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Building a resilience infrastructure for Content Distribution

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  • 1. Telecommunications Congress – Andicom 2009 Building a Resilience Infrastructure For Content Distribution Presented by: Dallas Maham Sr. Product Manager Tellabs Optical Networking Group October 29, 2009
  • 2. The problem with the OLD Model Most Social Networks can be Affected by single individuals Viral Distribution Network Congestion Poor Service Experience Revenue Contraction Traffic Storm Fixed Hierarchy Congestion Traffic Users
  • 3. Why a Resilient Infrastructure is a good approach … Most Social Networks can be Affected by single individuals Viral Distribution Extra capacity via stacking Local BW control Traffic Storm Dynamic Hierarchy Modify Network Coverage  1  1 Congestion Traffic Users
  • 4. Agenda
    • Market Status
    • Dynamic Optical Networking
    • Ethernet over DWDM Example
  • 5. Ethernet microwave is worldwide backhaul winner
    • New connections move quickly to mostly IP/Ethernet, whether fiber, copper, or microwave
    May 2009
  • 6. Optical Packet Layer simplification and lowest cost per bit
  • 7. Optical Packet Metro Transport Evolution SDH & DWDM Pre-2006 2006 - 2009 2009+
    • Integrated Platform – WSS, Fabric (DCS & EN), Client Interfaces
    • Wavelength Selectable Switch (WSS) Provides Multi-Degree Optical Switching
    • TDM and Packet Aggregation via Hybrid Electrical Switch Fabric
    • Tunable Optics and Rate Adaptive Client Ports
  • 8. Agenda
    • Market Status
    • Dynamic Optical Networking
    • Ethernet over DWDM Example
  • 9. Tellabs 7100 Optical Transport System Dynamic Optical Networking Fundamentals Universal System Architecture Dynamic Optical Layer Intelligent Services Layer 10G C A R D OTN C A R D BB DCS + Packet Switch + OTN Switch Build The Highway Support Any Vehicles 10G 40G 100G SDH – Ethernet - SANS A DM C A R D A DM C A R D ETHERNET ETHERNET 40G C A R D 40G C A R D 100G C A R D 100G C A R D ROADM based Dynamic Optical Core Common Dynamic Optical Network For All Applications Integrated BB DCS + L2 Switch + OTN Switch Integrated Ethernet Switch 10G Transport 40G Transport 100G Transport (Future) OTN Multiplexer Integrated MSPP
  • 10. Value in Optical Networking
    • Lay a Dynamic Optical Foundation from which you can…
      • Grow to any capacity
      • Rapidly allocate bandwidth to meet traffic demands
      • Efficiently carry any kind of service (SDH, Video, Metro Ethernet, Wavelength)
    • … While dramatically reducing transport network costs
      • Integrated TDM Switching to collapse optical ADM rings onto one platform
      • Integrated Layer 2 switching for efficient video transport and commercial services from one platform
      • Put electronics only at the service end points
  • 11. Dynamic Optical Networking 7100 Networks can be incrementally built span by span as traffic requires Additional spans can be added one by one hitlessly when required
    • Turn up virtually any type of service across the network regardless of fiber topology with ZERO additional equipment required at intermediate nodes
      • SONET Rings
      • Pt to Pt Circuits (2.5G, 10G, 40G)
      • Ethernet (RPR, VLAN)
    Build A Dynamic Optical Foundation that Can Support Any Number of Nodes, Any Amount of Traffic, and Any Type of Service Note: Slide Best Viewed in Presentation Mode Networks can be incrementally built span by span as traffic requires Additional spans can be added one by one hitlessly when required Once the network is in place – new traffic can be turned up across the network simply by adding port cards at the end points
    • Turn up any type of service across the network regardless of fiber topology with ZERO additional equipment required at intermediate nodes
      • SDH Rings
      • Pt to Pt Circuits (2.5G, 10G, 40G)
      • Ethernet (RPR, VLAN)
  • 12. Why deploy DON from day one?
    • First cost of ADMs will provide lowest first cost, but
      • Growth is expensive and cumbersome!
      • Only grow by stacking rings
      • Doesn’t efficiently support the migration to packet networks
    • Start with the optical layer day one…
      • Build the network topology differently – match service demand not fiber map
      • Deploy electronics only at the end points
      • Add capacity at a much lower cost
      • Seamless expansion of optical layer to new offices further improves network economics
      • Support transport of all types of services (Ethernet, SDH, SAN, Video)
      • Efficiently support packet requirements with integrated switching
    Dynamic Optical Networks are the most cost effective design
  • 13. Real Network Example: Increase Revenue Generation 4 Node Network for IP DSL Growth (3 OC-3s) Historic Traffic Demands 2004-2006: 1xOC-192 Ring Plan W Carrollton Main IRNG W LWVL M A B B A A B B A OC-3 OC-3 OC-3 From 4 Nodes To 47 Nodes Where did the growth come from? 2006: % of Customer requests addressed: 20% 2007: % of Customer requests addressed: 80% Increase In Revenue For Service Provider: 3x 16 - OC-192 Equivalents Plan W Carrollton Main IRNG W LWVL M A B B A A B B A Lwvl W Crtn SE Plan W Carrollton Main Plano NW Crtn NE CRTN N Garland Main Plano M Rowlett Wylie Plano CC Plano N Grld S Grld N Grld SE IRNG W LWVL M A C B A A B B B B A A A A B C B A Irng N Irng E Irng M Irng SW Grapevine Denton Keller Sherman Justin Argyle Bnvl Whitesboro C Lwvl GR Lwvl RG Lwvl S VHO Irng WH Whitewright Merit Caddo Mills C D A A A B B B A B D C A B D B B B A A A A A C B A B A B D B A B A B A B A B B C B B B A B C B A B A B A A A B A B A B A B A B A C B A A In Less than 12 Months
  • 14. Agenda
    • Market Status
    • Dynamic Optical Networking
    • Ethernet over DWDM Example
  • 15. Ethernet Over DWDM (EoDWDM) Example Physical Logical Optimized use of Optical Circuits (OOO) and Ethernet Switching. L2 for QoS + TE x x x x
  • 16. Example: Existing IP Router Based Network: 10G MPLS Mesh
    • Fully redundant architecture, but underutilized pipes result in extra network costs
    • High Construction cost for any fiber links that may not already exist
    Network Core Layer To Access Layer and End User Buildings 10G Mesh Connections (one connection from Aggregation Routers to each Core Router and to each adjacent node) Network Distribution Layer Aggregation Network Locations
  • 17. Example: Existing IP Router Based Network: Pt to Pt DWDM Fully redundant architecture, but underutilized pipes result in extra network costs Network Distribution Layer Aggregation Network Locations One for One 10G connections to Core Routers (6 each in this example) 13 wavelengths to support this mesh Actual average throughput is about 5% of capacity 2G total bandwidth per site required in this example network Network Core Layer To Access Layer and End User Buildings
  • 18. Layer 2 Switched Transport Network STEP 1: Implement L2 Switched Network using STEP 2: Use 10G L2 network to aggregate traffic and switch to appropriate destinations
    • Control broadcast traffic through VLANs and Virtual Switches
    • Reduces Core Router Ports by only paying for actual bandwidth required
    • Reduces the quantity of 10G transponders in DWDM equipment, particularly at the Core Layer
    • Create logical mesh without costly physical fiber connections
    STEP 3: Optimize the Aggregation Network locations by pulling all traffic into the network:
    • CAPEX
      • Equipment
      • Fiber Construction
      • Software
    • OPEX
      • Installation
      • Maintenance
      • Provisioning
      • Troubleshooting
      • Power and Space
    Network Distribution Layer Aggregation Network Locations To Access Layer and End User Buildings Network Core Layer Example: Integrated L2, DWDM & Mesh Network
  • 19. Example: Core Node Comparison with 10 Aggregation Nodes 10G MPLS Mesh Architecture 10G Links to Aggregation nodes L3 Router 10x10G to Agg Nodes 12x10G XFP No DWDM Core Router Tellabs Proposed Architecture 10G Aggregated, switched links L3 Router 4x10G to L2 Network 6x10G XFP DWDM w/ Ethernet Switch 4x10G Protected, switched wavelength Core Router Pt to Pt DWDM Architecture L3 Router 10x10G to Agg Nodes 12x10G XFP DWDM 10x10G L1 transponders 10G from Aggregation nodes DWDM Core Router DWDM Note: Not accounting for interfaces between core routers DWDM
  • 20. Example: Aggregation Node Comparison Pt to Pt DWDM Architecture Adjacent node (10G) Adjacent node (10G) Core 1 (10G) Core 2 (10G) L3 Switch 40xGE 4x10G DWDM 4x10G L1 transponders GE Small to Med L3 switch 10G MPLS Mesh Architecture L3 Router 40xGE 2x10G to Core Node 2x10G to adjacent node 4x10G XFP No DWDM GE 10G to Core Node Aggregation Layer 3 Router 10G to adjacent node Tellabs Proposed Architecture No L3 Switch DWDM w/ Ethernet Switch 40xGE 2x10G protected, switched wavelength GE to end user buildings DWDM DWDM .... .... ....
  • 21. Example:
    • Reduced CAPEX with lower equipment costs
    • Maintained Critical Design Parameters
      • Network Redundancy
      • QoS Levels
    • Enabled Seamless Bandwidth Expansion
        • Grow to any capacity
        • Rapidly allocate bandwidth to meet traffic demands
        • Efficiently carry a wide range of services
    • Reduced Total Cost of Ownership, ongoing OPEX for the DOIM
      • Up to 65% savings for extended warranty and support
      • Up to 53% savings in power
    Design Goals Met:

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