Agile experience design

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Slides from the presentation I gave on Agile Experience Design. Look at the first slide. Someone delivered that. Someone signed it off. Someone had to use it. And they cried. It needn't be like that. This is how to make delightfully designed software faster. Test, learn, fail fast, succeed at speed.

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  • Mark HedlundMint focused on making the user do almost no work at all, by automatically editing and categorizing their data, reducing the number of fields in their signup form, and giving them immediate gratification as soon as they possibly could; we completely sucked at all of that. Instead, I prioritized trying to build tools that would eventually help people change their financial behavior for the better, which I believed required people to more closely work with and understand their data.
  • I looked for quotes on numbers of startups that failed, I thought this was a reasonably impactful number. Celebrate this! Realise how dumb it is to make predicitons and projections. Have a vision but realise that things will change in the journey. Pivot.
  • Steve Jobs: “…innovation is not about saying "yes" to everything. It's about saying "no" to all but the most crucial features.”
  • Look at the iPhone. When it was launched, on paper it was rubbish. Look at all those features it didn’t ship with. iPhone Sales are forecast to Surpass 100 Million by 2011. Steve Job’s had a vision, (there’s that vision thing again), to reinvent the phone. And he was was right. Three and a half years later, we don’t look at phones the same way.
  • You’ve got a product to market that is successful but is it any good?
  • This is why things must change…not living up to the promise or expectations. need to redefine how we design and deliver value and create compelling experiences
  • Prototype – test and learn. Apple’s approach is an exemplar of design thinking and using that to challenge the rules. When they created the store, they didn’t build a me-too store. They applied the same approach to the way they built the store."One of the best pieces of advice Mickey ever gave us was to go rent a warehouse and build a prototype of a store, and not, you know, just design it, go build 20 of them, then discover it didn't work," says Jobs. In other words, design it as you would a product. Apple Store Version 0.0 took shape in a warehouse near the Apple campus. "Ron and I had a store all designed," says Jobs, when they were stopped by an insight: The computer was evolving from a simple productivity tool to a "hub" for video, photography, music, information, and so forth. The sale, then, was less about the machine than what you could do with it. But looking at their store, they winced. The hardware was laid out by product category - in other words, by how the company was organized internally, not by how a customer might actually want to buy things. "We were like, 'Oh, God, we're screwed!'" says Jobs.But they weren't screwed; they were in a mockup. "So we redesigned it," he says. "And it cost us, I don't know, six, nine months. But it was the right decision by a million miles." When the first store finally opened, in Tysons Corner, Va., only a quarter of it was about product. The rest was arranged around interests: along the right wall, photos, videos, kids; on the left, problems. A third area - the Genius Bar in the back - was Johnson's brainstorm."When we launched retail, I got this group together, people from a variety of walks of life," says Johnson. "As an icebreaker, we said, 'Tell us about the best service experience you've ever had.'" Of the 18 people, 16 said it was in a hotel. This was unexpected. But of course: The concierge desk at a hotel isn't selling anything; it's there to help. "We said, 'Well, how do we create a store that has the friendliness of a Four Seasons Hotel?'" The answer: "Let's put a bar in our stores. But instead of dispensing alcohol, we dispense advice."http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2007/03/19/8402321/index.htmApple’s first London store on Regent Street opened in 2004, and is the most profitable shop per square foot in London. Apple has recently reported record quarterly figures, as its revenues rose 73% year-on-year to nearly $2.6 billion last quarter, thanks to the company’s recently introduced iPad, as well as the updated iPhone 4. In May, Apple overtook Microsoft as the largest technology company by market value.http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBsQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.verdict.co.uk%2FeNewsletters%2FVR_Global_Freeview%2Fissues%2F100819_GLOBAL_RETAIL_FREEVIEW.pdf&rct=j&q=site%3Awww.verdict.co.uk%2F%20apple&ei=HZ6TTNaOOoKQjAetkYDABQ&usg=AFQjCNEiy-CRweD_ZKe5aSHejTIcDzcQ7Q&sig2=Dl3N6LEygCmd1IrWCGPlNw
  • So how do we do it?When the problem space and the solution is well understood we can start buildingHowever, when either the problem or the solution is undefined we start by asking who, why, what and how (a lot)
  • Companies like westpac in oz are doing this
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  • MVT
  • So how do we do it?When the problem space and the solution is well understood we can start buildingHowever, when either the problem or the solution is undefined we start by asking who, why, what and how (a lot)
  • Design for everyone pleases no-oneGet to know your customers - Who, what, where, how and why…Profile your customers and make them part of your team (not a document)Office Depot: Kevin Peters – not how clean the windows are but can I achieve my goalhttp://hbr.org/2011/11/office-depots-president-mystery-shopping-turnaround/ar/1The office products retailer was measuring customer service using metrics— such as the cleanliness of bathrooms—that didn’t drive sales. Its new president is trying to fix that by retraining the staff and transforming the company.
  • Deniro – taxi driver.Design for everyone pleases no-oneGet to know your customers - Who, what, where, how and why…Profile your customers and make them part of your team (not a document)Office Depot: Kevin Peters – not how clean the windows are but can I achieve my goalhttp://hbr.org/2011/11/office-depots-president-mystery-shopping-turnaround/ar/1The office products retailer was measuring customer service using metrics— such as the cleanliness of bathrooms—that didn’t drive sales. Its new president is trying to fix that by retraining the staff and transforming the company.
  • Emotions, needs, wants, desires, Trigger.Why should anyone care?
  • Assumptions of the known knowns, but be ready to discover unkown unknowns.
  • Get to know your customersGo to where they hang outBecome a customer (westpac mystery shopping)
  • Not just the real world but digital – don’t just look in your own back yard.Listen and monitorFind out what they’re saying, influencing and being influenced by
  • Not just the real world but digital – don’t just look in your own back yard.Listen and monitorFind out what they’re saying, influencing and being influenced by
  • We think we have the best idea and look for validation of that idea. This can bias our questioning. Assume every assumption is wrong.
  • What are all the customer touchpoints with a systemBank example – customer comes wants a loan – tells a story.Medical startup – don’t start with the software, how to login etc, Metrobank – why can’t you get a card?
  • We use the wall as the desk. The wall is the ppt. People go out and come back with insights and design nuggets and we get them up on the wall. And we move the ideas about, and synthesize our thinking, look for themes, affinities….
  • And co-design! It is screen based products we are talking about, so go design the screens! This dude is a chief architect at a bank. He’s got a persona in front of him – Lucy – and he is drawing a portal dashboard for her retail banking needs.
  • Paper prototyping
  • Rapidly iterating. We are building out the product on paper. How cheap is that
  • Product ideas are emerging. We are testing and coming up with something we feel is ready to take to the next stage
  • Time to think about what we need. Or rather, what is the minimum the customer will need.
  • If you can’t agree on the MVP play games to help get you there. Here we’ve laid out all the requirements for a product and put a price on each on. “Create email campaigns” cost 1p. The developers were in the room – they estimated it. They’re going to build it. Doing some crude release planning we can say that the team can only afford 27p worth of requirements… yet there are 97p worth of stuff they want on the table….
  • Design doesn’t just happen at the startHaving created a vision, the design detail emerges during delivery.
  • Desirabilitycomes from design.
  • MARCDesirability comes from design.
  • Risk comes with guessing and spending money on features that are not needed in the end.45% of features are never used.Customer goals based on understandingTie goals back to the business objectivesDrive out the user-stories (requirements) and design detail from the goalsDecide on the MVP or the minimum release that we can get to market fastest that will deliver customer and business value.
  • Life begins at launchCrowdsource success -Listen, monitor & engageAB & Multivariate testingBe in a position to be able to continously design and continuously deliver improvments
  • Delivery of an MVP is not where the project stops but where learning begins.Test and learn at every stage and continue to innovate and respond to change.
  • Test early and often, throughout the entire new product development process5-100 users every week
  • Life begins at launchCrowdsource success -Listen, monitor & engageAB & Multivariate testingBe in a position to be able to continously design and continuously deliver improvments
  • Life begins at launchCrowdsource success -Listen, monitor & engageAB & Multivariate testingBe in a position to be able to continously design and continuously deliver improvments
  • AXD – what can you do?Adopt principles by stealth Shopper/customer centricInnovate with design thinkingCross-functional Collaboration is keyTest early, test often,measure always
  • In conclusion, bring a start up mentality to product development. Facebook is An idea that is 4 years in R&D is 2/3rd the life of Facebook. IT is a ¼ of the life of google. Look how those products have metamorphosed since their inception.
  • Questions?
  • Agile experience design

    1. 1. Agile experience designMarc McNeill@dancingmango
    2. 2. 01 Fail02 Agile and user experience design03 Discover & Envision04 Integrated Design & Delivery05 Continuous Improvement
    3. 3. 01 You Will FailImage source:
    4. 4. Vs
    5. 5. $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ If failure is defined as declaring a$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ projection and then falling short of$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ meeting it, then the failure rate is a$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ whopping 90 to 95 percent.$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ Shikhar Ghosh Harvard Business School$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
    6. 6. Never 45% Rarely 19% Sometimes16% Often 13% Always 7%Feature usage in deployed applicationsSource: The Standish Group
    7. 7. How quickly can you fail?How cheaply can you fail?
    8. 8. ✗Card slot ✗Video✗3g ✗Video calling✗Bluetooth ✗TV out✗Infrared ✗Music ring tones✗Decent camera ✗Voice dialing✗Secondary camera ✗Voice commands✗Camera flash ✗GPS✗MMS ✗JAVA✗Radio ✗Push to talk
    9. 9. Minimum doesn‟t mean crap
    10. 10. $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ Enterprises across 16 countries lose an estimated USD$338.5 billion each year$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ due to defections and abandoned purchases$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ as a direct result of a poor customer experience.$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$Source: Genesys: 9000 consumers surveyed (500 per country)
    11. 11. “Rent a warehouse and build a prototype of a store… go build 20 of them, then discover it didnt work…”Apple Store is the most profitable shop in LondonSources: Steve Jobs in Fortune Magazine March 8 2007 Verdict Global Retail Freview Aug 2010
    12. 12. 02 Agile and user centred designImage source:
    13. 13. Design led Participatory mindsetExpert mindset Research & development led
    14. 14. Code what is right
    15. 15. Agile
    16. 16. Agile
    17. 17. Agile
    18. 18. Agile
    19. 19. AXD
    20. 20. AXD Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/epaul_07/2437555740/
    21. 21. AXD
    22. 22. AXD
    23. 23. AXD
    24. 24. AXD
    25. 25. Deliver
    26. 26. Evolve 25% 25% 25% 25% http://www.artinthepicture.com/blog/?p=109 http://www.bloglifetime.com/images/blogs/11-2007/different-versions-of-the-mona-lisa.jpg
    27. 27. 03 Discover & EnvisionImage source: coloribus.com/harvey nichols ad campaign
    28. 28. Being obsessive about the customer
    29. 29. People are different Buying a mobile phoneImage source: hipstercred.wordpress.com
    30. 30. What’s the spec?
    31. 31. Teach me about it
    32. 32. Help me to decide
    33. 33. Who is most profitable?http://www.flickr.com/photos/40434084@N06/6734516407/
    34. 34. Be a method actorImage source: hipstercred.wordpress.com
    35. 35. Feel the problemEmotions, needs, wants desires, trigger
    36. 36. Empathy maphttp://answers.oreilly.com/topic/1860-gamestorming-empathy-map/
    37. 37. Develop hypothesesImage sourcehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/mybloodyself/435953128
    38. 38. Look outsideImage source: cityweekend.com.cn
    39. 39. Observe customers „in the wild‟
    40. 40. Digital ethnographyImage source: cityweekend.com.cn
    41. 41. Seek problemsImage source: cityweekend.com.cn
    42. 42. Ask questions, disprove hypotheseshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/9576621@N06/2930434641
    43. 43. Think customer journeysImage source: cityweekend.com.cn
    44. 44. Look for moments of opportunityImage source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31070478@N04/3216264101
    45. 45. How might we?
    46. 46. “The wall is the new desk” Dave Gray
    47. 47. It‟s a collaborative effort
    48. 48. It‟s a collaborative effort
    49. 49. Collaborative sketching
    50. 50. Bringing ideas to life
    51. 51. Rapid iterations
    52. 52. Emergent, tangible product ideas
    53. 53. Prototypes & 3-see ThursdayTesting rough prototypes
    54. 54. Design from the start The time travelling designer
    55. 55. Minimal Viable Product “Here’s a tip, pack it and halve it” – Lonely Planethttp://www.flickr.com/photos/joeyparsons/3240169886/
    56. 56. (Prioritisation can be fun)
    57. 57. 04IntegratedDesign &Delivery
    58. 58. At Sony we assume that all products of ourcompetitors have basically the sametechnology, price, performance andfeatures.Design is the only thing thatdifferentiates one product from anotherin the marketplace. Norio Ohga Former Chairman and CEO, Sony
    59. 59. “a focus on improving usability for thecustomer…. has been reflected inimproved provider conversion in theperiod, increasing revenues and RPV”
    60. 60. Goal driven development Otherwise known as preventing features trumping experience Locate Find a local See deal Sign-up for Buy the Be reminded Upload aSee all deals Get reports stockist deal details account product of deals deal Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story Story
    61. 61. Seeking excellence not trail-blazeImage source: cityweekend.com.cn
    62. 62. PairIn process
    63. 63. Release early and often
    64. 64. T T It‟s a Team effort T T
    65. 65. 04 Continuous ImprovementImage source: coloribus.com/harvey nichols ad campaign
    66. 66. Continuous testingImage source: modified: studiolineal.com
    67. 67. Continuous optimisation
    68. 68. Split testing
    69. 69. Crazy egg
    70. 70. In SummaryImgsrc:adrants.com
    71. 71. Step into their shoes Whole teamBy stealth test early & often
    72. 72. Be desirable [customer design led]Think big! [start with a vision]Start small! [Minimal viable product]Fail fast! [Test and learn]Grow success [Continuous design & deliver]
    73. 73. Keep in touchMarc McNeillmarc.mcneill@forward.co.uk dancingmangowww.dancingmango.com
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