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High school dropouts

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  • 1. High School Dropouts Danela Galvan
  • 2. Dropout Statistics It is estimated that 1 in 8 of American youth will never graduate from high school. One high school student drops out every 9 seconds. Christenson, S. L., & Thurlow, M. L. (2004). School dropouts: prevention considerations, interventions, and challenges. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 13, 36-39. doi: 10.1111/j.0963-7214.2004.01301010.x
  • 3. Risk Factors (Dropout Factories) The APA (American Psychological Association) (2012) suggests that certain high schools known as “dropout factories” play a major role. These high schools produce half of the nation’s dropouts which consist of two-thirds ethnic minority dropouts. Unfortunately, the majority of the students that attend these low-income schools are African Americans and Latino students. American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx
  • 4. Risk Factors (poor academic performance) Both the APA and Furey agree that poor academic performance contributes and is a predictor to students quitting school. Furey (2008) believes that students who are at risk for failure from as early as kindergarten are more likely to dropout. She adds that Latino students are more vulnerable to failure because they do not excel in writing and math during elementary education. The APA (2012) elaborates this key factor by explaining that students must master reading by the third grade in order to make a gradual transition from “learning to read to reading to learn”. These students are more inclined to dropout. Furey, E. R., (2008). Impact of poverty and parental expectations on Latino student high school dropout rates. Retrieved from userwww.sfsu.edu/~elisar/documents/Researchproject705.pdfYou +1d this publicly American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx
  • 5. Critical milestones Learning to read by the 3rd grade Progression from sixth through eight grade must yield success in reading, math, and English as well as absenteeism. Children’s beliefs in their competence and motivation to succeed academically especially in high school. Student effort American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx
  • 6. Critical milestones cont’d Positive peer associations A smooth transition into ninth grade Implementation of prevention programs that reinforce students’ social and emotional assets. Implementation of programs that focus on social, emotional, and academic learning from kindergarten. American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx
  • 7. Race/ethnicity and poverty Academic predictors are significantly higher for students of color English language learners or those not fluent in English are at a higher risk. Mediocre schools outweigh good parenting practices in low-income areas Several risk factors affect children born in low- income areas predict school failure, dropout, and entry into the juvenile justice. American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx
  • 8. Race/ethnicity and poverty cont’d African Americans students are more often disciplined or suspended because the lack of cultural sensitivity training thus contributing to dropout. Risk of falling into the school to prison pipeline specifically with boys of color lead to high school dropout. This population is not given the best opportunity and necessary investment. Dropout prevention does not pay attention to social and emotional factors.American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author.Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx
  • 9. Dropout rates affect the U.S. economy Average annual income for a high school dropout was $19,540 High school dropouts are the greatest affect of the ongoing recession. The risk of incarceration is much higher for male dropouts. Simply by cutting the dropout rate of Class 2008 in half has estimated to bring several billion additional dollars in economic benefits. American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx
  • 10. Conclusion High school dropout deeply causes harm to a successful future. High school dropout only continues the cycle of poverty. A good education is key to ending poverty within our youth. Implementation of effective early prevention is essential to end high school dropout. American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author: . Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx
  • 11. References References Christenson, S. L., & Thurlow, M. L. (2004). School dropouts: prevention considerations, interventions, and challenges. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 13, 36-39. doi: 10.1111/j.0963-7214.2004.01301010.x Furey, E. R., (2008). Impact of poverty and parental expectations on Latino student high school dropout rates. Retrieved from userwww.sfsu.edu/~elisar/documents/Researchproject705.pdfYou +1d this publicly American Psychological Association. (2012). Facing the school dropout dilemma. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/school-dropout-prevention.aspx .