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Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
Phase 5 Final
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Phase 5 Final

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Art Appreciation

Art Appreciation

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  1. Realism, Modernism, & Postmodernism By: Daisy Montañez-Ortiz HUM140-0702B-14 : Art Appreciation Ms. Jessica Beagan July 1, 2007
  2. Realism 1850-1880 <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Artists attempted to portray the lives, appearances, problems, customs, and morals of the middle and lower classes, of the unexceptional, the ordinary, the humble, and the unadorned. </li></ul><ul><li>In spite of its social inclinations Realism produced no new styles in architecture and few valuable sculptures. </li></ul><ul><li>Museum Quality Oil Paintings- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.huntfor.com/arthistory/c19th/realism.htm </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>The mid 19th century Realist movement chose to paint common, ordinary, sometimes ugly images rather than the stiff, conventional pictures favored by upper-class society. </li></ul><ul><li>It was an opposition to the traditional approach to Neoclassicism and the drama of Romanticism. </li></ul><ul><li>Worldwide Art Resources- </li></ul><ul><li>http:// wwar.com/masters/movements/realism.html </li></ul>
  3. Impressionism 1867-1886 <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Impressionism is a lot more a state of the mind than a technique; thus artists other than painters have also been qualified of impressionists . </li></ul><ul><li>Many of these painters ingnore the law of simultaneous contrast as established by Chevreul in 1823. </li></ul><ul><li>WebMuseum, Paris: Impressionism- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/glo/impressionism/ </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>The Impressionists in general are known for painting out of doors in a direct and painterly manner. It is a movement which had its beginnings in Paris among a group of artists who knew each other. Though Monet's early paintings of this style often include figures, he soon discovered that it was the landscape which most captured his interests. </li></ul><ul><li>Eyecon Art: Impressionism Claude Monet- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.eyeconart.net/history/impressionism.htm </li></ul>
  4. Cubism 1907-1914 <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Among the specific elements abandoned by the cubists were the sensual appeal of paint texture and color, subject matter with emotional charge or mood, the play of light on form, movement, atmosphere, and the illusionism that proceeded from scientifically based perspective. To replace these they employed an analytic system in which the three-dimensional subject (usually still life) was fragmented and redefined within a shallow plane or within several interlocking and often transparent planes. </li></ul><ul><li>Yahoo Education- Cubism </li></ul><ul><li>http://education.yahoo.com/reference/encyclopedia/entry/cubism </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>Cubist painters were not bound to copying form, texture, colour, and space; instead, they presented a new reality in paintings that depicted radically fragmented objects, whose several sides were seen simultaneously. </li></ul><ul><li>WebMuseum, Paris: Cubism- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/glo/cubism/ </li></ul>
  5. Fauvism 1905-1954 <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Fauvism was a short-lived movement, lasting only as long as its originator, Henri Matisse (1869-1954), fought to find the artistic freedom he needed. Matisse had to make color serve his art, rather as Gauguin needed to paint the sand pink to express an emotion. </li></ul><ul><li>WebMuseum, Paris: Fauvism- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/tl/20th/fauvism.html </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>The fauves rejected the impressionist palette of soft, shimmering tones in favor of radical new style, full of violent color and bold distortions. These painters never formed a movement in the strict sense of the word, but for years they would nurse a shared ambition, before each went his separate and more personal way. </li></ul><ul><li>Museum Quality Oil Paintings: Fauvism- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.huntfor.com/arthistory/C20th/fauvism.htm </li></ul>
  6. Abstraction 1910-1920 <ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>In its purest form in Western art, an abstract art is one without a recognizable subject, one which doesn't relate to anything external or try to &quot;look like&quot; something. Instead the colour and form (and often the materials and support) are the subject of the abstract painting. It's completely non-objective or non-representational. </li></ul><ul><li>About.Com: Painting- </li></ul><ul><li>http://painting.about.com/od/abstractart/a/abstract_art.htm </li></ul><ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Abstract Art is art that is not an accurate representation of a form or object.  This  representation can be differed in many ways including the shape, color, and form.  The artist takes the object and then either simplifies it or exaggerates it using these things. </li></ul><ul><li>Abstract Art and Artists- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.abstractart.20m.com/ </li></ul>
  7. Dada 1916-1923 <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Banding together in a loosely-knit group, these writers and artists used any public forum they could find to (metaphorically) spit on nationalism, rationalism, materialism and any other -ism which they felt had contributed to a senseless war. </li></ul><ul><li>About.com: Art History 101- </li></ul><ul><li>http://arthistory.about.com/cs/arthistory10one/a/dada.htm </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>Several artists employed the chance results of accident as a means of production, for instance. Literally, the word dada means several things in several languages: it's French for &quot;hobbyhorse&quot; and Slavic for &quot;yes yes.&quot; Some authorities say that the name Dada is a nonsensical word chosen at random from a dictionary. </li></ul><ul><li>Artlex: Dada- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/d/dada.html </li></ul>
  8. Surrealism 1924-1950’ s <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Surrealism is a style in which fantastical visual imagery from the subconscious mind is used with no intention of making the work logically comprehensible. </li></ul><ul><li>It was similar in some elements to the mystical 19th-century Symbolist movement, but was deeply influenced by the psychoanalytic work of Freud and Jung. </li></ul><ul><li>Art Cyclopedia- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.artcyclopedia.com/history/surrealism.html </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>As the artistic movement, Surrealism came into being after the French poet Andre Breton 1924 published the first Manifesto du surrealisme. In this book Breton suggested that rational thought was repressive to the powers of creativity and imagination and thus inimical to artistic expression. An admirer of Sigmund Freud and his concept of the subconscious, Breton felt that contact with this hidden part of the mind could produce poetic truth. </li></ul><ul><li>Museum Quality Oil Paintings: Surrealism- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.huntfor.com/arthistory/C20th/surrealism.htm </li></ul>
  9. Abstract Expressionism 1946-1960’ s <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Like many other modern movements, Abstract Expressionism does not describe any one particular style, but rather a general attitude; not all the work was abstract, nor was it all expressive. What these artists did have in common were morally loaded themes, often heavyweight and tragic, on a grand scale. </li></ul><ul><li>WebMuseum, Paris: Abstract Expressionism- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/tl/20th/abs-expr.html </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>These artists valued spontaneity and improvisation, and they accorded the highest importance to process. Their work resists stylistic categorization, but it can be clustered around two basic inclinations: an emphasis on dynamic, energetic gesture, in contrast to a reflective, cerebral focus on more open fields of color. In either case, the imagery was primarily abstract. Even when depicting images based on visual realities, the Abstract Expressionists favored a highly abstracted mode. </li></ul><ul><li>The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Abstract Expressionism- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/abex/hd_abex.htm </li></ul>
  10. Pop Art 1950’ s- 1960’ s <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Pop Art is a style of art which explores the everyday imagery that is so much a part of contemporary consumer culture. Common sources of imagery include advertisements, consumer product packaging, celebrity photographs, and comic strips. </li></ul><ul><li>Art Cyclopedia: Pop Art- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.artcyclopedia.com/history/pop.html </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>Andy Warhol's paintings of soup cans and movie stars are classic examples of Pop art. Pop artists wanted to bring art back to the people and to make it more meaningful to everyday folks. Critics saw Pop art as vulgar, sensational and without merit. Supporters liked it because they felt it was an art everybody could understand and that it brought all elements of art and life to one level. Some well-known artists of this period were Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Claes Oldenburg. </li></ul><ul><li>A Life Time of Color: Pop Art- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/study/g_pop_art.html </li></ul>
  11. Environmental Art Mid 1960 ’s- Late 1970’ s <ul><li>1. </li></ul><ul><li>Earthworks often refer to phenomena such as the slow process of erosion or to the movement of planets or stars, especially the sun. Many earthworks are intended to help us to better understand nature. Some demonstrate the inherent differences between nature and civilization, often pointing out artists' desires to understand, conquer, and control natural processes. </li></ul><ul><li>Artlex: Environmental Art/Earthworks- </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/e/earthart.html </li></ul><ul><li>2. </li></ul><ul><li>Interprets nature, creating artworks that inform us about nature and its processes, or about environmental problems we face </li></ul><ul><li>Is concerned with environmental forces and materials, creating artworks affected or powered by wind, water, lightning, even earthquakes </li></ul><ul><li>Re-envisions our relationship to nature, proposing through their work new ways for us to co-exist with our environment </li></ul><ul><li>Reclaims and remediate's damaged environments, restoring ecosystems in artistic and often aesthetic ways </li></ul><ul><li>Green Museum.Org: What is Environmental Art?- </li></ul><ul><li>http://greenmuseum.org/what_is_ea.php </li></ul>

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