ETI 2011_St Paul's HS
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ETI 2011_St Paul's HS

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Presentation by Senior Leadership Team of St Paul's High School Bessbrook, to ETI Conference, La Mon House, 22 February 2011.

Presentation by Senior Leadership Team of St Paul's High School Bessbrook, to ETI Conference, La Mon House, 22 February 2011.

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  • Good morning, and thank you. I am delighted to have the opportuin\n
  • I’d like to speak about ICT has been used effectively in St Paul’s as a tool for management, as well as a vehicle for innovation throughout our wide curriculum, and finally how continuous and up-to-date staff development in ICT is ensuring that opportunities for high quality learning and teaching are fostered and cultivated within St Paul’s.\n
  • If I could first place the recent developments in ICT in St Paul’s within a context it would start with this document. Circular 2007/24 was issued by the Department towards the end of 2007, and it provided statutory guidance and a framework for how ICT should be used effectively in schools. It also, helpfully, provided a case study of a school where this practice was already embedded. The school was St Columb’s College in Derry, and Siobhán and I had the pleasure in visiting St Columb’s for their Best Practice Event where we joined other colleagues in seeing how effectively they had embedded ICT in their school management, how it was effecting change in their varied curriculum, and how ICT as a tool for innovation was a driving force for School Improvement. Circular 2007/24 also recommended that school’s embark upon a journey of Self-Review and Evaluation of how ICT was being used in schools, by adopting the late, lamented BECTA Self Review Framework. This gave me, personally, an opportunity to embark on a whole-school initiative and to lead the school’s review of our ICT strategy and begin to shape how the change that we aspired to could be realised.Our journey through SRF and our successful application to be a BECTA ICT Award school (click) \n
  • If I could first place the recent developments in ICT in St Paul’s within a context it would start with this document. Circular 2007/24 was issued by the Department towards the end of 2007, and it provided statutory guidance and a framework for how ICT should be used effectively in schools. It also, helpfully, provided a case study of a school where this practice was already embedded. The school was St Columb’s College in Derry, and Siobhán and I had the pleasure in visiting St Columb’s for their Best Practice Event where we joined other colleagues in seeing how effectively they had embedded ICT in their school management, how it was effecting change in their varied curriculum, and how ICT as a tool for innovation was a driving force for School Improvement. Circular 2007/24 also recommended that school’s embark upon a journey of Self-Review and Evaluation of how ICT was being used in schools, by adopting the late, lamented BECTA Self Review Framework. This gave me, personally, an opportunity to embark on a whole-school initiative and to lead the school’s review of our ICT strategy and begin to shape how the change that we aspired to could be realised.Our journey through SRF and our successful application to be a BECTA ICT Award school (click) has led to a renewed vision of why ICT can be a catalyst for change in our schools and has allowed us to put in place robust structures that support this vision and constantly react and change to meet the diverse technological and pedagogical needs of our students. (click)\n
  • The vision I refer to is displayed behind me, and it is a result of consultation and debate with staff and students on our strategy for developing ICT in the future. We are a school in where ICT is ubiquitous and on-demand. Our students, and staff, have high expectations of the ICT service we provide, and this has led to responsibility on the school leadership to ensure that we are properly resourced in equipment, in training, and in professional support available on-demand.\n\nYou will have heard my colleagues refer to the very large staff employed by St Paul’s and the size of our campus, which currently stretches to over seven acres. It might be appropriate to discuss briefly how we have ensured ICT is embedded within the fabric of the St Paul’s and how our large and wide-spread staff have continuous access to a high quality ICT service.Our new building and extensive refurbishment which began in 2002 ultimately ensured that we were working in facilities which would allow for ICT to be most effectively used. All learning and teaching areas are equipped as standard with PC access, and with a digital projector and IWB. This is the basic package that a new member of staff to St Paul’s would be exposed to. In 2008, when C2k issued new laptops to each school, we decided to take the opportunity to equip departments who had a strong ICT demand with cluster suites, rather than issue laptops to staff members. We already had in a place a laptop-loan programme which was working effectively, and post holders in St Paul’s are issued with laptop access where there is a need to fulfill the requirements of their management tasks. In recent years, we have invested heavily in developing an Apple Mac network which runs contiguously with our C2k network and has allowed for greater flexibility with regards to innovation in Art & Design, Music and Languages.We have also invested heavily in our wireless network. Our school has virtually 100% Wi-Fi access, and this was an exciting and challenging direction which allowed for innovation (our netbook programme - more about that later) and ubiquitous access (students can work on their laptops, at their desks, whenever, wherever) to be realised.This is just a flavour of how well resourced we have. It didn’t happen overnight, and it certainly didn’t happen without significant investment from our own budget. While we rely heavily on C2k for our infrastructure - we are proud of our reputation as a leading school where we are constantly challenging our staff and students on what is accepted as ‘effective use of ICT’ and constantly upping our game to future-proof St Paul’s and to ensure that we continue to lead and to develop excellence. \n
  • Can I turn now and focus on some practical examples of how we are using ICT as a catalyst for change within St Paul’s.\n\nFirst I’d like to talk to you about how ICT as a tool for management is making a difference in our day to day work.\n
  • You can see from the slide behind me how SIMS.net is a powerful tool for management. We use all of the available modules and our staff, both teaching and non-teaching, receive regular training how SIMS can be exploited effectively.I’d like to focus on one of the modules which we use daily, and which has proved to be a huge success in assisting our pastoral team in monitoring and managing behaviour and achievement\n
  • You can see from the slide behind me how SIMS.net is a powerful tool for management. We use all of the available modules and our staff, both teaching and non-teaching, receive regular training how SIMS can be exploited effectively.I’d like to focus on one of the modules which we use daily, and which has proved to be a huge success in assisting our pastoral team in monitoring and managing behaviour and achievement\n
  • You can see from the slide behind me how SIMS.net is a powerful tool for management. We use all of the available modules and our staff, both teaching and non-teaching, receive regular training how SIMS can be exploited effectively.I’d like to focus on one of the modules which we use daily, and which has proved to be a huge success in assisting our pastoral team in monitoring and managing behaviour and achievement\n
  • You can see from the slide behind me how SIMS.net is a powerful tool for management. We use all of the available modules and our staff, both teaching and non-teaching, receive regular training how SIMS can be exploited effectively.I’d like to focus on one of the modules which we use daily, and which has proved to be a huge success in assisting our pastoral team in monitoring and managing behaviour and achievement\n
  • You can see from the slide behind me how SIMS.net is a powerful tool for management. We use all of the available modules and our staff, both teaching and non-teaching, receive regular training how SIMS can be exploited effectively.I’d like to focus on one of the modules which we use daily, and which has proved to be a huge success in assisting our pastoral team in monitoring and managing behaviour and achievement\n
  • You can see from the slide behind me how SIMS.net is a powerful tool for management. We use all of the available modules and our staff, both teaching and non-teaching, receive regular training how SIMS can be exploited effectively.I’d like to focus on one of the modules which we use daily, and which has proved to be a huge success in assisting our pastoral team in monitoring and managing behaviour and achievement\n
  • You can see from the slide behind me how SIMS.net is a powerful tool for management. We use all of the available modules and our staff, both teaching and non-teaching, receive regular training how SIMS can be exploited effectively.I’d like to focus on one of the modules which we use daily, and which has proved to be a huge success in assisting our pastoral team in monitoring and managing behaviour and achievement\n
  • You can see from the slide behind me how SIMS.net is a powerful tool for management. We use all of the available modules and our staff, both teaching and non-teaching, receive regular training how SIMS can be exploited effectively.I’d like to focus on one of the modules which we use daily, and which has proved to be a huge success in assisting our pastoral team in monitoring and managing behaviour and achievement\n
  • Staff now have access to a variety of data which provides a profile of a student and their assessment records, timetable, attendance profile and how well they’re behaving, or not if the case may be in class.This data and its easy updating facilitates a rapid reaction from form teachers and Year Heads. They now can deal with indiscretions and incidences of missed homework and poor behaviour immediately. Plus this system functions as a permanent record of how a student is progressing. At Parent Teacher Meetings or individual consultations between form teachers, Year Heads or the SLT with parents our staff have access to this data at their fingertips. It is not uncommon at PTMs in St Paul’s to see staff with laptops on their desks using this data to inform the discussion, and we’re working with SIMS.net and C2k to develop secure remote access to this data from home for approved users, and to allow for its access on mobile devices, improving the utilisation of the information and making it available wherever and whenever.\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • Improving communication has been another key area for development and one where ICT has been to the forefront.\n\nMy first management allowance at St Paul’s was for the provision of a daily staff bulletin, detailing events and happenings in the school, and providing a list of notices and announcements which form teachers would relay to students during the 10-minute Registration period. Before our redevelopment and extension, this duty meant that I word processed a document, and had it hand delivered around the large school campus each morning. Hardly ground breaking stuff.\n\nOur school bulletin, Cumarsáid, is now delivered each morning to staff desktops when they login initially.\n\nOur online platforms are another area of strength. Our school website is managed by one of our ICT Support Staff and is updated daily, sometimes hourly, with news, photos and information about our school. We have successfully connected our website to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, giving St Paul’s a new platform to promote our school, and utilising very effectively (and for free!) the new technologies that our students, and increasingly our parents and community use all the time.\n\nRecently, we were forced to close the school due to bad weather. The decision was made very late on the Sunday night, and within minutes an alert had been posted on the school website, which triggered a ‘tweet’ to all our Twitter followers, which automatically updated the school’s Facebook page. All done in seconds – all done for free! We haven’t bought into the text-to-parent messaging system yet, because our in-house ‘self-designed’ system seems to work well for us. Incidentally, I know it is a successful system – as no-one turned up for school the next morning!\n\nThe centralised school diary has allowed us to ensure that school resources are managed properly and led to a more orderly school calendar and timetable. Staff now register their ‘event’ or ‘trip’ with the one of the school’s admin staff, who ensures the calendar on SIMS.net is up to date. Where necessary, this can also be duplicated on to the school’s parents’ calendar, published on the website homepage. Parents who ‘subscribe’ to our Google calendar using an online calendar service or a smartphone, will have the updated or new event automatically pushed to their device.\n\n
  • \n
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  • Can I now talk about ICT as a tool for curriculum innovation. Unless we are using this tool to improve the quality of learning and teaching in our classrooms, and empowering our staff to utilise ICT to this highest level, then we are wasting our time.\n\nOur over-riding priority as we developed our ICT strategy was to ensure that staff were aware of the effectiveness of ICT in the classroom, and beyond, and how it could be used to enhance and enrich learning opportunities. The implementation of the RC allowed us to move at speed with this plan, and staff are constantly being exposed to new digital tools and new ways of delivering content and skills through the utilisation of ICT.\n\nAgain, our new building allowed a lot of this to happen organically. We are a very well-resourced school, and our staff are not allowed to use the excuse that they don’t have the equipment available to innovate or to exploit the potential of ICT. Staff who want to use podcasting in their classroom, or make a movie, or build a website - can have the equipment delivered to their room, have bespoke training provided and have an ICT Support professional in the room with them to assist and help with lesson. Nothing is impossible! Those are our watchwords. \n\nTo allow for this high level support and assistance we have invested heavily in ICT Support. Currently we have team of five professionals, led by the ICT Support Manager who provide technical assistance to our staff and students. From fixing a broken printer, to updating our website, to making HD movies, podcasts, websites and more - our technicians provide ‘at elbow’ support to all staff on-demand. Staff have the choice of upskilling and learning how to use these digital tools to enhance their teaching and the learning opportunities provided to our students, or they can choose to spend their time creating and cultivating an idea, speaking to one of our professionals who will go away, build on the idea, come back and present to the teacher, who can accept or adapt, and then assist in the delivery in the classroom.\n\nThis model works very effectively with online learning. We embarked three years ago on our own VLE ... which we called Oscail 24/7 - define. As with most projects in St Paul’s it was an organic growth. It was something that I was very interested in personally, and I could see the benefits to augmenting face-to-face lessons with high quality learning experiences which could be accessible to my students outside of the classroom. My participation and graduation from RTU’s OLTE programme in 2009, along with a number of other colleagues, gave us an appropriate grounding in how online learning can be delivered effectively - and moved us away from the simple concept of dumping all our slideshows, and notes online - to challenging us to provide a different learning experience online. SLT identified this as effective practice and a cohort of our A Level students are having different elements of their A Level courses in Irish, Drama, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and Biology delivered online, with a reduction in face-to-face teaching time, compensated with high quality online learning experiences. I mention this in detail, as staff were challenged by this development and needed reassurance and an effective support system. Rather than train all our staff in the intricacies of creating an online course, and enrolling students, maintaining their course, uploading files etc, our vision was to invest in ICT Support who could provide this ‘mundane’ side of things effectively, and free up staff to ‘create’, and ‘think’, and ‘enrich’ their lessons. Staff now spend time crafting an online lesson, which is then uploaded to their course by one of our technicians who maintains the course in liaison with the teacher. We had seen, too often, that staff would become burdened down and disheartened by complex online systems which obstructed the effective deployment of online learning and created barriers for growth. Our ICT Support model is now facilitating the opposite of this and is flourishing.\n\nProvision for online learning was enhanced with our Post 16 Netbook Programme. In the last three years we invested in nearly 400 netbook laptops which we issue to our Year 13 and 14 students, when they return in September. The netbooks can access our WiFi network throughout the school, and the students can take the netbook home in the evening. This initiative was recognised by BECTA as a significant factor in reducing the digital divide between the better off and the less well off in our school community and facilitating equality of access to all. This initiative which grew from a pastoral need, i.e. students were underusing our Study facilities as they searched the school for ICT access, a demand that we as teachers were increasing placing on them, as become a huge success - and has led to strange developments such as Siobhan, an ICT teacher, teaching her A Level ICT class in a Spanish classroom, with the students continuing their course using their netbooks. ECDL is delivered to students in Post 16 who don’t possess an ICT qualification and is not taught in an ICT suite. Our students at Post 16 can access ICT and our online networks anywhere in the school and at home - 24/7.\n\n
  • Can I now talk about ICT as a tool for curriculum innovation. Unless we are using this tool to improve the quality of learning and teaching in our classrooms, and empowering our staff to utilise ICT to this highest level, then we are wasting our time.\n\nOur over-riding priority as we developed our ICT strategy was to ensure that staff were aware of the effectiveness of ICT in the classroom, and beyond, and how it could be used to enhance and enrich learning opportunities. The implementation of the RC allowed us to move at speed with this plan, and staff are constantly being exposed to new digital tools and new ways of delivering content and skills through the utilisation of ICT.\n\nAgain, our new building allowed a lot of this to happen organically. We are a very well-resourced school, and our staff are not allowed to use the excuse that they don’t have the equipment available to innovate or to exploit the potential of ICT. Staff who want to use podcasting in their classroom, or make a movie, or build a website - can have the equipment delivered to their room, have bespoke training provided and have an ICT Support professional in the room with them to assist and help with lesson. Nothing is impossible! Those are our watchwords. \n\nTo allow for this high level support and assistance we have invested heavily in ICT Support. Currently we have team of five professionals, led by the ICT Support Manager who provide technical assistance to our staff and students. From fixing a broken printer, to updating our website, to making HD movies, podcasts, websites and more - our technicians provide ‘at elbow’ support to all staff on-demand. Staff have the choice of upskilling and learning how to use these digital tools to enhance their teaching and the learning opportunities provided to our students, or they can choose to spend their time creating and cultivating an idea, speaking to one of our professionals who will go away, build on the idea, come back and present to the teacher, who can accept or adapt, and then assist in the delivery in the classroom.\n\nThis model works very effectively with online learning. We embarked three years ago on our own VLE ... which we called Oscail 24/7 - define. As with most projects in St Paul’s it was an organic growth. It was something that I was very interested in personally, and I could see the benefits to augmenting face-to-face lessons with high quality learning experiences which could be accessible to my students outside of the classroom. My participation and graduation from RTU’s OLTE programme in 2009, along with a number of other colleagues, gave us an appropriate grounding in how online learning can be delivered effectively - and moved us away from the simple concept of dumping all our slideshows, and notes online - to challenging us to provide a different learning experience online. SLT identified this as effective practice and a cohort of our A Level students are having different elements of their A Level courses in Irish, Drama, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and Biology delivered online, with a reduction in face-to-face teaching time, compensated with high quality online learning experiences. I mention this in detail, as staff were challenged by this development and needed reassurance and an effective support system. Rather than train all our staff in the intricacies of creating an online course, and enrolling students, maintaining their course, uploading files etc, our vision was to invest in ICT Support who could provide this ‘mundane’ side of things effectively, and free up staff to ‘create’, and ‘think’, and ‘enrich’ their lessons. Staff now spend time crafting an online lesson, which is then uploaded to their course by one of our technicians who maintains the course in liaison with the teacher. We had seen, too often, that staff would become burdened down and disheartened by complex online systems which obstructed the effective deployment of online learning and created barriers for growth. Our ICT Support model is now facilitating the opposite of this and is flourishing.\n\nProvision for online learning was enhanced with our Post 16 Netbook Programme. In the last three years we invested in nearly 400 netbook laptops which we issue to our Year 13 and 14 students, when they return in September. The netbooks can access our WiFi network throughout the school, and the students can take the netbook home in the evening. This initiative was recognised by BECTA as a significant factor in reducing the digital divide between the better off and the less well off in our school community and facilitating equality of access to all. This initiative which grew from a pastoral need, i.e. students were underusing our Study facilities as they searched the school for ICT access, a demand that we as teachers were increasing placing on them, as become a huge success - and has led to strange developments such as Siobhan, an ICT teacher, teaching her A Level ICT class in a Spanish classroom, with the students continuing their course using their netbooks. ECDL is delivered to students in Post 16 who don’t possess an ICT qualification and is not taught in an ICT suite. Our students at Post 16 can access ICT and our online networks anywhere in the school and at home - 24/7.\n\n
  • Can I now talk about ICT as a tool for curriculum innovation. Unless we are using this tool to improve the quality of learning and teaching in our classrooms, and empowering our staff to utilise ICT to this highest level, then we are wasting our time.\n\nOur over-riding priority as we developed our ICT strategy was to ensure that staff were aware of the effectiveness of ICT in the classroom, and beyond, and how it could be used to enhance and enrich learning opportunities. The implementation of the RC allowed us to move at speed with this plan, and staff are constantly being exposed to new digital tools and new ways of delivering content and skills through the utilisation of ICT.\n\nAgain, our new building allowed a lot of this to happen organically. We are a very well-resourced school, and our staff are not allowed to use the excuse that they don’t have the equipment available to innovate or to exploit the potential of ICT. Staff who want to use podcasting in their classroom, or make a movie, or build a website - can have the equipment delivered to their room, have bespoke training provided and have an ICT Support professional in the room with them to assist and help with lesson. Nothing is impossible! Those are our watchwords. \n\nTo allow for this high level support and assistance we have invested heavily in ICT Support. Currently we have team of five professionals, led by the ICT Support Manager who provide technical assistance to our staff and students. From fixing a broken printer, to updating our website, to making HD movies, podcasts, websites and more - our technicians provide ‘at elbow’ support to all staff on-demand. Staff have the choice of upskilling and learning how to use these digital tools to enhance their teaching and the learning opportunities provided to our students, or they can choose to spend their time creating and cultivating an idea, speaking to one of our professionals who will go away, build on the idea, come back and present to the teacher, who can accept or adapt, and then assist in the delivery in the classroom.\n\nThis model works very effectively with online learning. We embarked three years ago on our own VLE ... which we called Oscail 24/7 - define. As with most projects in St Paul’s it was an organic growth. It was something that I was very interested in personally, and I could see the benefits to augmenting face-to-face lessons with high quality learning experiences which could be accessible to my students outside of the classroom. My participation and graduation from RTU’s OLTE programme in 2009, along with a number of other colleagues, gave us an appropriate grounding in how online learning can be delivered effectively - and moved us away from the simple concept of dumping all our slideshows, and notes online - to challenging us to provide a different learning experience online. SLT identified this as effective practice and a cohort of our A Level students are having different elements of their A Level courses in Irish, Drama, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and Biology delivered online, with a reduction in face-to-face teaching time, compensated with high quality online learning experiences. I mention this in detail, as staff were challenged by this development and needed reassurance and an effective support system. Rather than train all our staff in the intricacies of creating an online course, and enrolling students, maintaining their course, uploading files etc, our vision was to invest in ICT Support who could provide this ‘mundane’ side of things effectively, and free up staff to ‘create’, and ‘think’, and ‘enrich’ their lessons. Staff now spend time crafting an online lesson, which is then uploaded to their course by one of our technicians who maintains the course in liaison with the teacher. We had seen, too often, that staff would become burdened down and disheartened by complex online systems which obstructed the effective deployment of online learning and created barriers for growth. Our ICT Support model is now facilitating the opposite of this and is flourishing.\n\nProvision for online learning was enhanced with our Post 16 Netbook Programme. In the last three years we invested in nearly 400 netbook laptops which we issue to our Year 13 and 14 students, when they return in September. The netbooks can access our WiFi network throughout the school, and the students can take the netbook home in the evening. This initiative was recognised by BECTA as a significant factor in reducing the digital divide between the better off and the less well off in our school community and facilitating equality of access to all. This initiative which grew from a pastoral need, i.e. students were underusing our Study facilities as they searched the school for ICT access, a demand that we as teachers were increasing placing on them, as become a huge success - and has led to strange developments such as Siobhan, an ICT teacher, teaching her A Level ICT class in a Spanish classroom, with the students continuing their course using their netbooks. ECDL is delivered to students in Post 16 who don’t possess an ICT qualification and is not taught in an ICT suite. Our students at Post 16 can access ICT and our online networks anywhere in the school and at home - 24/7.\n\n
  • Can I now talk about ICT as a tool for curriculum innovation. Unless we are using this tool to improve the quality of learning and teaching in our classrooms, and empowering our staff to utilise ICT to this highest level, then we are wasting our time.\n\nOur over-riding priority as we developed our ICT strategy was to ensure that staff were aware of the effectiveness of ICT in the classroom, and beyond, and how it could be used to enhance and enrich learning opportunities. The implementation of the RC allowed us to move at speed with this plan, and staff are constantly being exposed to new digital tools and new ways of delivering content and skills through the utilisation of ICT.\n\nAgain, our new building allowed a lot of this to happen organically. We are a very well-resourced school, and our staff are not allowed to use the excuse that they don’t have the equipment available to innovate or to exploit the potential of ICT. Staff who want to use podcasting in their classroom, or make a movie, or build a website - can have the equipment delivered to their room, have bespoke training provided and have an ICT Support professional in the room with them to assist and help with lesson. Nothing is impossible! Those are our watchwords. \n\nTo allow for this high level support and assistance we have invested heavily in ICT Support. Currently we have team of five professionals, led by the ICT Support Manager who provide technical assistance to our staff and students. From fixing a broken printer, to updating our website, to making HD movies, podcasts, websites and more - our technicians provide ‘at elbow’ support to all staff on-demand. Staff have the choice of upskilling and learning how to use these digital tools to enhance their teaching and the learning opportunities provided to our students, or they can choose to spend their time creating and cultivating an idea, speaking to one of our professionals who will go away, build on the idea, come back and present to the teacher, who can accept or adapt, and then assist in the delivery in the classroom.\n\nThis model works very effectively with online learning. We embarked three years ago on our own VLE ... which we called Oscail 24/7 - define. As with most projects in St Paul’s it was an organic growth. It was something that I was very interested in personally, and I could see the benefits to augmenting face-to-face lessons with high quality learning experiences which could be accessible to my students outside of the classroom. My participation and graduation from RTU’s OLTE programme in 2009, along with a number of other colleagues, gave us an appropriate grounding in how online learning can be delivered effectively - and moved us away from the simple concept of dumping all our slideshows, and notes online - to challenging us to provide a different learning experience online. SLT identified this as effective practice and a cohort of our A Level students are having different elements of their A Level courses in Irish, Drama, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and Biology delivered online, with a reduction in face-to-face teaching time, compensated with high quality online learning experiences. I mention this in detail, as staff were challenged by this development and needed reassurance and an effective support system. Rather than train all our staff in the intricacies of creating an online course, and enrolling students, maintaining their course, uploading files etc, our vision was to invest in ICT Support who could provide this ‘mundane’ side of things effectively, and free up staff to ‘create’, and ‘think’, and ‘enrich’ their lessons. Staff now spend time crafting an online lesson, which is then uploaded to their course by one of our technicians who maintains the course in liaison with the teacher. We had seen, too often, that staff would become burdened down and disheartened by complex online systems which obstructed the effective deployment of online learning and created barriers for growth. Our ICT Support model is now facilitating the opposite of this and is flourishing.\n\nProvision for online learning was enhanced with our Post 16 Netbook Programme. In the last three years we invested in nearly 400 netbook laptops which we issue to our Year 13 and 14 students, when they return in September. The netbooks can access our WiFi network throughout the school, and the students can take the netbook home in the evening. This initiative was recognised by BECTA as a significant factor in reducing the digital divide between the better off and the less well off in our school community and facilitating equality of access to all. This initiative which grew from a pastoral need, i.e. students were underusing our Study facilities as they searched the school for ICT access, a demand that we as teachers were increasing placing on them, as become a huge success - and has led to strange developments such as Siobhan, an ICT teacher, teaching her A Level ICT class in a Spanish classroom, with the students continuing their course using their netbooks. ECDL is delivered to students in Post 16 who don’t possess an ICT qualification and is not taught in an ICT suite. Our students at Post 16 can access ICT and our online networks anywhere in the school and at home - 24/7.\n\n
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ETI 2011_St Paul's HS ETI 2011_St Paul's HS Presentation Transcript

  • A Quality Education for AllSt Paul’s High School, Bessbrook
  • Mr Oliver Mooney Principal Quality Education for all
  • 2002 2007
  • Mrs Anne Mallon Vice PrincipalHead of Curriculum Quality Education for all
  • Change for Curriculum InnovationChange to address public perceptionChange creating a consumer drivencurriculum at KS4 and KS5 Quality Education for all
  • History & Geography Quality Education for all
  • Environment & Society Quality Education for all
  • Citizenship & Employability Quality Education for all
  • Learning for Life & Work Quality Education for all
  • Monitoring & Evaluation Quality Education for all
  • Curriculum Monitoring & Evaluation Quality Education for all
  • Curriculum Pastoral Monitoring & Evaluation Quality Education for all
  • Curriculum Pastoral Monitoring & Evaluation Quality Education for all
  • Curriculum Pastoral Monitoring & Evaluation Learning for Life & Work Quality Education for all
  • Modern Languages Quality Education for all
  • Modern Languages Quality Education for all
  • French Modern Languages Quality Education for all
  • French Modern Languages Quality Education for all
  • French Irish Modern Languages Quality Education for all
  • French Irish Modern Languages Quality Education for all
  • French Irish Modern Languages Spanish Quality Education for all
  • French Irish Modern Languages Spanish Quality Education for all
  • Health Education Quality Education for all
  • Healthy Eating HeartStart Health Education Smoking CessationStaff Development RSE Programme Quality Education for all
  • Literacy Support Quality Education for all
  • SportMusic
  • Curriculum at Key Stage 4 Quality Education for all
  • Consumer driven Curriculum at Key Stage 4 Quality Education for all
  • Consumer driven 6-week Careers module Curriculum at Key Stage 4 Quality Education for all
  • Consumer driven 6-week Careers module Curriculum at Key Stage 4Parent & Pupil Interviews Quality Education for all
  • Consumer driven 6-week Careers module Curriculum at Key Stage 4 InformationParent & Pupil Interviews Parent Teacher Meeting Quality Education for all
  • GCSE Occupational Studies Edexcel • DiDA Level 2 Diploma in Digital Applications• Art & Design • Business & Services • CiDA Level 2 Certificate in Digital Applications• Business Studies • Construction• Construction and the Built Environment • Design & Creativity City & Guilds• Design & Technology • Engineering & engineering • Level 2 Certificate in CAD Parametric Drawing• Drama services • Level 1 Certificate for IT users• English • Environment & Society • Level 1 in Key Skills ICT English Literature • Technology & Innovation• French CCEA• Geography BTec Level 2• History Extended Certificate • Level 1 Certificate in Essential Skills:• Health & Social Care Communication• Home Economics: Food• Home Economics: Child Development • Applied Science • Children’s Care, Learning • Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills:• ICT Communication and Development• Irish• Learning for Life & Work • Creative Media Production • Engineering • Level 1 Certificate in Essential Skills:• Mathematics Application of Number• Moving Images Art • Health & Social Care• Physical Education • Performance Arts: Dance • Travel & Tourism • Level 1 Certificate in Essential Skills:• Religious Studies Application of Number• Science: Double Award BTec Level 2 Diploma• Science: Single Award • Level 1 Certificate in Employment Skills• Spanish • Sport
  • ICT Key Stage 4 Post 16 GNVQ ICT ICTThomas Telford ICT Applied ICTEssential Skills ICT Single & Double AwardICT CiDA DiDA ECDL
  • Technology & Design Key Stage 4 Post 16 GCSE Technology A Level Technology GCSE Construction BTec National DiplomaBTec First Certificate: BTec National Certificate Engineering Construction CAD
  • PE & Sport Key Stage 4 Post 16 GCSE PE A Level PEGCSE PE: Double AwardBTec First Diploma: Sport BTec National Award BTec First Certificate: BTec NationalPerforming Arts (Dance) Certificate BTec National Diploma
  • A Level Applied A Level CACHE• Art & Design • Business Studies • Level 2 Diploma in Childcare and• Biology • Health & Social Care: Single Award Education• Chemistry • Health & Social Care: Double Award• Drama & Theatre Studies • Applied ICT: Single Award• English Literature • Applied ICT: Double Award CAD• French• Geography BTec Nationals• History • Level 2 Certificate in Computer• ICT Aided Design• Irish • Construction & The Built Environment:• Mathematics Subsidiary Diploma• Music • Construction & The Built Environment: CCEA• Physics Diploma• Physical Education • Performing Arts: Dance: National Award • Sport: Performance & Excellence: • Level 3 Certificate in Personal• Religious Studies Effectiveness (COPE)• Sociology Subsidiary Diploma• Technology & Design • Sport: Performance & Excellence:• Spanish Extended Diploma Offered at A Level BCS Level 1 and 2• Government & Politics • Certificate for IT users: ECDL:• Home Economics Part 1 and 2
  • Thursday Curriculum at Key Stage 4 GCSE options BTec First Extended Certificate BTec First Diploma: Sport • Drama • Children’s Care, Learning &1 • BTec Performing Arts: Dance Development Occupational Studies • CiDA • Creative Media Production2 • DiDA • Engineering • ICT • Health & Social Care3 • Music • Travel & Tourism • Art • Construction and the Built4 • Moving Images Art Environment • Construction5 • Health & Social Care • Home Economics: Food • Home Economics: Childcare ‘Normal Timetable’7 • English Occupational8 • Mathematics GCSE Learning for Life & Work Studies • Science9 • Religious Studies
  • GCSE Options •Drama •BTec Performing Arts: Dance •CiDA1 •DiDA2 •ICT3 •Music4 •Art5 •Moving Images Art •Construction •Health & Social Care •Home Economics: Food •Home Economics: Childcare
  • Thursday Curriculum at Key Stage 4 GCSE options BTec First Extended Certificate BTec First Diploma: Sport • Drama • Children’s Care, Learning &1 • BTec Performing Arts: Dance Development Occupational Studies • CiDA • Creative Media Production2 • DiDA • Engineering • ICT • Health & Social Care3 • Music • Travel & Tourism • Art • Construction and the Built4 • Moving Images Art Environment • Construction5 • Health & Social Care • Home Economics: Food • Home Economics: Childcare ‘Normal Timetable’7 • English Occupational8 • Mathematics GCSE Learning for Life & Work Studies • Science9 • Religious Studies
  • BTec First Extended Certificate1 •Children’s Care, Learning & Development2 •Creative Media Production3 •Engineering •Health & Social Care4 •Travel & Tourism5 •Construction and the Built Environment
  • Thursday Curriculum at Key Stage 4 GCSE options BTec First Extended Certificate BTec First Diploma: Sport • Drama • Children’s Care, Learning &1 • BTec Performing Arts: Dance Development Occupational Studies • CiDA • Creative Media Production2 • DiDA • Engineering • ICT • Health & Social Care3 • Music • Travel & Tourism • Art • Construction and the Built4 • Moving Images Art Environment • Construction5 • Health & Social Care • Home Economics: Food • Home Economics: Childcare ‘Normal Timetable’7 • English Occupational8 • Mathematics GCSE Learning for Life & Work Studies • Science9 • Religious Studies
  • Alternative Education Programme Quality Education for all
  • Essential Skills Alternative Education Programme Quality Education for all
  • Upskilling of staff inEssential Skills Mathematics & English Alternative Education Programme Quality Education for all
  • Upskilling of staff inEssential Skills Mathematics & English Alternative Education Programme 3 days in school 2 days with training agencies Quality Education for all
  • Change for Curriculum InnovationChange to address public perceptionChange creating a consumer drivencurriculum at KS4 and KS5 Quality Education for all
  • Mrs Siobhán Bradley Senior Managerfor Staff Development Quality Education for all
  • Staff Development Quality Education for all
  • Empower Staff Development Quality Education for all
  • Empower Lead Staff Development Quality Education for all
  • Empower Lead Staff DevelopmentProcess of change Quality Education for all
  • Empower Lead Staff DevelopmentProcess of change Excellence Quality Education for all
  • Staff Development Quality Education for all
  • Capacity Building Staff Development Quality Education for all
  • Capacity Building PRSD Staff Development Quality Education for all
  • Capacity Building PRSD Staff DevelopmentBeginning teachers Student teachers Quality Education for all
  • Capacity Building PRSD Staff DevelopmentBeginning teachers Middle management Student teachers Leadership skills Quality Education for all
  • Capacity building Quality Education for all
  • Implementation of the Revised Curriculum Capacity building Quality Education for all
  • Implementation of the Catalyst for Revised Curriculum change Capacity building Quality Education for all
  • Implementation of the Catalyst for Revised Curriculum change Capacity building Developing leadership skills Quality Education for all
  • Implementation of the Catalyst for Revised Curriculum change Capacity building Developing leadership skills Open invitation Quality Education for all
  • Implementation of the Catalyst for Revised Curriculum change Capacity building Developing leadership Range and diversity skills Open invitation Quality Education for all
  • Advantages Quality Education for all
  • Collective vision Advantages Quality Education for all
  • Working as part ofCollective vision a leadership team Advantages Quality Education for all
  • Working as part ofCollective vision a leadership team Advantages Role models Quality Education for all
  • Working as part of Collective vision a leadership team AdvantagesLeading staff INSET Role models Quality Education for all
  • PRSD Quality Education for all
  • Monitoring & EvaluationWhole-school initiative PRSD Quality Education for all
  • Monitoring & Evaluation 25Whole-school initiative Reviewers PRSD Quality Education for all
  • Monitoring & Evaluation 25Whole-school initiative Reviewers PRSD School Development Plan Quality Education for all
  • Monitoring & Evaluation 25Whole-school initiative Reviewers PRSD School Development Plan Two whole-school objectives Quality Education for all
  • Monitoring & Evaluation 25Whole-school initiative Reviewers PRSD- Sharing good practice- Professional dialogue School Development - Open door policy Plan Two whole-school objectives Quality Education for all
  • Staff Communication Event Quality Education for all
  • Open to Sharing Good Practice Staff Communication Event Quality Education for all
  • Open to Sharing Good Practice Staff ‘taste and see’ Staff Communication Event Quality Education for all
  • Open to Sharing Good Practice Staff ‘taste and see’ Staff Communication Event - curricular - pastoral - ICT - student initiatives Quality Education for all
  • Open to Sharing Good Practice Staff ‘taste and see’ Staff Communication Event - curricular - pastoral - ICT - student initiatives iNet Specialist Schools Showcase Quality Education for all
  • Open to Sharing Good Practice Staff ‘taste and see’ Staff Communication Event - curricular 20 staff leading - pastoral presentations - ICT - student initiatives iNet Specialist Schools Showcase Quality Education for all
  • Using Moving Images Art inStudents’ Council Online learning in Languages Key Stage 3 Mediascape / GPS technology in STEM Area Learning Community Environment & Society
  • Beginning teachers Quality Education for all
  • The future of education Beginning teachers Quality Education for all
  • The future of education Future Leaders Beginning teachers Quality Education for all
  • The future of education - enthusiasm - new ideas Future Leaders - new strategies Beginning teachers Quality Education for all
  • The future of education - enthusiasm - new ideas Future Leaders - new strategies Beginning teachers Mentoring Quality Education for all
  • The future of education - enthusiasm - new ideas Future Leaders - new strategies Beginning teachers Mentoring EPD supports the SDP and DDPs Quality Education for all
  • The future of education - enthusiasm - new ideas Future Leaders - new strategies Beginning teachers ePortfolios Mentoring EPD supports the SDP and DDPs Quality Education for all
  • Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • Professional Qualification for Headship Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • PQH Graduates lead: - Curriculum ChangeProfessional Qualification - Pastoral Initiatives for Headship - Collaboration & ALC - School Improvement & MER - Target Setting & Intervention Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • PQH Graduates lead: - Curriculum ChangeProfessional Qualification - Pastoral Initiatives for Headship - Collaboration & ALC - School Improvement & MER - Target Setting & Intervention Developing Leaders ‘Aspiring Leadership Programme’ Quality Education for all
  • PQH Graduates lead: - Curriculum ChangeProfessional Qualification - Pastoral Initiatives for Headship - Collaboration & ALC - School Improvement & MER - Target Setting & Intervention Developing Leaders HOD ‘Aspiring Leadership Year Head Programme’ Teachers with other posts of responsibility Quality Education for all
  • Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • Mentoring/Coaching Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • Mentoring/Coaching Share Good Practice Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • Mentoring/Coaching Share Good Practice Whole-school improvement Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • Mentoring/Coaching Share Good Practice Whole-school improvement Developing Leaders Learning and teaching Quality Education for all
  • Mentoring/Coaching Share Good Practice Whole-school improvement Developing Leaders Learning and teaching Leadership skills Quality Education for all
  • Mentoring/Coaching Share Good Practice Whole-school improvement Developing LeadersLeading whole-school Learning and teaching initiatives Leadership skills Quality Education for all
  • Mentoring/Coaching Share Good Practice Monitoring and Whole-school evaluating improvement Developing LeadersLeading whole-school Learning and teaching initiatives Leadership skills Quality Education for all
  • Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • Self-assessment Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • Self-assessment Leadership workshops Developing Leaders Quality Education for all
  • Self-assessment Leadership workshops Developing Leaders School based improvement activity Quality Education for all
  • Self-assessment Leadership workshops Developing Leaders School based Accreditation improvement activity Quality Education for all
  • Mrs Una McNulty Vice Principalin charge of Standards Quality Education for all
  • Leadership Strategyfor whole-school improvement Quality Education for all
  • Quality Education for all
  • Whole-school self evaluation- Curricular- Pastoral Quality Education for all
  • Whole-school self evaluation- Curricular- PastoralTarget Setting- working with HOD in KS3 and KS4 Quality Education for all
  • Whole-school self evaluation- Curricular- PastoralTarget Setting- working with HOD in KS3 and KS4Posts of Responsibility Quality Education for all
  • The Knoster Grid Quality Education for all
  • The Knoster Grid Vision Quality Education for all
  • The Knoster Grid Vision Consensus Quality Education for all
  • The Knoster Grid Vision Consensus Skills Quality Education for all
  • The Knoster Grid Vision Consensus Skills Incentives Quality Education for all
  • The Knoster Grid Vision Consensus Skills Incentives Resources Quality Education for all
  • The Knoster Grid Vision Consensus Skills Incentives Resources Action Plan Quality Education for all
  • Using data in St Paul’s Quality Education for all
  • To ask questionsUsing data in St Paul’s Quality Education for all
  • To ask questionsUsing data in To stimulate St Paul’s discussion Quality Education for all
  • To ask questionsUsing data in To stimulate St Paul’s discussion To prompt action Quality Education for all
  • Quality Education for all
  • TargetSetting Quality Education for all
  • TargetSetting Quality Education for all
  • PrimaryTarget School ReportSetting Quality Education for all
  • PrimaryTarget School ReportSetting Quality Education for all
  • MiDYiS Primary NFERProgress Target School Report 12 / 13 Setting Quality Education for all
  • MiDYiS Primary NFERProgress Target School Report 12 / 13 Setting Quality Education for all
  • MiDYiS Primary NFERProgress Target School Report 12 / 13 Setting Assessment Manager Quality Education for all
  • MiDYiS Primary NFERProgress Target School Report 12 / 13 Setting Assessment Manager Quality Education for all
  • Mentoring MiDYiS Primary NFERProgress Target School Report 12 / 13 Setting Assessment Manager Quality Education for all
  • Accountability Challenge Empowers Sharing of HOD withGood Practice Process increased responsibility Challenges Creates open Methodology culture Quality Education for all
  • Predictions v Targets Predictions Targets What needs to be done in order toBased on our experience he/she is move this pupil to a Grade ‘C’ or likely to get a grade ‘D’ better. Quality Education for all
  • Interviews Resources Organisation with parents of teaching Raising RaisingNumeracy in all Early Literacy in all areas of Intervention areas of learning learning Toe - to - Toe T.L.C. W.A.T. Quality Education for all
  • Posts of Responsibility
  • The process promotes... Quality Education for all
  • The process promotes... Accountability Critical Evaluation Reflection Reappraisal Capacity Building Empowerment Quality Education for all
  • “ The culture of a school is seen as the deciding factor when it comes to a school’s state of readiness and its capacity to improve. ” [‘The Intelligent School’, MacGilchrist, Myers and Reed] Quality Education for all
  • ICT as a catalyst for change Mr Dáithí Murray Director of ICT Quality Education for all
  • ICT as a tool for managementICT as a tool for curriculum innovationICT as a tool for staff development Quality Education for all
  • Statutory Guidance and Framework Quality Education for all
  • Statutory Guidance and Framework Quality Education for all
  • ICT Mark School Awarded 2008 Quality Education for all
  • Vision “ A school committed toembedding the use of ICT as an essential tool for teaching and learning, and to harness its potential and enrich the way young people learn. ”
  • ICT as a tool for management Quality Education for all
  • Exploiting Sims.net effectively Quality Education for all
  • Attendance Lesson Monitor Assessment & Timetable Reporting Exploiting Sims.net effectivelyData Analysis Examinations Behaviour & Achievement Financial Management Quality Education for all
  • Quality Education for all
  • Improving Communication Quality Education for all
  • Cumarsáid: Staff e-BulletinImproving Communication Quality Education for all
  • Cumarsáid: Staff e-BulletinImproving Communication School Website www.stpaulsbessbrook.org School VLE ‘ Oscail 24/7 ’ www.oscail247.org Quality Education for all
  • Cumarsáid: Staff e-Bulletin Improving Communication School WebsiteSocial Networking www.stpaulsbessbrook.org School VLE ‘ Oscail 24/7 ’ www.oscail247.org Quality Education for all
  • Cumarsáid: Staff e-Bulletin Improving Communication School Website Social Networking www.stpaulsbessbrook.org School VLEwww.facebook.com/ ‘ Oscail 24/7 ’ stpaulbessbrook www.oscail247.org Quality Education for all
  • Cumarsáid: Staff e-Bulletin Improving Communication School Website Social Networking www.stpaulsbessbrook.org School VLEwww.facebook.com/ www.twitter.com/ ‘ Oscail 24/7 ’ stpaulbessbrook stpaulsbbrook www.oscail247.org Quality Education for all
  • Curriculum Innovation & Capacity Building Quality Education for all
  • Raising AwarenessCurriculum Innovation & Capacity Building Quality Education for all
  • Raising Awareness New BuildingCurriculum Innovation & Capacity Building Quality Education for all
  • Raising Awareness New BuildingCurriculum Innovation & Capacity Building ‘At elbow’ support Quality Education for all
  • Raising Awareness New BuildingCurriculum Innovation & Capacity Building Improving digital ‘At elbow’ support literacy Quality Education for all
  • Permanent Staff- ICT Support Manger - ICT Technician 2 ICT Support at St Paul’s
  • Permanent Staff Placement Staff (12-month contract)- ICT Support Manger QUB: CIT - ICT Technician 2 UUJ: IMD ICT Support at St Paul’s
  • Developing online learning
  • St Paul’s VLEwww.oscail247.org Developing online learning
  • St Paul’s VLE OLTEwww.oscail247.org Developing online learning
  • St Paul’s VLE OLTEwww.oscail247.org Developing online learning Change in mindset
  • St Paul’s VLE OLTEwww.oscail247.org Developing online learning Support for staff Change in mindset
  • St Paul’s VLE OLTE www.oscail247.org Developing online learningf Support for staff Change in mindset
  • Post 16 Netbook Programme
  • Post 16 Netbook Programme
  • Issued to all Post 16 students Bridging the ‘digital divide’ A pastoral need with a curriculum solution For use in school and at homePost 16 Netbook Programme
  • Issued to all Post 16 students Bridging the ‘digital divide’ A pastoral need with a curriculum solution For use in school and at homePost 16 Netbook Programme
  • Issued to all Post 16 students Bridging the ‘digital divide’ A pastoral need with a curriculum solution For use in school and at homePost 16 Netbook Programme
  • Issued to all Post 16 students Bridging the ‘digital divide’ A pastoral need with a curriculum solution For use in school and at homePost 16 Netbook Programme
  • ICT inSt Paul’s
  • creating literate digital citizens ICT inSt Paul’s
  • creating literate digital citizens ICT inSt Paul’s improving fluency of staff
  • creating literate digital citizens ICT in St Paul’scoherent improvingresource fluency ofstrategy staff
  • engaging creatingeffectively literate with digital parents citizens ICT in St Paul’scoherent improvingresource fluency ofstrategy staff
  • Mr Oliver Mooney Principal Quality Education for all
  • 90 67.5 45 61.00%50.00% 67.00% 79.00% 85.00% 57.00% 71.00% 22.5 2005 2006 2007 2008 0 2009 2010 2011 Percentage of Year 12 obtaining Grades A* - C in 5 or more subjects
  • A Quality Education for AllSt Paul’s High School, Bessbrook