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Coast Guard Logistics Information Management System (CG-LIMS) Concept of Operations (CONOP) version 1.0 dated 6/5/2010

Coast Guard Logistics Information Management System (CG-LIMS) Concept of Operations (CONOP) version 1.0 dated 6/5/2010

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CG-LIMS CONOP CG-LIMS CONOP Document Transcript

  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 PREFACE What is a CONOPS? The CONOPS, or Concept of Operations, is both an analysis and a formal document that describes how an asset or system will be employed and supported. It is developed to bridge the gap between the Mission Need Statement (MNS) and the Operational Requirements Document (ORD) by identifying the capabilities needed to perform the missions expressed in the MNS. The CONOPS is a communication vehicle to inform the mission managers, capability managers, project management staff, designers/developers, operational and mission support commanders, tactical users and other stakeholders of the asset’s or system’s intended uses and methods of support. [Note: The CONOPS is neither a specification nor a formal statement of requirements. It is used as a source of information for the development of such documents and for project planning and decision making. It is written in common-user language, without requiring the provision of quantified, testable specifications.] How does the CONOPS do this? The CONOPS expresses the employment and support vision of the users, capability managers, and supporters prior to commencing work on the ORD. The CONOPS gains consensus amongst stakeholders on the uses, operating and support concepts, employment, capabilities, and benefits of an asset or system. In order to achieve consensus, stakeholders must collaboratively balance the desires of mission success against the realities of the service. The CONOPS uses mission and support scenarios to describe, in non-technical terms, a “day-in-the-life” of the asset or system. These scenarios are fictional but realistic depictions of the asset or system in operation or being supported in order to achieve mission readiness. They are written or validated by the hands-on users of the system or asset. From these scenarios, needed capabilities can be easily derived. Outputs from the CONOPS: This CONOPS culminates with a description of functional capabilities which provide ORD teams a starting point as well as a traceability tool in which to base their efforts. The CONOPS conveys the operational and support concept of the asset or system to the ORD team and future stakeholders so that they may better understand the intended employment and support. The CONOPS initiates the thought process of verifying suitability and effectiveness of the system or asset by providing a reference for determining “fitness for purpose.” The CONOPS development process can enable operational, maintenance, support, acquisition, and supplier personnel to improve their understanding of the user needs and expectations. Version 1.0 ii
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 Executive Summary This CONOPS describes how the Coast Guard Logistics Information Management System (CG-LIMS) will fill the need for the Coast Guard’s single, centrally managed logistics system to support standard mission support business process across the enterprise. The Logistics Management Transformation Office (LMTO) was established in 2004 with the goal to “identify the desired end-state that clearly defines the vision of a single, unified logistics and finance system for the Coast Guard.” 1 Achieving this vision will allow mission support to overcome challenges that impact mission readiness and operational effectiveness and improve decision making, by enabling decision support at the enterprise and tactical level. Furthermore, it will allow the organization to satisfy logistics-related financial management requirements of the Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Act of 1990 and the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996 (FFMIA) by capturing financial data at the transaction level and providing transparent integration with the Coast Guard core accounting system. To help achieve the above vision, CG-LIMS will directly support the Coast Guard Modernization Effort, transformation toward the Mission Support Business Model, and the four cornerstones of that model: Configuration Management, Total Asset Visibility, Bi-Level Maintenance, and a single point of accountability through Product Line Managers. CG-LIMS will be the Information Technology (IT) system that will fully implement Logistics Transformation, truly providing opportunity for the Coast Guard to align standard mission support process across the enterprise to support mission execution. Resulting improvements will lead to higher asset and system availability and provide the capabilities necessary to support the most complex and difficult decisions across all of its communities. CG-LIMS will be the authoritative source for the configuration of all Coast Guard assets. It will enable product line management by providing total asset visibility throughout the enterprise. It will be the tool through which all maintenance is managed, and by which the enterprise supply chain is driven. All technical information relating to Coast Guard assets, including technical publications and manuals, drawings, maintenance procedure cards, and maintained raw data will be organized and managed in the system. The components of configuration, maintenance, supply, and technical information will be tightly integrated and configured to allow efficient execution of a standardized business process. As mission support is executed throughout the Coast Guard, CG-LIMS will interface with finance, procurement and human resources, so that enterprise business needs are met in a standardized manner. CG-LIMS will also reach out to systems beyond the Coast Guard to execute integrated logistics with other government agencies and vendors. 1 LMTO Charter v2.1, dated 05-Oct-2004. Version 1.0 iii
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 Table of Contents Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... iii  List of Tables .................................................................................................................................. 2  List of Figures ................................................................................................................................. 3  1  Missions & Capabilities .......................................................................................................... 4  1.1  Mission Need.................................................................................................................... 4  1.2  MNS Capability Gap ........................................................................................................ 4  2   Operations and Support Description ....................................................................................... 6  2.1   Missions ........................................................................................................................... 6  2.2   Users and Other Stakeholders .......................................................................................... 6  2.3   Policies, Assumptions and Constraints ............................................................................ 7  2.3.1  Policy ........................................................................................................................ 7  2.3.3   Constraints ................................................................................................................ 9  2.4   Operational Description ................................................................................................. 10  2.4.1   Operating Concept (OpCon) ................................................................................... 10  2.4.2  Employment Modes ................................................................................................ 13  2.4.3  Scheduling and Operations Planning ...................................................................... 13  2.4.4   Operating Environment ........................................................................................... 15  2.4.5   Threats and Hazards ................................................................................................ 16  2.4.6   Interoperability with other Elements ...................................................................... 18  2.5   System Support Description ........................................................................................... 19  2.5.1  Six Facets of Readiness. ......................................................................................... 19  2.5.2   Environments. ......................................................................................................... 21  2.6   Potential Impacts ............................................................................................................ 22  3   Scenarios ............................................................................................................................... 25  3.1   Mission Support Scenarios ............................................................................................. 25  3.1.1  A Day in the Life of an Operational Unit ............................................................... 25  3.1.2  EAL Integration ...................................................................................................... 29  3.1.3  Project Management Integration ............................................................................. 31  3.1.4  Configuration Management .................................................................................... 32  3.2   System Support Scenarios .............................................................................................. 34  3.2.1  Readying the Production Environment ................................................................... 34  3.2.2  Sustainment ............................................................................................................. 35  3.2.3  When Disaster Happens .......................................................................................... 36  4   Functional Capabilities ......................................................................................................... 37  4.1   Mission Support Operations ........................................................................................... 37  4.1.1  Configuration Management .................................................................................... 37  4.1.2  Maintenance Management ...................................................................................... 37  4.1.3  Supply Chain Management ..................................................................................... 37  4.1.4  Technical Information Management ....................................................................... 38  4.1.5  Analysis and Reporting ........................................................................................... 38  4.1.6  Interfaces ................................................................................................................. 38  5   CONOPS Development Team .............................................................................................. 40  Version 1.0 1 View slide
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 List of Tables Title/Paragraph Page Number Table 2-1: Operations and Mission Support Users…………………..…………6 Table 2-2: Other Stakeholders………………………………………..…………7 Table 2-3: Threats and Hazards………………………………………………..16 Table 5-1: CONOPS Development Team…..…………………….…….…......40 Version 1.0 2 View slide
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 List of Figures Title/Paragraph Page Number Figure 1: CG-LIMS OV-1………………………………………….…………11 Version 1.0 3
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 1 Missions & Capabilities 1.1 The Coast Guard is modernizing its business structure and transforming the way mission support is performed. To support the modernized business model, the Coast Guard must adhere to four cornerstones: configuration management, total asset visibility, a bi-level maintenance philosophy, and product line management (see section 2.4.1 for more detail). The cornerstones are standardized across the organization, and enterprise transformation efforts are currently aligning operational and support communities to the new business model. The Coast Guard IT architecture needs to support the modernized Coast Guard across operational communities. 1.2 MNS Capability Gap The Coast Guard currently invests in multiple logistics information systems supporting many communities and business processes. The systems are not well integrated and do not provide the necessary asset and parts visibility to effectively support Coast Guard missions. The inability to share real time information regarding asset status, configuration, inventory, and maintenance history degrades preparedness and has negative impact on operations. Additionally, many of these systems have been organically developed and have significant support costs. CG-LIMS will allow consolidation of all existing logistics information system functions and provide the means by which all communities will follow a standardized, common business process. Our legacy logistics systems are closely tied to their asset-specific business processes. Those processes are changing as the Coast Guard transforms the organization and support structure, and CG-LIMS is needed to modernize our IT and provide the tools necessary to fully transform Coast Guard mission support business practice. The existing logistics information systems cannot be economically changed to support the improved process or scaled to meet the enterprise requirements. Furthermore, CG-LIMS must enable the Coast Guard’s Chief Financial Officer to report financial performance by providing transparent, traceable financial information from the logistics system and interfacing effectively with the core accounting system. CG-LIMS will capture all necessary financial transaction information during logistics transactions and make it available to financial managers for general ledger reconciliation. Finally, our current logistics systems are not consistently aligned with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) enterprise architecture. CG-LIMS will align with the DHS architecture and potentially serve as a model mission support system for the DHS enterprise. The Coast Guard must invest in a centrally-managed, integrated, enterprise-wide logistics information management system that leverages government and industry standards and best practices to provide mission support. By implementing a logistics system capable of supporting an improved business process and organizational structure, we will optimize operational support, reduce costs across the organization, Version 1.0 4
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 provide real time financial data, and align with DHS enterprise architecture. CG-LIMS is necessary for the Coast Guard to efficiently accomplish its missions and capably manage increasing roles in homeland security. CG-LIMS is the single logistics information management system of the future, configured to support a common mission support business process across all Coast Guard assets. Version 1.0 5
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 2 Operations and Support Description 2.1 Missions CG-LIMS will directly support the operations performing all eleven statutory missions found in section 888 of the Homeland Security Act. Each operational asset and point of infrastructure support will rely on CG-LIMS to manage and automate their individual mission support needs. Every mission manager in the Coast Guard will be equally dependent on the quality, accuracy, and timeliness of mission support provided through the use of CG-LIMS. To support Coast Guard operations, CG-LIMS will provide configuration management, maintenance management, technical information management, and supply chain management functions for a common Coast Guard business process. A key element of success for CG-LIMS will be its ability to capture transaction-level financial information and appropriately integrate with the enterprise core accounting system. 2.2 Users and Other Stakeholders When fully implemented, CG-LIMS will provide consistent, authoritative information to virtually every member of Coast Guard operations and mission support, from the lowest ranking deck plate sailor who performs maintenance on an asset, to senior leaders who make operational and policy decisions based on information from the system. A representative description of daily user interaction with the system is in section 3.1. Table 2-1 shows the range of users who will interact with CG-LIMS to perform Coast Guard operations. Table 2-1: Operations and Mission Support Users Role Use Mission Analysts Access equipment availability and reliability metrics and traceability of asset configuration to requirements. Budget Forecasters Access real time statistics and reports that provide historical and projected maintenance costs across the enterprise. Program Managers Analyze logistics metrics, create mission support policy, and ensure policy is being followed. Configuration Access authoritative source for configuration status accounting and use Control Boards CG-LIMS configuration change workflow. Acquisition Use existing configuration baselines to standardize product line acquisitions Organizations and provisioning. Product Line Enforce asset configuration policy; monitor equipment history; execute Managers engineering analyses; propose and execute configuration, maintenance procedure, and technical information changes; oversee maintenance planning and execution; manage and optimize supply activities. Maintenance Schedule, execute, and record depot-level maintenance activities. Requires Support access to asset configuration information, maintenance procedures, other Organizations technical information, and supply chain functionality. Initiate configuration and technical information change requests. Version 1.0 6
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 Role Use Units Schedule, execute, and record organization-level maintenance activities. Requires access to asset configuration information, maintenance procedures, other technical information, and supply chain functionality. Initiate configuration and technical information change requests. Manage local inventories and property. Inventory Control Manage inventory and process supply chain operations. Points Financial Managers Utilize transaction level data captured by CG-LIMS and provided to the core accounting system to reconcile accounts, prioritize and plan activities, and provide transparency into individual unit spending patterns. Training Incorporate configuration change information into relevant curriculums. Organizations Provide performance support and training on operational use of CG-LIMS. Once CG-LIMS is delivered to the Coast Guard, a team of personnel will be required to maintain the hardware and software to ensure its capability is available to operational users of the system. The System Support Agent (SSA) roles and responsibilities will be detailed in the Integrated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP). Key stakeholders include DHS, DoD, and other government agencies who rely on Coast Guard mission support or integrate with Coast Guard mission support components. Contractors and suppliers will also rely on CG-LIMS as the primary interface configured to support the Coast Guard business process. Table 2-2: Other Stakeholders Stakeholder Use DHS Enterprise Architects and policy makers should ensure that both business process and IT related decisions account for CG-LIMS configuration and capability. Department of Defense Integrate with Coast Guard logistics, identifying methods for sharing (DoD) standard support for common platforms and equipment. The Coast Guard should also integrate with the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), providing better visibility and opportunity for support. Commercial Vendors Contractors who provide the Coast Guard with goods and services will need to ensure that engineering and configuration data and logistics support is delivered in accordance with the standard business process supported by CG-LIMS. 2.3 Policies, Assumptions and Constraints 2.3.1 Policy While CG-LIMS must support Coast Guard operations and mission support, which has layers of law, regulation, and policy governing the business, CG-LIMS must also conform to certain policies specific to IT and support systems. Chief among these are the Clinger Cohen Act, the Chief Financial Officers Act, and the Homeland Security Act. Version 1.0 7
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 The Clinger-Cohen Act (CCA) of 1996 mandates that the government information technology shop be operated exactly as an efficient and profitable business would be operated. CCA policy compliance helps to frame a strategy for focusing CG-LIMS requirements toward a responsible IT acquisition. The Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Act of 1990 requires that federal agencies produce accurate, detailed financial statements certified by independent auditors. The Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996 (FFMIA) went beyond earlier policy and details requirements that state financial management systems must provide accurate, reliable, and timely financial management information to the government’s managers. Any implementation of CG-LIMS must ensure financial information necessary for full compliance is captured and integrated with the Coast Guard and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) core accounting system. The Homeland Security Act of 2002 placed the Coast Guard under the DHS. Subsequent DHS Appropriation Acts have required the Chief Information Officer to submit to Congress plans for implementing an Enterprise Architecture (EA), which are found in DHS EA Reports and the Capital Investment Plan for Implementing the DHS Enterprise Architecture. Consequently, the Coast Guard must comply with the audit baseline and standards established by DHS for its component agencies, including using the DHS Technical Reference Model (TRM) and DHS Service-Oriented Architecture Framework. Within the Coast Guard, CG-6 provides IT governance and policy and CG-9 provides acquisition governance and policy. Both dictate use of the System Engineering Life Cycle (SELC) process for CG-LIMS. CG-LIMS will be acquired through the formal major acquisitions process defined by the Coast Guard Major Systems Acquisitions Manual, COMDTINST M5000.10 (series). 2.3.2 Assumptions CG-LIMS will be limited in its scope to the functions described in this document to support the standard, enterprise mission support business model. Specifically, CG-LIMS will not be responsible for managing enterprise financial accounting or the general ledger, procurement functionality, human resource information, standardized project management, or Coast Guard operations. It will, however, be a mixed financial system (tracking auditable transaction-level financial information) and be required to integrate with core financial and enterprise procurement, human resource, project management, and operations systems, as well as procurement, engineering and logistics systems from the Department of Defense (DoD) and other government agencies. CG-LIMS may consist of one or many applications that integrate standard logistics functions of configuration management, maintenance management, Version 1.0 8
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 supply chain management, and technical information management for assets across the enterprise. CG-LIMS will be the authoritative source for the information contained in the system directly supporting these functions. CG-LIMS will ultimately be the single logistics system for the Coast Guard. It will provide mission support for all assets: aircraft, boats, ships, shore structures, piers and infrastructure, and electronics and software. It will not only manage configuration of assets, it will track individual parts, special tools, and test equipment throughout their life cycles. Failure history for types of equipment and parts will be recorded and delivered for maintenance analysis. Individual parts will be tracked throughout their life, retaining history of location, status, failures, and repairs. Supply chain management functionality will include robust inventory and warehouse management across the enterprise. Maintenance activities will be wholly contained in the system. Access to technical documentation and the management of configuration, maintenance, and supply activities for each asset will all be accomplished using CG-LIMS, following one, standard business process. CG-LIMS capability will be acquired and implemented in segments of functionality. Assets currently being supported by legacy logistics systems will be migrated to CG-LIMS in accordance with the Deputy Commandant for Mission Support (DCMS) Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) for modernization and transformation. The legacy logistics systems will then be targeted for disposal. CG-LIMS must provide support for system users who have limited or no network connectivity. See Section 2.4.4 for further explanation. The Project Manager (CG-9334) is responsible for the system acquisition as described in COMDTINST M5000.10 (series). CG-LIMS configuration management will be governed by the CG-LIMS Configuration Control Board (CCB). CG-LIMS Disaster Recovery (DR) hardware and software IT components will be hosted at a DR site in a physical location separated from the production environment. 2.3.3 Constraints CG-LIMS must provide an operational availability of 98.6%. See Section 2.4.3.1 for more detail. CG-LIMS must provide an operational reliability of 93.1%. See Section 2.4.3.2 for more detail. Version 1.0 9
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 The IT solution for CG-LIMS will be compatible with the technological constraints identified in the DHS TRM and will have to be consistent with the common operation environment of the hosting site. Information security requirements are critical, yet difficult to meet if not addressed early in a project. The solution must be able to meet the requirements and then follow the standard process to ensure compliance during configuration. 2.4 Operational Description 2.4.1 Operating Concept (OpCon) Coast Guard Modernization and the transformation toward standardized Mission Support are enterprise-wide initiatives to provide field operations the best possible support. There are four cornerstones of the Coast Guard common business approach to mission support 2 : • A service-wide commitment to configuration management; • Total asset visibility across the Coast Guard through an enterprise IT system; • A bi-level support system consisting of organizational and depot levels; and • A single point of accountability for asset support through the establishment of asset Product Line Managers (PLM). In order for the Coast Guard to achieve these goals, modernized IT tools are crucial, and CG-LIMS is the IT system required to fully implement this unified and disciplined approach to mission support. As new assets enter service, it is vital that strict configuration management be effectively managed and maintained so that the enterprise mission support model can be implemented unhindered by current IT constraints. The PLM will rely on the system to provide total asset visibility, as will the technicians executing maintenance. Figure 1 shows the operational view (OV-1) depicting how CG-LIMS will support the operations of the Coast Guard. It directly supports current Coast Guard Modernization efforts. 2 Mission Support Handbook V1.0 Version 1.0 10
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 Figure 1: CG-LIMS OV-1 The system will manage the configuration of all Coast Guard assets, providing traceability between physical configuration status and various baselines, including functional baselines (requirements). It will document changes and status of asset configuration and ensure a consistent control process is followed throughout an asset’s lifecycle. The technical information used to feed asset configuration, such as engineering data and manuals, will also be managed by CG-LIMS. Both the configuration and technical information are used to generate maintenance procedures, which are also documented and maintained in CG-LIMS. Engineering data associated with configuration items, such as Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) data, including Failure Mode Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA) and Level of Repair Analysis (LORA), are crucial to document in the system and maintain throughout the lifecycle of maintenance-worthy items. Information gathered by CG-LIMS during the operation and maintenance of assets will allow improved Version 1.0 11
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 analysis of tracked systems and enable refinement of the technical information that affect operations, maintenance, supply, and acquisition strategies. A configuration-based maintenance program ensures that operational availability and resource thresholds are achieved and sustained while reducing probability of failures, minimizing unauthorized configuration changes, optimizing both manpower and personnel resources, and centrally managing the supply chain. The Coast Guard’s bi-level maintenance model is capability based: organizational (unit) level (O-level) and depot level (D-level) maintenance is defined based on comparing the engineering data analysis with the skills, capacity, tools, and authority required to perform specific maintenance procedures. The actual maintenance will be tracked in CG-LIMS and performed in accordance with the technical information and procedures provided through the system. CG-LIMS will provide the required capability for the Coast Guard to support moving supplies necessary for maintenance and mission support. Not only will CG-LIMS integrate maintenance actions with associated supply chain functionality and procurement and finance interfaces, it will provide the ability to maintain total asset visibility, or timely and accurate information on the location, movement, status, and identity of equipment and supplies. The Coast Guard will then be able to act on this information, providing transparency to decision makers and oversight entities. Product lines are managed at designated Aviation (ALC), Surface Forces (SFLC), and Shore Infrastructure (SILC) Logistics Centers and C4IT (C4IT SC) and Personnel (PSC) Service Centers. Product lines are essential to the foundation of the Coast Guard’s mission support model and are formed early in the lifecycle of a program, initially residing within the Asset Project Office (APO) during acquisition. Once a new asset is fully operational and achieving a steady state of performance, the product line transitions to the designated logistics or service center, continuing lifecycle support until disposal. Product Line Managers (PLM) are the single point of contact for any given asset, responsible for technical service requests, maintenance procedures, asset configuration data, parts use authorization, reliability analysis, spare parts provisioning and procurement services, and D-level maintenance. Assets installed on or used with a parent asset will be managed no differently than the parent. For example, assume a C4IT system pallet is managed by a product line of the C4IT Service Center. The pallet has a configuration that is maintained in CG-LIMS, including hardware and versions of software. The aircraft upon which the pallet is installed is managed by a product line of the ALC. The pallet is managed as a configuration item within that parent aircraft asset. When a problem occurs with the pallet, the parent asset is responsible for notifying the PLM at ALC. The PLM at ALC will see that the C4IT SC has responsibility for that particular asset and engage the appropriate PLM. In this Version 1.0 12
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 way, the PLM of the parent asset will have visibility into the status of the aircraft, while the child asset requiring attention is appropriately managed by a separate service center. Similarly, an underway cutter with a helicopter on board will be managed by a PLM at SFLC. If a problem is encountered with the aircraft, the PLM at SFLC will be first in line to be notified that a change in status to the capability of the cutter has occurred. The ALC will in turn be notified that one of their assets has an issue. In both cases, access to technical documentation and the management of configuration, maintenance, and supply activities for each asset will all be accomplished using CG-LIMS, following the same, standard business process. CG-LIMS will be centrally hosted and provide system access to all applicable field units from standard workstations connected to the Coast Guard network. Interfaces with both internal and external systems will use the enterprise Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) when practical. CG-LIMS users at individual units will have visibility access to enterprise information based on roles. Units without continuous network connections, such as an underway ship or Deployable Operations Group (DOG) unit, will use a distributed instance of the system to follow standard business practice. The system will sync with the central system according to defined business rules. Rules must be configurable to allow for optimized information exchange when limited connectivity is available, such as through a satellite. 2.4.2 Employment Modes Role-based permissions will control user access to system information and functionality. For instance, program analysts and decision makers across the enterprise will need access to all CG-LIMS information. The acquisition community will need to submit technical information and configuration data through CG-LIMS for newly acquired assets. Trainers will require access to CG-LIMS for both pipeline and on-site training. Financial managers will need to reconcile financial records down to the transaction level. Product Line Managers will need access to CG-LIMS to plan, budget, and execute asset support. Unit level users will need to schedule and execute maintenance, requisition parts, perform property and inventory audits, and execute supply chain actions. Item managers will require access to CG-LIMS to make requisition and procurement decisions. System support users will require administrative permissions to manage the system configuration. 2.4.3 Scheduling and Operations Planning 2.4.3.1 Availability CG-LIMS users will typically expect the system to be available for use at all times. While usage will peak during a normal workday, maintenance will be performed on assets around the clock, requiring Version 1.0 13
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 availability of all functions of CG-LIMS. Many units strategically perform maintenance with their duty sections during the night when operations are typically at the lowest levels. It is critical that mission support personnel have access to the parts and technical data required to maintain assets. CG-LIMS will only be as usable as it is available. Access to maintenance schedules and procedures, parts availability information, parts requisitioning functionality, and technical documentation will be expected of the system during routine field level mission support operations. Furthermore, to maintain data integrity users will be expected to input their activities into CG-LIMS upon completion of a task. A unit can routinely tolerate a scheduled 2 hour downtime once in any given week, allowing mission support personnel to pull a reasonable amount of information prior to the anticipated downtime so that mission support operations can continue without system access. System outages up to 4 hours could be tolerated, but not more than four times in a year, due to its significant impact on mission support operations. For this reason, CG-LIMS will require a high degree of reliability, discussed in Section 2.4.3.2. Since CG-LIMS will be operational 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, total time used in availability calculations must be based on 8,760 hours per year. The total downtime tolerable to system users is 120 hours per year (2 routine hours per week plus four 4 hour unexpected outages). Consequently, the total operational uptime targeted for the system is 8,640 (8,760 – 120 = 8,640) hours per year. The required operational availability for CG-LIMS is the total operational uptime targeted (8,640 hours) divided by the total time (8,760 hours), or 98.6%. An even more desirable level of availability would be achieved if the scheduled downtime were limited to 1 hour per week. Maintaining the tolerable 16 hours of unexpected downtime over a year, this would increase the availability to 99.2%. 2.4.3.2 Reliability Reliability is a measure of the probability that the system will perform without failure over a specific interval. CG-LIMS reliability must also be sufficient to support the required availability. Reliability is generally expressed in terms of a Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF). Version 1.0 14
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 Once operational, the reliability can be measured as an inverse exponential function of Euler’s constant raised to an exponent of actual operating hours divided by the number of system failures experienced during a specific interval. The interval is determined by calculating the Mean Time Between Maintenance (MTBM). Because CG-LIMS users are willing to tolerate weekly maintenance periods (of no greater than 2 hours each) and 4 unexpected failures per year, the MTBM requirement for CG-LIMS should not be less than 154.3 hours (target operational uptime ÷ total number of periods of downtime due to maintenance). To keep unplanned downtime to a tolerable minimum, the requirement for MTBF should not be less than 2,160 hours (target operational uptime ÷ number of failure events). Consequently, the required reliability, or probability that the system will operate without an unexpected failure between maintenance periods, should not be less than 93.1%, calculated by using the following equation: . 2.4.4 Operating Environment CG-LIMS will reside in the Coast Guard’s Common Operating Environment (COMDTINST 5230.59) and be accessed through Coast Guard Standard Workstations. CG-LIMS will accordingly comply with COMDTINST 5200.16, Standard Workstation III Configuration Management Policy. Hardware acquired through separate acquisitions may interface with CG-LIMS in the future, such as bar code scanners or portable maintenance recording devices, but they fall outside the scope of the CG-LIMS system acquisition. CG-LIMS will be used on assets that do not always have 100% network connectivity. Users will be able to use CG-LIMS while in a disconnected environment and be confident that information available in the system is current relative to the most recent network connection to the central servers, according to established business rules. Work performed in CG-LIMS while in the disconnected environment will be saved and automatically update the central system once connectivity is restored. The following connectivity situations must be addressed: a. Shore-based continuous connectivity: This will be the most common operating environment for CG-LIMS, allowing full system access to users at land-based units with Coast Guard One Network (CGOne) access through Local Area Network (LAN) connectivity. Version 1.0 15
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 b. No connectivity: This supports users during anticipated periods without connectivity to CGOne, such as underway cutters, other mobile units, and remote sites. Facilitating this environment requires that the unit have some lightweight application server, a data repository, and means for detecting loss of network connectivity. c. Limited connectivity: This supports users with connectivity to the CGOne via satellite link or other wireless protocol. Facilitating this environment requires that the system have some means for detecting the presence of Wide Area Network (WAN) connectivity. CG-LIMS will provide a prioritization service for synchronizing data with the central server according to business rules to maximize use of limited bandwidth. 2.4.5 Threats and Hazards Standard Coast Guard IT policy and safeguards will mitigate risks to CG-LIMS reliability and stability. Table 2-3 details specific threats and hazards at both the primary hosting site and distributed sites operating Coast Guard standard workstations, which may have local instances of CG-LIMS for operating in a disconnected environment. Extended loss of CG-LIMS capability would severely impede Coast Guard operations. As the primary IT tool used for mission support, it will be the source for information captured during logistics activities, such as configuration and maintenance status and location and condition of Coast Guard property and inventory. PLMs will be responsible for keeping copies of current maintenance procedures and technical documentation so that mission support operations can be performed and documented off-line in unique cases where access to a CG-LIMS environment is not available, according to policy and standard process. Table 2-3: Threats and Hazards Threat / Hazard Symptom of Threat or Contributor Factors Required to Hazard / Opposing Maintain Effectiveness Force and Capabilities Primary Site Hazard The hosting facility is damaged Weather or Disaster Recovery & Business – Environmental by an environmental hazard natural Continuity (DRBC) Infrastructure Disaster (e.g. tornado, hurricane, fire, occurrence DRBC Plan etc) that causes the system to DRBC Plan Implementation no longer function at the primary site Primary Site Hazard - The hosting facility is damaged Person DRBC Infrastructure Human Unintentional by an unintentional human DRBC Plan Disaster action (e.g. cut power line, etc) DRBC Plan Implementation that causes the system to no longer function at the primary site Version 1.0 16
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 Threat / Hazard Symptom of Threat or Contributor Factors Required to Hazard / Opposing Maintain Effectiveness Force and Capabilities Primary Site Threat - The hosting facility is damaged Person DRBC Infrastructure Human Intentional by an intentional human action DRBC Plan Disaster (e.g. sabotaged disk drive, etc) DRBC Plan Implementation that causes the system to no Site Security Personnel longer function at the primary Security Clearances for Personnel site CG-CIRT Investigation Primary Site Threat – One or more of the system Person DoS Detection Denial of Service components are attacked DoS Prevention Techniques (DoS) affecting service (negative (Verfication, Filtering, Access availability) but w/o loss of Control Lists, etc), Firewall data (sustained integrity) DoS Isolation and Restoration CG-CIRT Investigation Primary Site Threat – One or more of the system Person Logging and Auditing Breach of Security components are compromised Audit Log Analysis resulting in a breach of security Data backup procedures and loss of data or data Data Restoration integrity Site Security Personnel Security Clearances for Personnel CG-CIRT Investigation Distributed System The remote hosting facility Weather or Replacement hardware (HW) and Component Hazard – housing distributed system natural software (SW) components Environmental component is damaged by an occurrence Synchronization Plan Disaster environmental hazard (e.g. System Recovery Plan tornado, hurricane, fire) that Data Recovery Plan causes the system to no longer function at the remote site Distributed System The remote hosting facility Person Replacement HW and SW Component Hazard – housing distributed system components Human Unintentional component is damaged by an Synchronization Plan Disaster unintentional human action System Recovery Plan (e.g. damaged communication Data Recovery Plan equipment, etc) that causes the system to no longer function at the remote site Distributed System The remote hosting facility Person Replacement HW and SW Component Threat – housing distributed system components Human Intentional component is damaged by an Synchronization Plan Disaster intentional human action (e.g. System Recovery Plan damaged communication Data Recovery Plan equipment, etc) that causes the Site Security Personnel system to no longer function at Security Clearances for Personnel the remote site CG-CIRT Investigation Distributed System One or more of the system Person Theft Prevention Component Threat – components are compromised Theft Investigation Breach of Security resulting in a breach of security Replace HW& SW components and loss of data or data Synchronization Plan integrity System Recovery Plan Data Recovery Plan Site Security Personnel Security Clearances for Personnel CG-CIRT Investigation Version 1.0 17
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 2.4.6 Interoperability with other Elements Interoperability with both Coast Guard and external systems is critical to the success of CG-LIMS. Asset Logistics Management Information System (ALMIS) is the principal IT system currently supporting modernized logistics business practice. CG-LIMS must initially integrate with ALMIS as segments are developed and implemented. ALMIS architecture allows for a modular recapitalization strategy, so interim interfaces will be required in a way that overall functionality is not lost when any asset migrates from ALMIS to CG-LIMS. CG-LIMS will integrate with Electronic Asset Logbook (EAL), the operations system supporting modernized assets, to provide asset condition and availability information. EAL currently provides unscheduled maintenance management functionality to assets enrolled in ALMIS; this functionality must be migrated to CG-LIMS. EAL will remain as the operations system supporting Modernization, while CG-LIMS will become the logistics system managing modernized mission support. CG-LIMS must integrate with the Coast Guard core accounting system and provide accurate transaction-level data for financial accountability, tracking and analysis. It must also feed the enterprise procurement system. Integration with human resource management systems will eliminate dual entry of personnel, training, and competency information and enable real-time job-cost valuations. CG-LIMS will integrate with hardware and feeder systems as technologies evolve. For instance, bar code scanners and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) readers may be employed in the field to improve supply activities; personnel may use handheld, electronic devices to record maintenance or inventory activities; and automated maintenance monitoring systems, such as the one deployed on the National Security Cutter, can provide real time equipment usage information to update component history relevant to maintenance periodicity. External systems to which CG-LIMS will integrate include DoD systems, DHS systems, Other Government Agency (OGA) supply systems, commercial shipping systems, and vendors. DoD systems include Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) systems (in accordance with Defense Logistics Management System (DLMS) to ensure supply support and information sharing with other government agencies is conducted in an automated information system environment), inventory control point systems that supply the Coast Guard, and maintenance systems requiring updates for DoD equipment employed by the Coast Guard, such as Navy Type/Navy Owned (NTNO). Possible interfaces with DHS include department-wide property management, financial, environmental, and energy systems. CG-LIMS will integrate with commercial freight services, such as RPS, Inc and Federal Express to track shipments and Version 1.0 18
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 provide visibility to customers waiting for parts. Vendors supply systems will also have a means to interface with CG-LIMS to automate supply activities. 2.5 System Support Description 2.5.1 This section applies the Six Facets of Readiness model to CG-LIMS hosting and support. The following descriptions are based on the assumption that the Coast Guard will be the SSA for CG-LIMS at Full Operational Capability (FOC). 2.5.1.1 People The Coast Guard provides full-service hosting and support for many applications in addition to CG-LIMS. Personnel will directly and indirectly support each system at the hosting site. In direct support of CG-LIMS will be the core business unit team made up of a Project Officer (PO) and staff. The PO will be a government employee and serve as a liaison between the SSA and the Project Manager (CG-9334), System Development Agent (SDA), Sponsor’s Representative (CG-442), Asset Manager (CG-632), and other stakeholders. The system staff will be comprised of a Functional Area Manager (FAM) and, depending on the hosting and support requirements, additional personnel to provide full system lifecycle support for the servers, applications, and databases. Staff may include system administrators, database administrators, developers, testers, system support specialists, documentation specialists, analysts, and configuration management specialists. 2.5.1.2 Training The system-user interface and logic flows will be tailored as much as possible to meet user needs, within the limits of the chosen acquisition strategy. Tailoring could potentially include customized 'interface overlays' for each major class of user to facilitate their entry into the system, based on their level of understanding of the system and what tasks they need to perform. A robust embedded help feature will be provided, as will a self-guided embedded training capability. Based on previous projects of similar scope and breadth, however, some user training may be required, particularly when the system is initially deployed. All of the strategies listed above will be utilized as much as possible to reduce the long-term cost of resident training solutions. While detailed training requirements will be determined for each user group based on deliberately-determined knowledge, skills and ability gaps, it is likely that some training will be required, as described below. Version 1.0 19
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 System indoctrination and familiarization will be provided to initial users as the system is installed and brought online. This training will orient the various user groups to the interface and help them more quickly acclimate to the new system and their expected role therein. Although user performance is not expected to be different or unique, this initial training will be vital to help manage the organizational change required to ensure the system is implemented effectively and efficiently in the work place. Although this training will not necessarily be provided to all user groups, it is likely to be provided for database administrators, those responsible for configuring the application to implement approved change requests and assist in managing application accounts, personnel who will configure or customize the application(s) to interoperate with other enterprise applications, and a representative sample of unit users. Additional support and training may also be provided to Help Desk personnel providing support for CG-LIMS in order to rapidly and effectively assist field users having difficulties. 2.5.1.3 Equipment CG-LIMS will include hardware and software at the central hosting site and disaster recovery site, maintained in accordance with the O-level and D-level maintenance plans delivered with the system and managed by the C4IT SC. Hardware choices should be coordinated with the C4IT SC to ensure adherence to any standards and compatibility with the hosting sites. Distributed environments of CG-LIMS at units expecting to use the system during periods of limited or zero network connectivity may need additional hardware to support local instances, depending on the final solution. 2.5.1.4 Support System experts will monitor CG-LIMS equipment and the infrastructure elements of the surrounding environment for events that may affect the system. In the event of a system equipment failure, staff will repair, replace, or contact vendors for replacement and repair. The system and surrounding infrastructure will be configured to maximize redundancy of critical system elements, minimizing system downtime in the event of failure. In the event of an IT security incident, staff on site will respond to minimize threats to the system and site and involve others (i.e. CG-CIRT) when necessary. Version 1.0 20
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 Hardware, software, and infrastructure will require periodic upgrades that will be performed in accordance with CCB priority and Coast Guard policy. 2.5.1.5 Infrastructure C4IT SC is responsible for Coast Guard IT product lines. Enterprise IT infrastructure required to carry information to and from central severs and distributed network locations will be maintained by the C4IT SC as a course of business outside the scope of CG-LIMS, except for capability specific to CG-LIMS deployment. IT components specific to CG-LIMS will follow O and D level maintenance plans according to the standard Coast Guard business model. 2.5.1.6 Information Technical documentation for CG-LIMS will be maintained in accordance with existing change management procedures. Substantial vendor supplied documentation will be collected during the acquisition to support the products delivered. Critical documentation to be obtained during the acquisition includes detailed configuration information, to be conveyed from the SDA to the SSA when appropriate. 2.5.2 The following environments are envisioned for CG-LIMS, each having its own unique support mode. 2.5.2.1 Development Environment: This is a secondary CG-LIMS environment providing capability for implementing approved change requests before testing and production release. 2.5.2.2 Operational Test & Evaluation (OT&E) Environment: This is a secondary CG-LIMS environment providing testing and evaluation capability. 2.5.2.3 Production Environment: This is the primary CG-LIMS transaction processing environment. It is comprised of various hardware and software components to support the three connectivity environments (connected, limited connectivity, zero connectivity) described in Section 2.4.4 to the hosting site’s central application servers and data repositories. 2.5.2.4 Disaster Recovery (DR) Environment: This environment is established to support the hosting site’s central application servers and Version 1.0 21
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 data repositories in cases where a significant event causes them to be unavailable. 2.5.2.5 Failover Environment: This environment is established to support the hosting site’s primary application servers and data repositories in cases where a localized event causes either or both the servers and repositories at the hosting site to be unavailable, requiring transition to other infrastructure components. 2.5.2.6 Training Environment: The system will include a robust embedded training capability that will allow users to rehearse and practice common functions and to solve problems. This environment will appear exactly like the operational environment but user actions will be able to manipulate simulated data vice real data. 2.6 Potential Impacts CG-LIMS will be the IT tool by which the Coast Guard continues logistics transformation to support optimal mission support through Modernization. Significant change management strategies are already in place to help mitigate organizational impacts of such sweeping change. Highlighted below are specific additional impacts anticipated when CG-LIMS is implemented. 2.6.1 Operational (Mission Support) Impacts The users of current logistics systems being replaced by CG-LIMS will experience the most impact. The IT logistics system currently being used by both the aviation community and units undergoing logistics transformation is ALMIS. It will be the first system targeted for replacement by CG-LIMS. CG-LIMS will enable the full vision of Modernization to be realized, overcoming constraints with ALMIS and the other legacy logistics systems which limit full implementation of the modernized business model. However, some changes to low level business practice will be required to use modern technology to fully support the high level business process goals. One clear example of change to current ALMIS users will be how maintenance is managed. Currently, corrective maintenance is managed in an ALMIS application that also manages operations, EAL, separately from the application that manages scheduled preventative maintenance. Due to its operations management functionality, EAL is not going to be replaced by CG-LIMS; however the maintenance management functionality will be migrated to CG-LIMS. Both preventative and corrective maintenance will be managed in one system, CG-LIMS. See section 3.1 for an example of how this will take place while maintaining the integrity of EAL information. Version 1.0 22
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 One of the biggest challenges with implementing the Coast Guard’s modernized business model is standardizing functional process, including financial and procurement transactions, across communities. Statutory requirements now require the Coast Guard to follow standard practice for financial accounting. Some of our existing general ledgers and procurement modules are inappropriately contained within current logistics systems. The implementation of CG-LIMS must support a new enterprise business model where there is a single general ledger. The enterprise strategy for migrating from the current state of multiple general ledgers and procurement applications to a single general ledger and single procurement application has not yet been defined, but it will certainly require a change in configuration from our current logistics systems to adopt a new process when financial events are initiated. The project will defer to CG-1 as to Human System Integration (HSI) analyses that should be conducted. These will likely include user need analyses, task analyses, manpower requirements analyses and training supportability analyses. These efforts will be fully integrated with DCMS transformation timelines. 2.6.2 System Support Impacts New Interconnection Security Agreements (ISA) and Memoranda of Agreement (MOA) in support of interfaces between systems will be required as part of initial Certification and Accreditation (C&A) for CG-LIMS. The creation of ISAs and MOAs requires time to define scope, negotiate details of the interconnection among different system owners, and obtain Designated Accrediting Authorities (DAA) approval. In order for CG-LIMS to interface through an evolving Services Oriented Architecture (SOA), interfacing systems are likely to require modification to consume and deliver messages on the Enterprise Service Bus (ESB). Interfacing systems may require increased bandwidth and storage capacities for increased data transfer or changes in data transfer format associated with CG-LIMS requirements. CG-LIMS and ALMIS systems staff will need to collaborate on many activities such as: • Establishing a rollback plan to address risks associated with initial implementation. • Creating and executing data migration plans. • Developing new interfaces to support data sharing. • Planning and execution of beta testing. • Coordinating parallel operation between legacy logistics systems and the new CG-LIMS. Version 1.0 23
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 If validated by analyses, job aids and resident training solutions may need to be developed to support desired user performance. Hardware and software residing on distributed assets may need to be upgraded as a result of the implementation of CG-LIMS and require subsequent equipment upgrades or replacement as changes are made to the centralized environment at the production hosting site. The hosting sites may need to allocate additional workspace and infrastructure elements (i.e. office space for personnel increases, data floor space, power supply, network access bandwidth) as they take on CG-LIMS hardware and software. Version 1.0 24
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 3 Scenarios CG-LIMS will be providing mission support capability to all Coast Guard operations. While operational commands and assets will be in the field performing Coast Guard missions, mission support personnel will be busy ensuring operations have the right resources in a timely manner, and their primary tool will be CG-LIMS. The following scenarios are broken into two categories. Section 3.1 addresses how CG-LIMS will be used. Section 3.2 describes how CG-LIMS will be maintained. 3.1 Mission Support Scenarios 3.1.1 A Day in the Life of an Operational Unit This unit level scenario describes typical use of CG-LIMS to support operational assets. The roles of the unit personnel, Product Line Manager (PLM), operational commander, and supply support are described as they perform their parts in planning and executing mission support. 3.1.1.1 Maintenance Planning The maintenance officer at a unit finishes Friday by preparing for next week’s work. He opens the CG-LIMS application from his desk workstation and takes a look at the scheduling module to see what maintenance is due. He has responsibility for all O-level maintenance required of the unit, including facility infrastructure, vehicles, station radio equipment and three small boats, all of which is managed by CG-LIMS. He checks the O-level assigned tasks and sees that his weekly schedule includes a quarterly inspection and two weekly lubrication tasks for each small boat, an operating hour induced bearing inspection on the first boat, and a monthly inspection of all the fire extinguishers at the station. Total labor hours required are 21 man-hours, for which he will need to assign personnel from his unit. He also sees that a support team is scheduled to visit the unit on Wednesday to perform D-level preventative maintenance, some machinery overhaul on the second boat, which is supposed to take three days, rendering the asset unavailable during the overhaul. He had arranged this visit with the PLM over a month ago, after they were notified by CG-LIMS that the maintenance was going to be due. He also notes that another D-level maintenance task is due in less than three weeks. This is not a surprise to him, as he (and the PLM) already received the email automatically generated by CG-LIMS giving him 30 days notice, which is standard for that particular task, Version 1.0 25
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 and the PLM had emailed him some windows of availability for support teams capable of performing the maintenance. He decides to follow up with the PLM next week to get it on the schedule. He is confident that the materials necessary for the maintenance will arrive to his unit prior to the start date, since CG-LIMS calculates necessary lead times, notifies personnel responsible for authorizing shipment, and facilitates efficient transportation and tracking. He does not need to worry about finding and procuring parts for preventative maintenance, as the PLM, with the help of CG-LIMS, ensures his unit is fully stocked for maintenance prior to its date of execution. Now that the maintenance officer knows what maintenance should be completed next week, he opens the unit’s operations application and takes a look at the upcoming operations schedule to ensure that there won’t be any conflicts. Operations look normal, which will allow bringing down the second asset for the three days and plenty of time to accomplish the remaining O-level maintenance tasks. The list of available personnel and their qualifications is automatically updated in CG-LIMS through an interface with the enterprise HR system. The maintenance officer makes a detailed schedule of which maintenance technicians will be assigned each O-level task and what day it will be performed. He schedules the O-level work on the second asset to take place during the D-level overhaul to make use of the down time and maximize operating availability. CG-LIMS would have flagged him if any of the maintenance scheduled required a qualification not held by at least one assigned technician. 3.1.1.2 Supply Chain – Part 1 Maintenance materials for the scheduled checks and overhaul were identified automatically by CG-LIMS and advance notifications were sent to the PLM. She verified the need and authorized the supply shipments to the unit, which were automatically sent to the appropriate item managers. The item managers for specific materials followed their business rules to authorize the packaging and shipment of materials from the most advantageous Inventory Control Point (ICP) to the unit. The ICP received the order and packaged the material with a separate order also scheduled for the same unit, which were then delivered prior to the scheduled maintenance. During the packaging, shipping, and receiving process, CG-LIMS captures the financial transactions associated with the delivery of goods. Version 1.0 26
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 The unit is also allocated a stock of repair parts, based on planned maintenance and failure trends, as determined by the Product Line Manager (PLM) and mission operations. CG-LIMS automatically sends demand signals to the PLM when the reorder point is reached and materials are replenished in the same way that maintenance materials were ordered. Consumable items, such as fuel for operations and surge capacity stockpiles, are also automatically replenished as consumed. When the reorder point for an inventory item is reached at an ICP, procurement might be necessary to replenish inventory. CG-LIMS manages the process for item managers to electronically create and send purchase requests to the enterprise procurement system. As material is used, transferred, disposed of and received, CG-LIMS captures the financial data associated with each transaction and provides the required detail to the core accounting system to meet enterprise business rules and CFO compliance. 3.1.1.3 Maintenance Preparation The maintenance technician assigned the bearing inspection begins her Monday by logging into the common kiosk computer, opening CG-LIMS, and seeing her scheduled tasks. She clicks on the work order she is scheduled to do and accesses the Maintenance Procedure Card (MPC) for her next job, which is available electronically and is printable. She executes the start of the maintenance action in CG-LIMS, which notifies EAL that the asset is operationally unavailable due to maintenance, and requests the required materials, which are listed both within the maintenance module of CG-LIMS (i.e. the work order) and on the MPC. She also has the ability to view local and enterprise inventory levels of specific parts. Because this is scheduled maintenance, the PLM has ensured her local store room is sufficiently stocked for the job. She pulls the required materials from stores. All tools and materials are available, the necessary technical drawings are included on the MPC (with additional technical drawings, publications and manuals available through hyper-links via the CG-LIMS interface), and step by step instructions are provided. The maintenance technician has practiced this particular maintenance task with the same MPC during “A” school and is confident she will be able to accomplish the task within the work order’s estimated timeframe. Version 1.0 27
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 3.1.1.4 Maintenance Execution The technician follows the steps on the MPC to complete the task. The work order requires disassembling a portion of a motor, measuring a component for signs of wear, and replacing a bearing if the component wear is beyond indicated tolerances. The technician places safety tags on the operating controls and performs all tasks as directed, finding that the bearing surface is scored and pitted well beyond the allowable tolerances. Continued operation of the asset in this condition has a possibility of causing failure to other machinery components. The MPC directs her to perform an unscheduled corrective action, as detailed in a separate maintenance task. She initiates the creation of a separate work order, which is now linked to the original work order in CG-LIMS. CG-LIMS sends a notification to the maintenance officer that a corrective maintenance work order has been created, and the technician confirms with him that she will begin work on the new work order immediately. CG-LIMS automatically sends a real time update to EAL indicating a revised window of estimated unavailability, as well as any new operational restrictions placed on the asset (such as required sea, ground, or flight checks that must be accomplished before the asset can be put back into full operational status). The technician orders the required materials for the corrective maintenance, which are available in stores, pulls them for the job, prints out the MPC, and begins the repair. As she was trained in “A” school, she compares the provided diagrams, parts lists, and specifications to the actual equipment to ensure accuracy, confirming all documentation is correct. She removes the worn bearing, replaces it with the new bearing, removes the safety tags, and successfully performs the required machinery tests. The technician marks the maintenance actions as complete in CG-LIMS and electronically forwards them to a designated Quality Assurance (QA) technician. The QA technician inspects the work and then signs off on it in CG-LIMS. This triggers notification to the designated Maintenance Release Authority that action is required to clear the asset for operations. Once approved, CG-LIMS automatically sends notification to EAL that the asset is now operationally available. If operational restrictions still exist for the asset, they will be indicated in EAL so that operators can then manage the asset accordingly. If the actual repair time had exceeded the scheduled down time, automatic updates would have gone out to the maintenance officer and sent to EAL to update operational commanders. Version 1.0 28
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 3.1.1.5 Supply Chain – Part 2 The allowance of two spare bearings for the unit’s three assets is managed by CG-LIMS based on the latest RCM analyses. The consumed part will be replaced automatically, as CG-LIMS recognizes that only one is left in the unit storeroom, and produces an order for replacement that will end up with the item manager for final disposition. The bearing in the above scenario is not considered a repairable item, so the technician disposed of it during the maintenance evolution. If it had been designated as a repairable part, it would have been tagged as “Not Ready for Issue” and returned to supply, and the configuration of the asset would have been automatically updated when the maintenance action was recorded in CG-LIMS: the new part installed on the asset would be recorded into the asset configuration, and the part to be repaired would then be tracked in CG-LIMS for lifetime component history. The location and status of all parts are visible to CG-LIMS users. 3.1.2 EAL Integration EAL will remain the system that operators use, both to plan missions and report outcomes of executed missions. Operators are interested in the status of pending or ongoing maintenance on assets, since it impacts asset availability for mission execution. Consequently, CG-LIMS must have an interface with EAL. Operators will not be expected to perform extra steps to record asset usage and discrepancies following a mission. A seamless method of recording asset usage information and entering discrepancies to initiate corrective maintenance will continue to be the norm, even though the maintenance itself will be managed through CG-LIMS, not EAL. The following scenario describes the same unit from section 3.1.1 performing operations while the preventative maintenance was being conducted as scheduled. 3.1.2.1 Asset Availability On Tuesday evening OPCOM tasks the unit with providing an asset to help a search and rescue mission. OPCOM was aware of the unit’s availability status even before they asked for the asset, as EAL provides asset visibility enterprise wide. The operations officer of the unit looks at the schedule in EAL and notes that it is a light week with only training missions scheduled. He notes that one asset is currently unavailable for an estimated 5 more hours as the duty section performs scheduled maintenance, which requires an operational test before being mission capable. The work order had been opened in CG-LIMS, which automatically updated EAL through a real-time interface. The Version 1.0 29
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 second asset is preparing for a training mission and is ready to go, but is scheduled to go down for extended maintenance in the morning (the CG-LIMS maintenance schedule updates EAL to show upcoming availability). The final asset is fully available. The unit operations officer decides to suspend the training mission, send the ready asset to the search and rescue operation, and get the second available asset ready on stand-by. According to unit standing orders, he needs to have two assets available this week, and he is comfortable that by the time the scheduled overhaul is to begin the next day, the asset currently undergoing maintenance will be fully available. 3.1.2.2 Discrepancy Discovery During the search and rescue mission, the boat crew notes a few discrepancies. A gauge isn’t working properly. A light seems to be burned out. Smoke started coming out of a control panel upon return to the unit. Any immediate corrective actions are taken in accordance with standard operating procedures. 3.1.2.3 Post-Operations Reporting Upon return to the unit, the designated crew member logs into a standard workstation. He fills out the reports that include what was conducted operationally, as well as asset discrepancies found during the operation and actions already taken to correct them. Certain operating statistics are important to preventative maintenance schedules. Relevant statistics, such as operating hours, are automatically sent to CG-LIMS though an interface when the post-operations report is submitted in EAL. EAL is not the sole source of asset operating statistics, but will be the source for some. Any asset with maintenance due according to an operating statistic, such as cycles, hours, starts, landings, etc., will have its own business rules regulating how that information is collected. In many cases, such as this one, the time operating the asset is a critical statistic logged into EAL during the routine post-operation report and serves to update that tracked parameter in CG-LIMS. EAL will remain the initial IT interface for the crew member logging the post operational information. Currently, EAL has a tab known as the “pink sheet,” where discrepancies worthy of maintenance action are recorded. The EAL “pink sheet” will be replaced with the CG- LIMS user interface, which will capture all the necessary information to create corrective maintenance work orders. The fields required to Version 1.0 30
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 create a corrective maintenance work order will be consistent and standard across the enterprise. From an enterprise perspective, users will be able to arrive at the CG-LIMS module for entering this information by either opening CG-LIMS directly or following the post operations process through EAL. In the current scenario, the crew member arrives at the CG-LIMS module to enter asset discrepancies by clicking the appropriate link in EAL, which has replaced the “pink sheet,” effectively following the same post operation logging process as before CG-LIMS was implemented. EAL will require a technical solution to seamlessly integrate the CG-LIMS interface for capturing this asset discrepancy information. Once logged, the maintenance to address the discrepancies will be managed through completion in CG-LIMS. The interface between CG-LIMS and EAL will continue to inform operational personnel on the status of maintenance as it relates to individual assets. 3.1.3 Project Management Integration The IT architecture for Mission Support will include standard use of project management tools outside of CG-LIMS. To support the project management functionality needed to coordinate long term maintenance projects and availabilities, CG-LIMS must interface with external systems in such a way that the status of individual configuration, maintenance, and supply activities is transparent and can be coordinated with a master schedule. CG-LIMS will not be the tool by which large depot maintenance projects are managed. It will be the source of record for documented configuration changes and maintenance requirements. It will maintain record of all maintenance completed so that costs are tracked and trends can be identified. But it will not coordinate contract management and multiple activities the way a project management tool can. CG-LIMS will provide the equivalent of a Maintenance Due List for any given asset (including corrective maintenance), any executed maintenance must be recorded in CG-LIMS, and CG-LIMS must account for any change to an asset’s approved or actual configuration; but it is not intended to take the place of a full project management tool. CG-LIMS will manage unit level schedules once a unit is actually tasked with executing maintenance. CG-LIMS will automatically task units with O-level maintenance as it comes due, because individual units are by definition responsible with executing that maintenance. D-level maintenance will make it onto the CG-LIMS schedule with a responsible party once scheduled by the PLM. Sometimes this means it will reside on a project management plan before being scheduled in CG-LIMS. CG-LIMS will track any deferral of maintenance, including D-level maintenance items, and notify personnel when maintenance is due in, due, and overdue, but it won’t manage any heavy duty Version 1.0 31
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 project planning that is better suited for software specifically designed for that purpose. 3.1.4 Configuration Management While configuration status accounting will be affected by maintenance actions as noted above (where a component was removed from an asset and a different component was installed), allowable (or directed) changes in asset configuration and a capability to audit physical configuration against documented configuration will also be managed in CG-LIMS. 3.1.4.1 Configuration Changes The manufacturer of a communications system (installed on multiple USCG assets) identifies a problem that could lead to injury to the operator. The manufacturer distributes a service bulletin to the Coast Guard system manager. The system manager logs the service bulletin into CG-LIMS as an Engineering Change Proposal (ECP). He uses CG-LIMS to identify all instances of the specific model of communications systems and checks to see if there are problems previously reported associated with this configuration item. There are none reported. The system manager assigns a technical expert to evaluate the service bulletin. Because the required change has safety implications, it becomes a high priority and supersedes all lower priority work for the system manager and technical expert. The technical expert validates the technical merits of the service bulletin and that the service bulletin can be implemented by O-level maintenance, in accordance with the LORA documented in CG-LIMS. The system manager uses CG-LIMS to complete the ECP, including identification of all configuration items that will be impacted by the change and all documentation that will be updated. Identification of the cost of the change is supported by CG-LIMS, including one-time materials and labor, documentation updates, and changes to operations and maintenance costs. CG-LIMS provides guidance to the system manager in populating the data fields and enforces completeness. The ECP, including the service bulletin and technical analysis, is routed to the CCB for approval, within a workflow in CG-LIMS. The CCB is presented with a summary of all information required to make their decision. Background material, associated drawings, maintenance procedures, and operating manuals are available through CG-LIMS for the CCB’s decision-making needs. Version 1.0 32
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 The CCB identifies two potential issues: • Conflict with the Interface Control Document (ICD) between the communications system and the data network. The ICD is reviewed through CG-LIMS and determined to not require change. • Weight and moment. The change is less than the threshold for cutters, but exceeds the threshold for one class of aircraft, the MH-65. The system CCB approves the ECP through CG-LIMS. For assets other than the MH-65, the approved ECP, along with the service bulletin showing the modification procedures, is used to authorize asset configuration changes within the system and create scheduled maintenance actions in CG-LIMS. Due to funding constraints, the PLMs defer lower priority maintenance (without violating periodicity) in CG-LIMS in order to fund this change. For the MH-65, the system-level approved ECP is routed to the aircraft CCB for platform level impact evaluation prior to configuration change authorization and entry as a required maintenance action. The units complete the change as ordered. When the maintenance is documented in CG-LIMS, the asset configuration is automatically updated. CG-LIMS maintains the history of configuration for the life of the asset. 3.1.4.2 Configuration Audit A logistics center audit coordinator uses CG-LIMS to develop a schedule of audits to ensure that each unit’s configuration is audited annually. He tasks a team of auditors to visit the operating unit. The on-site auditors use CG-LIMS to create an audit package. CG-LIMS has determined that 25 items need to be audited to ensure the spot-check meets a 95% accuracy confidence interval. Additionally, three configuration changes have been implemented since the last audit and need to be verified. The auditors use the audit package to verify the 28 configuration items exist, characteristics and serial numbers match, and that they are installed as shown in the technical documentation. The audit package notes that there were three approved waivers and two known deviations during the previous audit. The auditors verify the deviations have been corrected and recorded in CG-LIMS. One unauthorized change is identified in the audit, which triggers an audit of 20 additional items. According to the business rules, any more unauthorized changes would indicate a systematic failure in Version 1.0 33
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 configuration control and lead to a 100% configuration audit. There are no other unauthorized changes identified by the auditors. The costs of the unauthorized change, and the estimated costs to reverse the change, are documented by the auditors in CG-LIMS. Through CG-LIMS, an auditor uses a checklist to verify that each of the unit’s assets have a CM plan, documented ORDs, requirements traceability matrices, interface control documents, functional configuration audits, and physical configuration audits recorded in their baseline. In this case they are all correctly documented, approved, and available through CG-LIMS. The results of the audit are recorded in CG-LIMS for each individual asset, unit, product line and center of excellence. Data accuracy system-wide is verified to be greater than the 95% target. CG-LIMS shows that two product lines have consistently low data accuracy (below 80%). Performance intervention is recommended. 3.2 System Support Scenarios 3.2.1 Readying the Production Environment 3.2.1.1 System Installation, Configuration and Integration - Host Site Infrastructure The system’s hardware and software will be installed and configured on servers and other devices managed by the C4IT SC. In order to ready the production environment, staging of hardware and software configuration will occur in the development and testing environments first, and then migrate to the production environment. The typical path is to initiate builds in the development environment to establish a “working version” before base-lining a configuration and rebuilding it in the OT&E for testing, evaluation and documentation refinement. Assuming successful OT&E, the image is migrated to the production environment for a limited initial release. CG-LIMS will also maintain a “production-ready” disaster recovery environment which will be hosted at a location physically separated from the production environment (refer to Section 3.2.3). Hardware and software will be configured and installed during the acquisition. C4IT SC personnel will provide necessary support, including providing access to the hosting site and provisioning data floor rack space for hardware, temporary storage and staging of equipment before installation on the data floor, and cabling, ensuring adequate network connectivity, assigning IP addresses, and providing data floor escorts. During the installation and configuration period, Version 1.0 34
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 SSA personnel must work alongside the SDA to ensure that system support responsibility can transition effectively according to the acquisition schedule and support strategy. CG-LIMS integration architecture will initially be configured by the SDA to connect CG-LIMS to other systems inside and outside the Coast Guard. Integration may include point-to-point and publish and subscribe connections and, to the greatest extent possible, satisfy integration via a message-based, document-driven, asynchronous, services oriented approach using the Enterprise Service Bus established at the OSC as the conduit by which messages are delivered and received. 3.2.1.2 System Installation, Configuration and Integration – Distributed Environment A standard distributed environment to be used by units in a disconnected mode of operation (see Section 2.4.4) must also be delivered during the acquisition. The capability will need to be delivered with a repeatable process for implementation at units post-acquisition. Hardware preparation, software installation, and configuration and integration points will be established. Initial data loads and unit, functional, system and integration testing will occur before delivery to the end using unit for acceptance testing. 3.2.2 Sustainment Normal support for CG-LIMS will follow standard policies at the central hosting site and Disaster Recovery (DR) site. See Section 2.5 for a description of normal system support, which includes full life cycle support for servers, applications, and databases. Enterprise IT infrastructure required to carry information to and from central severs and distributed network locations will be maintained by the C4IT SC as a course of business outside the scope of CG-LIMS. IT components specific to CG-LIMS will follow O-level and D-level maintenance plans according to the standard Coast Guard business model. The system staff at each hosting site will maintain equipment, troubleshoot software issues, and implement approved upgrades. A help desk will be established to answer user concerns from the field. At distributed sites, any O-level maintenance will be conducted by unit personnel and D-level maintenance will be coordinated through the Product Line Manager, making use of support units across the enterprise. Version 1.0 35
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 3.2.3 When Disaster Happens A DR infrastructure will be required to meet availability requirements and will be physically established and configured at a site separate from the central hosting site. CG-LIMS is classified as a Gold-level DR system which indicates in the event of a DR occurrence, the system will be capable of switching over to a DR infrastructure in 24 hours or less. The Disaster Recovery infrastructure is equally capable of supporting the same usage patterns as handled at the primary host site. The DR site configuration is a mirror image of the primary host and it receives near real-time synchronization of data to ensure rapid failover should a disaster event occur. A possible disaster recovery scenario may play out as follows: The central hosting site loses power in a community wide blackout. Backup generators engage and essential power is restored to the data center data floor and other areas of the facility’s buildings to ensure the safety of the workers inside and continuity of operations on the data floor. The CG-LIMS Damage Assessment Team evaluates the system’s current state and reports that the system is currently operational. After talking to the power company, the site Disaster Recovery Coordinator is concerned that the power outage could continue for a significant amount of time. To avoid dependence on auxiliary power, she obtains authorization for Gold-level systems to fail over to DR. The CG-LIMS Disaster Recovery Team then executes its DR Plan. Personnel at the DR site prepare for the switch, and users are notified of a brief disruption in service. Coast Guard Telecommunications and Information Systems Command (TISCOM) switches over the system’s IP addresses in the Domain Name Server (DNS) to activate the infrastructure at the DR site. CG-LIMS is shutdown at the central hosting site, and then the DNS switch is made by TISCOM. A second notice is delivered to the user community to let them know they can now expect availability again. DR service stays in place until the DR event has been investigated and no longer poses a risk. At that point restoration of service at the primary host site can occur and can be carried out according to the DR fall back plan. Version 1.0 36
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 4 Functional Capabilities 4.1 Mission Support Operations Mission Support operates its infrastructure to deliver a comprehensive set of services to support operators performing Coast Guard missions. CG-LIMS will provide the automated IT platform through which Coast Guard Mission Support organizations will perform their jobs. The following functional capabilities will be directly provided by CG-LIMS for mission support. 4.1.1 Configuration Management CG-LIMS will provide accountability for the systems engineering data and asset configuration required to generate practical maintenance and provisioning to support Coast Guard missions. Engineering elements use this information to provide key technical input to both support planning, as well as any process improvement efforts needed to address performance problems. CG-LIMS will be the record of authority for the engineering data maintained by the Coast Guard for any given asset. It will associate the engineering data with asset configuration items and items in inventory and provide input for performing maintenance planning analyses. CG-LIMS will provide the ability to propose and enact configuration changes for any given asset or product line, including managing the workflow through the lifecycle of the change from proposal to the maintenance action completing the change. CG-LIMS will provide support for configuration audits and maintain the history of asset configuration and discrepancies, providing traceability between any given configuration and the functional baseline for the asset. 4.1.2 Maintenance Management CG-LIMS will provide the capability required to sustain all assets, ensuring that they are available when needed to perform Coast Guard missions, based on required operational availability. This includes the detailed procedures, tool requirements, and technical documentation needed to perform the work, as well as planning, scheduling, execution, monitoring and control functions for the maintenance activities themselves. 4.1.3 Supply Chain Management CG-LIMS will provide the supply chain management services required to guarantee that maintenance parts, equipment, and all operational supplies are available when needed to support both operations and the mission support Version 1.0 37
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 infrastructure itself. These services include: demand planning; inventory management; warehouse management; transportation management; discrepancy reporting (i.e. supply, transportation, and quality); and metrics in accordance with the Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) model. 4.1.4 Technical Information Management CG-LIMS will provide the repository for architectures, policies, practices and procedures that properly manage the full data lifecycle needs of the Coast Guard’s mission support enterprise. This includes baseline, engineering, and configuration data, technical manuals, drawings, publications, and documented maintenance procedures. 4.1.5 Analysis and Reporting CG-LIMS will provide an analysis and reporting functionality. Users will be able to query stored data to establish trends and look for conclusions to events. Based on analysis, management decisions will be able to be made to set performance thresholds and deliver metrics deemed valuable by the organization. Standard and ad hoc reports will be available to provide a holistic view of the Coast Guard’s asset base and operational costs, enabling decision makers to control and optimize mission support operations for quality and efficiency. 4.1.6 Interfaces CG-LIMS will provide integration with operations, workforce, financial, procurement, and property management systems, so that information sharing is automated in a way that eliminates dual entry of information and clearly delineates records of authority. The technical documentation functionality of CG-LIMS has the potential to serve all communities of the Coast Guard, maintaining authoritative documents in digital format. 4.1.6.1 Operations Management Systems CG-LIMS will provide asset availability data so that operations managers can evaluate the availability of assets, due to scheduled and unscheduled maintenance, repair, and overhaul. Operations systems will provide asset usage data to CG-LIMS, such as operating hours and change of location. 4.1.6.2 Workforce Management Systems CG-LIMS will maintain and provide a history of maintenance performed by any individual, allowing workforce managers to analyze specific skill sets. The workforce management system will provide to Version 1.0 38
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 CG-LIMS the authoritative status of personnel and to what unit and organizational role they are assigned. It will also provide personnel cost data to enable CG-LIMS to package real-time maintenance job costing information. 4.1.6.3 Financial Management Systems To adequately measure financial performance, provide transparency to our financial history and obligations, and execute effective budgeting and financial planning, CG-LIMS will track at the transaction level purchases, expenditures, asset movements, asset changes, and job costing. Transaction level financial data will be provided to the core accounting system for reconciliation, organizational analysis, and accountability. 4.1.6.4 Procurement Management Systems CG-LIMS will feed the enterprise procurement system by providing a demand signal and mandatory allowances. CG-LIMS supply chain functionality will drive the need to replenish supplies, which will eventually kick off new procurement activities as inventory levels fall below re-stocking levels managed by CG-LIMS business rules. CG- LIMS will need to provide adequate information to the procurement system for the purchase and then account for the financial information upon receipt. 4.1.6.5 Property Management If CG-LIMS does not maintain the record of authority for tangible personal property and real property for the Coast Guard, it will need to interface with the system of record. DHS has indicated their enterprise property management system may be a required system to which agencies must report. These functionality and interface requirements will be determined by future enterprise property management policy. Version 1.0 39
  • CG-LIMS Concept of Operations CG-442 5 CONOPS Development Team This CONOPS has been developed and approved by the CG-LIMS Operational Requirements Document (ORD) Integrated Product Team (IPT), a multidisciplinary team with empowered members representing the offices indicated in Table 5-1. Table 5-1: CONOPS Development Team Office Role Primary Alternate ALC Aviation Logistics Center (ALC) Paul Herold LCDR Robert Taylor LCDR Nathaniel APO Asset Project Office (APO) – Assistant IPT Chair Williams Joe Colvin C4IT SC C4IT Service Center (C4IT SC) LCDR Joe Healy LT Richard Vincent OSC System Support Agent (SSA) Dave Seal Ken Molenda FINCEN Finance Center Janet Price FORCECOM FORCECOM LT Marc Warren SFLC Surface Forces Logistics Center (SFLC) Mitch Ekstrom Jim Lane SILC Shore Infrastructure Logistics Center (SILC) Bob Phillips CDR Ben Davis LANTAREA(A- OCIT) OPCOM (OC-7) LT Shawn Lansing LCDR Derek Schade CG-1B3 HR Strategy and Capability Development CDR Matt Smith LT Scott Rooke CG-113 Safety and Environmental Health Leslie Holland Advanced Distributed Learning (Training & FC-51 WP&D) LCDR Aaron Waters LT Andy Campbell CG-41 Aeronautical Engineering, MRS (HC-144A) LCDR Craig Massello CDR John Hollingsworth CG-43 Civil Engineering CDR Ben Davis Bob Phillips CG-431 Real Property Terri Peasley Jennifer Stomber CG-441 Mobile Assets Henry Herzberg Art Walz CG-442 IPT Chair - Requirements Lead (Log Sys Div) Jim Sylvester CG-444 Configuration Management Chris Boyle CG-45 Naval Engineering CDR Brian Ellis CG-47 Environmental Management Martin Nguyen Ed Wandelt CG-6B Enterprise Architecture Bob McKee CDR Joe Sundland Records, Mail, Forms, Printing, Privacy CG-61 Management James Roppel Various CG-632 CG-LIMS Asset Manager Jon Shurtleff Bob Bannon CG-634 HR Information Systems (Interfaces) Lynnae Tyler CG-771 DCO CDR Brendan Kelly CG-832 Energy Phyllis Stange Lawrence Plomann (CG- CG-84 Financial Policy and Systems Russ Thompson 633) CG-842 Personal Property Kristin Devendorf Lynn Brown CG-85 Financial Transformation & Compliance Robert Hart CG-913 Procurement Policy and Oversight Mark Hopkins CG-924 Office of Acquisition Support Brian Shorb James Ledbetter Office of Research, Development, Test & CG-926 Evaluation Wayne Cavey Mike Wetzl CG-9334 CG-LIMS Acquisition Project Manager (PM) CDR Dan Taylor Lisa Thomson Version 1.0 40