K-5 Safe Routes to School Educator
Guide with Common Core State
Standards Correlations
Daina Lujan
Coordinator, Safe Route...
Agenda
Activity

Time

Purpose

Introductions

5 Minutes

To meet one another

Overview

15 Minutes

To introduce the guid...
Guide Overview
• Kindergarten through Fifth Grade Guide
• Paired Grade Levels with Encouragement Projects Section
• Suppor...
CCSS and NGSS Alignments
• CCSS Features
•Nonfiction Reading Passages
•Opinion Writing Drawing on Evidence
•Fractions, Sca...
Intended Use
• Flexible Implementation Formats

•Individual lessons
•Units
•Classroom
•After School Programs
•Clubs

www.s...
Lesson Features
• Overview
• Supplies
• Activity(ies)
•Suggested Time
•Directions for Teachers and Activity Leaders
• Conn...
Kindergarten & First Grade Activities
• Use Your Head Before Your Feet
• Be Safe on Your Feet

• Walking Makes Sense
• Thi...
Second & Third Grade Activities

• Intersections Galore
• Walk Around the Block
• Active Travel Choices
• Pollution Soluti...
Fourth & Fifth Grade Activities
• School Safety Audit

• My Safe Route to School
• Greenhouse in a Bottle
• What’s in Our ...
Projects
• Walk and Roll Art Studio
• What’s Your Story?

• Walk and Roll Team Trivia
• What’s the Speed Limit?

www.smcoe...
Support Resources
Lesson Resources
Safety Guidelines
Literature

Websites
Videos

www.smcoe.org
Break Time

www.smcoe.org
Hands-on Time
• Self-Assign to One of Three Groups
• 30 Minutes to:
•Go Through Activity
•Select Portion to Teach to the G...
A Closer Look
• K/1 Group: Using People Power
• 2/3 Group: Walk Around the Block
• 4/5 Group: My Safe Route

www.smcoe.org
Share Out
• Take 10-15 Minutes to:

•Teach a Segment of the Lesson
•Share the Group’s Thoughts
•Features you like
•Adaptat...
Looking for More?
California Active Communities
http://www.caactivecommunities.org/newtools/
Minneapolis Public Schools, B...
Workshop Evaluation
What information was most useful to you?

What topics would you like to know more about?

What other w...
Daina Lujan
dlujan@smcoe.org
650-802-5306

www.smcoe.org
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K-5 Safe Routes to School Educator Guide Workshop

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Safe Routes to School Coordinator, Daina Lujan, provides an overview of the San Mateo County Safe Routes to School kindergarten through fifth grade Educator Guide with Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards correlations. This guide was developed in partnership with Alameda County Safe Routes to School. Curriculum writing support was provided by Lily Jones. Graphic design work courtesy of Rob Boldt.

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  • Just what is this guide that has Daina so excited?This guide was produced through the collaborative efforts of Transform of Alameda County Safe Routes and San Mateo County Safe Routes with curriculum writing support from Lily Jones and graphic design support from Rob Boldt. The activities includes in this guide are designed to increase student awareness of transportation options, safe practices, health the effects of pollution.Reference the Table of Contents. The guide includes lessons for students in grades k-5. Grade levels are paired and there is a an encouragement project section. Right after the Table of Contents are letters of introduction for families which explain to parents the purpose of the lessons and ideas of how they can provide additional support. Additional resources such as a literary, online and video resources are also included at the back.Past the Table of Contents and the Parent Letters is a chart outlining the standards addressed through the lessons. The guide is available in printed and downloadable format. To help support instruction, a video and book are included with the printed version of the guide. The video is accessible from the website.
  • For those familiar with the earlier version of this guide, you’ll notice substantial revisions to bring this guide into alignment with the CCSS and NGSS. These addition include grade level appropriate, nonfiction reading passages, writing opinion pieces that have students use evidence to support their position, and enhanced math activities that include work with fractions, scaled bar graphs, time, and traffic counts with averages.Additionally, in alignment with the NGSS, the new science lessons include hands on experiments, data collection, analysis, and drawing conclusions.
  • This guide is meant to be flexible because as we all know, one size doesn’t fit all.To that end, the activities in this guide can stand on their own or be part of a larger unit. To support implementation of lessons as stand alones, some guidance is provided on page 6 of the front matter. For instance, in late September or early October, just before International Walk to School Day, a teacher, after school program leader, or club leader may opt to teach a lesson on safety to help ensure that kids who participate in event activities do so safely. A few lessons are called out by month that correlate to annual activities such as International Walk to School Day, Bike to School Day, and Earth Day.The lessons can also be taught as part of a larger unit on Safe Routes, which means the lessons can be taught in the order they appear, or an implementer can reorganize the order of the lessons to adapt to the amount of time available or unit goals.The lessons are written in a format that allows any adult to use the guide. So, teachers, after school leaders, or even club leaders can take guide, prepare and lead an activity.
  • Turn to Page 2 of your guide.Every paired grade level section and the additional projects section begins with a “What’s the Big Idea?” This section is like a unit overview to highlight how Safety, Community and Environment and Health are addressed through the course of the lessons.The lessons begin with a lesson overview to help whoever is leading the activity understand what is they will be teaching and what kids should understand at the end of the activity.Below the overview is a supply list so activity leaders know what to prepare in advance.Following these warm up pieces, activities are outlined. In general, the larger lesson is broken out into several activities with time suggestions. Ideally the activities are presented in order, but the reality of leading these lessons is that there’s just never enough time, so an activity leader can review the sub activities, consider the amount of time they have available and then pick the pieces that will get them the most bang for their buck. For instance, the lesson we are looking at “Use Your Head Before Your Feet” includes 4 sub activities; a discussion, a review of pedestrian traffic signals, a worksheet to teach the poem “Use Your Head Before Your Feet,” and walk/don’t walk game similar to red light/green light. The activities follow a traditional lesson format with a warm up, instruction, guided practice, and independent practice as appropriate. They also, whenever possible, work to engage students through different learning modalities. Also, as you can see from the way the sub activities are described, they can stand on their own.Every activity closes with Connections and Extensions, which are just ways to extend the learning beyond what is provided in the lessons. So, for instance, in “Use Your Head Before Your Feet,” one of the suggested connection and extensions is to write out the ‘Use Your Head Before Your Feet” poem on sentence strips and create a puzzle by posting the strips out of order.At the very end of each activity description, one will find all of the hand outs referenced in the lesson. For instance with Use Your Head Before Your Feet, there is a handout of the Use Your Head Before Your Feet poem and a worksheet of the Pedestrian Signs and Signals.
  • I’m going to briefly highlight each of the paired grade level sections by outlining the focus at the grade level and a brief overview of each of the lessons. Then we’ll break up and have some hands on time with some of the activities.Big Idea: Increase safe walking practices, awareness of transportation options, and the concept of carpooling to reduce carbon footprints.Use Your Head Before Your Feet: Learn rules for safe walking, traffic signs and signals.Be Safe on Your Feet: Uses Pedestrian Safety video to reinforce safe pedestrian practices. Video is included with printed version and also available online at www.smcoe.k12.ca.us/sr2s under educator guideWalking Makes Sense: Students use their sense to gather information about their neighborhoods in a short neighborhood walk that includes a Pedestrian Safety Scavenger HuntThis is the Way We Go to School: Using the book included with the printed version, students learn about all of the different ways people get to school around the world and then conduct a survey to learn about the recent shift in how students get to school today compared with the previous generation.Using People Power: Students learn about how different forms of transportation are powered (people v. gas powered) and are introduced to the benefits of sharing a ride through the use of transit or carpooling
  • Big Idea: Learn about how to safely cross at intersections, global climate change and air quality.Intersections Galore: Students learn about different types of intersections and how to safely cross through a safety video and a couple of games such as controlled chaos and red light/green light. Students apply their learnings in a skit.Walk Around the Block: Students go on a guided walk around the block to practice safe pedestrian practicesActive Travel Choices: Students learn about travel options, how their classmates get to school, and the benefits of active travelPollution Solutions: Students learn about solid, liquid, and gas pollutants and the benefits of sharing a ride.Green Heroes: In Green Heros kids learn more about the human causes of pollution, how kids have worked to make a positive difference, and begin considering and committing to how they can make a positive difference.
  • Big Idea: In fourth and fifth grades, students begin considering the safety of their neighborhoods and the routes they walk and roll on. Students also conduct experiments and traffic counts to gather data and draw conclusions about the impact of pollution and what can be done.School Safety Audit: Students conducts a safety audit and then write an opinion piece about the safety of their neighborhood. My Safe Route to School: Students map their Safe Route to School and write letters expressing concerns and outlining solutions to challenges they face on their walks and rolls to school. Greenhouse in a Bottle: Students learn about global climate change, carbon dioxide, and the oxygen cycle and consider what can be done. What’s in Our Air: Students use index cards with petrolium jelly to capture particulate matter in the air and consider the health impacts the additional particulate matter has on human health and how to mitigate the amount of particulate matter in the air around schools. Let’s Carpool: Students conduct a traffic count and formulate hypotheses about transportation issues near the school.
  • Big Idea: Projects that can be used to review material covered, build excitement for an upcoming event, or to use as a culminating activity.Walk and Roll Art Studio: Students design posters and bannersWhat’s Your Story: Students write and illustrate a story about their experience walking and/or rolling to school. Walk and Roll Team Trivia: Students review safe cycling, safe pedestrian, and reasons for walking and rolling concepts. Questions and answer options are included, but can be adapted.What’s the Speed Limit: Students measure just how fast cars are going and consider and advocate for safer speed limits in school zones
  • At the very back of the guide are a few resources for activities that span several grade levels such as the Walk/Don’t walk Game in k/1 and 2/3. There are also a few extra handouts if a teacher is looking for something quick to plug in to support a school activity, but doesn’t have time to teach a whole unit or read the educator guide.There are some safety guidelines that can be posted on school websites or sent home to parents with the unit letterThere are also lists of additional literary, online, and video resources. I would like to draw your attention to the very last link –Pennsylvania Safe Routes to School Program video. The elementary video less the Governor’s piece is the video used for this guide. The middle school video available through Pennsylvania’s Department of Transportation, hosted on YouTube is also appropriate for older elementary and middle schoolers.
  • Let’s take a 10 minute break before we start on the next section of this workshop
  • All righty, it’s time to get our hands into this guide!In a moment, you’re going to self assign yourselves to a group. We’ll have three groups, a K/1, a 2/3 and a 4/5 group. Each group will have 30 minutes to look at an activity (I’ll cover options in just a moment), then select a 3-5 minute piece to teach us, and then share their thoughts which can include things you like, adaptations you might suggest for different environments, etcQuestions before I share the group assignment options
  • Select one group to assign yourself to.All copies have been prepared.K/1 materials are here (point to location)2/3 materials are here (point to location)4/5 materials are here (point to location)I’ll put the guidelines up in case you find your group off track and we’ll reconvene at (name time)
  • CA Active Communities is due to soon launch both an elementary and middle school educator guide for Safe Routes. The Elementary Guide is aligned to the CCSS and the Middle School guide was developed by Arthur Orsini of Vancouver through the implementation of three pilots. It is more of a youth engagement, club leadership guide.Betsy Stretch of Minneapolis developed and implemented a multi-week unit exploring the mechanics of a bicycleUrbanThinkers, led by Arthur Orsini has an adult facilitator guide for engaging elementary and middle schoolers available for download. The present version is soon to be updated, but the 2010 version includes ideas for shared leadership and engaging youth.
  • K-5 Safe Routes to School Educator Guide Workshop

    1. 1. K-5 Safe Routes to School Educator Guide with Common Core State Standards Correlations Daina Lujan Coordinator, Safe Routes to School www.smcoe.org
    2. 2. Agenda Activity Time Purpose Introductions 5 Minutes To meet one another Overview 15 Minutes To introduce the guide and its features Lesson Overview 30 Minutes To introduce the activity format and concepts touched upon Hands-On Lesson Exploration 30 Minutes To develop an understanding of a lesson of interest Share Out 45 Minutes To share elements of lessons explored and ideas for adaptations Wrap Up 5 Minutes To share additional resources www.smcoe.org
    3. 3. Guide Overview • Kindergarten through Fifth Grade Guide • Paired Grade Levels with Encouragement Projects Section • Support Resources • Aligned to Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) • Accessible in printed and downloadable formats •www.smcoe.k12.ca.us/sr2s www.smcoe.org
    4. 4. CCSS and NGSS Alignments • CCSS Features •Nonfiction Reading Passages •Opinion Writing Drawing on Evidence •Fractions, Scaled Bar Graphs, Time, Traffic Counts with Averages • NGSS Features •Experiments, Data Collection, Analysis, and Drawing Conclusions www.smcoe.org
    5. 5. Intended Use • Flexible Implementation Formats •Individual lessons •Units •Classroom •After School Programs •Clubs www.smcoe.org
    6. 6. Lesson Features • Overview • Supplies • Activity(ies) •Suggested Time •Directions for Teachers and Activity Leaders • Connections and Extensions • Support Materials www.smcoe.org
    7. 7. Kindergarten & First Grade Activities • Use Your Head Before Your Feet • Be Safe on Your Feet • Walking Makes Sense • This is the Way We Go to School • Using People Power www.smcoe.org
    8. 8. Second & Third Grade Activities • Intersections Galore • Walk Around the Block • Active Travel Choices • Pollution Solutions • Green Heroes www.smcoe.org
    9. 9. Fourth & Fifth Grade Activities • School Safety Audit • My Safe Route to School • Greenhouse in a Bottle • What’s in Our Air? • Let’s Carpool! www.smcoe.org
    10. 10. Projects • Walk and Roll Art Studio • What’s Your Story? • Walk and Roll Team Trivia • What’s the Speed Limit? www.smcoe.org
    11. 11. Support Resources Lesson Resources Safety Guidelines Literature Websites Videos www.smcoe.org
    12. 12. Break Time www.smcoe.org
    13. 13. Hands-on Time • Self-Assign to One of Three Groups • 30 Minutes to: •Go Through Activity •Select Portion to Teach to the Group •Consider: •What works, what would be adaptions to specific implementation settings www.smcoe.org
    14. 14. A Closer Look • K/1 Group: Using People Power • 2/3 Group: Walk Around the Block • 4/5 Group: My Safe Route www.smcoe.org
    15. 15. Share Out • Take 10-15 Minutes to: •Teach a Segment of the Lesson •Share the Group’s Thoughts •Features you like •Adaptations you may make for different grade levels or settings (i.e. classroom v. after school setting) www.smcoe.org
    16. 16. Looking for More? California Active Communities http://www.caactivecommunities.org/newtools/ Minneapolis Public Schools, Betsy Stretch Mechanics of a Bicycle for Grade 6 Elizabeth.Stretch@mpls.k12.mn.us UrbanThinkers http://www.urbanthinkers.ca/tools/ www.smcoe.org
    17. 17. Workshop Evaluation What information was most useful to you? What topics would you like to know more about? What other workshops would you like to see offered by San Mateo County Safe Routes to School? www.smcoe.org
    18. 18. Daina Lujan dlujan@smcoe.org 650-802-5306 www.smcoe.org

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