New literacies pp

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  • Literacy can also include the ability to understand all forms of communication, be it body language, pictures, video & sound (reading, speaking, listening and viewing). Evolving definitions of literacy often include all the symbol systems relevant to a particular community. Literacy encompasses a complex set of abilities to understand and use the dominant symbol systems of a culture for personal and community development. In a technological society, the concept of literacy is expanding to include the media and electronic text, in addition to alphabetic and number systems. These abilities vary in different social and cultural contexts according to need and demand.
  • It involves a working knowledge of current high-technology, and an understanding of how it can be used. Further, digital literacy involves a consciousness of the technological forces that affect culture and human behavior.  Digitally literate people can communicate and work more efficiently, especially with those who possess the same knowledge and skills.

Transcript

  • 1. New LiteraciesWhat is literacy in the 21st Century? Danele Butler, EDU 533 Spring 2012
  • 2. What are we talking about?• In the past, technology was a secondary, marginalized element of education.• Today, technology has become completely intertwined with literacy in a child’s experience outside the classroom.• Today’s classroom must find ways to make this paradigm shift and incorporate technology into the classroom.
  • 3. Fable
  • 4. To what does“multiliteracies” or “New Literacies” refer?
  • 5. digital literacyvisual literacy andcritical literacyand maybe more….
  • 6. DefinitionsLiteracyIn the most basicterms it is makingsense of your world.The ability to read forknowledge and writecoherently and thinkcritically about thewritten word.
  • 7. DefinitionsDigital literacyis the ability to locate, organize,understand, evaluate, and analyzeinformation using digital technology.Research around digital literacy isconcerned with wider aspectsassociated with learning how toeffectively find, use, summarize,evaluate, create, and communicateinformation while using digitaltechnologies, not just being literateat using a computer.Digital literacy encompasses alldigital devices, such as computerhardware, software, (particularlythose used most frequently bybusinesses), the Internet, and cellphones. A person using these skillsto interact with society may becalled a digital citizen.
  • 8. DefinitionsVisual literacyis the ability to interpret,negotiate, and make meaningfrom information presented inthe form of an image.Visual literacy is based on theidea that pictures can be “read”and that meaning can becommunicated through aprocess of reading.
  • 9. Applying visual literacy to picture books “It is the synergistic relationship among art, text, and design that makes the picture book unique (Sipe, 1998a). Isolating one system of meaning to serve as a prompt for another privileges one system of meaning (usually written language) over another (usually art or design). We need to help readers see illustrations and design elements as systems of meaning in their own right and develop skills and strategies for readers to use in comprehending these aspects of picture books (Serafini, 2011).” “When Bad Things Happened to Good Books” Frank Sarfini
  • 10. DefinitionsCritical literacyCritical literacy encouragesreaders to actively analyze textsand offers strategies for whatproponents describe asuncovering underlyingmessages.There are several differenttheoretical perspectives oncritical literacy that haveproduced different pedagogicalapproaches to teaching andlearning. All of these approachesshare the basic premise thatliteracy requires the literateconsumers of text to adopt acritical and questioningapproach.
  • 11. Background on Critical LiteracyAccording to proponents of critical literacy, thepractice is not simply a means of attainingliteracy in the sense of improving the ability todecode words, syntax, etc. Social justice pedagogy ofIn fact, the ability to read words on paper is not Brazilian educator andnecessarily required in order to engage in a critical theorist Paulo Freire (Marxist): assumesdiscussion of "texts," which can include oppressiontelevision, movies, web pages, music, art and othermeans of expression. The important thing is beingable to have a discussion with others about the Australian: starts with textdifferent meanings a text might have and teachingthe potentially critically literate learner how tothink flexibly about it. Definitions Context DiscourseAt the heart of this approach to teaching is the belief that Discursive backgroundwhile literacy enables students to make meaning from Intertextualitytexts, critical literacy will empower them to understand View of the Worldhow texts are trying to influence and change them as Gaps and Silencesmembers of society. Positioning Agency Deconstruction
  • 12. A resource close at hand for more discussion ofcritical literacy….Critical literacy in a primary multiliteracies classroom: The Hurricane GroupPenny Silvers Dominican University, USA, psilvers@dom.eduMary Shorey Pritchett Elementary School, Illinois, USALinda Crafton University of Wisconsin Parkside, USAAbstractThis qualitative research presents an expanded perspective of literacy practices in which young students engage inmultiple literacies while exploring personal inquiries about Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, LA. An extendedclassroom example and analysis taken from a broader research project focusing on early multiliteracies, illustratesthe ability of young students to ask critical questions, explore alternative perspectives, and engage in multimodalresponses to construct and communicate meaning as they take social action. Narrative inquiry and discourse analysisprovide insight into ways that primary children engage in authentic inquiry from a critical, social justice perspective.They also show how traditional early childhood curriculum can focus on social issues through critical framing. Thisclassroom example demonstrates students’ increasing ability to use a range of multimodal tools to accomplishmutually agreed socially relevant goals within a classroom community of practice. Critical literacy in a primarymultiliteracies classroom: The Hurricane Group
  • 13. What is the future for literacy in the 21st Century?
  • 14. 50 most common text terms:2moro – Tomorrow OMG – Oh My God2nite – Tonight OT – Off TopicBRB – Be Right Back POV – Point Of ViewBTW – By The Way RBTL – Read Between The LinesB4N – Bye For Now ROTFLMAO – Rolling On The Floor Laughing My Ass OffBCNU – Be Seeing You RT – Real TimeBFF – Best Friends Forever RTM – Read The ManualCYA – Cover Your Ass SH – Sh** HappensDBEYR – Don’t Believe Everything You Read SITD – Still In The DarkDILLIGAS – Do I Look Like I Give A Sh** SOL - Sh** Out of LuckFUD – Fear, Uncertainty, and Disinformation STBY – Sucks To Be YouFWIW – For What It’s Worth SWAK – Sealed With A KissGR8 – Great TFH – Thread From HellILY – I Love You THX – ThanksIMHO – In My Humble Opinion TLC – Tender Loving CareIRL – In Real Life TMI – Too Much InformationISO – In Search Of TTYL – Talk To You LaterJ/K – Just Kidding TYVM – Thank You Very MuchL8R – Later VBG – Very Big GrinLMAO – Laughing My Ass Off WEG – Wicked Evil GrinLOL – Laughing Out Loud -or- Lots Of Love WTF – What The F***LYLAS – Love You Like A Sister WYWH – Wish You Were HereMHOTY – My Hat’s Off To You XOXO – Hugs and KissesNIMBY – Not In My Back Yard (http://www.sync-blog.com/sync/2007/12/top-50-most-NP – No Problem com.html)NUB – it stands for a new personOIC – Oh, I See