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Kỹ năng bán hàng cùng Google adwords - p1, Xây Dựng
 

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Kỹ năng bán hàng cùng Google adwords - p1, Xây Dựng

Kỹ năng bán hàng cùng Google adwords - p1, Xây Dựng

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    Kỹ năng bán hàng cùng Google adwords - p1, Xây Dựng Kỹ năng bán hàng cùng Google adwords - p1, Xây Dựng Document Transcript

    • The Trusted Digital Media Advisor I: Building Your Business
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 1   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Welcome         Welcome  to  The  Trusted  Digital  Media  Advisor.         The  digital  advertising  opportunity  is  immense.  For  most  SMBs,  understanding  the   landscape,  identifying  the  opportunities  and  making  the  best  choices  requires  a  partner  –  a   Trusted  Digital  Media  Advisor.       This  program  is  designed  to  help  you  become  just  that.  From  providing  solutions  to   truly  becoming  your  customer’s  trusted  advisor,  this  program  will  focus  on  the  practice  of  a   sales  framework  that  shifts  the  focus  from  the  seller  (you)  to  the  buyer  (your  prospect  or   customer).       Great just isn’t good enough.
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 2   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   The  Trusted  Digital  Media  Advisor   What  does  it  mean  to  be  a  Trusted  Digital  Media  Advisor?         There  are  many  ways  to  consider  this  simple  chart.  For  the  purposes  of  this  program,   we’ve  defined  these  three  stages  in  following  ways:     Solution  Based   At  this  stage,  the  digital  media  advisor  (you)  is  having  conversations  that  identify  which   products  and  services  (solutions)  will  solve  specific  business  issues.  The  customer  may  be   new  to  digital  media,  or  not  completely  convinced  of  its  value.         Relationship  Based   Here,  “relationship”  does  not  refer  to  the  glad-­‐handing,  baked  good-­‐bearing  salesman  of   yore  who  believed  his  success  to  be  a  result  of  his  charisma  and  likeability.  In  today’s   market,  buyers  value  relationships  with  sellers  who  bear  gifts  of  fresh  ideas  and  actionable   insight.     As  the  customer  experiences  the  positive  results  of  your  partnership,  trust  and   credibility  increase.  You  are  increasingly  positioned  as  the  digital  media  expert  and  you  are   Adapted  from  David   Maister,  The  Trusted   Advisor  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 3   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   able  to  help  your  customer  make  better,  more  informed  decisions  about  his  or  her  digital   strategy  and  business.     Trust  Based   In  this  stage,  your  conversations  are  no  longer  limited  to  products  and  budgets.  You   have  established  a  truly  collaborative  partnership  with  your  customer  and  are  working   together  to  “constantly  innovate  around  their  approach,  enabling  them  to  take  advantage  of   our  increasingly  digital  society  and  capitalize  on  the  trends  we’re  seeing  …”  -­‐  Nikesh  Arora,   SVP  and  Chief  Business  Officer,  Google.     Please  consider  three  of  your  accounts  (A:  a  top  account,  B:  a  new  account  with  untapped   potential  and  C:  an  account  that  isn’t  growing.)         Where  would  you  plot  your  relationship  with  each  account  in  the  matrix  above?         What  actions  might  you  consider  to…   deepen  your  personal  relationship  with  each  account?         broaden  the  scope  of  business  issues  your  customer  engages  in  with  you,  formally  or   informally?  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 4   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Course  Outline   1.  Introduction   • The  Trusted  Digital  Media  Advisor   • Introductions   • Why  use  a  sales  process?   2.  Digital  Value  Proposition   • Mapping  your  customers   • Mapping  your  industry   • Identifying  the  issues   • Describing  benefits,  not  features   3.    Plan   • What  to  know  before  you  go   • Defining  a  purpose  and  desired  outcome   • Using  a  pre-­‐call  planning  template   4.    Open   • Building  rapport   • Sharing  an  agenda   • Delivering  a  positioning  statement   5.    Identify   • Understanding  the  purpose  of  discovery   • Identifying  emotional  and  logical  needs   • Following  the  discovery  flow   • Summarizing  your  discovery   6.    Recommend   • Defining  the  elements  of  your  story   • Designing  a  customized  solution   7.    Handle  Objections   • Putting  objections  in  context   • Applying  the  objection  handling  process  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 5   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   • Responding  to  common  objections   3.    Close   • Closing  on  your  desired  outcome   • Choosing  a  closing  approach   • Setting  expectations  and  next  steps   3.    Summary   • Cumulative  practice   • Key  takeaways   • Action  plan       At  the  end  of  this  course,  you  will  be  able  to:   • Implement  a  repeatable  sales  process  that  will  enable  you  consistently  to  do   the  right  things  on  purpose.   • Be  more  purposeful  in  your  customer  interactions  by  practicing  more   thoughtful  pre-­‐call  planning.   • Practice  more  effective  inquiry  to  identify  the  customer’s  problem  and  why   he  or  she  would  like  to  solve  it.   • Present  your  recommendation  in  a  way  that  engages  the  customer’s  logical   and  emotional  decision-­‐making  process.   • Listen  to  customer  objections  and  find  the  opportunities  they  present.   • Gain  commitment  from  customers  for  desired  next  steps.               "I would visualize things coming to me. It would just make me feel better. Visualization works if you work hard. That's the thing. You can't just visualize and go eat a sandwich." - Jim Carrey Actor and Comedian
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 6   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Personal  Introductions   Name     Current  role?    Past  experience?     What  is  the  greatest  challenge  you  face  (that  is  under  your  control)  when  working  with   customers  to  invest  in  digital  marketing?     After  reviewing  the  learning  objectives  for  this  course,  what  one  thing  would  help  you  be   more  effective  in  your  role?     If  this  training  is  effective,  how  will  you  know?     What  would  you  like  to  be  remembered  for  at  your  company?   Why am I using all this ink? Studies indicate that handwriting notes helps aid retention when learning.
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 7   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   The  Difference  between  Selling  and  Buying   How  does  it  feel  to  be  “sold  to”?     How  does  it  feel  to  buy  something?     What  is  the  difference  between  the  two  experiences?      
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 8   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Selling  to  the  Empowered  Customer   The  power  dynamic  of  the  sales  interaction  has  changed  dramatically.  Salespeople  no   longer  control  access  to  information  —  their  product  specifications,  price  list,  stock  levels,   competitor  offers  —  all  this  and  more  is  often  easily  available  for  customers.  In  this  age  of   the  empowered  customer  and  self-­‐service,  why  even  have  sales  people?     “While  our  access  to  raw  information  has  grown  exponentially,   our  time  to  process  this  information  has  declined  rapidly,  which   has  placed  an  unprecedented  premium  on  the  act  of  meaning-­‐ making.”   -­‐  George  Dyson,  Futurist       The  explosion  of  information  and  choice  means  that  more  than  ever,  people  need  help   to  narrow  their  options  to  the  most  meaningful  ones.  Credible  experts  who  have  earned   their  trust  (that’s  you)  have  an  enormous  opportunity  to  help  them  identify  the  problem   they  wish  to  solve,  and  to  help  them  make  better,  more  informed  choices.     What  have  you  noticed  about  the  way  customers  have  changed?     What  impact  has  this  had  on  the  way  you  work  with  customers?  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 9   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   What  Makes  You  Different?   One  of  the  keys  to  selling  is  being  able  communicate  how  your  products  and  services   solve  problems  and  create  value  for  the  customers.  While  mastery  of  product  knowledge  is   critical,  understanding  how  customers  leverage  those  products  and  how  it  impacts  their   business  is  a  story  we  can  all  get  better  at  telling.         What  value  does  your  company  provide?   What  are  some  key  features  of  your  company?  What  are  the  benefits  (to  the  customer)  of   those  features?     Features     Benefits         How  are  you  different?   Circle  those  features  that  differentiate  your  company  from  the  competition.  How  do  you   know  if  they  are  truly  a  differentiating  feature?   1. It  is  unique  to  your  company.    (Has  any  company  ever  said,  “We  provide  mediocre   customer  service”?)   2. It’s  something  the  customer  cares  about.    (Your  building  might  be  LEED  certified  –   does  this  matter  to  your  customers?)   3. You  can  back  up  your  claim.    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 10   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Delivering  a  3x3   Understanding  your  differentiating  features  is  not  enough.  You  must  be  able  to   communicate  the  benefits  of  your  features  with  clarity  and  conviction.  It  can  be  easy  to   ramble  on  for  10  minutes  about  the  history  of  your  company  and  why  you  think  you  could   be  the  right  partner  for  your  customer.  The  challenge  is  to  focus  your  thoughts  in  a  clear,   easy-­‐to-­‐understand  way  and  do  this  in  a  short  amount  of  time.   An  excellent  technique  for  communicating  the  key  components  of  your  value   proposition  is  this  classic  three-­‐step  structure:   • First,  preview  your  key  points  –  tell  them  what  you’re  going  to  tell  them.   • Second,  explain  each  of  your  key  points  in  detail  –  tell  them.   • Third,  summarize  your  key  points  –  tell  them  what  you  told  them.     3x3 worksheet The  3  key  features  we  offer  to  our  customers  are:       1. 2. 3.   The  first  key  feature  is:     The  main  benefits  our  customers  receive  are:        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 11   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   The  second  key  feature  we  offer  is:     The  main  benefits  our  customers  receive  are:     The  third  key  feature  we  provide  is:     The  main  benefits  our  customers  receive  are:       So,  in  summary,  the  key  benefits  we  provide  our  customers  are:     1.     2.     3.    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 12   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Speak  in  Terms  of  the  Customer’s  Interests   You  can  tell  your  customer  a  lot  about  you,  your  company,  and  your  products  and   services  but  if  you  do  not  connect  that  information  to  problems  your  customer  wants  to   solve,  it  will  make  very  little  difference.  Information  must  be  communicated  in  a  way  that   immediately  answers  the  question,  “What’s  in  it  for  me,  the  customer?”   Using  the  structure  of  Link  –  Feature  –  Bridge  –  Benefit  (LFBB)  is  a  simple  way  to   consistently  communicate  in  a  way  that  speaks  to  the  customer’s  interests.     A  link  calls  back  to  something  the  customer  said  previously.     A  feature  is  a  fact  about  a  product  (that  can  be  proven).     A  bridge  is  a  short  phrase  using  the  word  “you”  that  pivots  the  feature  to  the  benefit.       A  benefit  is  how  the  customer  would  use  or  experience  the  feature.             “Just because I don’t care doesn’t mean I don’t understand.” - Homer Simpson, Television Dad  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 13   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Strong  Growth  Ahead  for  Local  Online   22 Google confidential22 Google confidential Strong Growth Ahead for Local Online !"#$%#"&'(()**"+,,'-./0),"12-3""+**"4.560,"4),)(7)83" $2.0 $2.1 $4.2 $5.5 $8.2 $12.9 $13.4 $13.6 $16.4 $19.9 $22.7 $24.8 $26.6 $27.9 $0.0 $5.0 $10.0 $15.0 $20.0 $25.0 $30.0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012f 2013f 2014f 2015f 2016f $Billions Local Online Ad Spend 2003 - 2016
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 14   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   LFBB:    Digital  Marketing   Customer       Link     Feature     Bridge       Benefits                                  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 15   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   LFBB:    AdWords   Customer     Link     Feature     Bridge       Benefits                                
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 16   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   LFBB:    ____________________________________   Customer     Link     Feature     Bridge       Benefits                                
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 17   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Check  Your  Jargon   Sometimes,  our  experience  and  expertise  can  work  against  us.  It’s  easy  to  forget  that  words   and  concepts  that  are  second  nature  to  us  can  be  confusing  or  totally  foreign  to  customers.     Part  of  our  role  is  to  educate  people  about  digital  marketing  to  help  them  make  an  informed,   confident  decision.  Being  able  to  translate  industry  jargon  into  clear,  relatable  language  is  a  big   part  of  what  helps  digital  media  experts  gain  their  customers’  trust.       Words  and  concepts  to  consider       Alternative  phrasing/explanations                                                                                       “The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” - George Bernard Shaw
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 18   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Why  Use  a  Process?   Consistently  good  results  happen  on  purpose.  When  you  look  closely  at  people  who   excel  in  their  work,  you  almost  always  find  a  commitment  to  a  process  built  on  solid   fundamentals.  Successful  professionals  are  usually  very  disciplined  about  following  a   consistent  process,  even  if  this  process  is  subconscious.  We  often  refer  to  this  as  being   “unconsciously  competent.”   Internalizing  a  sales  process  reduces  the  “mental  gymnastics”  required  to  focus  on  the   mechanics  of  the  interaction  and  allows  you  to  relax,  turn  the  focus  to  the  client  and   respond  genuinely  and  creatively  in  the  moment.     TDMA Sales Process  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 19   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   PLAN         source:    thinkwithgoogle.com  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 20   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Do  Your  Homework   Business  owners  don’t  have  time  to  sit  and  play  20  questions  with  sales  people   anymore.  (If  they  do,  that  may  not  be  someone  whose  business  you  want.)  Customers   expect  their  potential  partners  to  have  done  their  homework,  to  know  the  basic  facts  about   their  business  and  to  be  prepared  to  offer  insights  and  value  before  they  even  sit  down  for   a  meeting.  The  more  prepared  you  are,  the  greater  your  credibility.     tip:    People  always  want  to  know,  “What  are  other  people  like  me  doing  that’s  working?”     Know Before You Go 1. Review  the  customer’s  website.  Have  a  basic  understanding  of  the  business.  What’s  the   flagship  product  or  service?  Whom  is  the  customer  trying  to  reach?  What  does  the   company  use  their  website  for?  Experience  the  company’s  mobile  presence.  Visit  their   store.   2. Do  some  research.  Is  your  customer  already  doing  online  marketing?  Is  the  company  in   the  organic  search  results?  How  competitive  is  the  ad  space?  Who  are  your  customer’s   competitors?  How  different  are  they?   3. Speak  your  customer’s  language.  What  vertical  is  your  customer  in?  What  is  the   company’s  sales  cycle?  What  challenges  does  your  customer  face?  What  case  studies  or   success  stories  does  your  company  have  that  would  be  relevant?   4. Plan  an  online  strategy.  What  could  be  a  potential  AdWords  strategy  for  the  customer?     What  products  might  help  your  customer’s  business?       What  else  would  you  suggest?        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 21   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Defining  the  Purpose  and  Desired  Outcome   Defining  these  two  simple  objectives  can  have  a  tremendous  impact  on  the  results  of   your  meetings.  Clarifying  purpose  and  desired  outcomes  helps  to  focus  your  energy  and  set   the  stage  for  the  rest  of  your  preparation.  The  challenge  is  that  you  must  give  yourself  the   mental  space  to  stop  and  think,  even  if  only  for  a  couple  of  minutes.  In  fact,  two  minutes  is   usually  all  it  takes  to  kick  start  your  preparation  so  that  the  best  version  of  yourself  shows   up  at  the  meeting.     Purpose:   “Why  are  we  having  the  meeting?  What  is  the  benefit  to  the   customer?”     Desired  outcomes:     “What  does  success  look  like  at  the  end  of  this  meeting?”     Choose  one  of  your  key  upcoming  meetings  and  think  through  these  key  questions.         Purpose       Desired  Outcome     tip:    During  the  initial  getting-­‐to-­‐know-­‐you  meeting,  sales  people  often  say,  “The  purpose   of  this  meeting  is  for  me  to  understand  a  little  bit  more  about  your  business,  for  you  to  hear   about  how  my  company  helps  business  like  yours  and  then  for  us  to  see  if  there’s  a  good   fit.”         Based  on  this  stated  purpose,  who  will  receive  the  greatest  benefit  from  this  meeting?    Who   should  (always)  benefit  from  meeting  with  you?      
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 22   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   How  might  you  restate  the  purpose  of  this  meeting  to  be  more  customer-­‐centric?           Now,  follow  through  and  make  this  more  than  a  spin  on  words.    Deliver  the  benefit.       Prep Template Using  the  Prep  Template  on  the  following  page,  think  through  an  upcoming  meeting.     What  else  would  you  add  to  your  preparation  plan?        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 23   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.       !"#$%&#'$()*#% % !"#$% % &'(#)*$+,-+)(.$/#% % &)0#"/#% % % 1'23$0/$% % • 1##$02$$(% • 45"#6(%)0%#5$3+%*3027% • 45"#%2)%#5$8%/"+$%*)(#%"9)'#7% % % -'+.)($% % • 458%"+$%:$%5";30<%#53(%*$$#30<7%%45"#6(%#5$%9$0$=3#%#)%#5$%/'(#)*$+7% % !$(3+$2%>'#/)*$(% % • ?=%#53(%*$$#30<%<)$(%<+$"#@%5):%:3AA%?%B0):7% % 1<$02"%?#$*(% % +, %%% -, %%% ., %%% /, % % -)(3#3)030<%C#"#$*$0#% % %%19)'#%'(%"02%:58%:$6+$%+$A$;"0#%#)%8)'% %%% % D8.3/"A%/'(#)*$+(%"02%5):%#5$8%9$0$=3#%!"#$%&'()*+$*(,+-./(0* * % !3(/);$+8% % &'++$0#%C3#'"#3)0%,%!$(3+$2%C3#'"#3)0%,%-+3*"+8%E)#3;"#30<%F"/#)+% * % -)#$0#3"A%%>9G$/#3)0(% % % 012%34((%0)56(#% % >#5$+%D)H!)(% ! I0<"<$%"'23$0/$%30%"2;"0/$%#)%"<+$$%)0%.'+.)($,"<$02"% ! J):%:3AA%8)'%9'3A2%+"..)+#7%
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 24   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   OPEN  |  Building  Rapport   When  you  meet  with  a  customer,  your  immediate  goal  is  to  build  rapport.  This  is  true   on  the  first  meeting,  the  second  meeting  or  the  20th  meeting.  Rapport  refers  to  a  level  of   comfort  between  two  people.  To  build  rapport  with  customers,  you  must  behave  in  ways   that  align  with  their  values  and  interests.   • Be  prepared  and  genuinely  interested.   • Know  your  audience.  In  their  limited  available  time,  senior  executives  are  more   interested  in  knowing  how  you  will  create  value  for  their  organization.  With  the   people  you  will  be  working  with  on  a  day-­‐to-­‐day  basis,  you  may  need  to  spend   (or  be  more  open  to  spending)  more  time  building  personal  rapport  –  they  want   to  know  that  you’ll  be  someone  they  can  work  closely  with.   • Know  when  to  bring  preliminary  pleasantries  to  an  end  and  transition  in  to  the   business  conversation.       tip:    Have  you  ever  heard  the  saying,  “All  things  being  equal,  people  prefer  to  do  business   with  people  they  like”?  Research  shows  that  actually,  people  prefer  to  do  business  with   people  whom  they  think  like  them.  So  the  best  way  to  build  rapport  and  long  term   relationships  with  customers  is  to  demonstrate  genuine  interest  and  curiosity  about  them,   and  their  business.       Preliminary Pleasantries Most  meetings  begin  with  some  preliminary  pleasantries.  With  new  relationships,  this   is  especially  important  and  a  great  opportunity  to  find  some  common  ground  with   customers,  outside  the  scope  of  the  typical  discussions.     What  research  might  you  do  beforehand  to  build  rapport  and  find  common  ground?        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 25   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   “We  Are  Google”   What  are  some  of  the  opinions  and  perceptions  customers  might  already  have  about   Google?     Positive     Negative       How  can  those  opinions  help  or  hinder  you  when  working  with  customers?     How  can  you  overcome  these  perceptions?        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 26   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Sharing  the  Agenda   Opening  the  business  conversation  can  happen  in  a  formal  way  (e.g.  using  a  printed   agenda)  or  a  less  formal  way  (e.g.  asking  the  customer  subtle  questions  to  determine  their   priorities).  Regardless  of  whether  you  are  deliberate  about  sharing  your  agenda  or  not,   having  a  clear,  pre-­‐determined  agenda  is  a  best  practice.  It’s  also  critical,  as  you  start  the   meeting,  that  the  customer  is  part  of  the  agenda  creation  process.  You  must  gain  their  input   along  the  way  to  make  sure  you  are  headed  down  the  proper  path.   Elements  of  an  effective  agenda/agenda  statement  are  as  follows:   • Purpose:  State  the  purpose  of  the  meeting  in  a  customer  benefit-­‐oriented   manner,  i.e.,  why  are  we  having  the  meeting  and  what’s  in  it  for  the   customer?   • Objectives/topics:  List  the  few  topics  that  you  expect  to  discuss  with  the   customer  that  will  enable  the  meeting’s  purpose  to  be  accomplished.   • Gain  customer  input:  Solicit  feedback  to  make  sure  you  are  headed  down   the  right  path  and  addressing  what’s  most  important  to  the  customer.   • Transition  to  your  positioning  statement:  Once  you  confirm  the  agenda,   transition  to  your  positioning  statement.       What  does  setting  an  agenda  for  the  meeting  do  for  you?     What  does  it  do  for  the  client?         “Five frogs are sitting on a log. Four decide to jump off. How many are left? Answer: Five. Why? Because there’s a difference between deciding and doing.” –Mark L. Feldman & Michael F. Spratt  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 27   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Agenda  Statement  Worksheet   Prepare  your  agenda  statement  for  an  upcoming  call  or  meeting.     Purpose       Outline       Input       Transition        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 28   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Your  Positioning  Statement   A  positioning  statement  is  a  90  second  overview  of  who  you  are  and  how  you  work  with   customers.  It  helps  build  your  credibility,  gives  context  to  the  conversation  and  helps  the   customer  begin  to  connect  your  work  to  the  issues  he  or  she  faces.   The  structure  of  a  positioning  statement  is:     1. Describe  what  you  focus  on  doing.     2. Describe  the  type  of  customer  you  serve  and  a  major  problem  they  typically   experience  (something  this  customer  might  also  be  experiencing).     3. Describe  how  your  typical  customer  benefits  from  working  with  you.     4. Bridge  to  the  Identify  step  with  a  question.       tip:    Make  this  about  the  customer  and  their  world,  not  about  you.  Your  positioning   statement  should  instantly  get  the  customer  thinking  about  their  own  situation.         Try  out  your  positioning  statement  on  someone.  If  their  reaction  is,  “Oh.  That’s  interesting,”   take  some  time  to  work  on  it.  The  initial  moment  of  a  sales  conversation  is  critical  -­‐  you   must  immediately  establish  relevancy  and  credibility.     Your  positioning  statement  should  engage  people  and  leave  them  wanting  to  know  more.     tip:    Keep  it  short!        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 29   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Positioning  Statement  Worksheet   Describe  what  you  focus  on  doing.     Describe  the  type  of  customer  you  serve  and  a  major  problem  they  typically   experience.     Describe  how  your  typical  customer  benefits  from  working  with  you.     Bridge  to  the  Identify  step  with  a  question.           Practice  delivering  the  Agenda  Statement  and  Positioning  Statement  in  one  step.        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 30   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   IDENTIFY  |  Why  Ask  Questions?   What  logical  needs  is  the  customer  attempting  to  address?  What  are  the  emotional   needs  that  will  convince  him  or  her  to  act?  Identifying  these  needs  is  the  next  step  of  the   process.     On  average,  in  a  successful  meeting,  what  percentage  of  the  time  should  you  be  speaking  vs.   listening?     How  can  asking  the  right  questions  help  you  to  strengthen  your  relationship  and  create   opportunities?     How  can  “experience”  help  you  and  hurt  you  when  asking  questions  to  understand  the   customer’s  business?         Do   Don’t     • Listen  for  what’s  different   • Listen  for  what’s  familiar   • See  your  customer  as  a  unique   person   • See  your  customer  as  someone  filling   a  role   • Listen  to  understand   • Listen  to  respond   • Be  a  “curious”  listener   • Be  a  “judgmental”  listener             “Good questions do not merely elicit information the client already knows; they provoke a deeper exploration and insight on the part of the client.” - Mahan Khalsa  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 31   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Being  a  Better  Listener   There  are  few  skills  in  life  that  will  have  a  more  dramatic  positive  impact  on   relationships,  both  professionally  and  personally,  than  good  listening.  In  a  recent  NPR   interview,  Tony  Carnevale,  director  of  the  Georgetown  University  Center  on  Education  and   the  Workforce,  discussed  how  the  nature  of  our  work  has  changed.  Based  on  data  from  the   Bureau  of  Labor  Statistics,  the  Center  identified  the  major  shift  as  “…  from  physical  skill  to   skill  that  has  more  to  with  cognitive  function,  and  more  to  do  with  interacting  with  other   people.”  Active  listening  is  now  a  skill  that  is  important  in  75  percent  of  jobs,  which  is  an   increase  of  50  percent  from  jobs  in  the  1970s.    (Siegel  2011)         “The  difference  between  listening  and  active  listening  is  what  your  wife  or  partner  or  a   friend  will  always  tell  you  you  don’t  do,  which  is  to  hear  what  they  say  and  act  on  it;  that  is,   to  incorporate  what  they’re  telling  you  into  your  behaviors,”  says  Carnevale.     What  is  the  difference  between  “listening  to  respond”  and  “listening  to  understand”?     How  do  you  feel  when  you  are  interrupted  or  when  a  person  you  are  talking  with  “finishes   your  sentences”  for  you?  Why?         Does  good  listening  serve  emotional  or  logical  needs?  Please  explain.     Keys  to  Listening   • Hear  others’  opinions  before  expressing  your  own.   • If  you  want  to  solve  a  problem,  you  have  to  understand  it  first.   • Learn  how  to  acknowledge  opinions  or  statements  without  agreeing  or   disagreeing  with  them.    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 32   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Creating  an  Opportunity  Gap   You  begin  by  asking  general  current  situation  questions  and  then  move  to  more  specific   questions  about  the  business.  The  goal  is  to  continue  building  trust  and  rapport  with  the   customer  by  being  genuinely  curious  about  the  customer  and  his  or  her  business.  You  also   want  to  explore  the  areas  of  the  business  where  we  can  provide  value.   The  number  one  goal  of  discovery  is  to  create  an  opportunity  gap  by  making  your   customer  aware  of  the  “gap”  between  where  he  is  and  where  he  wants  to  be.  You  also  need   to  discuss  goals  and  priorities  and  why  these  are  so  important.       The  majority  of  time  in  an  initial  meeting  should  be  spent  in  discovery  mode  because  it   provides  the  information  needed  to  present  a  relevant  solution  that  addresses  the   customer’s  objectives,  pain  points,  and  goals.  An  effective  meeting  can  help  the  customer  to   think  more  clearly  about  his  business,  his  challenges  and  opportunities  and  what  he  needs   to  do  about  it.     On  the  following  pages  you’ll  find  examples  of  current  situation  and  desired  situation   questions  you  can  use  in  initial  meetings.  You  probably  won’t  ask  all  of  these  questions  but   you  need  to  follow  a  solid  process  that  will  effectively  explore  these  key  areas  and  give  you   the  information  you  need.      
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 33   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   SMB  Advertising  Objectives       What  questions  would  you  prepare  to  identify  your  customer’s  primary  advertising   objective?  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 34   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Current  Situation  Questions   Business   • Tell  me  about  your  business  today  and  how  you  differentiate  yourself  in  the   marketplace.   • Who  are  your  target  customers?   • What  are  your  best-­‐selling  products  or  services?  How  much  do  they  sell  for?   • When  are  your  busy  seasons?   • Where  are  you  online?  Where  are  you  offline?   • Who  are  your  main  competitors?  What  sets  you  apart  from  them?     • How  do  you  see  the  market  changing?  What  trends/conditions  are  most  impacting   you?   • What  is  the  value  of  a  customer?  What  is  a  customer’s  lifetime  value?       Individual   • What  are  the  big  issues  on  your  agenda?  Why  are  those  important  right  now?   • How  is  your  success  measured?    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 35   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Marketing   • Who  handles  marketing  strategy  for  your  business?   • What  are  your  marketing  goals?  What  is  your  marketing  budget?   • Where  are  you  marketing  your  business  (online  and  offline)?  Why  did  you  decide  to   use  those  channels?   • Do  you  know  how  most  of  your  customers  find  you?   • What  are  the  goals  of  your  website?   • How  much  new  business  would  come  from  your  website?  How  instrumental  is  your   website  in  growing  your  business?   • Do  you  know  how  your  website  is  performing  in  attracting  customers  to  your   business?   • What  are  you  currently  doing  to  drive  traffic  to  your  website?  How  are  you   currently  marketing  your  website?   • What  advertising  mediums  are  working  best  for  you  and  why?   • Have  you  tried  advertising  with  Google?   • How  much  does  it  cost  to  acquire  a  new  customer?  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 36   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Desired  Situation  Questions   Business   • What  are  the  top  priorities  for  your  business  this  year  and  how  are  you  acting  on   them?   • What  plans  do  you  have  to  grow  your  business?   • What  are  some  of  the  challenges  or  roadblocks  that  you  anticipate  handling?   • Is  there  a  product  or  service  that  you  would  like  to  make  a  bigger  percentage  of  your   revenue  mix?       Individual   • What  are  your  priorities  for  this  year?  This  quarter?   • What  projects  do  you  have  on  the  back  burner  that  you  would  really  like  to  make   progress  on?  What  roadblocks  are  you  facing?    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 37   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.     Marketing   • When  do  you  want  to  advertise  to  customers  in  the  buying  cycle?   • What  are  the  specific  goals  you  are  trying  to  achieve  with  your  marketing?   • Do  you  have  a  preference  towards  acquisition  or  retention?  Which  is  more   important  to  you  and  why?   • Are  you  happy  with  the  amount  of  sales  and  customers  you  currently  have  or  could   you  use  more?   • Are  you  happy  with  your  brand  awareness?       Ask  the  customer  to  expand  on  how  solving  a  problem  or  taking  advantage  of  an   opportunity  would  help  them.     What  would  the  impact  be  if  …?   If  you  could  …  what  would  your  next  move  be?  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 38   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Expectations   • What  do  you  expect  from  a  digital  marketing  partner?   • (If  there’s  an  incumbent)  What  does  your  current  partner  do  really  well?   • What  is  your  timeline  for  implementation?   • Who  else  should  be  involved  in  these  discussions?   • What  concerns  do  you  have?     Primary  Motivating  Factors   Although  customers  have  a  diverse  array  of  concerns,  they  struggle  with  the  same  problems.         Problem   Impact   Emotional  Need   Limited  time   Unable  to  pursue  new   marketing  strategies     Lack  of  experience   Mistakes  in  online   marketing  campaigns     Resource  constraints   Cutting  corners  and   employee  dissatisfaction     Not  targeting  audience   effectively   Failure  to  generate  revenue     Inability  to  measure   success   Suboptimal  use  of   marketing  budget     Limited  marketing   strategy   Missing  out  on  customer   segments     Limited  budget   Limited  investment  in  the   future       Why  is  this  a  priority  now?   What  prompted  you  to  …?   What  questions  would  you  ask  to  identify  your  customer’s  primary  motivating  factors?  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 39   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   tip:    Be  very  careful  when  identifying  customer  pain  points.  You  never  want  to  make  the   customer  “wrong.”    You  are  not  implying  that  she  has  made  poor  decisions  –  she  made  the   best  decision  possible.  Your  role  is  to  highlight  information,  possibilities  and  options  that   will  help  her  make  even  better  decisions  and  improve  (not  correct)  the  situation.      
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 40   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Practice   Please  use  the  scenarios  provided  to  role-­‐play  the  Identify  step  of  a  customer  interaction.     Round  1  Notes       Round  2  Notes       Round  3  Notes  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 41   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Summarizing  What  the  Customer  Shared   All  too  often,  sales  people  ask  questions,  take  a  few  notes  and  then…  do  nothing.    People   need  to  know  that  they  have  been  heard  and  understood.  The  best  way  to  ensure  that  this   has  happened  is  by  delivering  an  effective  summary  following  a  structure  like  this.     Introduce  the  summary     Bridging  Phrase:   Let’s  review  what  we  talked  about  to  make  sure  we  are  on   the  same  page.         Summarize  Current  Situation     Bridging  Phrase:   Currently…   • Summarize  key  points  of  the  current  situation         Summarize  Desired  Situation     Bridging  Phrase:   The  main  goals/priorities/outcomes  are…   • Review  key  goals,  priorities  and  timelines  and  the   results  your  customer    wants  to  produce         Ask  Confirming  Questions     Key  Questions:   • Does  that  accurately  sum  up  your  situation?   • Can  you  think  of  anything  important  that  we  have   not  discussed?         Transition  to  Next  Steps     Bridging  Phrase:   Great.  Let’s  talk  about  some  possible  next  steps  …        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 42   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Summary  Practice   Use  the  notes  you  took  from  your  role-­‐plays  to  practice  delivering  a  summary.     Introduce  the  Recap   Transition  Phrase:         Summarize  Current  Situation   Transition  Phrase:         Summarize  Desired  Situation   Transition  Phrase:         Ask  Confirming  Questions   Key  Questions:         Transition  to  Next  Steps   Transition  Phrase:    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 43   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Ideas  to  Practice   • Ask  questions  and  listen.  Your  customer  should  feel  important  and   validated.   • Start  easy.  Start  discovery  with  more  basic/general  questions  and  then   move  to  the  complicated  and  specific  areas.  This  approach  puts  the  customer   at  ease.   • Use  clarifying  questions.  When  you  uncover  an  important  priority,  use   clarifying  questions  to  go  deeper.  E.g.,  “Why  is  that  important  right  now?    How   does  that  impact  you  in  your  role?”  etc.   • Focus  on  customer  outcomes,  not  products.  Focus  on  what  the  customer  is   trying  to  achieve  and  show  him  how  your  products  and  services  will  help  to   make  that  happen.   • Follow  a  discovery  flow  by  asking  current  situation  questions  followed  by   desired  situation  questions  (goals)  which  will  help  to  create  a  selling  gap.   • Use  questions  to  move  deeper  within  the  organization.  What  challenges   and  opportunities  is  your  customer  being  asked  to  address  by  his  boss?   • Questions  lead  to  credibility.  Asking  thoughtful  questions  about  specific   topics  relevant  to  your  customer  is  one  of  the  best  ways  to  gain  credibility.       • Take  accurate  notes.  You  will  be  able  to  do  a  discovery  summary  and   effectively  customize  your  recommendations.                       “The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions.” - Neurologist Donald Galne  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 44   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   RECOMMEND       source:    thinkwithgoogle.com  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 45   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Elements  of  Your  Story   Once  you’ve  identified  your  customer’s  needs,  you’re  ready  to  recommend  some   solutions!  Depending  on  your  sales  cycle  or  the  customer,  this  step  may  come  during  the   same  meeting  or  you  may  offer  to  come  back  at  a  later  time  to  present  your   recommendations.  In  any  case,  you  will  need  to  craft  a  story  to  persuade  your  customer.   CHECKLIST   1   The  imperative   • Reasons  your  customer  needs  to  do  something  different  from  what   she  does  today  –  e.g.,  competitors  are  gaining  ground,  sales  are   dropping,  the  company’s  online  presence  is  ineffective   2   Customer  goals   • Targets  that  are  specific  to  the  customer  company  (and,  ideally,  the   individual)  which  demonstrate  our  understanding  of  its  business   and  identifies  what  problem/challenge  we  are  trying  to  address   3   Best-­‐in-­‐class  /   Competition   • Examples  of  other  companies,  ideally  competitors,  who  “get  it”  and   are  doing  a  better  job  of  taking  advantage  of  online  marketing   technologies  with  you  to  get  ahead   4   Your  value   proposition   • How  you  can  help  the  customer  achieve  business  goals/address     problems     • The  quantified  value  to  the  customer  in  terms  of  cost  of  advertising   versus  potential  audience  reached,  and  the  investment  required  –   aka  the  “business  case”   • What  proportion  of  your  customer’s  total  marketing  budget  this   represents   • How  this  compares  to  your  customer’s  traditional  messaging  and   marketing  approach  –  you  are  cheaper,  more  flexible,  etc.   5   Next  steps   • Asking  for  feedback  on  business  case  and  commitment  to  agreed   upon  goals   • Action  plan  with  deadlines   • Timeline  for  key  interactions  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 46   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Design  a  Customized  Solution       Using  the  customer  profile  you  brought  with  you  and  the  checklist  and  solution  template   above,  develop  a  solution  recommendation  for  your  client.    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 47   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.     source:    thinkwithgoogle.com  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 48   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Recommendation  Practice   Notes  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 49   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   HANDLE  |  Responding  to  Objections   Objections,  concerns  and  hesitations  are  a  natural  part  of  the  decision  making  process   and  can  come  up  at  any  time.  They  are  not  necessarily  an  indication  that  the  customer  does   not  want  to  do  business  with  you.  The  approach  to  dealing  with  resistance  can  be  more   important  than  the  actual  response.       Listen   When  you  hear  an  objection,  your  initial  impulse  may  be  to  respond  immediately.  It’s  a   natural  reaction  and  one  that  can  take  a  lot  of  effort  to  stifle.  The  first  step  is  to  listen  truly   to  what  the  customer  is  saying.  We  spoke  earlier  about  the  difference  between  listening  to   respond  and  listening  to  understand  -­‐  the  latter  will  serve  you  well  here.   Before  you  say  anything,  pause.     Clarify   Ask  questions  to  clarify  what  the  customer’s  concern  is  truly  about.  “That  sounds   expensive,”  can  mean  many  different  things.  Make  sure  you  know  which  one  it  is  before  you   develop  a  response.          
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 50   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Good  things  happen  when  you  ask  clarifying  questions:   • The  emotion  behind  the  objection  often  dissipates  as  the  customer  talks  about  it.     This  can  help  make  him  or  her  more  receptive  to  your  response.   • You  will  hear  clues  as  to  the  best  way  to  respond.  Often  customers  will  talk   themselves  out  of  the  objection  as  they  explain  why  the  objection  is  an  important   concern.   • Questions  help  you  to  gather  more  information,  which  leads  to  more  questions.   • Questions  help  you  to  uncover  the  real  issues.   • Questions  keep  you  from  contracting  the  most  dreaded  illness  of  sales  people  –   talking  too  much.   • Questions  help  you  to  gain  credibility  in  the  eyes  of  the  customer.   • Questions  help  the  customer  solve  his  or  her  concerns.     Some  clarifying  questions  to  try:   • Please  help  me  better  understand  your  hesitation.   • What  is  it  specifically  that  you  are  concerned  about?   • What  were  you  expecting?  How  did  you  arrive  at  that  expectation?   • Could  you  tell  me  a  little  more  about  that  concern  so  that  I  can  understand  it  better?   • Could  you  please  explain  it  to  me  in  more  detail?     Restate   After  you’ve  asked  some  clarifying  questions,  restate  the  objection  back  to  the  customer  to   ensure  that  you  have  correctly  identified  the  issue.  Are  you  and  your  customer  on  the  same   page?  If  the  answer  is  yes,  proceed  to  the  next  step  –  Cushion.  If  not,  go  back  to  the  Listen   step  and  repeat  the  process  until  you’ve  reached  agreement  on  the  restate.     Cushion   A  cushion  is  an  acknowledgement  or  statement  of  empathy  that  shows  the  customer  that   you  have  heard  her  and  that  you  know  this  issue  is  important.    Put  yourself  “on  the  same   side  of  the  table”  as  the  customer  –  you  are  working  with  your  customer,  not  against.       Respond   Finally,  respond  to  the  objection.  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 51   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Responding  to  Specific  Objections   Objection:    I  already  have  an  excellent  position  in  the  organic  search.  Why  should  I  pay  to   advertise  on  Google?         What  clarifying  questions  would  you  ask?         How  did  the  customer  respond  to  your  clarifying  question?         What  would  you  say  to  respond  to  this  objection?               What  evidence  can  you  use  that  will  help  you  when  responding  to  this  objection?               Prioritize.  When  you  have  more  than  one  objection,  ask  the  customer  to  tell  you  which   objection  is  the  one  causing  the  greatest  concern  and  begin  there.          
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 52   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.       Objection:    I  don’t  have  the  budget  for  this.       What  clarifying  questions  would  you  ask?         How  did  the  customer  respond  to  your  clarifying  question?         What  would  you  say  to  respond  to  this  objection?               What  evidence  can  you  use  that  will  help  you  when  responding  to  this  objection?                   Avoid  the  words  “but,  however,  and  actually.”  They  typically  connect  opposing  ideas.          
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 53   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Objection:    My  audience  is  not  online/using  the  internet.       What  clarifying  questions  would  you  ask?         How  did  the  customer  respond  to  your  clarifying  question?         What  would  you  say  to  respond  to  this  objection?               What  evidence  can  you  use  that  will  help  you  when  responding  to  this  objection?                     Use  trial  closes  to  solicit  customer  feedback  and  give  your  customer  the  opportunity  to   express  concerns.              
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 54   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Objection:    I  already  tried  this  and  it  didn’t  work  for  us.       What  clarifying  questions  would  you  ask?         How  did  the  customer  respond  to  your  clarifying  question?         What  would  you  say  to  respond  to  this  objection?               What  evidence  can  you  use  that  will  help  you  when  responding  to  this  objection?                       “Never argue. To win an argument is to lose a sale.” - Alfred Fuller, founder of the Fuller Brush Company
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 55   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Cumulative  Practice   For  this  practice  you  will  work  in  triads:  Google  Seller,  Customer,  and  Coach     Google  Seller   • Focus  on  an  upcoming  meeting  or  call.   • Use  the  Conversation  Stack  to  build  rapport.   • Transition  into  the  business  conversation  with  an  agenda  statement.   • Create  a  selling  gap  by  asking  questions.   • Take  notes  and  recap  the  conversation.     Customer   • The  person  playing  the  Google  Seller  will  brief  you  on  your  role.   • Stay  in  character  and  embellish  as  needed.  Keep  your  answers  fairly  short.   • Avoid  giving  challenging  objections  that  derail  the  conversation.     Coach   • Take  notes  on  how  the  person  playing  the  Google  Seller  uses  the  skills  we  are   focusing  on.   • Be  prepared  to  provide  three  specific  positive  comments  and  one  suggestion.    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 56   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   CLOSE  |  Gaining  Commitment   Closing  is  not  a  mysterious  process,  nor  is  it  a  matter  of  tricks  or  manipulation.    Closing   is  the  natural  conclusion  at  the  end  of  the  sales  process.  If  you  have  not  done  a  good  job  of   the  previous  steps  (planning,  building  rapport,  asking  questions,  recommending  a  solution,   handling  objections)  no  closing  technique  in  the  world  is  going  to  save  the  sale  at  the  end.       However,  you  must  get  in  the  habit  of  asking  for  the  “order,”  in  whatever  form  that   might  take  –  the  next  meeting,  an  introduction  to  an  executive,  a  signed  proposal,  a  trial   run,  etc.    As  Google  sellers  like  to  say,  “Thank  you  is  not  a  close.”   If  you  ask  for  the  sale  and  the  customer  is  not  ready  to  commit,  it  is  better  to  drop  back   into  the  responding  to  objections  process  and  try  to  resolve  the  concern.     What  do  you  do  to  close  the  meeting  effectively?     What  do  you  say  or  do  to  close  a  “sale”?     At  the  end  of  a  meeting,  how  do  you  know  if  you  have  achieved  your  purpose?  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 57   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Closing  Techniques   Alternate choice or choice of two positives This  technique  is  very  popular.    It  asks  the  customer  to  choose  one  of  two  answers,  both   of  which  indicate  a  positive  buying  decision  has  been  made.  The  closing  question  needs  to   be  carefully  prepared.  (Think  back  to  your  desired  outcome  planning.)       Example   • Would  Tuesday  afternoon  or  Wednesday  morning  be  better  for  you?   • Which  region  should  we  start  with,  the  Northeast  or  Central?       Assumptive close The  assumptive  close  is  used  when  the  customer  has  expressed  a  positive  reaction  to   your  recommendation  and  seems  to  have  no  strong  objections.  You  simply  assume  they  are   going  to  buy.     Example   • How  about  we  set  up  a  meeting  with  our  account  management  team  for  next   Thursday?   • Why  don’t  I  send  over  the  new  contract  this  afternoon?     Direct close Simply  ask  for  the  business.  This  is  sometimes  used  as  a  trial  close.     Example   • Can  we  increase  your  monthly  budget  to  $10,000  then?  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 58   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Tips  about  Closing   1. Remember  that  closing  is  really  the  process  of  opening  a  relationship.  Getting  the   buying  commitment  is  not  the  only  detail  when  it  comes  to  closing.   2. Most  of  the  typical  closing  techniques  like  asking  for  the  order  are  actually   accomplished  in  the  responding  to  objections  process.  Focus  your  attention  on   helping  the  prospect  by  sincerely  addressing  any  concerns.   3. Don’t  over  promise  just  to  make  the  sale.  You  set  yourself  up  for  future  customer   disappointment,  decreased  repeat  business,  and  fewer  referrals.       4. Realize  that  many  customers  create  buying  resistance  as  a  negotiating  technique.     Focus  your  attention  on  value,  not  price.   5. Review  the  details  of  every  closed  sale.  Customers  often  forget  them  or  even  worse,   think  they  heard  something  you  didn’t  commit  to.  Make  sure  this  never  happens  by   summarizing  all  details.   6. Close  when  the  customer  has  agreed  on  the  benefits  you’ve  presented,  and/or  when   you  get  a  buying  signal:  readiness  to  move  ahead.   7. A  close  could  be  asking  the  customer  to  sign  an  agreement  or  accept  the  proposal.   8. If  ultimately  you  do  get  a  “no,”  thank  the  customer  for  taking  the  time  to  meet  with   you,  ask  for  feedback  on  why  he  or  she  said  no  and  what  you  did  or  did  not  do  that   affected  the  decision,  and  ask  for  potential  business  in  the  future.  Also  ask   permission  to  stay  in  touch.   9. Sometimes  it’s  best  to  walk  away  as  well.  It’s  better  to  get  “no”  and  walk  away  from   the  particular  piece  of  business  than  to  continually  get  “maybes”  and  prolong  a   relationship  that  won’t  be  beneficial  to  either  party.  It  could  be  time  wasted.        
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 59   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Post  Meeting  Process   The  post  meeting  process  is  designed  to  help  you  to  capture  your  thoughts  while  they   are  fresh  so  you  can  efficiently  share  relevant  information  with  your  teammates  and  build   on  this  information  as  you  grow  your  relationship  with  this  customer.  There  are  three  steps   to  the  post  meeting  process:     1. Debrief   While  the  meeting  is  still  very  clear  in  your  mind,  quickly  capture  your  thoughts.     2. Clarify  Goals  and  Next  Actions   What  are  the  main  goals  and  next  actions?     3. Meeting  Recap  to  the  Customer   Follow  up  with  a  brief  summary  of  the  key  points  and  next  actions.     The Meeting Recap After  a  customer  meeting  it  is  important  to  maintain  momentum  and  capitalize  on  the   enthusiasm  you  have  generated.  By  following  up  quickly  with  customers  you  help  to  build   trust  and  keep  the  conversation  going.  A  simple  yet  often  overlooked,  practice  is  to  provide   the  customer  with  a  brief  summary  of  the  meeting  including  next  actions.  An  effective,   timely  (within  24  hours)  recap  produces  multiple  benefits:   • The  customer  can  easily  share  this  information  with  others  in  his   organization.   • You  can  more  easily  engage  your  team  members  and  get  them  up  to  speed.   • It  helps  you  to  refresh  your  thinking  when  you  are  preparing  for  the  next   call/meeting  with  this  customer.   How  does  a  timely  recap  help  you?  How  does  it  help  the  customer?    
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 60   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Post  Meeting  Template   Immediate     Discussion   Debrief   While  the  meeting  is  still  clear  in  your  mind,  quickly  capture  your  thoughts.   o Did  we  achieve  our  desired  outcomes?   o What  did  we  learn?   o Insights  to  share  with  team   o Customer  reaction   o What  resonated?   o What  didn’t?     Capture  This   Clarify  Goals  and  Next  Actions   Confirm:   o What  are  the  near  term  goals  for  the  customer?   o What  ideas  should  we  capture  for  future  discussions?   o What  do  we  need  to  share  with  other  colleagues?   o What  are  the  specific  next  actions  and  who  is  responsible  for  each?   o Who  will  write  the  recap?                 Email  within  24   hrs   Meeting  Recap  to  the  Customer   Send  an  email  recap  to  all  meeting  attendees  (cc:  other  stakeholders)   summarizing  the  following:   o Attendees  (customer/your  company)   o “Thanks  for  your  time  and  the  opportunity  to  discuss…”   o Key  insights   o Next  meeting/call  scheduled   o Next  actions  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 61   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   source:    thinkwithgoogle.com  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 62   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Cumulative  Practice   Please  practice  the  process  from  opening  to  closing.     Notes  
    • TDMA | I: BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS 63   ©Google 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form or by any process without permission in writing from Google, Inc.   Wrap  Up   What  was  the  most  important  benefit  you  gained  from  this  session?     How  will  this  program  change  the  way  you  communicate  with  customers  going  forward?     Is  there  any  area  we  covered  that  you  would  like  to  get  more  training  on  in  the  future?     What  other  class  member  in  the  room  would  you  like  to  thank  for  helping  to  make  this   training  session  more  valuable  to  you  personally?