Design with a Smile

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Five tips for introducing humor into your design work. Presentation to students in Ohio University's School of Visual Communication. April 11, 2011

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Design with a Smile

  1. 1. n :Desig milew ith a S :Design with a Smile 2011 VisCom Day Charlie Zimkus : : The Columbus Dispatch czimkus@dispatch.com
  2. 2. n :Desig milew ith a S 6 ways to introduce humor into your work 1) Exaggerate. 2) Use visual metaphors. 3) Make a game of it. 4) Get others to play along. 5) Parody.
  3. 3. n :Desig milew ith a S 1) Exaggerate.
  4. 4. n :Desig milew ith a S Scale is an obvious candidate. Whether you make things big ...
  5. 5. Cook’s Corner .................H2 ∑ Two’s Company ..............H2 Grape Expectations ......H3 By Definition ..................H3 n H WEDNESDAY :Desig mile For the Gourmet ............H5 Desperation Dinners .....H5 MARCH 17, 2004 ith a S CUTTING EDGEw Food auction Haven’t settled on tonight’s plans for St. Patrick’s Day? Then consider heading to Loveland for ‘‘A Time With Paddington,’’ a Paddington bear exhibit and food auc- tion sponsored by the Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum. People can bid on items, includ- ing dinner for two, home- made pies and gift certifi- cates to local restaurants. The event is being held at the JoAnn Richardson His- tory House at Park and Riverside Drive in Love- ... or small. land. For more informa- tion, call 513-683-5692. Irish legend And speaking of St. Patrick’s Day, did you know that cutting the cross in the top of Irish soda bread is an old superstition? According to the March issue of Martha Stewart Living, making those cuts in the top of the bread was supposed to ‘‘let the devil out’’ before baking. Free ice Although it may not seem like it, spring is not far off. CHARLIE ZIMKUS | DISPATCH PHOTO ILLUSTRATION To celebrate the first day of spring, Rita’s Water Ice at 2116 W. Henderson Rd. large measure will give away a regular- size Italian ice treat to everyone who stops by In Saturday. Nationwide, the company plans to give away more than a half- million cups of ice. For Cook’s Corner .................H2 ∑ Two’s Company ..............H2 Grape Expectations ......H3 By Definition ..................H3 For the Gourmet ............H5 Desperation Dinners .....H5 more information, call H WEDNESDAY MARCH 17, 2004 CUTTING EDGE 614-457-7290. Broiler wisdom Food auction Haven’t settled on tonight’s plans for St. Patrick’s Day? Then consider heading to Broiling is a great alterna- Loveland for ‘‘A Time With Paddington,’’ a Paddington bear exhibit and food auc- tive to grilling during cold More cookbooks target pint-size chefs tion sponsored by the Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum. People can bid on items, includ- ing dinner for two, home- months. To avoid broiler made pies and gift certifi- cates to local restaurants. The event is being held at the JoAnn Richardson His- fires, cooking aficionado tory House at Park and Riverside Drive in Love- land. For more informa- tion, call 513-683-5692. James Beard recommend- ed putting a piece of bread in the bottom of the Irish legend broiler pan. According to By Robin Davis safety guidelines throughout And speaking of St. Patrick’s Day, did you know that cutting the cross in the top of Irish soda bread is an old superstition? According to the March 1,001 Secrets of Great THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH Buying tips the recipes or at least have a issue of Martha Stewart Living, making those cuts Cooks, bread absorbs the While many experts think any section on kitchen safety. N in the top of the bread was supposed to ‘‘let the devil out’’ before baking. grease that can catch fire. ot so long ago, cookbooks for children consisted of smaller cookbook that makes children ∑ Select cookbooks that go Free ice Although it may not seem like it, spring is not far off. interested in food and cooking CHARLIE ZIMKUS | DISPATCH PHOTO ILLUSTRATION versions of Mom’s favorite volumes. Pint-size Betty Crocker, To celebrate the first day of spring, Rita’s Water Ice at 2116 W. Henderson Rd. beyond traditional kid favorites large will give away a regular- size Italian ice treat to everyone who stops by is good, they have a few sug- like macaroni and cheese. In measure Saturday. Nationwide, the company plans to give away more than a half- million cups of ice. For more information, call 614-457-7290. Fanny Farmer and Good Housekeeping books seemed aimed gestions for picking the best: Books that include dishes on Broiler wisdom Broiling is a great alterna- tive to grilling during cold at junior housewives to go right along with baby dolls and plastic ∑ Pick books with colorful pho- fruits and vegetables may More cookbooks target pint-size chefs tographs. Seeing what the fin- months. To avoid broiler fires, cooking aficionado James Beard recommend- enourage children to try some- kitchen sets. ¶ But as food in this country has earned a capital ‘‘F’’ ed putting a piece of ished food looks like can entice bread in the bottom of the broiler pan. According to 1,001 Secrets of Great Cooks, bread absorbs the By Robin Davis THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH Buying tips While many experts think any safety guidelines throughout the recipes or at least have a section on kitchen safety. thing new. N grease that can catch fire. ot so long ago, cookbooks for children consisted of smaller children to try different recipes. cookbook that makes children ∑ Select cookbooks that go interested in food and cooking with glossy magazines, gourmet cookware stores and even an entire versions of Mom’s favorite volumes. Pint-size Betty Crocker, ∑ Be sure to get books that are beyond traditional kid favorites is good, they have a few sug- like macaroni and cheese. Fanny Farmer and Good Housekeeping books seemed aimed gestions for picking the best: Books that include dishes on Picture books are especially at junior housewives to go right along with baby dolls and plastic ∑ Pick books with colorful pho- fruits and vegetables may tographs. Seeing what the fin- enourage children to try some- kitchen sets. ¶ But as food in this country has earned a capital ‘‘F’’ with glossy magazines, gourmet cookware stores and even an entire ished food looks like can entice children to try different recipes. thing new. ∑ Be sure to get books that are age-appropriate for the child. Dandy recipes If there’s spring, there TV channel complete with celebrity chefs dedicated to food, so too has the kids’ cookbook market changed. ¶ Saveur magazine recently Picture books are especially good for younger kids with lim- ited reading skills. ∑ Scan the recipes to be sure age-appropriate for the child. Books written for an 8-year-old may not be appealing to a 12- year-old. TV channel complete with celebrity chefs dedicated to food, so too good for younger kids with lim- Books written for an 8-year-old ited reading skills. must be summer, and with reported that 7,552 children’s cookbooks were available on they cover the basics: how to ∑ Stick to books that use easy- Dandy recipes measure liquids versus dry may not be appealing to a 12- summer come dandelions. amazon.com. Anyone who has taken a walk down a bookstore aisle to-find ingredients. Remember: has the kids’ cookbook market changed. ¶ Saveur magazine recently Try your hand at dandelion ingredients, how to preheat the It will be the adult who needs cooking at the National can see the staggering variety of books aimed at teaching children oven, how to mix. to make the extra trip for any- Dandelion Cook-off in See COOKBOOKS Page H3 ∑ Look for books which include thing special. Dover. Entrants should pre- pare unique recipes using the dandelion flower, root If there’s spring, there ∑ Scan the recipes to be sure year-old. reported that 7,552 children’s cookbooks were available on or green as a main ingredi- ent. Deadline for recipe submission is April 1. Finalists will compete at the Dandelion May Fest on must be summer, and with they cover the basics: how to ∑ Stick to books that use easy- measure liquids versus dry May 1 at Breitenbach Wine Cellars and could win Tips will make you a fan of sauces in a pan summer come dandelions. to-find ingredients. Remember: $500 for first place. That’s just enough money for a visit from the weed killer. For more information, visit By CeCe Sullivan The foundation of pan sauces are high heat. (Some burners are hotter than amazon.com. Anyone who has taken a walk down a bookstore aisle ingredients, how to preheat the www.breitenbachwine.com or call 1-800-THE-WINE. THE SEATTLE TIMES the crusty juices that form on the Try your hand at dandelion others, so adjust the heat accordingly.) Add the oil or other fat called for in the recipe. It will be the adult who needs oven, how to mix. Pan sauces, unlike the emulsified When hot, add food and cook without Child’s traits ‘‘In order to know whether a human being is young or branch of the sauce family, have a forgiv- ing nature. If the sauce is too thin, it can either be reduced further or thickened with a starch. Or maybe the sauce has bottom of the pan when food is browned, sauteed or roasted. moving until a crust is formed, which cooking at the National should release easily from the pan. Then turn and finish cooking. The food should be a rich brown, but should not blacken. can see the staggering variety of books aimed at teaching children to make the extra trip for any- old, offer it food of differ- been reduced so much, it needs loosening 2. Degrease: After sauteing and remov- ent kinds at short inter- vals. If young, it will eat anything at any hour of the day or night.’’ up. Just correct the consistency with a tablespoon or two of water or other liquid. The foundation of pan sauces are the crusty juices that form on the bottom of size of the pan: ‘‘When meats are sauteed,’’ he writes, ‘‘they should fit neatly into the saute pan with no extra room. If the pan is too large, so that part of its sur- Dandelion Cook-off in ing meat from pan, pour off the fat. (If aromatics are going to be added, a thin glaze of fat can be left on the bottom of the pan.) See COOKBOOKS Page H3 ∑ Look for books which include thing special. Dover. Entrants should pre- — Oliver Wendell Holmes the pan when food is browned, sauteed or face is exposed during sauteing, the meat 3. Deglaze: After degreasing pan, put it roasted. Here’s how to construct an ele- juices, which are essential to pan- back on the heat. Now add aromatics such gant sauce, step by step. deglazed sauces, will burn. An overcrowd- as minced garlic and shallot, or a mirepoix 1. Saute: Meats should first be patted ed pan, on the other hand, will prevent — a tiny dice of carrot, celery and onion. pare unique recipes using with paper towels to absorb excess mois- the meat from browning evenly and may Saute about 30 seconds. Pour liquid into Send your food news and BARY WONG | THE SEATTLE TIMES tidbits to Food Editor Robin ture. Choose a heavy-bottomed saute or even cause it to release its juices too the pan; it should come to a boil quickly. Davis, The Columbus Dispatch, frying pan. In Sauces: Classical and Con- quickly, so that it simmers in its own Use a spatula to loosen the browned An apricot-wild mushroom sauce to go 34 S. 3rd St., Columbus, Ohio temporary Sauce Making, author James juices, rather than browns.’’ with sauteed pork chops is made in the Peterson advises paying attention to the Heat the pan over medium to medium- See SAUCES Page H3 pan in which the meat was cooked. the dandelion flower, root 43215; fax, 614-559-1754. 03/17 FOOD, PAGE H1 or green as a main ingredi- ent. Deadline for recipe submission is April 1. Finalists will compete at the Dandelion May Fest on May 1 at Breitenbach Wine Cellars and could win
  6. 6. n :Desig milew ith a S Playing with scale can have a light-hearted effect.
  7. 7. METRO SCIENCE THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2007 BREAKING NEWS: DISPATCH.COM n :Desig mile SCIENCE BRIEFSw ith a S Forbidden Old NASA spacecraft assigned to new jobs NASA took its Deep Impact spacecraft — the one that in 2005 sent an 800-pound probe crashing into a comet — and gave it two new missions. One was to study known extrasolar planets, fruit(cake) and the other to fly past a sec- ond comet, Boethin, in 2008, and survey it. But since the mission was announced, a prob- lem cropped up. Boethin, which Exploit the is about a mile in diameter, seems to have disappeared. Astronomers cannot locate it and suggest that it may have broken into pieces too small to be seen. characteristics of So NASA is retargeting the Deep Impact craft. The agency ap- proved sending the spacecraft to another comet, Hartley 2. your subject in Fast-flowing water can form deposits, too About two-thirds of the sedi- mentary rock at or near the unusual ways. earth’s surface is mudstone, rock formed by the deposition of clays and other fine particles. Those particles are carried by water and are so fine that it has always been assumed that for deposi- tion to occur, the water had to be still — a deep lake, perhaps. But a study by Juergen Schieber and Kevin Thaisen of Indiana Uni- versity, with John Southard of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology, published in Science, shows that fine clays may be PubDate: 12-25-07 Page: 6 E Edition: 1 Replate: User: kmetts Color:C M K Y deposited by fast-flowing water. METRO SCIENCE E6 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2007 BREAKING NEWS: DISPATCH.COM SCIENCE BRIEFS Forbidden Old NASA spacecraft assigned to new jobs NASA took its Deep Impact spacecraft — the one that in 2005 sent an 800-pound probe crashing into a comet — and gave it two new missions. One was to study known extrasolar planets, fruit(cake) and the other to fly past a sec- ond comet, Boethin, in 2008, and survey it. But since the mission was announced, a prob- lem cropped up. Boethin, which is about a mile in diameter, seems to have disappeared. Astronomers cannot locate it and Ocean worms aren’t suggest that it may have broken into pieces too small to be seen. So NASA is retargeting the Deep Impact craft. The agency ap- proved sending the spacecraft to another comet, Hartley 2. Fast-flowing water can form deposits, too About two-thirds of the sedi- picky eaters after all CHARLIE ZIMKUS, RENEE SAUER DISPATCH PHOTO ILLUSTRATION mentary rock at or near the earth’s surface is mudstone, rock The ocean is home to many weird formed by the deposition of clays and other fine particles. Those particles are carried by water and are so fine that it has always creatures, but few that are as been assumed that for deposi- tion to occur, the water had to be still — a deep lake, perhaps. But a study by Juergen Schieber and weird as the worms of the genus Kevin Thaisen of Indiana Uni- versity, with John Southard of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology, published in Science, Osedax. The worms feast on the shows that fine clays may be deposited by fast-flowing water. bones of “whalefalls,” carcasses on the seafloor. Osedax can Ocean worms aren’t picky eaters after all make short work of even large whales, said Robert C. Vrijenhoek CHARLIE ZIMKUS, RENEE SAUER DISPATCH PHOTO ILLUSTRATION The ocean is home to many weird creatures, but few that are as weird as the worms of the genus Osedax. The worms feast on the of the Monterey Bay Aquarium bones of “whalefalls,” carcasses on the seafloor. Osedax can make short work of even large whales, said Robert C. Vrijenhoek Research Institute in California. of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in California. But the ocean floor is not exactly wall-to-wall whalefalls. Might the Experts dig into But the ocean floor is not exactly worms devour bones of other Experts dig into marine mammals as well? To test the oft-maligned that idea, Vrijenhoek and col- leagues set out cow bones near holiday staple whalefalls. Might the wall-to-wall whale carcasses in Monterey Bay. As they report in The Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the bones were colo- worms devour bones of other nized within a few months at several sites. By demonstrating that the worms go for cow bones, the researchers have shown that By Kevin Mayhood F the worms could have a more marine mammals as well? To test THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH varied diet. “If they can live on cow bones,” Vrijenhoek said, ruitcake is food for thought. spongy and dries out and “they can probably live on any- And, with a handful of large U.S. bakers alone crumbles,” Klosterman said. the oft-maligned thing.” that idea, Vrijenhoek and col- selling more than 6 million pounds of the stuff But a fruitcake, as it ages, — From wire reports “can become practically un- during the holidays, there’s a lot to go around. breakable.” Some receivers revel in the fare while others use the cakes as doorstops, toss them in the gar- Dig the cake SCIENCE BLOG - To read Dark Matter on the Web, go to http:// leagues set out cow bones near bage or regift them. However, this butt of holiday jokes can be No ancient, petrified fruit- cake has been discovered, but the holiday staple can none- viewed as a veritable brick of plenty for sciences theless offer a lesson in geol- whale carcasses in Monterey Bay. blog.dispatch.com/darkmatter/ including metallurgy, geology, composite mate- ogy. only real analogy “The rials and psychology. would be to glacial till,” said Read on. Dale Gnidovec, curator of the As they report in The Proceedings Like a brick house Orton Geological Museum at Ohio State University. holiday staple Institute. The nuts and fruits and the Composites, such as con- “Fruitcake is analogous to cake that binds them are akin of the Royal Society B: Biological crete and fiberglass, are two how a lot of these materials to the boulders, rocks, sand or more materials mixed are formed,” he said. “You and gravel that glaciers car- together to provide properties have a matrix — the cake mix ried with them across much greater than the individual — which is loaded with rein- of Ohio millions of years ago, Sciences, the bones were colo- components can offer, said forcing particles, in this case Gnidovec said. Don Klosterman, senior po- fruits and nuts. lymer engineer at the Uni- “Without the reinforcing HOW TO REACH US versity of Dayton’s Research materials, a plain cake is See FRUITCAKE Page E7 ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR Mark Somerson......614-461-8508 msomerson@dispatch.com nized within a few months at SCIENCE REPORTER Kevin Mayhood.......614-461-5256 kmayhood@dispatch.com several sites. By demonstrating that the worms go for cow bones, 12-25-07 the researchers have shown that PAGE E6 By Kevin Mayhood the worms could have a more THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH varied diet. “If they can live on cow bones,” Vrijenhoek said, ruitcake is food for thought. spongy and dries out and “they can probably live on any- thing.” And, with a handful of large U.S. bakers alone crumbles,” Klosterman said. But a fruitcake, as it ages,
  8. 8. n :Desig mile w ith a S Don’t wear large metal items that might set off metal detectors. (Small belt buckles and rings are usually OK.) Push it to the extreme.e removed quicklyengers must removeTRAVEL PubDate: 11-18-07 Page: 1 F Edition: 1 Replate: User: czimkus Color:C K Y M SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 2007 Fnt. Sun-soaked casinos Coming next Sunday Online OGLEBAY RESORT AND ANOTHER THING Holiday lights and more Florida bets on growing industry ,F3 Dispatch.com/blogs For breaking news, visit Dispatch.com. Speedier security By Steve Stephens THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH F Learn how lying can be a trying experience, with delays, overbookings and cancellations. to minimize But passengers face their first trial well before they delays reach the gate: at the security screening checkpoint. The approach of the Thanksgiving holiday — one of the busiest at airport times at the nation’s airports — promises to add to those trials. Even frequent fliers sometimes get confused or befuddled checkpoints when confronting security checkpoints. For newbies, the process can be especially stressful. See SECURITY Page F2 TIPS FOR GETTING THROUGH SECURITY Remember the “3-1-1 Rule.” All carry-on liquids Don’t pack carry-on bags too full. must be in 3.4-ounce or smaller containers and Security screeners must be able to identify all must fit inside one clear 1-quart bag. the items in bags when X-raying them. Have your boarding pass and ID in hand so you can present them at checkpoints. Don’t wear large metal items that might set off metal detectors. (Small belt buckles and rings Put loose metal items such as keys, cell phones, are usually OK.) pagers and loose change into a carry-on bag, or gather them in one place so they can easily be found, passed through the X-ray machine and retrieved. Wear shoes that can be removed quickly and put back on. Passengers must remove shoes at the checkpoint. CHARLIE ZIMKUS DISPATCH What is and isn’t OK ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED After Sept. 11, 2001, when terrorists took over airplanes - Beverages bought - Metal scissors with - Beverages - Torch lighters with box cutters, security screenings became more intense. after going through blades shorter than bought before - Lighter fluid Then came a potential bomber with explosives in his shoes security screening 4 inches going through security screening - Nightsticks and a plot to blow up planes using bottled liquids. - Pudding, yogurt, - Nail files 3 ounces or less and larger than - Tools longer All that has led to a crackdown — and confusion — on what - Safety razors 3 ounces than 7 inches is allowed aboard an airplane in carry-on bags. - Cigar cutters - Walking canes - Box cutters - Meat cleavers Some prohibited items are allowed in checked bags in- - Corkscrews - Umbrellas stead of a carry-on, but don’t be surprised that your fire- - Gel-type candles - Drills and drill - Tools such as screw- - One book of safety bits works or grenades aren’t allowed in either the passenger drivers and pliers - Gel-type shoe compartment or the cargo hold. matches inserts - Golf clubs shorter than 7 inches Here is a partial list of what is allowed in carry-on luggage - Baby formula - Snow globes - Ski poles - Knitting needles and and what is not. crochet hooks - Transformer toys - Spray paint - Sabers For a more complete list, visit www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel. Click on the link “Prohibited Items.’’ TICKET TO WRITE Time wasn’t on his side when Congress set the clocks Like many travelers, I get nerv- I blame my pocket planner and about an hour from that very ous when I’m running late for a Congress. moment, I thought. Our hostess flight or a ferry or a hotel check- Given my crazy schedule, my I often feel out of step with the seemed out. planner is indispensable. I go rest of the world, but never in so So why don’t I where it tells me to go when it tells tangible a form. Still, it wasn’t until strangely wear a watch? me. (If I ever misplace it, look for hours and miles later that I began antsy to The answer me curled up and mewling under to suspect the truth. probably lies my desk.) So when the planner When I finally got my signals conduct buried some- plainly stated “Daylight-saving straight, I realized, with wonder, where deep in time ends” Oct. 28, I believed it. that lagging behind hadn’t led to an interview my psyche, just Unfortunately, Congress had any awful repercussions. I’d even I had set up to the left of the other ideas and voted, apparently enjoyed an extra hour’s sleep. neurons that sometime after my planner was This time, Congress gets a pass. for, oh, generate those STEVE printed, to extend daylight-saving Charity cruise about an dreams in time an extra week. which I appear STEPHENS At the inn where I was staying, I Earlier this year I wrote about hour from naked on a wondered why all the guests had the Buckeye Cruise for Cancer, a stage while forgetting all my lines. shown up for breakfast so early. Caribbean cruise Feb. 8-11 that that very But a watch wouldn’t have Everyone seemed to be checking promises to raise at least $500,000 moment. helped me a few weeks ago, when out early, too. And our hostess to fight cancer. I spent almost an entire day one seemed strangely antsy to conduct hour behind the rest of the world. an interview I had set up for, oh, See STEPHENS Page F2 CHARLIE ZIMKUS DISPATCH 11-18-07 PAGE F1
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  15. 15. at airport times at the nation’s airports — promises to add to those trials. Even frequent fliers sometimes get confused or befuddled checkpoints n :Desig mile when confronting security checkpoints. For newbies, the process can be especially stressful. See SECURITY Page F2w ith a S TIPS FOR GETTING THROUGH SECURITY Remember the “3-1-1 Rule.” All carry-on liquids Don’t pack carry-on bags too full. must be in 3.4-ounce or smaller containers and Security screeners must be able to identify all must fit inside one clear 1-quart bag. the items in bags when X-raying them. Have your boarding pass and ID in hand so you can present them at checkpoints. Don’t wear large metal items that might set off metal detectors. (Small belt buckles and rings Put loose metal items such as keys, cell phones, are usually OK.) pagers and loose change into a carry-on bag, or gather them in one place so they can easily be found, passed through the X-ray machine and retrieved. Wear shoes that can be removed quickly and put back on. Passengers must remove shoes at the checkpoint. CHARLIE ZIMKUS DISPATCH What is and isn’t OK ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED After Sept. 11, 2001, when terrorists took over airplanes - Beverages bought - Metal scissors with - Beverages - Torch lighters with box cutters, security screenings became more intense. after going through blades shorter than bought before - Lighter fluid security screening 4 inches going through
  16. 16. n :Desig milew ith a S 2) Use visual metaphors.

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