The Social Side of Mobile Health
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The Social Side of Mobile Health

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Short talk given to the UBC School of Population and Public Health course on social media in health and medicine (SPPH 581H).

Short talk given to the UBC School of Population and Public Health course on social media in health and medicine (SPPH 581H).

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  • Great share. Thanks, Daniel. I was unaware of fourhealth until now. Cool concept.
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  • Ubiquitous, networked, interactive (two-way), and we keep them on.
  • We think of ourselves through a lens of the things we own. This is why when we lose things, it hurts. And why when we go through loss there may follow periods of creativity or purchase through which we attempt to “recreate” ourselves.
  • So I guess now I want to return finally to that notion of the network and the spread of healthy behaviours, given the light of this powerful connection we are building both between devices and others, but also to ourselves and the mobile devices that are starting to represent pieces of us more and more. And similar to the way location based data and cell signals transformed the epidemological methods of John Snow’s map, this network map is changing to. You can tell what I’m going to do next right? These signals and these devices and these relationships and networks that are tightening thanks to mobile devices are going to be able to create and sustain healthy behaviours because of the association that we are building with the device. And I think there is a flattending of these networks, the always on nature and the ease with which we can connect to others makes these clustered networks increasingly common. Later tonight and in the readings for class tonight I think you’ll probably talk about apps and about the specific tools that are making these things happen, but I just wanted to bring this perspective to the class because ultimately with social media and with mHelath applications we’re still designing for people, and to improve health and that’s always the thing that is foremost in our minds when we talk about this type of thing. With that, thank you for your time, and I hope you have a great rest of the term. Thanks for having me.
  • So I guess now I want to return finally to that notion of the network and the spread of healthy behaviours, given the light of this powerful connection we are building both between devices and others, but also to ourselves and the mobile devices that are starting to represent pieces of us more and more. And similar to the way location based data and cell signals transformed the epidemological methods of John Snow’s map, this network map is changing to. You can tell what I’m going to do next right? These signals and these devices and these relationships and networks that are tightening thanks to mobile devices are going to be able to create and sustain healthy behaviours because of the association that we are building with the device. And I think there is a flattending of these networks, the always on nature and the ease with which we can connect to others makes these clustered networks increasingly common. Later tonight and in the readings for class tonight I think you’ll probably talk about apps and about the specific tools that are making these things happen, but I just wanted to bring this perspective to the class because ultimately with social media and with mHelath applications we’re still designing for people, and to improve health and that’s always the thing that is foremost in our minds when we talk about this type of thing. With that, thank you for your time, and I hope you have a great rest of the term. Thanks for having me.

The Social Side of Mobile Health Presentation Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2.
    • The social side of mobile health
    • Exploring the nature of mobile consumption, creation and connection for health
    • Daniel Hooker, MLIS
    • eHealth Strategy Office
    • @danhooker
  • 3.
    • Information is mobile
    • Health information on mobile devices is
    • consumed
    • created
    • contextual
    • connected
  • 4.
    • Health information is consumed on mobiles
  • 5.
    • Consumer-targeted
  • 6.
    • Professional-targeted
  • 7.
    • Health information is created on mobiles
  • 8.
    • Tracking health through behaviour
  • 9.
    • Tracking health through keywords
  • 10.
    • Tracking health through sentiment
  • 11.
    • Tracking health through location
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15.
    • Seemingly unrelated information has a way of becoming useful, too
  • 16.
    • Foursquare
    Image courtesy eelx on Flickr.
  • 17.
    • Foursquare, meet hospitals
  • 18.
    • Foursquare, meet healthy behaviour
  • 19.
    • But the true transformative power of mobile is in the users and their communities
  • 20.
    • Communities for behaviour change
    • Centola (2010): What kind of network structures spread health behaviours better?
    Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  • 21.
    • Communities for behaviour change
    • Centola (2010): What kind of network structures spread health behaviours better?
      • ” long-tie” networks that spread behaviours quickly but lack redundant exposures
      • OR
      • Clustered networks that don’t spread behaviour far, but have layers of exposure
    Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  • 22. Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  • 23.
    • Communities for behaviour change
    • Centola (2010): What kind of network structures spread health behaviours better?
      • ” long-tie” networks that spread behaviours quickly but lack redundant exposures
      • OR
      • Clustered networks that don’t spread behaviour far, but have layers of exposure
    Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  • 24.
    • Mobile communities for behaviour change
    • Mobile devices have the potential to be effective in supporting these networks due to two unique, converging factors:
      • The “always-on” nature
      • The relationship we create with the device itself
  • 25.
    • The “always-on” nature
  • 26.
    • The relationship of user/device
  • 27.
    • User/device relationships
    • Belk (1988) looked at how we “extend” ourselves through our possessions, and may in fact associate portions of our self-concept through this extended self more so than an unextended self.
    Journal of Consumer Research 15(2), 139-168 http :// www.jstor.org /stable/2489522
  • 28.
    • User/device relationships
    • Belk (1988) looked at how we “extend” ourselves through our possessions, and may in fact associate portions of our self-concept through this extended self more so than an unextended self.
      • photo albums
    Journal of Consumer Research 15(2), 139-168 http :// www.jstor.org /stable/2489522
  • 29.
    • User/device relationships
    • Belk (1988) looked at how we “extend” ourselves through our possessions, and may in fact associate portions of our self-concept through this extended self more so than an unextended self.
      • photo albums
      • cars
    Journal of Consumer Research 15(2), 139-168 http :// www.jstor.org /stable/2489522
  • 30.
    • User/device relationships
    • Belk (1988) looked at how we “extend” ourselves through our possessions, and may in fact associate portions of our self-concept through this extended self more so than an unextended self.
      • photo albums
      • cars
      • [cell phones]
    Journal of Consumer Research 15(2), 139-168 http :// www.jstor.org /stable/2489522
  • 31.
    • User/device relationships
    • Blom and Monk (2003) examined cell phone users’ motivations for personalizing their devices.
    Behaviour & Information Technology, 26:3, 237-24 doi: 10.1080/01449290500348168
  • 32.
    • User/device relationships
    • Blom and Monk (2003) examined cell phone users’ motivations for personalizing their devices.
    • “ There are significant positive correlations between the extent of personalization and… enduring emotional effects.”
    Behaviour & Information Technology, 26:3, 237-24 doi: 10.1080/01449290500348168
  • 33.
    • User/device relationships
    • Jarvenpaa and Lang (2005) outline the paradoxes of mobile usage
    Information Systems Management 22(4) 7-23 doi: 10.1201/1078.10580530/45520.22.4.20050901/90026.2
  • 34.
    • User/device relationships
    • Jarvenpaa and Lang (2005) outline the paradoxes of mobile usage
    • Does your device empower you?
    • Or enslave you?
    • Or both?
    Information Systems Management 22(4) 7-23 doi: 10.1201/1078.10580530/45520.22.4.20050901/90026.2
  • 35.
    • User/device relationships
    • Sherry Turkle at MIT has been a long-time thinker and scholar in this area, and wrote a paper that describes these events as a new form of technology that is “always on, always on you.”
    “ Always-on/Always-on-you: The Tethered Self . ” In Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies, James E. Katz (ed.). MIT Press, 2008.
  • 36.
    • User/device relationships
    • Sherry Turkle at MIT has been a long-time thinker and scholar in this area, and wrote a paper that describes these events as a new form of technology that is “always on, always on you.”
    • “ We occupy a liminal space between physical life and our life on the screen. We participate in both at the same time.”
    “ Always-on/Always-on-you: The Tethered Self . ” In Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies, James E. Katz (ed.). MIT Press, 2008.
  • 37.
    • This connection between user and device is becoming stronger all the time
  • 38.  
  • 39.  
  • 40.  
  • 41.  
  • 42. Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  • 43. Science 2010;329(5996) doi: 10.1126/science.1185231
  • 44.  
  • 45.