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Creative writing workshop rules and guidelines spring 2011
 

Creative writing workshop rules and guidelines spring 2011

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An introduction to the creative writing workshop experience for a course at Brophy Prep in Phoenix, AZ, USA.

An introduction to the creative writing workshop experience for a course at Brophy Prep in Phoenix, AZ, USA.

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    Creative writing workshop rules and guidelines spring 2011 Creative writing workshop rules and guidelines spring 2011 Presentation Transcript

    • Introduction to Creative Writing Brophy College Preparatory
    • Writers HEART Readers
      • A Story---or any other literary work that presumes to call itself art—is an act of communication between the writer and the reader. Anyone can express himself or herself, but what writers and poets want to do more than simply express themselves, is to communicate…The need is always to translate one’s thoughts and deepest concerns into a form—fictional or poetic—in the hope that a reader will always understand and experience those same feelings and concerns. –Raymond Carver
      • Before your workshop, post your work (Blackboard Discussion Board) along with THREE questions for your workshop mates to consider while reading
      • Read an excerpt out loud . Depending on time, you’ll like choose an interesting or troubling section.
      • After reading it, the writer should then be silent and take notes in his Writer’s Notebook. Be a diligent recorder of what you hear people say about your draft.
      • Be open to all comments . As the group responds to the writing, please remind yourself that the writing is being discussed, not the writer.
      • Read the piece actively before class begins. Download the piece from Blackboard and use inking and/or the MS Word “comments” feature.
        • TWO margin comments per page minimum
        • Answers to Writer’s 3 Questions
      • Begin the workshop with an overview of the piece using the PQP method: your impressions, insights, heat. What’s alive in this piece? Memorable image?
      • Then provide useful feedback followed by specific details. Refer to the specific moments in the text where a line, image, metaphor, structural component, etc. was very effective or ineffective. How so?
      • Suggest the need to expand, free write, start over, rethink words or ideas. Suggest research topics, or a published writer that writes similar themes. Offer directions where the piece could start or finish.
      • At Workshop end, you will place the Word file you annotated into the Webfile folder for that student
    • What is Active Reading?
    • During the Workshop…
      • Writer is Dead (taking notes)
      • Previously workshopped student will lead next workshop
      • You must make TWO substantive comments (0-6 pt. scale) during each class Workshop
      • [that’s 6 x 20 = 120 points possible]
      • Remember Burroway: Participants should move beyond “I like”
        • Is there a drama in this situation?
        • I’m wondering what this word suggests.
        • This reminds me of…
        • It’s like…
        • I think this character wants/needs/desires…
        • What if…?
        • The rhythm is…
        • Could this be expanded to become…?
        • Is the conflict between…or…?
        • Does this connect with/to…?
        • The atmosphere seems…
        • The voice appears to be …
    • KEY WORDS FOR WORKSHOP TO SOUND SMART…
      • DICTION IMAGERY
      • SETTING
      • DIALOGUE
      • TONE
      • MOOD
      • CLIMAX
      • EXPOSITION
      • DRAMATIC ARC
      • TENSION / CRISIS
      • In media res
      • Deus ex machina
      • VOICE POINT-of-VIEW (POV)
      • CONSISTENCY RELATABILITY BELIEVABILITY
      • FLASHBACK/BACKSTORY
      • CHARACTERIZATION (development)
      • CHARACTERS’ MOTIVATION
      • SUMMARY vs. SCENE
      • SENSORY DETAIL
    • Schedule of all-group workshop – Spring 11
      • Sean Bassett
      • Nikhar Abbas
      • Christopher Perkins
      • Marc Hubble
      • Jamar Kelley
      • Skylar Kaye
      • Robert March
      • Matthew Pohlman
      • William DuVal
      • Cyrus Afkhami
      • Peter Johnson
      • Jordan Minnifield
      • Samuel Smith
      • Ramon Fonseca
      • Joseph Maggi
      • Rodrigo Furtado
      • James Blaha
      • Eric Small
      • Christopher Erdely
      • Frederick Rowe
      • Carter Radcliffe
        • Pink : What works in the piece. Why?
        • Purple: Ideas
          • Presents/needs fresh, original idea. Focuses/needs on feeling or experience. Uses/needs concrete images.
        • Red: Conventions
          • Grammar, spelling, punctuation, formatting, etc.
        • Green: Diction (Word Choice + Syntax)
          • Creates vivid images of concrete things; provides a consistent set of metaphors and figurative language; avoids abstractions in favor of specificity
        • Blue: Organization and Flow
          • Transitional words, phrases, scenes; Sequencing is logical; Appropriate sentence, paragraph, and section breaks
        • Remember: useful feedback requires specific details.