• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Project-Based Learning - USD 340
 

Project-Based Learning - USD 340

on

  • 1,947 views

Uploaded as part of the PBL workshop at Jefferson West USD 340 on November 17, 2009

Uploaded as part of the PBL workshop at Jefferson West USD 340 on November 17, 2009

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,947
Views on SlideShare
1,946
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
68
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Project-Based Learning - USD 340 Project-Based Learning - USD 340 Presentation Transcript

    • Project-Based Learning, Higher-Order Thinking, and Student-Centered Instruction Doug Adams ALTEC [email_address]
    • First activity!
      • As you are watching the movie clip, write questions you might ask
        • On a test
        • To the characters
        • To the actors/writers/producer
    • Bloom’s Cognitive Taxonomy (1956)
    • Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy (2001) (Anderson & Krathwohl et al , eds., 2001) “ Knowledge” “ Comprehension” “ Synthesis”
    • Mind-set Verbs Apply: Do, use, organize, collect, operate, summarize, practice, solve, try Remember: State, show, list, tally, define, identify, repeat, recall, label, quote Understand: Restate, reword, describe, illustrate, review, discuss, explain (in your own words) Create: Develop, invent, extend, hypothesize, compose Evaluate: Judge, interpret, justify, assess, weigh, appraise, criticize Analyze: Extract, deduce, investigate, fill in, combine, disassemble,
    • Organizing Bloom’s Taxonomy
      • Level 3: High
        • Creating something unique (to the learner)
        • Making judgments, choices, decisions
        • Breaking down concepts into component parts
      • Level 2: Intermediate
        • Using information, skills, and concepts in new situations
      • Level 1: Low
        • Understanding and interpreting information
        • Acquiring and remembering new information
    • Supporting Higher-Order Thinking
      • It is estimated that 90% of all test questions asked in the US are of “Low level” - knowledge and comprehension (Wilen, W.W., 1992)
      • “ Low level” doesn’t mean easy:
          • Write an essay explaining the decline and fall of the Roman Empire incorporating at least five of the seven causes discussed in class from the writings of Gibbon and Toynbee
      • “ High level” doesn’t mean hard:
          • Which movie did you like more, WALL-E or Cars ? Why?
    • Complex Thinking Strategies
      • Decision Making
      • Reasoning
      • Investigation
      • Experimental Inquiry
      • Directed Problem Solving
      • Creative Problem Solving
      • Reflective Thinking
    • Complex Thinking Strategies
      • Identify some complex thinking strategies being used in this video
    • Curriculum-Framing Questions
      • Guide a unit of study and include:
        • Essential Questions
        • Unit Questions
        • Content Questions
    • Essential Questions
        • Are broad, open-ended questions
        • Address big ideas and enduring concepts
        • Often cross disciplines and help students see how subjects are related
        • Example:
          • Why is math important to my life?
          • How does conflict produce change?
          • What lessons can be learned by running a city?
    • Unit Questions
        • Are open-ended questions that tie directly to a project or unit
        • Help students demonstrate the scope of their understanding of a subject
        • Examples:
          • How important is measurement in building a home?
          • How are changes in economics a factor in war?
          • In the story, Charlotte’s Web , how do the animals’ different abilities help Wilbur survive and succeed?
          • How does stress on the environment impact biology?
    • Content Questions
        • Are fact-based, concrete questions
        • Have a narrow set of correct answers
        • Often relate to definitions, identifications, and general recall of information (example: questions found on a test)
      • Examples:
          • How do you find the values of unknowns in equations?
          • What is a fable?
          • Who is the main character in To Kill a Mockingbird ?
          • How are volcanoes made?
          • Why is it cold in the winter when the sun is shining?
    • Project-Based Learning (PBL)
      • “ I hear and I forget.
      • I see and I remember.
      • I do and I understand . ”
      • -- (Confucius)
    • Why Projects?
      • To learn collaboration, work in teams .
      • To learn critical thinking, take on problems .
      • To learn oral communication, present .
      • To learn written communication, write .
      • To learn technology, use technology .
      • To develop citizenship, take on civic issues .
      • To learn about careers, do internships .
      • To learn content, do all of the above .
    • Project-Based Learning
      • Hands-on, student-centered activity in which students demonstrate understanding through performance/creation
      • Long-term
      • Non-traditional
      • Personalized
      • Mastery of material in context
      • http:// www.edutopia.org /project-learning-overview-video
    • Benefits of PBL
      • Increased motivation and engagement
      • Increased application and retention
      • Better transfer of skills
      • 21 st Century Skills:
        • critical thinking
        • collaboration
        • Communication
      • Connects school to real world
      • Multiple assessment opportunities
    • Challenges with PBL
      • Designing projects
        • Resources
        • Time
        • Expertise
      • Assessing projects
        • Meeting standards
        • Reliability and validity
        • Rubrics
      • Resistance from establishment
    • Examples
      • Edutopia
        • Barrel of Worms ( http:// www.edutopia.org/newsome -park )
        • Monarch Butterflies ( http://www.edutopia.org/journey-north )
      • Matrix
        • http:// www.youtube.com/user/matrixlearning
    • Steps to Creating a Project
      • Develop an idea
      • Decide goals
      • Define the knowledge to be demonstrated
      • Decide how students can demonstrate that knowledge
      • Create a schedule
      • Create an assessment plan
      • Monitor project and evaluate
    • 1) Develop an idea
      • Start with a driving question – Essential or Unit question, NOT Content
      • Be authentic
        • Use real-world problems
        • Tie to community or school life
        • Allow students to have an impact
      • Be current
      • Involve students
      • Use what you know
    • Driving Question
      • Shift from “right answer” to complex, local, active questions:
      • What are the characteristics of healthy soil?
      • vs
      • Is our soil healthy enough to support a vegetable garden?
    • Driving Question
      • Shift from abstract to concrete:
      • How do architects use geometry?
      • vs
      • How can we design a building with the most number of apartments with the given specifications?
    • Driving Question
      • Shift from “too big” to answerable:
      • How has technology affected history?
      • vs
      • Does technology make war more or less humane?
    • Driving Question
      • Shift from “teacher talk” to student-friendly:
      • How does the author of Bleak House use voice and characterization to reflect on his childhood and the social climate?
      • vs
      • How do our childhood memories affect how we see the world?
    • Activity
      • Look at an existing unit that you enjoy
      • Come up with a driving question to use as inspiration for a project
        • Can work solo or teamed (no more than 3)
        • Driving question should reflect input from all
    • 2) Decide goals
      • Core content and skills to be assessed
      • 21 st Century skills to be assessed
      • Additional content to be encouraged
      • What standards will be addressed?
    • 3) Make a plan
      • Involve students
        • How can we answer this question?
        • What can we do to support the inquiry?
      • Look at available resources
        • Primary sources online
        • Local resources
        • Internet
    • Primary Source Material
      • Engage Students
        • Tie to prior knowledge
        • Evaluate the source
        • Look at details
        • Make it personal
      • Promote Inquiry
        • Make speculations (creator, purpose, audience)
        • Compare to other primary and secondary sources
        • Talk about other places to find primary sources
    • Primary Source Example
      • Library of Congress ( http:// www.loc.gov )
        • American Memory Project
        • World Digital Library
        • Thomas – Legislation Information
        • Veteran’s history
        • Teacher Resources
    • More Primary Sources
      • Similar resources exist at many high-level government sites
        • Geology & Geography ( http://USGS.gov )
        • Space and Physics ( http://NASA.gov )
        • Oceanography & Meteorology ( http://NOAA.gov )
        • Health & Medicine ( http://CDC.gov & http://HHS.gov )
        • Energy ( http://www.energy.gov )
        • Smithsonian Museums ( http:// si.edu )
    • Project-Based Learning Resources
      • Buck Institute for Education (BIE)
        • http://www.bie.org
      • Edutopia
        • http://www.edutopia.org/project-learning
        • http://www.edutopia.org/teaching-module-pbl
      • ePals
        • http://www.epals.org
      • iEARN (International Education and Resource Network)
        • http://www.iearn.org/
    • 3) Create a schedule
      • What time can be allotted to the project?
        • Start with “contact hours”
        • How many days?
        • Regular schedule or ad hoc?
        • What events have a fixed time?
        • Will multiple classrooms be involved?
      • Help students budget time
        • Involve students in creating timeline
        • Fixed benchmarks
        • Help with time management
    • Activity
      • In groups, fill in more of the Project Planning Form
        • Content and skills to be assessed
        • Content and skills to be encouraged
        • Standards
        • Description
        • Brainstorm resources
        • Think about time limits and benchmarks
    • 4) Create an assessment plan
      • Involve students in planning
      • Rubrics
        • Self
        • Peer
        • Teacher
        • Expert
      • Assess identified skills from goals
      • Plan for differentiation
    • Activity
      • Complete Project Planning Form
        • Describe final project
          • Who is the audience?
        • What rubrics will you need to create?
        • What other assessments will you need?
        • What will you need to accommodate through differentiation?
    • 5) Monitor and evaluate
      • Be a mentor, not a director
      • Help students stick to the timeline
      • Remind students of rubrics
      • Reflect often
      • Discuss what worked and what didn’t
      • Plan for changes
      • Share ideas for new projects
    • Differentiated Instruction & Technology
      • Adapting educational activities and instructional approaches to meet the needs of all students within a single classroom
      • Students vary in many ways:
      • Background Knowledge
      • Readiness
      • Language Skills
      • Learning Styles
      • Interests
      • more?
    • Differentiated Instruction
    • Differentiation - Content
      • Student selection of topics/interests
      • Compacting the curriculum
      • Accelerated or remedial activities
      • Example: ThinkTank ( http://thinktank.4teachers.org )
    • Differentiation - Process
      • Vary the expectations and requirements
      • Allow students to participate in setting goals
      • Combine group work with individual activities
      • Example: RubiStar and PBL Checklists
      • ( http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ )
      • ( http://pblchecklist.4teachers.org/ )
    • Differentiation - Product
      • Allow students to demonstrate knowledge in a variety of ways
      • Vary performance expectations
      • Example: KidsVid and Web Poster Wizard
      • ( http:// kidsvid.altec.org / )
      • ( http://poster.4teachers.org/ )