Ancient Egypt
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Ancient Egypt

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Ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt Presentation Transcript

  • Ancient Egypt By: Daisy Montanez-Ortiz
  • In the Beginning
    • Ancient Egypt’s civilization began at The Delta and ran down the Nile river. The river allowed farmers to raise and maintain good crops and agriculture. The Nile river allowed the civilizations to call this their home for a long time.
    Carlos, Michael C. 2007
  • Predynastic (ca.4300-3000 BCE)
    • Naqada I (Amratian) (ca. 4300 - 3600 B.C.E.)
    • Naqada II (Gerzean) (ca. 3600 - 3150 B.C.E.)
    • Naqada III (Semainean) (ca. 3150 - 3000 B.C.E.)
    Early predynastic pottery. The main fundamental of their lives, hunting and herding cattle. Later in the predynastic period unusual ceremonial artifacts and ivory handles flint knives began to play an important role in emerging religious ritual and social hierarchy (Andrews, Mark. 2005). Andrews, Mark. 1999-2005 Andrews, Mark. 1999-2005
  • Early Dynastic (ca 3000-2675 BCE)
    • Dynasty 1 (ca. 3000 - 2800 B.C.E.)
    • Dynasty 2 (ca. 2800 - 2675 B.C.E.)
    The evolution of writing dated before the 1 st Dynasty, and shown here is the name of a city at the start of the 1 st Dynasty. Kinnaer, Jacques. 2007
    • The rise of urbanism was a very important change that marked the Early Dynastic Period. Many abandoned their countryside homes and moved to larger communities or cities (Kinnaer, J. 2007).
  • Early Dynastic (ca 3000-2675 BCE)
    • Craftsmen increased their skills and experimented with the use of more durable materials (Kinnaer, J. 2007). The Statue of Khasekhemwi was a human figure that seems like a person of power. I believe the person was sitting on a throne. The cone shaped head is actually some type of head wrap or crown. The left arm tucked under the right arm with the right arm on the right knee would signify to me that this is someone of power. The three dimensional art represents the beginning of the ancient Egypt architecture.
    Kinnaer, Jacques 2007
  • Old Kingdom (ca. 2675-2130 BCE) Dynasty 3 (ca. 2675 - 2625 B.C.E.) Dynasty 4 (ca. 2625 - 2500 B.C.E) Dynasty 5 (ca. 2500 - 2350 B.C.E.) Dynasty 6 (ca. 2350 - 2710 B.C.E) Dynasties 7-8 (ca. 2170 - 2130 B.C.E.) "the age of the pyramids"
    • The pyramids built during early Old Kingdom were not “true” pyramids, but they were the beginning of something extraordinaire. The “true” pyramids didn’t get constructed until the 4 th dynasty on.
    Imenhotep’s Stepped Pyramid Roseman, Pamela T. 2007
  • First Intermediate Period (ca.2130-1980 BCE)
    • The long reign of Pepi II and climatic changes resulted in the fall of the Old Kingdom period.
    Dynasties 9-10 (ca. 2130 - 1970 B.C.E.) Dynasty 11, Part I (ca. 2081 - 1980 B.C.E.) Kinnaer, Jacques 2007 With the decline of the royal ateliers at Memphis, the art that was produced during the 1 st intermediate period was crude, as shown by this funerary relief from Dendara (Kinnear, J. 2007).
  • Middle Kingdom (ca. 1980 - 1630 BCE) Dynasty 11, Part II (ca. 1980 - 1938 B.C.E) Dynasty 12 (ca. 1938 - 1759 B.C.E.) Dynasty 13 (ca. 1759 - after 1630 B.C.E.) Dynasty 14 (dates uncertain, but contemporary with later Dynasty 13) Arts and crafts flourished during the Middle Kingdom as is shown in this lovely amulet of Sesostris III. Kinnaer, J. 2007
    • Mentuhotep II as the second founder of Egypt, launched a new building campaign throughout the country to build impressive monuments (Kinnaer, J 2007).
    A life-size wooden statue of the 13th Dynasty king Hor I was found at Dashur. Kinnaer, J. 2007
  • 2nd Intermediate period (ca. 1630 - 1539/1523 B.C.E) Dynasty 15 (ca. 1630 - 1523 B.C.E.) Dynasty 16 (dates unknown: minor Hyksos rulers, contemporary with Dynasty 15) Dynasty 17 (ca. 1630 - 1539 B.C.E.)
    • There were wars going on during this period that resulted in the changes of territory.
    The mummy of Seqenenre shows that this king died a violent death. Whether this was on the battlefield or the result of a murderous plot is not known. Kinnaer, J. 2007.
  • New Kingdom (ca. 1539 - 1075 BCE) Dynasty 18 (ca. 1539 - 1292 B.C.E.) Dynasty 19 (ca. 1292 - 1190 B.C.E.) Dynasty 20 (ca. 1190 - 1075 B.C.E.) Thutmosis III was the greatest conqueror of the New Kingdom. Ramesses II reclaimed Egypt's lost glory through war and peace treaties.
  • Third Intermediate Period (ca. 1075 - 656 B.C.E.)
    • Period of relative peace and stability
    • By the 25 th dynasty the three Delta-dynasties allied themselves against the Nubian invasion and they were defeated. The 25 th dynasty was now the Nubian Dynasty.
    The high quality craftsman-ship of the 21st and 22nd Dynasties, as shown in this death mask of Psusennes. Kinnear, J. 2007 Dynasty 21 (ca. 1075 - 945 B.C.E.) Dynasty 22 (ca. 945 - 712 B.C.E.) Dynasty 23 (ca. 838 - 712 B.C.E.) Dynasty 24 (ca. 727 - 712 B.C.E.) Dynasty 25 (ca. 760 - 656 B.C.E.)
  • Late Period (ca. 664-332 BCE)
    • During the 29 th and 30 th Dynasty Egypt had regained independence which restored all of it’s traditions.
    Dynasty 26 (ca. 664 - 525 B.C.E.) Dynasty 27 (ca. 525 - 404 B.C.E.) Dynasty 28 (ca. 404 - 399 B.C.E.) Dynasty 29 (ca. 399 - 380 B.C.E.) Dynasty 30 (ca. 380 - 343 B.C.E.) Dynasty 31 (ca. 343 - 332 B.C.E.) A magical statue dated to the 30th Dynasty. The statue looks relaxed and at peace. Kinnaer, J 2007
  • Macedonian Period (ca. 332 - 305 B.C.E.) Alexander the Great
    • Alexander restored the damage done by the second Persian occupation.
    • After his death, Alexander’s successors continued to restore Egypt, they also supported building new temples throughout the country (Kinnaer, J 2007).
    Kinnaer, J 2007.
  • References Andres, Mark. (1999-2005). An Introduction to Egyptian Art . Retrieved June 1, 2007, from http:// www.touregypt.net/featurestories/artoverview/htm Carlos, Michael C. (2007). Egypt . Retrieved June 1, 2007, from http:// www.carlos.emory.edu/ODYSSEY/EGYPT/nilemap.html Kinnaer, Jacques. (2007). The Ancient Egypt Site . Retrieved June 1, 2007, from http://www.ancient-egypt.org/index.html Roseman, Pamela T. (2007). The Old Kingdom: the Age of Pyramids . Retrieved June 1, 2007, from http://www.gpc.edu/~proroseman/Old%20Kingdom%20Pyramids.htm