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Indian Vocational Education Sector: Trends & Opportunities (2012-2017) – New Report by Daedal Research

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The report provides an in-depth analysis of the Indian vocational education and training sector with focus on government initiatives. It assesses the key opportunities in the market and also outlines …

The report provides an in-depth analysis of the Indian vocational education and training sector with focus on government initiatives. It assesses the key opportunities in the market and also outlines the factors that are and will be driving the growth of the industry. Further, key players of the industry have been profiled.

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  • 1. View Report Details[Indian Vocational Education Segment: Trends & Opportunities (2012-2017)]
  • 2. View Report DetailsExecutive SummaryThe Indian education system is one of the largest in the world. It is divided into two segments -formal segment (schools and higher education) and non-formal (vocational education coachinginstitutes, preschools, etc.) business segment. The system of education in the nation has beenevolving from being purely knowledge based in the past to become more skill based. This hasled to emergence of niche segments like vocational training, e-learning, skill developmentcourses, among others.Vocational Education and Training (VET) being a concurrent subject, the responsibility is sharedby both central and state governments. In due course of time, VET has gained much importancein nation‟s overall education initiative. In order for VET to play greater role, it should be mademore flexible and demand- based to match skill-sets requirement in constantly changingtechnologies and industries.The „young‟ population of India on provision of adequate training can provide it withdemographic dividend vis-à-vis other nations by providing required skilled manpower for bothnational and international markets. The government has set a target to skill 500 million peopleby the end of the year 2020. It has already started working in this direction and has taken anumber of important initiatives. Traditionally vocational education training in India was providedby institutes in the public sector but now many private institutes have forayed in either alone orin association in government body in the form of public private partnership (PPP).Some of the challenges that confront VET in India are low relevance of vocational educationcourses to job market needs which leads to low success of VET graduates. There is shortage ofquality faculty in vocational training institutes as there is no provision for training of vocationalteachers. Lack of fund in these institutes and less private participation are also some of themajor setbacks for the segment. These challenges have been discussed in detail in the reportand analyst recommendations have also been included.
  • 3. View Report DetailsThe report titled “Indian Vocational Education Segment: Trend and Opportunities (2012-2017)” provides an in-depth analysis of the Indian vocational education and training sectorwith focus on government initiatives. It assesses the key opportunities in the market and alsooutlines the factors that are and will be driving the growth of the industry. Further, keyplayers of the industry like NIIT Technology, Everonn Skill Development Limited, CentumLearning Limited, IIJT, IndiaCan and ICA have been profiled and growth of the industry hasbeen predicted taking into consideration the previous growth patterns, the growth driversand the current and future trends.
  • 4. Education Sector in India: OverviewThe education sector is one of the largest services market in India with market size ofmore than 450 million students by volume in 2011. It comprises of 1.3 millionschools, 30,000 colleges and 542 universities. Indian Education Industry, Market Indian Education Industry Segmentation by Size, 2007-2011(US$ Billion) Category (2010) Higher education Coaching K-12 institutes Vocational Pre- education schools 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E • The industry grew at a CAGR of ………% during the period 2007-2012. • Indian education sector consists of K-12, higher education, pre-schools, coaching institutes and vocational education. K-12 is the biggest segment of the Indian education sector, accounting for ………….% of the total market share in 2010.
  • 5. Indian Vocational Education Segment : OverviewVocational education plays an important role in the Indian education system. Indiaas a country has quantitative advantage when it comes to workforce but in termsof quality, it has inefficient workforce. Indian Vocational Education Segment, Market Indian Vocational Education, Market Size Size, 2007-2011 (US$ Billion) Forecast, 2012-2017 (US$ Billion) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E 2017E• The industry grew at a CAGR of ………% during the period 2007-2011.• Market size of Vocational Education in 2017 is expected to reach to US$ ………..billion from US$ ……… billion in 2012 by growing at a CAGR of……%.• Growth in the industry is due to …………………………………………….
  • 6. Market TrendsIncreasing demand for skilled Government’s increased emphasisworkforce on vocational education• ……………………………………………………. • …………………………………………………….• ……………………………………………………. • …………………………………………………….• …………………………………………………… • ……………………………………………………• ………………………………………………….. • …………………………………………………..• …………………………………………………… • …………………………………………………… Private participation Private Equity Funds in the sector• ……………………………………………………. • …………………………………………………….• ……………………………………………………. • …………………………………………………….• …………………………………………………… • ……………………………………………………• ………………………………………………………. • …………………………………………………..• ………………………………………………….. • …………………………………………………….
  • 7. Table of Contents1. Executive Summary 7.6 ICA2. Indian Education Segment 8. Recommendation2.1 Industry Structure 9. About Us2.2 Market Size 10. Disclaimer3. Vocational Education in India3.1 Vocation Education and Training Structure3.2 Vocational fields3.3 Vocational Education and Training in IndianScenario3.4 Market Size4. Market Trends4.1 Increasing demand for skilled workforce4.2 Government‟s increased emphasis onvocational education4.3 Private participation4.4 Private Equity Funds in the sector5. Drivers & Challenges5.1 Drivers5.2 Challenges6. Indian Vocational Education Segment :PESTAnalysis7. Company Profiles7.1 Everonn Skill Development Limited (ESDL)7.2 NIIT Technology7.3 Centum Learning Limited7.4 IIJT7.4 IndiaCan
  • 8. List of ChartsFigure 1: Indian Education Industry StructureFigure 2: Indian Education Industry, Market Size, 2007-2011(US$ Billion)Figure 3: Indian Education Industry Segmentation by Category (2010)Figure 4: Indian Education Industry ClassificationFigure 5: Indian Vocation Education Industry StructureFigure 6: Indian Vocational Education Segment, Market Size, 2007-2011 (US$ Billion)Figure 7: Indian Vocational Education, Market Size Forecast, 2012-2017 (US$ Billion)Figure 8: Labour Supply-Demand Gap in Various Countries (2010)Figure 9: Percentage Expenditure of ITIs (2009)Figure 10: Percentage Expenditure of ITCs (2009)Figure 11: Enrollment in ITI/ITC by type of tradeFigure 12: Enrollment in private Institutions by type of tradeFigure 13: India Real GDP Growth, 2006-2012Figure 14: Expenditure on Education as Percentage of GDPFigure 15: Real GDP per Capita, 2006-2011 (US$)Figure 16: Expenditure on Education as Percentage of GDP