4 Steps to Creating Customer Oxygen STYLE STANDARDS
<ul><li>A Story </li></ul>
Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
 
 
This is what he got… <ul><li>“ Pricey and gross, but fun for boys” </li></ul><ul><li>“ If you want your child to cry, buy ...
Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
Her fault
Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
<ul><li>The Real Tragedy… </li></ul><ul><li>Still sold after this 77 th  review and up to 177 reviews (over a year) </li><...
op·er·a·tion·al·ise v.  put into operation or use.
4 Steps to Start Getting the Customer Voice Heard Everywhere
4 Steps to Customer Oxygen <ul><li>Start with the P&L </li></ul><ul><li>Get customers participating </li></ul><ul><li>Get ...
<ul><li>Start with the P&L </li></ul><ul><li>(by ending with the P&L) </li></ul>
Does Your Program have Soft or Solid Metrics? Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
<ul><li>Get  Customers Participating </li></ul>
Is This How You Think of Customer Value? Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
Compete on Participation Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc. Cultivating user involvement  so that eac...
The reputation economy requires a new way of marketing… Participation Chain
Example: JVC starts with a review… Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
… And links to answers Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
<ul><li>Get Employees Participating </li></ul>
Get others involved <ul><li>The IKEA Effect </li></ul>Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc. Labor undert...
Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
<ul><li>Peacock-ing </li></ul><ul><li>+ </li></ul><ul><li>Woodpeck-ing </li></ul>
Peacock-ing Launch a turning point event the organization can’t miss. Every person at every level will have to stop and lo...
% Woodpeck-ing Engaging the organization’s core repetitively, persistently, tirelessly.
<ul><li>Tell  Your  Stories </li></ul>
The Customer & Dell are Engaged Customer Affirmation tool for customers considering purchase  and provide feedback to Dell...
A quick bedtime story <ul><li>A pricey activity table suffers from being too “soft”… </li></ul>
Here comes the shocking part… <ul><li>The Land of Nod analysed the comments, reengineered the table and then sent replacem...
Improving products… <ul><li>Client improved over 700 products in five months </li></ul><ul><li>Key cross-functional teams ...
Thank you! <ul><li>Sam Decker, Chief Marketing Officer </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: @samde...
 
4 million visits a week Visits = Users = Customers = People!
Bazarvoice Social Commerce Summit 2010 <ul><li>April 19 th  – 21 st </li></ul><ul><li>AT&T Executive Education and Confere...
Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc. Use  of Customer Content & Data  Customer Content Conceptual Frame...
Confidential and Proprietary.  © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
Where’s the Focus of Your Functions? 95% 20% 10% Courtesy: Round.co.uk
Each base state has its own unique benefits Courtesy: Round.co.uk Revenue Costs Churn Revenue Revenue Churn Churn Costs Co...
Customer Centricity Indicator shows the balance of a company Courtesy: Round.co.uk Customer Strategy Organisation Design I...
 
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Sam Decker at SBS2010

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Sam Decker's talk on Customer Oxygen at the Dachis Group Social Business Summit 2010 in Austin, TX

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  • An evil-looking monster mountain that spits red slime, throws rocks out of its head, while your hot wheel cars fly out of every oraface. I should’ve sat on Santa’s lap and asked him to come over to put this montrosity together.
  • Shit cano.. Santa brought my 4 year old son a terrible toy. This is not a presentation about passing blame
  • I Now the moral of the story for the purpose of this presentation is not to blame santa or anyone else. These things just happen.
  • As tragic as this story of a disappointed 4-year old and a failure of Santa Claus, the other tragedy bridges us closer to our corporate responsibilities and opportunities.
  • What the heck does this long word – “Operationalise” – mean? It’s simple. It’s about putting the content you collect to work throughout the business. This means affecting customer service, buying/merchandising, finance, stores, and everyone in-between.
  • Make the connection to KPIs that connect to P&amp;L. Determine success. Ask “Why” after every statement It’s a strange paradox we’re in. So much attention and hype around Web 2.0, communities, social technology and the like. Perhaps even the CEO says he wants ‘community’ or a blog. After all, blogging was on the cover of business week!
  • Make the connection to KPIs that connect to P&amp;L. Determine success. Ask “Why” after every statement It’s a strange paradox we’re in. So much attention and hype around Web 2.0, communities, social technology and the like. Perhaps even the CEO says he wants ‘community’ or a blog. After all, blogging was on the cover of business week!
  • In the current explosion of social interactions, it’s time to rethink your marketing assets. It’s always been about the customer, but now there’s exponential impact from your customers’ engagement and influence. Their participation is the key to unlocking value. As you begin the task of lengthening and deepening customers’ participation on your site, ask yourself where customers are participating with your brand or platform and determine what your brand is already doing to keep the conversation going. Look for participation dead ends, such as thank you pages that lead nowhere. Consider possible ways to follow up, including links on the submission form, confirmation e-mails, follow-up e-mails, and specialized notifications on return visits. Consider both short-term and long-term engagement, realizing that a user’s visit to your site may be his first, or may be his tenth. Make sure that the loyal customer has new and different opportunities, as people may tire if they’re offered the same opportunities again and again. Don’t be afraid to change the conversation as you get to know one another better. Much has been said about engagement, and about markets as conversations. The participation chain concept addresses one of the key considerations involved in this type of marketing – once you begin a dialogue with your potential customer, how do you keep it going and make the value exchange deeper and more meaningful? Begin by asking for participation, even if it’s only the online equivalent of “How are you feeling this evening?” – because a seemingly-banal response like “fine” could be the first link in a strong and lengthy participation chain.
  • himmelskratzer&apos;s As part of a consumer research study, residents of Dallas, Texas, received a phone call asking if they would let a Hunger Relief Committee representative come to their homes and sell them cookies, with the proceeds to be used to buy meals for the needy. Only 18 percent agreed. But, when the caller started by asking, “How are you feeling this evening?” and waited for a reply, 32 percent – nearly double the earlier number – agreed to a visit from the cookie seller. Even more astounding was the fact that once someone followed up by paying a visit, nearly everyone (89 percent) made a cookie purchase. Daniel J. Howard, the researcher at Southern Methodist University who conducted the study, called this the “foot-in-the-mouth effect,” because, in this case, the salesperson didn’t even need to get a foot in the door. Once people had expressed themselves in even the most banal way, saying “good” or “fine” or the like, they were much more likely to take the next step of allowing the cookie seller to visit their homes. Once the salesperson was at their doorstep, they were almost certain to purchase. This powerful analog interaction can be replicated online in what we call a “participation chain” – a way of cultivating user involvement so that each action builds upon the one before, building value along the way. After an initial act of participation, marketers can then lead the person to another act, and to another, and so on. The chain of user engagement not only increases that person’s relationship with your brand, and potentially leads to a purchase, but may also leave behind a “trail” of content which can lead other site visitors to increase their own engagement. In 2007, Forrester’s Brian Haven concluded that “engagement” was marketing’s new key metric, but engagement is not a binary thing. It needs to be cultivated by leading users along a participation chain.
  • Make the connection to KPIs that connect to P&amp;L. Determine success. Ask “Why” after every statement It’s a strange paradox we’re in. So much attention and hype around Web 2.0, communities, social technology and the like. Perhaps even the CEO says he wants ‘community’ or a blog. After all, blogging was on the cover of business week!
  • When you start into social
  • Here are two generally accepted principles: 1. In traditional recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) models, direct marketers know that the person most likely to respond to an offer is someone who has responded to a previous offer. 2. Researchers know that someone who has participated in a survey, usability study, or focus group is likely to change the way they think or behave as a result of that experience. We can combine these two principles into a simple truth: time and money are two sides of the same coin. In general, the more time a customer spends with you – assuming a positive experience – the more likely they are to spend money with you (or take some related action). A Harvard Business Review article by Michael I. Norton refers to this as “The Ikea Effect,” noting that his research has found that labor undertaken in association with a brand – such as self-assembly of Ikea furniture – increases people’s affection for the result of that labor. “When people construct products themselves, from bookshelves to Build-a-Bears, they come to overvalue their (often poorly made) creations,” Norton writes. Online, those who labor to contribute content – reviews, answers, stories, wishlists, etc. – have, in effect, invested themselves in something. Their contributions could be for the sake of others. A study by Keller Fay and Bazaarvoice revealed 90% of people who write product reviews do so to help others, and 80% do so to help the brand. Regardless of whether the investment is for others or for the brand, when someone participates within a platform or web site, they increase their connection to that brand or platform. r
  • Stories travel faster socially Plot = characters, problem, solution Show connection to P&amp;L Interesting, educational, entertaining, suprising, relevant
  • Prior to 2008, Oriental Trading Company was a catalog-centric company. A traditional direct marketing firm, they lived and died by their circulation – this was the main metric measured. Products were not at the forefront of their thinking – the theme for their catalogs was paramount. When Sam Taylor, the current CEO, joined the firm, he kick-started the transformation. Each product needed to stand on its own merit, apart from a catalog or theme. As a result core teams across merchandising, ecommerce, marketing and more get together weekly to review products that need improvement. They created a plan that involves reaching out to each supplier and once the products are improved the promptly promote this fact on the site helping to build further brand loyalty and customer satisfaction.
  • How things worked at Dell I worked at Dell, developing the Dell.com consumer site. At Dell, the best source of customer feedback we had was from : Customer Service Calls Product Returns Sales volume Compare this to today, where Dell is now a Bazaarvoice client, and getting increasingly involved in the Social Web. Take IdeaStorm, for example, where Dell developed a desktop Linux box based on a customer recommendation. They went from a customer idea to launching the product in less than [X Weeks]. Being able to recognize the demand for a product and react to those opinions is priceless.
  • Sam Decker at SBS2010

    1. 1. 4 Steps to Creating Customer Oxygen STYLE STANDARDS
    2. 2. <ul><li>A Story </li></ul>
    3. 3. Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    4. 6. This is what he got… <ul><li>“ Pricey and gross, but fun for boys” </li></ul><ul><li>“ If you want your child to cry, buy this toy!” </li></ul><ul><li>“ ****CANO!!!” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Smells like feces” </li></ul>Hot Wheels Slimecano
    5. 7. Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    6. 8. Her fault
    7. 9. Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    8. 10. <ul><li>The Real Tragedy… </li></ul><ul><li>Still sold after this 77 th review and up to 177 reviews (over a year) </li></ul><ul><li>No response from retailer </li></ul><ul><li>No response from manufacturer </li></ul>
    9. 11. op·er·a·tion·al·ise v. put into operation or use.
    10. 12. 4 Steps to Start Getting the Customer Voice Heard Everywhere
    11. 13. 4 Steps to Customer Oxygen <ul><li>Start with the P&L </li></ul><ul><li>Get customers participating </li></ul><ul><li>Get employees participating </li></ul><ul><li>Tell your stories </li></ul>Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    12. 14. <ul><li>Start with the P&L </li></ul><ul><li>(by ending with the P&L) </li></ul>
    13. 15. Does Your Program have Soft or Solid Metrics? Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    14. 16. <ul><li>Get Customers Participating </li></ul>
    15. 17. Is This How You Think of Customer Value? Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    16. 18. Compete on Participation Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc. Cultivating user involvement so that each action builds upon the one before, building value along the way.
    17. 19. The reputation economy requires a new way of marketing… Participation Chain
    18. 20. Example: JVC starts with a review… Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    19. 21. … And links to answers Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    20. 22. <ul><li>Get Employees Participating </li></ul>
    21. 23.
    22. 24.
    23. 25.
    24. 26.
    25. 27. Get others involved <ul><li>The IKEA Effect </li></ul>Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc. Labor undertaken in association with a project – similar to assembly of Ikea furniture – increases people’s affection for the result of that labor. Image by Andrew Scott on Flickr.com
    26. 28. Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    27. 29. <ul><li>Peacock-ing </li></ul><ul><li>+ </li></ul><ul><li>Woodpeck-ing </li></ul>
    28. 30. Peacock-ing Launch a turning point event the organization can’t miss. Every person at every level will have to stop and look.
    29. 31.
    30. 32. % Woodpeck-ing Engaging the organization’s core repetitively, persistently, tirelessly.
    31. 33.
    32. 34. <ul><li>Tell Your Stories </li></ul>
    33. 35. The Customer & Dell are Engaged Customer Affirmation tool for customers considering purchase and provide feedback to Dell Rating Product Development Insight to customers likes, pain-points, desires & uses Rating Sales Highlight reviews as part of sales process- online, chat and phone Rating Customer Care Attend to customer issues to surprise & delight customers- Dell cares Rating Brand Tool to receive direct feedback on customer uses, behaviors & nomenclature Be the first to write a review!
    34. 36. A quick bedtime story <ul><li>A pricey activity table suffers from being too “soft”… </li></ul>
    35. 37. Here comes the shocking part… <ul><li>The Land of Nod analysed the comments, reengineered the table and then sent replacements to every single reviewer! </li></ul>
    36. 38. Improving products… <ul><li>Client improved over 700 products in five months </li></ul><ul><li>Key cross-functional teams meet and develop plans of action </li></ul><ul><li>Use feedback and provide content to suppliers </li></ul><ul><li>Company promotes product changes to customers </li></ul>
    37. 39. Thank you! <ul><li>Sam Decker, Chief Marketing Officer </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: @samdecker </li></ul>Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    38. 41. 4 million visits a week Visits = Users = Customers = People!
    39. 42. Bazarvoice Social Commerce Summit 2010 <ul><li>April 19 th – 21 st </li></ul><ul><li>AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center </li></ul><ul><li>Austin, Texas </li></ul><ul><li>www.socialcommercesummit.com </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sam Decker </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>@samdecker </li></ul></ul>Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    40. 43. Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc. Use of Customer Content & Data Customer Content Conceptual Framework ROI Measurement & Exec Buy-In
    41. 44. Confidential and Proprietary. © 2009 Bazaarvoice, Inc.
    42. 45. Where’s the Focus of Your Functions? 95% 20% 10% Courtesy: Round.co.uk
    43. 46. Each base state has its own unique benefits Courtesy: Round.co.uk Revenue Costs Churn Revenue Revenue Churn Churn Costs Costs
    44. 47. Customer Centricity Indicator shows the balance of a company Courtesy: Round.co.uk Customer Strategy Organisation Design Information Architecture Performance Measures Business Leadership 1 st Base Product Centric 2 nd Base Customer Focus 3 rd Base Customer Value 4 th Base Customer Centric 1 3 4 2

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