the Vote.0328/0338 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S STUDIES (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5How does gender shape our lives on individual, cultural, and social levels? What does it mean to study "women" as a group? What does a feministlook like? This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical thinking questions surrounding the gendered experience. This class willbe an historical examination of how sex and gender issues have changed throughout history. This class promises lively discussions and debates,historical perspectives and pop-culture, hands-on research and film analysis and a better understanding of the world we live in.
  • 320329/0339 THE SERVICE LEARNING PROJECT (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5This course is particularly designed for students who want to get out into the community and find businesses, community organizations and othergroups who would like to mentor seniors in various career paths. The projects will depend on the interests of the students, the needs of the communityand the availability of opportunities. Students will be expected to record their experiences in journals and write a reflection at the end of each of theirservice learning projects and experiences.0330/0340 US HISTORY: 1970 TO PRESENT (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5This class will cover American history from Nixon to Obama. Areas of discussion will include the Watergate scandal, the Reagan Revolution, theClinton Impeachment, the attacks of September, 11, the Iraq War, etc. Students in this class will be expected to discuss and debate controversialissues, read articles and primary documents, and write position papers. We will also use a wide variety of media resources.0343/0344 MODERN GENOCIDE AND HUMAN RIGHTS (CP or H) (12) S 2.5This seminar will include the examination of the causes and consequences of events such as the transatlantic slave trade, the oppression of the Irish, theArmenian genocide, the Holocaust, the genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda and Darfur, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the rights of stateless peoples,human trafficking and other related topics. The goal of this course is to teach student about these problems to make them aware as responsible citizensin a complex, troubled world. The seminar will involve discussion and debate, as well as analytical papers and group and individual presentations.0321/0322 ADVANCED CULTURAL STUDIES OF CHINA (CP or H) (11, 12) S 2.5The advanced cultural study will focus on various themes relating to China including its geography, its philosophies, its arts and literature, and the roleof women. There will be specific emphasis on China’s response to the West from 1800 to the present and how China’s philosophical beliefs haveinfluenced this response. The era following Mao’s death in 1976 and the position of China in the world as we enter the 21stcentury will be the finalfocus of the course. Field trips to the Museum of Fine Arts and the Peabody Essex Museum will also enrich student exposure to China.0347/0348 THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST (CP or H) (12) S 2.5It is almost impossible to pick up a newspaper or flip on the news without hearing about the Middle East. As important as it is to be aware of thesecurrent issues, it is equally important to truly understand the history of this region. This course examines major trends in the evolution of the mIddleEast in the modern era. Middle East histry with an emphasis ooon four themes: imperialism, nationalism, modernization, and Islam.0111/0112 HUMANITIES: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH (CP or H) (12) Y/Double 10.0 (Prerequisite: Requires a “C” average or better inprevious English and/or Social Studies courses, for honors must meet the requirements of the English and/or Social departments.)Humanities is a double-credit course for seniors in the literature, history, art and music of Western civilization. Organized chronologically andinterdisciplinary in approach, Humanities emphasizes especially the classical and medieval periods, the Renaissance, and selected aspects of thenineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students study the work of many of the major writers, artists and composers of the Western tradition. Papers andprojects are both analytical and creative.Students taking Humanities must have a "C" average or better in their previous high school English courses. Students may elect to work at the honorslevel in this course by meeting the requirements of the English and/or Social Studies courses for honors level work.Humanities fulfills the Fine and Applied Arts requirement as well as the senior English requirement.TECHNOLOGY/ENGINEERINGThe Technology/Engineering Department offers courses that are beneficial for all students. Courses are designed to help students develop the knowledge,skills, and work ethic necessary to successfully pursue further college preparation, technical careers at the post secondary level or to help obtain employmentupon graduation.Students are challenged to apply the “Design Process,” as described in the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Technology/Engineering, to plan,create, build, test, manage, and assess technology through individual and group activities. These activities will involve students in action based "hands-on"processes that utilize tools, machines and specialized equipment. The courses are designed so that students will gain an understanding of how technology canbe applied to benefit society and how science and technology can impact human affairs as well as our environment in both positive and negative ways. Careand attention are devoted to the further development of each students talents, knowledge, skills and interests.The following Technology course offerings can be taken for a full year or half-year either semester and can be elected to fulfill the 5 credit "Fine andApplied Arts" graduation requirement.Half-year Full yearArchitectural Computer Design (Arch/CAD) 2.5 5.0 creditsEngineering the Future 2.5 5.0 creditsRobotics / Electromechanical Design 2.5 5.0 creditsTV Studio and Video Production 2.5 5.0 creditsWood and Cabinet Making I 2.5 5.0 creditsWood and Cabinet Making II 2.5 5.0 credits
  • 330733 ARCHITECTURAL COMPUTER DESIGN (Arch/CAD) (CP) (9,10,11,12) S 2.50734 ARCHITECTURAL COMPUTER DESIGN (Arch/CAD) (Honors) (9,10,11,12) S 2.5 (Honors criteria: 2 additional CAD drawings over CPrequirements and term paper or scale model of designed home.)Students will be challenged to take their own original designs and transform them into scaled architectural plans using hand drafting skills as well ascomputer-aided design software. The students will also learn functional space planning techniques, basic construction standards and designconventions that will allow them to design a variety of projects such as sheds, decks, garages and vacation homes. Other related design aspects such assite planning considerations, aesthetic and environmental impacts will be addressed as projects develop on an individual basis.Architectural Drawing and Computer Aided Design will meet the “Fine and Applied Arts” graduation requirement and may be elected for up to 20credits.0743 ENGINEERING THE FUTURE (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5The engineering course is a semester course designed to give students an understanding of the engineering processes that provide us the products weuse everyday. Students use the engineering design process to analyze, build, and test projects in the areas of transportation, manufacturing,communication, and construction. Students complete work in two or more of these areas each semester, constructing working projects while learningthe role engineering plays in solving problems and helping to make our lives better.The Engineering the Future course is a hands-on project centered experience, which will help you to understand: How engineering is used to make our world function. Why technological systems operate the way they do. The benefits and the detriments of technology in our world. Who are engineers and why did they choose this career. How new technology products are developed.Engineering the Future course will meet the Fine and Applied Arts graduation requirement and may be elected for up to 10 credits0744 ROBOTICS / ELECTROMECHANICAL DESIGN (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5Robotics / Electromechanical Design is an elective semester course for students interested in working hands-on with robots. Students design, fabricate,program, and use task-oriented robots. The course covers the engineering design process, basic electrical and mechanical design, and basicmicrocontroller programming. This is an exploratory course where students demonstrate mastery by building a robot. Students study various sensorsand various actuators (for analysis and action in the real world) and combine them with a controller to build a complete system designed to accomplisha task. The safe and proper operation of all machines and tools is covered. The course includes the study of current industrial, commercial,governmental, and competitive robotics. No previous experience in robotics, electronics, or mechanics is necessary.Robotics / Electromechanical Design will meet the “Fine and Applied Arts” graduation requirement and may be elected for up to 20 credits.0731 TV STUDIO AND VIDEO PRODUCTION (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5This course is taught in the Win CAM television studio. Students will work together as production teams to plan, direct, shoot and edit their own TVshow or video production. Everyone will have the opportunity to explore all the various roles associated with broadcast communications. Students canhost and act as guests on their own talk show, produce a video as a project for one of their other classes or sports team, or submit individual proposalsto be approved by the teacher. Students will be involved with directing, lighting, sound, computer effects, scripting and storyboarding as well as thebasics of camera operations. Student projects of suitable community interest may be aired on the Winchester cable channel.TV Studio and Video Production will meet the “Fine and Applied Arts” graduation requirement and may be elected for up to 20 credits.0732 TV STUDIO AND VIDEO PRODUCTION (H) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5Students who have taken the first semester introductory level course and wish to explore more advanced studio aspects of video production includingdigital applications and nonlinear editing may request to take the course for honors. These students must have earned at least an A- in the first semestercourse and agree to more extensive assignments.TV Studio and Video Production will meet the “Fine and Applied Arts” graduation requirement and may be elected for up to 20 credits.0740 WOODWORKING AND CABINET MAKING I (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5Woodworking and Cabinet Making I will provide students with the opportunity to design, construct, and finish various furniture projects. This "hands-on" activity oriented course is for the beginner attempting his or her first woodworking project. The safe and proper operation of all woodworkingmachines is covered along with relevant background information on hand and power tools needed for cutting, shaping, forming and finishing wood.Woodworking and Cabinet Making I will meet the Fine and Applied Arts graduation requirement and may be elected in combination withWoodworking and Cabinet Making II for up to 20 credits.0741 WOODWORKING AND CABINET MAKING II (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5Woodworking and Cabinet Making II will provide students with the opportunity to design, construct, and finish various furniture projects. This "hands-on" activity oriented course is for the advanced woodworker who wants to try a unique woodworking operation such as making cabriole legs, applyinginlay and insets, or making raised panel doors. The safe and proper operation of all woodworking machines is covered along with relevant backgroundinformation on hand and power tools needed for cutting, shaping, forming and finishing wood. Student needs to have taken Woodworking and CabinetMaking I.Woodworking and Cabinet Making II will meet the Fine and Applied Arts graduation requirement and may be elected in combination withWoodworking and Cabinet Making I for up to 20 credits.
  • 34WELLNESS DEPARTMENT“Wellness” is a term that describes a person’s state of being as it relates to six life components: physical, mental, spiritual, financial, social, and career. Thecourses offered in the Wellness department have been designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills and strategies needed to make healthy choicesin each of these areas. Students will engage in active learning to practice critical thinking, problem solving and decision making skills necessary to achieve abalance among these life components which will lead them to sustained good health and well being. “Wellness is a journey not a destination!”Independent Study can be arranged for specific areas of interest with the approval of the Department Director and the high school administration.The following Wellness courses can be taken to partially or fully fulfill the 5 credit fine or applied arts graduation requirement.Foods and NutritionInternational Foods and CultureClothing and Textile ArtsAdvanced Clothing and Textile ArtsAdvanced Culinary ArtsAdvanced Culinary Arts (Honors)0660 CLOTHING AND TEXTILE ARTS (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5This course will fulfill half of the fine and applied arts graduation requirement. It is the prerequisite for Advanced Clothing and Textile Arts.Clothing and Textile Arts involves students in every aspect of wardrobe planning, selection, and care. This course includes elements of clothing design,pattern selection and fit, sewing equipment and tools. Laboratory experiences are combined with classroom instruction to help students develop theskills necessary for garment construction. Creative arts projects are an option for students. Students not only complete garments but they also explorecareer opportunities in this field. Community Service projects include: class quilt, hats, gloves, scarves for homeless shelters.0663 FOOD SCIENCE AND YOU (CP) (11, 12) Y 5.0How would you like to learn science in the user-friendly surroundings of a kitchen laboratory? The smells will be pleasant as you use the scientificmethod to study the chemical, biological, and physical basis of nutrition, food safety, and food processing. Using a hands-on, interdisciplinaryapproach, you will develop skills in reasoning when you do activities and experiments to learn about such things as acids and bases, catalysts, enzymes,and emulsions using common food products and ingredients. You will also have the opportunity to explore and learn about the many career options infood science and technology. This course is intended as a third science course. Students should fulfill their two required science courses (physical andbiological) in their ninth and tenth grade years.0661 FOODS AND NUTRITION (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 This course will fulfill half of the fine and applied arts graduation requirement.Nutrition and Foods emphasizes the fundamental areas of nutrition, consumer skills, and food preparation. It also broadens students understanding ofthe impact food has on their lives, including the diet-health link. Throughout the course students will gain confidence in preparation and artisticpresentation of foods.0662 INTERNATIONAL FOODS AND CULTURES (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Prerequisite: Nutrition and Foods) This course will fulfill half of thefine and applied arts graduation requirement.Students will learn advanced food preparation techniques. Opportunities will be provided to plan, prepare and evaluate a variety of international foods.Appreciation of the differences in international cuisines and the historical and geographical reasons for these differences will be emphasized. Travelaround the world in ninety days and experience the culture and cuisine of various countries!0664 ADVANCED CULINARY ARTS (CP) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Nutrition and Foods, International Food and Culture or approval ofDepartment coordinator) This course will fulfill the fine and applied arts graduation requirement.Advanced Culinary Arts will involve the advanced culinary student in time and money management skills, quantity cookery, nutritional analysis,quality control, and food product marketing. Students will plan and prepare foods products for their small business—Frugal Food Service.0665 ADVANCED CULINARY ARTS (H) (10, 11, 12) Y 5.0 (Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition, International Foods and Cultures, Advanced CulinaryArts). This course will fulfill the fine and applied arts graduation requirementStudents who have taken Advanced Culinary Arts and wish to explore their interest at an advanced level may request to take the course for honorscredit. These students must have earned a B+ or better in Advanced Culinary Arts. Students will be required to master, demonstrate and teach highlyspecialized culinary techniques to the class. Students will also be required to take a leadership role in the operation of large-scale food production.0666 ADVANCED CLOTHING AND TEXTILE ARTS (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5, Y5.0 (Prerequisite Clothing and Fashion)This course will fulfill half of the fine and applied arts graduation requirement and may be taken for four years.Advanced Clothing and Textile Arts is designed for students who enjoy projects in creating clothing such as sportswear, beachwear, tailored clothing,and formal wear. In addition, students may choose to design and make quilted or interior decorating projects. Each project will be selected keepingconsumer values in mind - how much can you save by designing and constructing you own prom gown? Creativity and artistry in the selection ofproject materials will be stressed. Each successive project will be selected according to interest and skills mastered.0667 EARLY CHILDHOOD (CP) (9, 10, 11, 12) S 2.5Early Childhood offers the student the opportunity to study the earliest stages of human development. Students will the physical, emotional, social andcognitive growth and development of children from the prenatal stage through the school-aged child. Class projects include a hands-on parentingexperience with the either “Baby Think It Over”, a flour baby or a life-like newborn doll. In addition, students develop appropriate activities forpreschoolers, Guest speakers, including parents of the Child Study Lab children; take an active role in classroom discussions, sharing areas of specialexpertise and current parenting practice.
  • 350668 CHILD STUDY LAB (CP) (10, 11, 12) S 2.5 (Prerequisite: Early Childhood or approval of Department Coordinator)In Child Study Lab, students will have the unique opportunity to combine classroom instruction with practical experience in the Winchester HighSchool Child Study Laboratory School as they learn about teaching and interacting with preschool age children. Each student will participate inplanning, organizing, implementing, and evaluating the laboratory school activities. Application of knowledge to future parenting skills willcontinually be stressed. This is a great opportunity for students to explore the many career possibilities in the field of early childhood. This coursemay be elected for up to 15 credits.0669 LIFE 101 (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5Life 101 is an innovative course designed to help students take charge of their future! Through activities, discussions and field trips, students explorethe basics of money management, food preparation and other life skills. Topics such as credit card use and abuse, how to purchase/lease a car, rent anapartment, select a phone service, file an income tax return will be included. Don’t just survive in the world, THRIVE!0075 PHYSICAL EDUCATION/ HEALTH- YEAR 1 (CP) (9, 10) S 2.5Physical education provides students with instruction in a variety of motor skills that are designed to enhance the physical, mental andsocial/emotional development of every student. The focus of the program is the development of the habits, knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessaryto attain WELLNESS FOR LIFE. The physical education curriculum includes a variety of activities that meets the needs and abilities of all students.Examples of “lifetime activities” in year 1 may include: Archery, Yoga, Intro to fitness and muscular endurance/strength training, PickleballOrienteering, Project Adventure.Examples of “team sports” in year 1 may include: Basketball, Floor Hockey, Outdoor/Indoor Soccer, ultimate frisbee, and lacrosse.The Fitnessgram will be administered at the beginning and end of the course.Health- Students will incorporate health components into their Physical Education Curriculum. Focuses during year 1 may include: understanding theconcept of wellness, first aid, alcohol and drug related issues, peer pressure, stress management, making healthy choices and methods of contraceptionand information about STI’s.0076 PHYSICAL EDUCATION/ HEALTH - YEAR 2 (CP) (9, 10) S 2.5Students will continue developing knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to attain WELLNESS FOR LIFE. They will participate in additional“lifetime activities and team sports”.Examples of “lifetime activities may include:Cooperative games, badminton, golf, racquetball, ultimate games and the elevem components offitness/wellness.Examples of team sports in year 2 may include: Volleyball, flag football, indoor soccer, baseball/softball and track and field.The Fitnessgram will be administered at the beginning and end of the course.Health- Students will continue with the second year of their health experience. Focuses during year 2 include CPR/AED training, conflict resolution,STI’s and sexual terminology and alcohol and other drug refusal skills program.0078 PHYSICAL EDUCATION - Workout! (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5Workout all semester! During the WORKOUT class, students will focus on developing an individualized workout plan for lifelong physical fitness.The five health related components of fitness: body composition, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance, and muscular strengthwill be integrated in the plan. Students will be able to workout in class, following their plan. Each class will include the following components: warm-up, stretch, cardiovascular, muscular endurance/strength, cool down and closure to the lesson. Students will record performance on their plan andmake modifications as needed to reach individual goals.0079 PHYSICAL EDUCATION - Lifetime Activities (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5The “Lifetime Activities” course is designed for those students who prefer to be active in individual and small team activities that promote lifetimefitness. Students will be given the opportunity to develop proficiency in select activities. The health related components of fitness will also beemphasized. Lifetime activities may include: yoga, archery, golf, pickleball, badminton, volleyball, cooperative games, track and field and omnikinball.0080 PHYSICAL EDUCATION - Team Sports (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5The “Team Sports” course is designed for those students who prefer to be active in team-based activities. Students will be given the opportunity todevelop proficiency in select activities. The health related components of fitness will also be emphasized. Team sports may include: floor hockey,team handball, volleyball, ultimate games, flag football, baseball/softball, indoor soccer, basketball and lacrosse.0072 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ALTERNATIVE - Interscholastic Sport (CP) (11, 12) S 2.5A student who successfully completes year 1 and year 2 of physical education is eligible to use a season of an interscholastic sport to fulfill theirphysical education requirement. Upon the completion of the season, students must receive a certificate signed by the athletic director in order toreceive credit for physical education. Students must indicate the season and sport that will be used to fulfill the physical education requirement on thecourse selection form. Please note that a senior who chooses to use an interscholastic sport to fulfill their physical education requirement and does notsuccessfully complete the season will not graduate unless the course is completed second semester, if applicable or in a summer school program.Students electing to participate in a school sport to fulfill the physical education requirement, must meet the following criteria to receive credit: Attend all practices and participate completely Attend all games / meetsAn appeal form must be completed by the students and submitted into the mailbox of Pamela Saba, Director of Wellness at Muraco Elementary Schoolby the due date stated on the form. Appeals will not be accepted after the due date. Appeal forms and tracking sheets will be made available onEdline.
  • 360071 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ALTERNATIVE - Outside Physical Activity (CP) (11, 12) S .5In very rare situations, students who are involved in a rigorous physical activity program outside of school may be able to apply this experiencetowards fulfillment of the physical education requirement. In order for an outside physical activity to be considered it must meet the followingcriteria: Take place under the instruction of a certified coach/instructor (copy of certification must be submitted). Engage the student in a minimum of 90 hours of rigorous activity in a semester. Include the following health components of fitness: body composition, muscular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility andcardiovascular endurance.If the appeal is approved, upon completion of the semester and to receive credit, the student will be required to:1. Provide a written assessment of how the physical activity addressed the components of fitness.2. Submit a record of attendance completed and signed off by the coach/instructor to the Athletic Director.This information will be reviewed by the Athletic Director who will then determine if the student met the requirement.An appeal form must be completed by the student and submitted into the mailbox of Pamela Saba, Director of Wellness at Muraco Elementary Schoolby the due date stated on the form. Appeals will not be accepted after the due date. Appeal forms and tracking sheets will be made available on Edline.***Memberships to a fitness club will not be accepted. ***
  • 37NON-DEPARTMENTAL2000/2001 STUDENT ASSISTANT (9,10,11,12) #2000 Year - #2001 Semester No Credits (times to be arranged) Pass/FailStudents interested in working as a student assistant (often in place of an academic block) should seek out a department office or other offices wherethey would like to work. They should then ask either the department head or an administrator to fill out the Student Assistant request form (available inMain Office and Guidance) and turn it in to an assistant principal.INDEPENDENT STUDY (C1) (11, 12) Y 5.0 or S 2.5 See Pages 5-6, Other Educational Opportunities, Independent Study.STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) CERTIFICATE PROGRAMMassachusetts and the nation are experiencing a STEM pipeline problem — a shortfall of workers properly equipped with the science, technology,engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and skills necessary for success in an innovation economy. Over the past 20 years, the number ofstudents graduating from STEM majors at U.S. colleges and universities has remained unchanged. During this same period, demand for STEM workershas grown at more than four times the rate of the overall U.S. workforce.K-12 school systems are beginning to address how to better prepare, engage, and excite a significantly higher number of students to pursue a STEMcurriculum, thus priming the front end of the higher education/workforce pipeline.To prime this pipeline, we must engage a more diverse spectrum of students in STEM fields of study. The STEM Certificate Program is a strategy toincrease the awareness, interest, and motivation of students for STEM related careers.Beginning in September, 2010 students may pick up a STEM certificate packet at the Guidance Office at any time or download the packet materialsfrom Edline. The packet includes all requirements, portfolio forms, and information to guide the students through the process of achieving STEMcertification.Students are responsible for obtaining the necessary approvals and maintaining their portfolio throughout their high school career. Students whocomplete all requirements may submit their portfolio for review. All portfolios must be submitted for review by October 1 or April 1 of the school year.Portfolios will be reviewed by a committee consisting of a teacher, a guidance counselor, and a community member in the fall and spring of eachacademic year.STEM Certificate Requirements* Students have the right to appeal any of the requirements below to achieve a STEM Certificate. Appeals should be made to the STEM ReviewCommittee (see Mr. Petty).1. Academica. Successful completion of 3 years of mathematics and enrollment in a 4thyear.b. Success completion of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics courses and enrollment in a 4thyear.c. Successful completion of Engineering the Future.d. Successful completion of three of the following Technology/Engineering, Computer Education, Art, and Mathematics courses:o Architectural Computer Design (C1/H)o TV Studio and Video Production (C1/H)o Robotics and Electromechanical Designo Computer Animation I and II (H)o Web Design I and II (H)o Photoshop I and IIo Digital Photographyo AP Computer Science2. STEM-Focused Projecta. A STEM Focused Project could include any of the following:o One full year of Robotic Club participationo Independent study / project in science, mathematics, technology, or engineeringo Internship of at least 30 hours in an approved location3. STEM-Focused Project Reflectiona. A reflective essay of 250-500 words reflecting upon the students STEM-Focused Project presented to a group of educators andprofessionals.4. A STEM Focused Resume
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