TIC TAK - Video Games In The Classroom
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TIC TAK - Video Games In The Classroom

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This session will demonstrate the use of games for K-12 students in an online environment across a variety of subject areas. Participants will be presented with the theory behind educational games......

This session will demonstrate the use of games for K-12 students in an online environment across a variety of subject areas. Participants will be presented with the theory behind educational games as well as demonstrations of how to use games in class to improve student performance. Teachers will become familiar with the use of single and multi-player games to reinforce basic skills as well as to support higher-order thinking and problem solving. Internet-based games will be presented along with ways to encourage collaboration, create emotional connections and enhance motivation. Common concerns about the use of games in the classroom will be addressed and discussed. Ever think you'd see your students spending hours voluntarily doing math drills or discussing economic theories? It can happen!

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  • "A guild master must be adept at many skills: attracting, evaluating, and recruiting new members; creating apprenticeship programs; orchestrating group strategy; and adjudicating disputes. Guilds routinely splinter over petty squabbles and other basic failures of management; the master must resolve them without losing valuable members, who can easily quit and join a rival guild." Brown, J.S. & Thomas, D. (2006). "You Play World of Warcraft? You're Hired!" Wired 14.04. http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/14.04/learn.html Core Subjects and 21 st Century Themes Math, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies Global Awareness and Civic Literacy Economic and Business Literacy Health Literacy Learning and Innovation Skills Creativity, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Communication and Collaboration Information Media and Technology Skills Information and Media Literacy - Communication and Technology Literacy Life and Career Skills Flexibility and Adaptability - Initiative, Productivity, and Self-direction Social Skills - Leadership, Accountability and Responsibility
  • http://www.wordspy.com/words/thumbculture.asp http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,6903,673103,00.html http://www.pliink.com/mt/marxy/archives/2007/03/the-second-digi.html The " thumb tribe " ( 親指族 ) - who primarily input text through the telephone numerical layout - show serious inexperience with using PCs and with typing on a real keyboard. They are "retrogressing" to a point where they have the pathetic PC skills of their out-of-date elders. Over the last six years, almost all age groups have seen their share of total home PC access usage increase - except for 20 year-olds who have dropped from making up 23.6% to now only 11.9%. This current rate means that they make up an almost identical proportion of the total as 50 year-olds. Kids are saying that they use e-mail to talk to their teachers, or for their jobs. “E-mail is useful for talking to adults.” Most of their interpersonal contact is via IM, or through postings on social networking sites.
  • 18:02-19:00 - Jenkins New media is adopted early by kids. Generation growing up with a technology treat it in a pragmatic manner. Next generation of teachers will have had game experience and it will be part of their culture. 20:44-21:05 - Gee The future is going to belong to people who are tech savvy and comfortable with technology, who don't view tech learning as hard or special but instead as an everyday thing. Active Web 2.0 – students are creators. In his book Joystick Nation , J.C. Herz wrote “TV turned kids of the fifties and sixties into a nation of screen watchers, videogames have created a cadre of screen manipulators”. At the very least, kids expect to be able to comment. Usually they want to construct. Multi-tasking The brain is linear in its application. Multi-tasking is really quickly switching and frequently between tasks. This comes naturally to a digital native, but makes non-natives uncomfortable. Non-linear thinking Hypertext and information on demand allows students to explore. Depth of thought is often exchanged for breadth of experience, leaving detailed information for on-demand searching – why memorize the periodic table when you can look it up whenever you need it? Be aware stat student research may lead them away from their initial topic idea. Ubiquity Technology is everywhere, and kids expect to be able to connect with anyone, anytime. See “periodic table” above Technical Fluency Compare to a person who is speaking a foreign language. Even if you speak it well, a native speaker sounds like he is talking faster. A digital native just “knows” how to interact with technology just as a native of a foreign country knows how to interact in a new situation. A native speaker uses nuances, slang, and assumptions of cultural reference. “Invisible bike” or “Leeeroy Jenkins” Feedback Instant feedback is expected. Students will desire frequent reward opportunities. Very clear goals and requirements are desired. And those goals should be individualized as much as possible (next) Individualization Digital Natives expect that their technology will be customized for them. Gone are the days of the model-T (“any color you want as long as it is black”) or the princess phone. Web sites, stores, music, and even material things are individual and customized. Risk-takers Losing a game or failing a task just means that you need to try again. Learning new technology (which happens all the time) is a matter of just trying something and watching how it responds. Mastery priciples should come into play to give students more opportunities – errors are chances to grow rather than failures to learn. Information sifting Students can manage vast amounts of information. They can quickly categorize data and find the relevant parts. For example, embedded advertising and popup windows.

Transcript

  • 1. Video Games in the Classroom Doug Adams ALTEC
  • 2. Why Games?
    • 21 st Century Skills
  • 3. The Millennial Generation
    • Millennials
    • Generation Y
    • N-Gen, Generation Next
    • Digital Natives
    • Oyayubizoku ( 親指族 ) “Thumb Tribe”
    “ Kids say e-mail is, like, sooooo dead.” – CNET News , July 18, 2007
  • 4. The Millennial Generation
    • “ Today’s students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach”
      • Mark Prensky
  • 5. Millennial Attitudes
    • “ I have to ‘ power down ’ when I go to school.”
    • “ When I am really busy, I hate going to school because I can’t do any work there.”
  • 6. Characteristics of Digital Natives
    • Active
    • Multi-tasking
    • Non-linear thinking
    • Ubiquity
    • Technical Fluency
    • Feedback
    • Individualization
    • Risk-taking
    • Collaborative
  • 7. But how will people learn in a world that is so… VIRTUAL?
    • From Scientific American, Aug, 1902:
    [C]hildren cope more easily with the new necessities of life, and new arrangements which perplexed their parents become habits easily borne. Thus we may imagine future generations perfectly calm among a hundred telephones and sleeping sweetly while airships whizz among countless electric wires over their heads and a perpetual night traffic of motor cars hurtles past their bedroom windows. As yet, our nervous systems are not so callous.
  • 8. Brain Research
    • The brain developed to solve problems related to surviving in an unstable outdoor environment that occur in near constant motion.
      • John Medina, Brain Rules
  • 9. Brain Research
    • If you wanted to create an educational environment that is directly opposed to the way the brain is good at doing, you would probably design something like the modern classroom .
      • John Medina, Brain Rules
  • 10. Patterns
    • The human brain loves patterns. We see patterns all around, in everyday life, in nature, in manmade objects.
    • We see patterns even when they don’t exist
  • 11.  
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15. Emotion
    • Our brains work best when there are emotions involved
      • Excitement
      • Engagement
      • Enthusiasm
      • Exploration
      • Frustration
  • 16. Collaboration
    • Our brains want to work with others
  • 17. Games…
    • …provide structured patterns
    • …create emotional connections
    • …encourage collaboration
  • 18.
    • “ Better theories of learning are embedded in the video games many children play than in the schools they attend.”
      • James Paul Gee What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy
  • 19. What kinds of theories?
    • Student-centered learning
    • Peer teaching
    • Feedback
    • Problem-solving
    • Empathy, role-play
    • Collaboration
    • Practice
    • Development of expertise
    • Scaffolding
  • 20. Umm, what?
  • 21. Concerns about Games
    • They cause violence
    • They are just for boys
    • They are just for kids
    • They are just for solitary loners who spend all their time in the basement eating Cheetohs and drinking Mountain Dew
  • 22. Scientific American
    • A pernicious excitement to learn and play _____ has spread all over the country, and numerous clubs for playing this game have been formed in cities and villages. Why should we regret this? It may be asked.
    • We answer, _____ is a mere amusement of very inferior character, which robs the mind of valuable time that might be devoted to nobler acquirements, while it affords no benefit whatever to the body.
    • _____ has acquired a high reputation as being a means to discipline the mind, but persons engaged in sedentary occupations should never practice this cheerless game; they require out-door exercises—not this sort of mental gladiatorship.
  • 23. Scientific American, July, 1859
    • A pernicious excitement to learn and play chess has spread all over the country, and numerous clubs for playing this game have been formed in cities and villages. Why should we regret this? It may be asked.
    • We answer, chess is a mere amusement of very inferior character, which robs the mind of valuable time that might be devoted to nobler acquirements, while it affords no benefit whatever to the body.
    • Chess has acquired a high reputation as being a means to discipline the mind, but persons engaged in sedentary occupations should never practice this cheerless game; they require out-door exercises—not this sort of mental gladiatorship.
  • 24. Challenges for Teachers
    • Time
    • Alignment with Standards
    • Cost
      • Software
      • Hardware
    • Assessment
      • Rubrics, participation, presentations
  • 25. ALTEC Games
    • http://arcademicskillbuilders.com/
      • Math and Language Arts
    • http://www.4kids.org/
      • Angles and Coordinates
  • 26. More Game Examples
    • Food Force
    • Stop Disasters
    • Magic Pen
    • You Are the Historian
    • Team Treks
    • Third World Farmer
    • Minyanland
    • ElectroCity
    • Nanoquest
    • Real Lives
    • Traveler IQ
    • The Forbidden City
    • Virtual History: Settling America
    • Discover Babylon
    • Dimension Math
    • Lunar Quest
    • Web Rangers
    • Peacemaker
    • Budget Hero
  • 27. Doug Adams [email_address] http://altec.org