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Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
Csla presentation reading online 2011
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Csla presentation reading online 2011

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Explores trends and research in online reading. Provides strategies for teaching online reading.

Explores trends and research in online reading. Provides strategies for teaching online reading.

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  • 1. Reading Online: Responding to the Changing Literacy Landscape California School Library Association Conference, Nov. 2011 Doug Achterman Teacher Librarian San Benito High School [email_address] http://caschoollibraries.pbworks.com
  • 2. <ul><li>While we’re waiting to get started, brainstorm a long list of skills good readers exhibit. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Good readers ______________. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connect reading to prior knowledge. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Connect reading to own lives and world. </li></ul></ul>
  • 3. Survey <ul><li>Who’s in the room? </li></ul>
  • 4. The Plan REVISE <ul><li>What good readers do </li></ul><ul><li>Why reading online matters </li></ul><ul><li>Differences between reading in print and online </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies for building online reading skills </li></ul>
  • 5. Good Readers…What’s missing? <ul><li>Set a Purpose for Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Preview the Text </li></ul><ul><li>Activate Background Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Predict </li></ul><ul><li>Cross - check </li></ul><ul><li>Visualize </li></ul><ul><li>Use text structure cues and aides. </li></ul><ul><li>Reread </li></ul><ul><li>Predict and Confirm </li></ul><ul><li>Infer </li></ul><ul><li>Connect to other texts, other knowledge, own life and experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Skip, read on, go back. </li></ul><ul><li>Retell and Summarize </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions </li></ul><ul><li>Draw conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesize </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor own comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>Know when to skim, skip, scan, slow down. </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate </li></ul>
  • 6.  
  • 7. Common Core Standards (CCS) <ul><li>“ Students Who are College and Career Ready in Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, and Language: </li></ul>  Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2010).  Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects . Washington, DC: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers.
  • 8. CCS: College-ready students: <ul><li>“ Use technology and digital media strategically and capably.” </li></ul>
  • 9. CCS: College-ready students: <ul><li>“ Tailor their searches online to acquire useful information efficiently.” </li></ul>
  • 10. CCS: College-ready students: <ul><li>“ Integrate what they learn using technology with what they learn offline.” </li></ul>
  • 11. CCS: College-ready students: <ul><li>“ Are familiar with the strengths and limitations of various technological tools.” </li></ul>
  • 12. CCS: College-ready students: <ul><li>“ Can select and use those (tools which are) best suited to their communication goals.” </li></ul>
  • 13. On the NAEP Horizon: Technology and Engineering Assessment 2014 <ul><li>“ Students will be asked to perform a variety of actions using a diverse set of tools in the process of solving problems and meeting goals within rich, complex scenarios that reflect realistic situations .” 2014 NAEP Technology and Engineering Literacy Framework – Pre Publication Edition   available http://www.edgateway.net/cs/naepsci/download/lib/249/prepub_naep_tel_ framework.pdf?x-r=pcfile_d National Assessment of Educational Progress </li></ul>
  • 14. Sample constructed-response questions being considered for 2014 NAEP test.
  • 15. Sample constructed-response questions being considered for 2014 NAEP test.
  • 16. Sample constructed-response questions being considered for 2014 NAEP test.
  • 17. In this example, students use various tools to explore the factors that affect plant growth in a greenhouse (Grade 12)
  • 18.  
  • 19.  
  • 20. NAEP Tech&Engineering Framework: <ul><li>“ This item represents a sample task in which students must use their knowledge about the engineering design process to answer a constructed response item.” </li></ul>
  • 21. What must students be able to do in order to: <ul><li>Understand the problem/question? </li></ul><ul><li>Locate and use the tools available on this site to gather information? </li></ul><ul><li>Assess which information on the site is important and which is irrelevant? </li></ul>
  • 22.  
  • 23. Leu et al., 2008 <ul><li>Many students’ online reading ability can be predicted by their print reading test scores. </li></ul>PRINT ONLINE EXAMPLE 1 EXAMPLE 2
  • 24. BUT: <ul><li>Some students’ online ability is only weakly linked to their print reading comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>ability. </li></ul>Leu, D. J., Zawilinski, L., Castek, J., Banerjee, M., Housand, B., Liu, Y., & O’Neil, M. (2008). What is new about the new literacies of online reading comprehension? In A. Berger, L. Rush, & J. Eakle (Eds.) Secondary school reading and writing: What research reveals for classroom practices . NCTE/NCRLL: Chicago, IL. PRINT ONLINE EXAMPLE 3 EXAMPLE 4
  • 25. Implications? <ul><li>Talk it over… </li></ul>
  • 26. Transfer <ul><li>When (educators) add laptops to classes and equip kids with on-campus digital tools, they add something else, too: the reading habits kids have developed after thousands of hours with those same tools in leisure time. Mark Bauerlein, “Online Literacy is a Lesser Kind,” Chronicle of Higher Education 54 (31), 2008. </li></ul>
  • 27. Guiding Questions <ul><li>What are the key differences between online and print reading? </li></ul><ul><li>As more and more academic reading is done online, what strategies can we offer that will build students’ academic reading skills? </li></ul>
  • 28. Coiro, J. (2009). Rethinking online reading assessment . Educational Leadership 66 (6), 59-63.
  • 29. In the Online Reading Comprehension Assessment (ORCA), Students <ul><li>“ Locate relevant information using a search engine.” </li></ul>
  • 30. In the ORCA, Students <ul><li>“ Verify information with at least one other source.” </li></ul>
  • 31. In the ORCA, Students <ul><li>“ Efficiently communicate electronic Web addresses so the receiver can quickly return to the appropriate location.” </li></ul>
  • 32. In the ORCA, Students <ul><li>“ Critically evaluate the information's accuracy.” </li></ul>
  • 33. Skilled Online Readers Can <ul><li>Efficiently use search engines </li></ul><ul><li>Navigate multilayered Web sites </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor the appropriateness of their pathway through a complex network of connected text. </li></ul><ul><li>Coiro, J. & Dobler, E. (2007). Exploring the online comprehension strategies used by sixth-grade skilled readers to search for and locate information on the Internet. Reading Research Quarterly (42), 214-257. </li></ul>
  • 34. Fisher, Lapp, & Wood <ul><ul><li>Print: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2-D </li></ul></ul>Fisher, D., Lapp, D., & Wood, K. (2011). Reading for details in online and printed text: a prerequisite for deep reading. Middle School Journal 42 (3) 58-63.
  • 35. <ul><ul><li>Online: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3-D </li></ul></ul>
  • 36. Fisher, Lapp, & Wood <ul><ul><li>Establish purpose </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Graphic organizers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitate discussions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slow down. </li></ul></ul>Fisher, D., Lapp, D., & Wood, K. (2011). Reading for details in online and printed text: a prerequisite for deep reading. Middle School Journal 42 (3) 58-63.
  • 37. Fisher, Lapp, & Wood <ul><ul><li>Establish purpose </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Graphic organizers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitate discussions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slow down. </li></ul></ul>Fisher, D., Lapp, D., & Wood, K. (2011). Reading for details in online and printed text: a prerequisite for deep reading. Middle School Journal 42 (3) 58-63.
  • 38. Think-Alouds as Modeling <ul><li>Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Guided practice/ Independent practice </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection </li></ul>Coiro, J. (2011). Talking about reading as thinking: modeling the hidden complexities of online reading comprehension. Theory into Practice 50(2 ) 107-115.
  • 39. Modeling <ul><li>Embed in content area curriculum. No disconnected scavenger hunts! </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the skills students will need to accomplish the online reading task. </li></ul>
  • 40. Modeling <ul><li>Anticipate the road blocks students will encounter. </li></ul><ul><li>Practice the think-aloud, emphasizing the key strategies students need practice employing. </li></ul>
  • 41. Modeling <ul><li>Don’t overdo it. Too much is too much. </li></ul>
  • 42. Coiro, J. (2011). Talking about reading as thinking: modeling the hidden complexities of online reading comprehension. Theory into Practice 50(2 ) 107-115.
  • 43. Coiro, J. (2011). Talking about reading as thinking: modeling the hidden complexities of online reading comprehension. Theory into Practice 50(2 ) 107-115. Teacher's guide for planning think-aloud lessons for online reading comprehension: https://sites.google.com/site/tiponlinethinkaloudlessons/home
  • 44.  
  • 45. Today we’re going to use this site as a starting point to create a brochure that helps other students understand what cancer is, what different cancers have in common, and whether or not cancer is contagious. We’ll also rate this site for ease of use, reliability, and quality of information, so we can decide whether or not to recommend it as a resource for other students. . Practice your think-aloud with your partner. What skills or strategies will you emphasize? What troubles, confusions, or road blocks can you anticipate? How will you address these in your think-aloud?
  • 46.  
  • 47. Modeling, Part 2 <ul><li>Be explicit about the relationships between online reading comprehension strategies and “traditional” strategies. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask specific questions about similarities and differences between print and online texts. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach text structure </li></ul>See Coiro, J. (2009). Promising practices for supporting adolescents’ online literacy development. In K.D. Wood and W.E. Blanton (Eds.). Promoting literacy with adolescent learners: Research-based instruction. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  • 48.  
  • 49.  
  • 50. Sample questions from Beyersdorfer’s lesson: If the site were a book, how many chapters would it have? What would be the title of Chapter Three?
  • 51.  
  • 52.  
  • 53. Think-Alouds as Modeling <ul><li>Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Guided practice/ Independent practice </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection </li></ul>Coiro, J. (2011). Talking about reading as thinking: modeling the hidden complexities of online reading comprehension. Theory into Practice 50(2 ) 107-115.
  • 54. Guided practice/Independent practice <ul><li>Pair students strategically when possible—especially minding language abilities. </li></ul>
  • 55. Guided practice/Independent practice <ul><li>Have students think aloud with their partners as they navigate through the activity (this requires modeling and practice, too). </li></ul>This is confusing. Should I click on the link for more information, or should I read what it says here?
  • 56. Guided practice/Independent practice <ul><li>Explore another resource or part of a site with the whole class, prompting for responses. </li></ul>
  • 57. Reflection <ul><li>Provide sentence frames and other scaffolds for structured responses as needed. </li></ul><ul><li>Example : </li></ul><ul><li>When I first opened this web page, what I didn’t understand right away was____________. </li></ul><ul><li>The part of this site that was most helpful was__________, because_________. </li></ul>
  • 58. Reflection <ul><li>It’s okay to set a timer and have students stop and reflect along the way at intervals. </li></ul><ul><li>Why might this be beneficial? </li></ul>
  • 59. Reflection Sidebar <ul><li>Assessing reflections: </li></ul><ul><li>Create a Google Form to have students complete at intervals. Answers come to you in a spread sheet, which you can sort and analyze as they come in. </li></ul>
  • 60.  
  • 61.  
  • 62.  
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  • 66.  
  • 67. Capturing and Assessing <ul><li>Google Forms: Quick reflections on both process and content. </li></ul><ul><li>Camtasia or iShowU (or even Jing—free!) to capture one or two students thinking aloud as they work. </li></ul>
  • 68. Assessing <ul><li>Create content-centered assessments that are dependent on online reading ability. </li></ul><ul><li>Assess both. </li></ul>
  • 69. What good readers do <ul><li>Use prior knowledge. They relate information to what they already know. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Text-to-self (relate to their own experiences) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Text-to-text (relate to other things they've read) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Text-to-world (relate to other things they know about the world)   </li></ul></ul>
  • 70. Slow Down: Cut/Paste/Comment <ul><li>Relate information to what they already know (Text to self). </li></ul>
  • 71. Slow Down: Cut/Paste/Comment <ul><li>Relate information to what they already know (Text to text). </li></ul>
  • 72. <ul><li>Relate information to what they already know (Text to world). </li></ul>Slow Down: Cut/Paste/Comment How this connects to the world today
  • 73. <ul><li>Ask questions about what they’re reading </li></ul>Slow Down: Cut/Paste/Comment My Question about This
  • 74. <ul><li>Make inferences, including predictions and conclusions </li></ul>Slow Down: Cut/Paste/Comment This passage suggests…because…
  • 75. Slow Down: Cut/Paste/Comment <ul><li>Retell or sum up </li></ul>In my own words
  • 76. Diigo <ul><li>Diigo Educator Accounts: students don’t need e-mail addresses. </li></ul><ul><li>Create groups to share web notes and discuss research. </li></ul>
  • 77. Evernote
  • 78. Final Thoughts <ul><li>Reading online requires an additional set of strategies to negotiate effectively. It’s time to start teaching those strategies. </li></ul><ul><li>Much of what we used to call information literacy has a new name: literacy. </li></ul><ul><li>When we talk to other educators about searching, organizing, and evaluating in an online environment, we can refer to these as READING skills. </li></ul>

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