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By Charlie Zimkus

www.CharlieZimkus.com
czimkus@yahoo.com
What are alternative story forms?
» They’re ways to tell stories that are beyond
the typical inverted-pyramid text + headl...
Why use ASFs?
» They grab readers’ attention
» They explain complex issues
» They help readers retain information
Helping readers understand
The 2007 Eyetrack study by the Poynter Institute had
three groups read an explanatory story abo...
What Eyetrack found
» Those who read the third prototype answered
at least seven of nine questions correctly, by an
almost...
The Backgrounder
Provides background information to supplement an ongoing news story.
Think of it as an easy-to-digest and...
Calendar
A good way to look ahead, especially if the “when” of the story is important.
Provides readers with the “what” an...
Cartoon
A fun way to tell a simple story visually.
Checklist
This to-do-list ASF engages the reader, asking them to pick up a
pencil and get involved. Could also be used for...
Data map
Sometimes reporters can use data plotted on a map to tell a story.
Diagram
Concepts can be easier to understand if you show
and tell readers what the story is about.
Election results
A useful roundup for election results that need
to be noted but do not require a full story.
Game
Let the game tell the story. This format is interactive
but there must be a logical progression for it to work.
LIFE&ARTS
Coming Friday

THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 24, 2011

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

Online

Gingerbread treat

Our suggestions begin
...
Government how they voted
Shows what action a government agency took, the vote
and what it means for readers. It allows th...
Graphic pages
Sometimes a story can be told through a variety of graphics,
including maps, charts and diagrams. The inform...
Grids/table
Used when you want to compare several items that are similar.
The comparison type must be short and the same l...
How to
Walks readers through a process.
FOODLIFE
Coming Thursday

WEDNESDAY
JANUARY 18, 2012

Online

Lots of lentils

A SPECIAL BABY CAKE

WHO’S YOUR VALENTINE?
...
Job search
Used when multiple candidates are being considered for the same job.
Categories can include age, background, pr...
Keys to victory
Whether it’s a big game or a big election, breaking down the
keys to victory into numbered lists makes the...
Location map
Use this when the location is the most important information. The map
serves as the backbone of the package a...
LIFEARTS
Coming Saturday

FRIDAY
MARCH 16, 2012

PART 2 OF OUR GUIDE

Online

Cheeky sidekick

Non-Downtown options

D

Ry...
Nuggets
Good to use when there are multiple elements to a story.
Rather than tying them together, let the nuggets stand on...
HOMEGARDEN
Coming next Sunday

HOME FOR HOLIDAYS

H

Online

Sweet as sugar

Readers share their tales

SUNDAY
DECEMBER 11...
Numbers
Use statistics to tell the story.
SATURDAY
MARCH 19, 2011

Coming Monday

Online

$175 million flop

FIVE YEARS OF TWITTER

SO WHAT’S HAPPENING?

Disney’s ‘...
Photo essay
Photo essays are self-contained presentations that tell the story visually.
You need text to set up the premis...
Process
Shows how something happens.
Combines elements of a timeline with diagrams.
QA
Answers readers questions at a glance,
simply and effectively.
QAs, continued
Let the subject or subjects of the story speak for themselves. This format
allows readers to scan more easi...
Quiz
Fun, interactive way to inform readers.
LIFEARTS
Coming Monday

SATURDAY
JANUARY 21, 2012

Sweet ‘Revenge’

BICENTENNIAL ARTWORK
Several displays to come

D

Onli...
Quote
When what is said is the story. Present the topic for the quotes
in an introduction and then let the speakers tell t...
Reality check
A quick way to verify the truthfulness of statements.
Our Ad Watch feature is a perfect example.
Reminder
Used to tell readers in a new way something they should already know,
such as how to steer out of a tailspin or t...
Report card
Usually less is more, but when comes to reporting Proficiency Test scores
for area schools, more is more. Each...
Story so far
Use for continuing stories to catch readers up to speed.
Ideally no more than 20-30 words. Could use subheads...
Talk to reader
Break out information into talking points to help guide readers
through a subject and answer their question...
Team comparison
Break down the information into main categories and
compare two teams. This format is similar to a grid.
Timeline
Use when the sequence of events is important in telling the story.
They help readers follow the big-picture part ...
Tips
Give readers advice, keeping the tips short and relevant. Having the tips
come from an expert gives the package autho...
Vignettes
Short, anecdotal tales that are useful when telling a story through
multiple people. Can be used with news as we...
HOMEGARDEN
Coming next Sunday

A PLACE OF HER OWN

H

Online

Rare Western visitor

Woman finds new home

SUNDAY
DECEMBER ...
Vocabulary lists
Helps readers understand terms that might be used throughout
a story or series of stories, or can be a co...
How do we use more ASFs?
» Think about the package, not just our part
» Open our minds
» Think like readers
» Plan ahead
»...
Effective collaboration
Former Poynter Institute fellow Monica Moses offers tips:

What story should be planned?

» Any st...
When is the right time to talk?

» Before writing or visual work is begun, but after

the reporter has a good idea of the ...
Questions to ask yourselves

» What is the point of the story?
» Why will readers care about it?
» What form should the st...
How long should these meetings last?

» No longer than 10 to 15 minutes.
» The more you do, the better and faster you beco...
Alternative story forms rock!
Alternative story forms rock!
Alternative story forms rock!
Alternative story forms rock!
Alternative story forms rock!
Alternative story forms rock!
Alternative story forms rock!
Alternative story forms rock!
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Alternative story forms rock!

  1. 1. e irvs tFo m ay ntor rS te l ! A k c o R By Charlie Zimkus www.CharlieZimkus.com czimkus@yahoo.com
  2. 2. What are alternative story forms? » They’re ways to tell stories that are beyond the typical inverted-pyramid text + headline + photograph package. » They’re typically more visual, and involve text working with images to tell a story. » Common examples are timelines, grids, Q&As, calendars and data maps.
  3. 3. Why use ASFs? » They grab readers’ attention » They explain complex issues » They help readers retain information
  4. 4. Helping readers understand The 2007 Eyetrack study by the Poynter Institute had three groups read an explanatory story about the bird flu that was presented in three ways. Readers were then quizzed on the content. The story forms: 1. Straight narrative with image and quote 2. Partial narrative with map and two sidebars 3. No traditional narrative, but a map, Q&A, by-the-numbers chart and other graphics
  5. 5. What Eyetrack found » Those who read the third prototype answered at least seven of nine questions correctly, by an almost 2-to-1 margin. » Of the people who had perfect scores, nine of 10 had read the graphic version. Conclusion: ASFs help readers retain information.
  6. 6. The Backgrounder Provides background information to supplement an ongoing news story. Think of it as an easy-to-digest and focused encyclopedia entry.
  7. 7. Calendar A good way to look ahead, especially if the “when” of the story is important. Provides readers with the “what” and the “when” at a glance.
  8. 8. Cartoon A fun way to tell a simple story visually.
  9. 9. Checklist This to-do-list ASF engages the reader, asking them to pick up a pencil and get involved. Could also be used for a public official or coach to outline an agenda.
  10. 10. Data map Sometimes reporters can use data plotted on a map to tell a story.
  11. 11. Diagram Concepts can be easier to understand if you show and tell readers what the story is about.
  12. 12. Election results A useful roundup for election results that need to be noted but do not require a full story.
  13. 13. Game Let the game tell the story. This format is interactive but there must be a logical progression for it to work.
  14. 14. LIFE&ARTS Coming Friday THURSDAY NOVEMBER 24, 2011 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE Online Gingerbread treat Our suggestions begin D Our seasonal contest for big people ,D3 JON WOODS AND TBDBITL Dispatch.com/video PROFILE ANNUAL THANKSGIVING GAME ROAD-TRIP CHALLENGE By Joe Blundo and Charlie Zimkus | THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH rab a pencil and a map: It’s time for Life Arts’ annual Thanksgiving game. Our Road-Trip Challenge asks you to identify 12 Ohio towns whose names begin with the letters in Thanksgiving. Get them all right, and you’ll win our admiration. And we’ll admire you even more if you answer our special bonus question — a riddle. Here’s how to play: On the state map, we have added visual clues suggested by the 12 towns. We have also provided a few key letters. Your job is to identify the towns, starting with No. 1. The task will take you on a virtual journey of about 1,569 miles (or so says Google Maps). It includes a couple of central Ohio locations, but mostly — to make the game more challenging — we roam the state in search of small locales. A state road map might come in handy. If you play the game right, the first letters of the towns will combine to spell Thanksgiving. From there, you move to the bonus round — in which we ask you to identify a special Columbus street. Good luck. G MATT MCCLAIN WASHINGTON POST Master Sgt. Martin J. Cervantez Stories of soldiers captured on canvas By Jacqueline Trescott THE WASHINGTON POST LAKE ERIE ˙ Toledo 9 ˙ ˙ ˙ 4 80 Cleveland 10 ˙ ˙ 90 1 ˙ Akro Akron Akron ˙ Youngstown 75 Rhymes with me! 71 11 ˙ 77 77 6 7 ˙ ˙ π ˙ 12 70 Columbus 70 Dayton ˙ ˙ 2 3 About one hour from Kandahar, Afghanistan, the artist walked with soldiers and bomb-sniffing dogs on the lookout for minefields and the enemy. They had inclines of dirt to hike over and grapevines to avoid. “There was actually a vineyard with grapes growing along dirt mounds,” recalled Master Sgt. Martin J. Cervantez. “The soldiers were doing patrols, up and over. But they were steep, and the dog handler had to lift the dogs.” Cervantez, 43, joins fellow soldiers in battle, but he makes sketches and takes photographs. Back in his spacious studio at Fort Belvoir, Va., the only official Army artist tries to capture what he saw, heard and felt. “I go through the sketches and photos,” he said. “What do I think would be visually appealing? What would capture the soldiers’ experience? I want to capture the soldiers’ perspective so they have something to grab onto.” Cervantez continues a See CANVAS Page D2 ˙ 71 Cincinnati ˙ Fe ˙ SHOW TELL 5 26 ˙ THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH 55.85 Oh i o ˙ 8 er Ri v 10 N MILES FOX Jason Bateman in a scene from Arrested Development 1. _ _ _ _ S B U _ _ 7. _ _ _ E N V _ _ _ _ 2. _ _ _ _ LT O _ 8. _ _ _ N T _ _ 3. _ _ H V _ _ _ _ 9. _ _ R M I _ _ _ _ 4. _ _ _ O L E _ _ 10. _ _ D E P _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 5. _ E _ O 11. _ _ S H _ _ _ _ _ 6. _ _ D N _ _ 12. _ _ H A _ _ _ SPECIAL BONUS RIDDLE East of Dublin lies a street That makes you think of darkish meat Eaten on a special day When the Detroit Lions play. Find this court whose name recalls Certain parts of Butterballs. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - Give up? Find the answers inside ,D2 ‘Arrested’ to return on Netflix Imagine Television and 20th Century Fox Television have made a deal with Netflix to put the former Fox series Arrested Development back into production, according to Broadcasting Cable. An undetermined number of new episodes of the show, with star Jason Bateman, are to become available on the video-subscription service starting in 2013. Group to sing at White House The New World Singers, a Columbus Children’s Choir ensemble of 32 youngsters 10 to 16, will travel to Washington to perform on Dec. 20 at the White House. The group, to be conducted by See SHOW TELL Page D2 After-Thanksgiving BONUS SALE! The Living Room Experts. Our Holiday Home Sale kicks off 5 DAYS ONLY! tomorrow at 8AM with bonus savings, FRI SAT SUN MON TUE special offers and free local delivery! 8-9 10-9 12-6 10-9 10-9 11-24-2011 PAGE D1 POLARIS 614-310-0900 TUTTLE CROSSING 614-339-2300 HAMILTON RD. 614-328-0300 www.FrontRoomFurnishings.com
  15. 15. Government how they voted Shows what action a government agency took, the vote and what it means for readers. It allows the reporter to focus on big issues while still recording the news.
  16. 16. Graphic pages Sometimes a story can be told through a variety of graphics, including maps, charts and diagrams. The information can be so thorough that a traditional story is not needed.
  17. 17. Grids/table Used when you want to compare several items that are similar. The comparison type must be short and the same length.
  18. 18. How to Walks readers through a process.
  19. 19. FOODLIFE Coming Thursday WEDNESDAY JANUARY 18, 2012 Online Lots of lentils A SPECIAL BABY CAKE WHO’S YOUR VALENTINE? A quick soup recipe ,D3 Goody reveals gender D Dispatch.com/now WHAT’S UP AT THE KITCHEN 1. Place about 1 tablespoon of filling in the center of each wrapper. 2. Moisten the edge of the wrapper with water to help seal it. 3. Fold the wrapper. Pleat the edges and press them together. 4. Note the halfmoon shape of a finished dumpling. 5. Boil dumplings in water until they have become tender. - A recipe for Year of the Dragon Dumplings ,D3 Food Editor Robin Davis will make Greek Sandwiches (see recipe, Page D2) on 10TV News HD at noon today on WBNS-TV (Channel 10). Missed the segment? Find it at Dispatch.com/food. RECIPES FROM BATALI Family starts with mealtime Asking families to have supper together every night is tough. Life gets in the way, what with sports, homework and other activities — not to mention two or three jobs. Still, making time is important, if only for one day a week at first. Choose your family’s favorite dish — say, meatloaf — and serve it every Tuesday. Trust me: Everyone will MARIO naturally start to build their BATALI schedules around the meal — thanks to a subtle shift in mentality. The goal is to gather to share stories and arguments. As my children were being raised, my wife, Susi, started every meal with “What’s the funniest thing you heard all day? What’s the worst thing that happened all day? With whom did you sit at lunch?” Family conversation has a new rival these days: handheld gadgets. I suggest adopting a Batali family rule: no technology at the table — no texting, tweeting or electronic messaging. (Jonesing for a tweet? Sneak off to the bathroom.) My offspring have started to enforce the ban, too. Sunday supper won’t cure the world’s problems. Yet the few minutes around the table might give children the confidence they need to thrive. The food at the table CHRIS RUSSELL DISPATCH PHOTOS; FOOD STYLING BY CHARLIE ZIMKUS Year of the Dragon Dumplings With Ginger Dipping Sauce Dumpling day By Robin Davis Filled noodles help make Lunar New Year entertaining for friends, relatives See BATALI Page D3 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH onday will welcome the Year of the Dragon with the Lunar New Year — and offer a reason to celebrate in the wake of many other holidays. The traditions of the Lunar New Year include the eating of Chinese dumplings, or tender dough stuffed with a variety of fillings, then boiled. The making of dumplings certainly takes time, but it lends itself to another Lunar New M See DUMPLING Page D3 - A recipe for a side dish with Brussels sprouts ,D3 TELEVISION Talk-show host has hectic first year By David Bauder ASSOCIATED PRESS BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — After taking over for Larry King last January, Piers Morgan worked for only 11 days before his vision of the show collided with reality. He was flying to Los Angeles with producer Jonathan Wald — and, as soon as they landed, their cellphones buzzed with news of political upheaval in Egypt. Wald turned to Morgan and said, “You know, we were wondering when we were first going to Piers Morgan go live. Tonight’s the night.” So began an eventful year that saw Morgan revise the format of his prime-time show, quit Amer- EXPLORE THE MANY OF THE ica’s Got Talent and see his reputation dragged into a phonehacking scandal. Through everything, he survived. He didn’t live up to his initial boasts about the competition being buried, but he didn’t fail, either. Viewership for Piers Morgan Tonight rose 9 percent over the final King year and even more among younger viewers. He is marking his first anniversary this week with See HOST Page D4 SHOW TELL ‘Artist’ up for 12 British awards The frothy silent movie The Artist and the moody spy saga Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy rank among the leading contenders for the British Academy Film Awards, the British equivalent of the Oscars. The Artist received 12 nominations; and Tinker Tailor, 11 — including nods for best picture and director, and best-actor mentions for Jean Dujardin and Gary Oldman. The other best-film nominees: The Descendants, Drive and The Help. In a diverse field not dominated by a single film, multiple nominations were also tallied by The Help, The Iron Lady, My Week With Marilyn and We flavors FAREAST Friday, January 20 through Sunday, January 22 SAMPLING 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. ALL MARKET DISTRICT LOCATIONS If you love Asian cuisine, then Market District is the place to be this weekend! Come sample fabulous Asian dishes and take advantage of great deals on a variety of Asian ingredients and foods all weekend long! 01-18-2012 PAGE D1 Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo in The Artist Need To Talk About Kevin. The best-actor contest pits Dujardin and Oldman against George Clooney of The Descendants, Michael Fassbender of Shame and Brad Pitt of Moneyball. Nominated for best actress are See SHOW TELL Page D4
  20. 20. Job search Used when multiple candidates are being considered for the same job. Categories can include age, background, pros/cons and qualifications.
  21. 21. Keys to victory Whether it’s a big game or a big election, breaking down the keys to victory into numbered lists makes the information more accessible to readers.
  22. 22. Location map Use this when the location is the most important information. The map serves as the backbone of the package and points out areas of interest. This example of the I-70/71 split incorporates a step-by-step ASF.
  23. 23. LIFEARTS Coming Saturday FRIDAY MARCH 16, 2012 PART 2 OF OUR GUIDE Online Cheeky sidekick Non-Downtown options D Ryan Johnson joins ‘Fairly Legal’ ,D3 SO WHAT’S HAPPENING? Dispatch.com/events A BREAK FROM THE MADNESS THE TOP FIVE PART 1 OF 2 DOWNTIME DELIGHTS Where to eat, drink and relax in the Arena District As pop culture goes, here’s what drew the most eyes and ears during the past 10 days: TELEVISION 1. American Idol (Wednesday), Fox 2. American Idol (Thursday), Fox 3. The Voice, NBC 4. Person of Interest, CBS 5. The Big Bang Theory, CBS ALBUMS By Jeffrey Sheban | THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH sst: In town for the weekend? Looking for a good time? With six NCAA Tournament games on tap Downtown on Friday and Sunday, thousands of visitors unfamiliar with Columbus will be seeking places to eat, drink and shop during their downtime. (And that number doesn’t count visitors who are destined for the state high-school girls basketball tournament and other big draws this weekend.) The good news: Nationwide Arena is ringed by restaurants, bars, boutiques and galleries — so finding a lot to do quickly won’t require a degree in logistics. To further simplify matters, The Dispatch has put together two installments of tips and suggestions for navigating the Arena District and points beyond. Today, with four games on the local NCAA basketball schedule, the focus is close to the action — a few blocks in any direction from the arena. For the off day, our guide on Saturday will broaden the scope, assuming that people have more time and a greater inclination to venture out. Let the big weekend begin. P 1. Wrecking Ball, Bruce Springsteen 2. 21, Adele 3. Now That’s What I Call Music! 41, various artists 4. Own the Night, Lady Antebellum 5. Mylo Xyloto, Coldplay COUNTRY SONGS jsheban@dispatch.com BROOD HERE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 1.5 MILES St. E. Lincoln t. 13. R Bar 14. Gordon Biersch 15. Big Bang Dueling Piano Bar 16. Buca di Beppo 17. Sunny Street Cafe 18. Boston’s the Gourmet Pizza 19. Ted’s Montana Grill 20. BD’s Mongolian Grill 21. Elevator Brewery Draught House N. High S 1. Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams 2. Homage 3. Sushi Rock 4. Bar Louie 5. Park Street Tavern 6. Park Street Cantina 7. Gaswerks 8. Garage Bar 9. BBR Columbus 10. Brothers Bar Grill 11. Japanese Steak House 12. Barley’s Brewing Co. 1 Brickel St. 2 Russell St. SHORT NORTH Park St. Whether toasting a lastminute win or drowning your sorrows after a heartbreaking loss, consider the flavors of establishments that brew their own beer. Three can be found within reasonable walking distances: Gordon Biersch (401 N. Front St.), part of a California chain, is a bottle cap’s throw from the arena; Barley’s Brewing Co. (467 N. High St.) features a different firkin (beer from a sealed cask) every Friday; and Elevator Brewery Draught Haus (161 N. High St.) offers tours of its nearby brewery (165 N. 4th St.) at 4 p.m. every Saturday. Food and drink G O O DA L E PA R K 3 Goodale St. I-670 CAP 670 Spruce St. 9 Vine St. 5 6 7 ARENA DISTRICT e Blvd. N. High S Nationwid t. Front St. N O R T H B A N K PA R K 20 d. Blvd. - To watch a video about Columbus microbreweries, visit Dispatch.com/video. 18 19 Marconi Blv John H. McConnell ON THE WEB HYATT REGENCY 16 DO WNTOWN ARENA GRAND MOVIE THEATER M C FERSON COMMONS Spring St. 21 DOWNTOWN YMCA SPORTS AUTHORITIES S C I OT O R I V E Long St. R N TOM BAKER | DISPATCH Pretty much every bar and restaurant has a variety of options for sports viewing, but some raise “big screen” to a new level. Hockey fans might want to check out R Bar (413 N. Front St.), the unofficial bar of the Columbus Blue Jackets, our not-sofearsome NHL team and the main tenant of Nationwide Arena. Other bars that emphasize sports viewing include Boston’s the Gourmet Pizza (191 W. Nationwide Blvd.), BBR Columbus (106 Vine St.), the Garage Bar (147 SONG AND DANCE Jukeboxes are a dime a dozen, but at least two Arena District establishments emphasize live music: Park Street Tavern (501 Park St.) and the Big Bang Dueling Piano Bar (401 N. Front St.). For the young at heart, singles and basketball fans looking to burn off nervous energy, a series of large, dance-friendly bars and clubs can be found on and near Park Street — generally two or three blocks from the arena. Included are Brothers Bar Grill (477 Park St.), Gaswerks (487 Park St.) and Park Street Cantina (491 Park St.). CHICO RITA Animated love story is for adults By Colin Covert STAR TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS) The fluidly animated Chico Rita offers a sexy, sultry, passionate love story between a 1940s Havana nightclub singer and her faithless pianist. The film, which lost the Oscar for animated feature to Rango, is told in terms easier to reconcile with a live-action movie: The relationship is realistic, frankly sexual and more emotionally violent than a cartoon is expected to be. The work represents a mostly Spanish-language collaboration between writer-director Fernando See CHICO RITA Page D2 Rita in Havana, in a scene from the film 03-16-2012 DVD SALES 1. Immortals 2. Game of Thrones: The Complete First Season 3. Jack and Jill 4. Footloose 5. Puss in Boots Sources: Nielsen Media Research, Billboard, Rentrak LUMA FILMS Each week, we consult Metacritic.com to compile aggregate opinions, converted to numbers, based on reviews from printed and online sources. Each movie is listed with its “Metascore,” an average rating from zero (terrible) to 100 (outstanding). — Michael Grossberg mgrossberg@dispatch.com TV crime-drama adaptations MOVIE ....................................SCORE 21 Jump Street (2012) 70 Miami Vice (2006) 65 Starsky Hutch (2004) 55 Charlie’s Angels (2000) 52 The A-Team (2010) 47 Top March-opening movies MOVIE ....................................SCORE Alice in Wonderland 53 ($334.2 million, 2010) 300 ($210.6, 2007) 51 Monsters vs. Aliens ($198.4, 2009) 56 Ice Age: The Meltdown ($195.3, 2006) 58 Liar Liar ($181.4, 1997) See BREAK Page D8 Football player James Laurinaitis, scheduled to appear at Fan Madness MOVIE REVIEW RB/HIP-HOP SONGS 1. Love on Top, Beyonce 2. The Motto, Drake featuring Lil Wayne 3. Strip, Chris Brown featuring Kevin McCall 4. Lotus Flower Bomb, Wale featuring Miguel 5. Rack City, Tyga CRITICS’ CHOICES 14 15 ARENA DISTRICT ATHLETIC CLUB 17 NORTH MARKET 13 Neil Ave. HUNTINGTON PARK 11 12 10 8 GREATER COLUMBUS CONVENTION CENTER 4 Vine St.) and Bar Louie (504 Park St.). For communal viewing with a twist, consider “Fan Madness,” a free event from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. today only in Battelle Hall of the Greater Columbus Convention Center (400 N. High St.). All tournament games will be televised on five large projection screens, and fans can mingle with former Ohio State athletes LeCharles Bentley, Terence Dials, Brian Hartline, Craig Krenzel, James Laurinaitis, Scoonie Penn and J.J. Sullinger. Beer will be available, as will video games, a mechanical riding bull and bag-toss games. For more information, visit www.fanmadness.com. 1. Home, Dierks Bentley 2. Alone With You, Jake Owen 3. Ours, Taylor Swift 4. Love’s Gonna Make It Alright, George Strait 5. Reality, Kenny Chesney 68 SHOW TELL CBS rolls out wave of renewals CBS has renewed 18 series, representing the bulk of its schedule, for next season. The mass renewal includes dramas, comedies, reality shows and newsmagazines but not the sitcom Two and a Half Men, whose return is still being negotiated. Three of the series had already been picked up: The Big Bang Theory, How I Met Your Mother and Survivor. The rest of the list consists of the dramas Blue Bloods, Criminal Minds, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, The Good Wife, Hawaii Five-0, The Mentalist, NCIS, NCIS: Los Angeles and Person of Interest; the comedies Mike Molly and 2 Broke Girls; the reality shows The Amazing Race and Undercover Boss; and the news- PAGE D1 CBS Jim Parsons, among the stars of The Big Bang Theory magazines 48 Hours Mystery and 60 Minutes. Museum, Smithsonian linked The Springfield Museum of Art has become the only Ohio art museum named a Smithsonian affiliate, the museum announced yesterday. The affiliation program, in See SHOW TELL Page D3
  24. 24. Nuggets Good to use when there are multiple elements to a story. Rather than tying them together, let the nuggets stand on their own. Includes a brief introduction, short text of 30 words or less and short headlines. Group related nuggets together.
  25. 25. HOMEGARDEN Coming next Sunday HOME FOR HOLIDAYS H Online Sweet as sugar Readers share their tales SUNDAY DECEMBER 11, 2011 Stevia can be grown indoors ,H6 CHUTNEY CHEESE BALL Dispatch.com/video OLD HOUSE HANDYMAN He wants some Goop in stocking Italianate American foursquare Craftsman This style, widely popular in the Midwest, is characterized by low-pitched hip roofs, decorative roof brackets, tall and narrow windows, and elaborate door and window crowns. Some examples include arched windows and cupolas or towers. This phrase describes a ubiquitous design popular during the first half of the 20th century, a stripped-down variation of the more elegant Prairie style. Foursquares are identified by their boxy shape, 21⁄2-story height and hip roofs, which typically include a center dormer. Fullwidth porches are common. Inspired by the Arts and Crafts movement, this style is distinguished externally by exposed roof rafters, low-pitched gabled roofs, wood or stone facades, wood details, and front porches supported by thick, tapered columns. Internally, the homes feature extensive wood trim and built-in details such as bookshelves. - When popular: 1900 to 1940 - When popular: 1905 to 1930 - Where to find: Olde Towne East, University District - Where to find: Clintonville, Grandview Heights - When popular: 1840 to 1885 - Where to find: German Village, Italian Village An architectural digest [ Experts clarify the proper descriptions for 10 home styles in central Ohio — from American foursquare to Tudor revival ] By Jim Weiker THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH Queen Anne hy sell a ranch home when you can sell a midcentury modern? And why bother with a bungalow when you can list a Craftsman? Names do matter, in architecture as well as in real estate. A snappy architectural description can add cache to a home. It can also draw frowns from those in the know. “The real-estate community has its jargon, and within the architectural history community, there’s jargon, Popular during the Victorian era, homes in this style are identified by steeply pitched roofs, multiple roof lines, shingle siding, asymmetry, front porches and front-facing gables. Bay windows are common, along with decorated exterior wall surfaces. W « - When popular: 1880 to 1910 - Where to find: Olde Towne East, Victorian Village My holiday gift to you is a list of my most-used tools, gadgets, glues and other assorted stocking stuffers, some of which cost nothing but might draw perplexed looks if you give them as gifts. Let’s start with the wire clothes hanger, the kind that comes back from the dry cleaner with your pressed suits. I use them for everything from holding small parts for ALAN spray-painting to repairing a sagging MILLER muffler. My daughter’s last muffler repair job was a work of art, with three strands of coat-hanger wire, two pieces of sheet metal from the bottom of a discarded charcoal grill and three metal screws. The guys who finally won the honor of replacing it with a new muffler howled when they saw my handiwork. I used hanger wire recently to clean out a downspout that had become clogged with leaves. The wire is flexible enough to make the turns in the elbows, and the hook on the end did a great job of snagging the gunk clogging the pipe. I suggested recently to some college students that they use a hanger to fix a sagging futon frame. They looked perplexed. “My hangers are all plastic,” one finally said. I will bequeath them one of my metal hangers. I bet you all have some great uses for old hangers. Please send your ideas to me so I can share them. Next on the all-time favorites list is something called Zip-It Clean, a tool so simple and vital — See MILLER Page H2 See STYLES Page H2 No furnace? Renovation in Minnesota makes leap Ranch Colonial revival Although its popularity peaked in the 1940s and 1950s, this style — based on early American styles such as Georgian and Federal — has never truly left. It is now enjoying another revival in places such as New Albany. The style appears in many variations, but it is broadly characterized by a center entrance accented by columns, a symmetrical facade, double-hung windows, brick or wood siding, and a rectangular layout. Also common are pediments over the front doors and window shutters. - When popular: 1880 to today By Matt McKinney This one-story design, sometimes called a rambler, emerged in California before World War II and flourished nationally in the 1950s and 1960s. It is marked by its single-level low-pitched roof, asymmetrical layout, abundance of windows and, typically, wide eaves, a rear terrace and minimal ornamentation. Among architectural purists, ranch describes a form, or shape, of a house, rather than its style. Likewise, the phrase midcentury modern doesn’t describe a style but might refer to a large ranch, especially one with an unusually open layout. - When popular: 1940 to 1980 STAR TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS) Cape Cod This simple style, introduced by English settlers in Massachusetts, was revived after World War II because of its efficiency and low cost. Typically found in 11⁄2-story versions, it’s characterized by open side gables, narrow roof overhangs, rectangular shape, wood siding and, usually, a symmetrical appearance. - When popular: 1940 to 1960 - Where to find: Colonial Hills in Worthington, Hanford Village on the East Side, Westgate on the West Side - Where to find: Bexley, Upper Arlington - Where to find: Upper Arlington, Northwest Side, Berwick Dutch Colonial revival Tudor revival International A variety of the Colonial revival movement, this style is primarily distinguished by gambrel roofs. Other characteristics include a rectangular shape, double-hung windows, symmetrical layouts and center entrances. Some versions include second-floor dormers or eaves extended over a porch. This style, which harks back to medieval English cottages, is identified by steeply pitched roofs, exposed decorative timbers, massive chimneys, multipaned casement windows and asymmetrical layouts. Elaborate examples feature wood-shingled roofs and decorated chimneys. Stucco siding is common, but brick or stone can also be found. The style, so-called because it originated in Europe, is chiefly identified by its flat roof, minimal ornamentation and plain stucco or concrete finish. Other common features include metal windows, corner windows, a lack of window or door trim, and cantilevered second-story projections. - When popular: 1890 to 1950 - When popular: 1925 to today - Where to find: Bexley, Old Beechwold, Upper Arlington - Where to find: scattered - When popular: 1900 to 1940 - Where to find: Clintonville Sources: A Field Guide to American Houses, Virginia Lee McAlester; The Visual Dictionary of American Domestic Architecture, Richard Carley; www.architecture.about.com; jan.ucc.nau.edu; Ohio Historic Preservation Office; LaFontaine Architecture Design; Columbus Landmarks Foundation 12-11-2011 PAGE H1 MINNEAPOLIS — Paul Brazelton will soon move his family into a recently renovated 1935 Tudor home in southern Minneapolis that has no furnace. Even though winter is bearing down, he removed the boiler and plans to use that basement space for his daughters’ home-school classroom. He also took out the fireplace. If this sounds like an uninviting house, there’s something else to know: Brazelton, a software engineer and passionate environmentalist, has almost finished a retrofit of his house to the stringent engineering standards of the Passivhaus, or Passive House, model, a German system of homebuilding that uses insulation and highly efficient doors and windows to save energy. The finished 2,000-square-foot home could be warmed even in the dead of winter with two small space heaters, Brazelton said, although the family plans to piggyback on their hot water heater and use an in-floor heating system in the basement. “We’re really nervous,” said Brazelton, “because when it’s 20 degrees below and you can feel your house contracting and cracking like it’s just trying to resist the cold, it’s hard to believe that two space heaters from Target will do the trick for us.” The finished project is on track to be certified by the Passivhaus Institute of Darmstadt, Germany, as the first EnerPHit home in North America, according to the family’s architect, Tim Eian of TE Studio in Minneapolis. The EnerPHit standard, deSee FURNACE Page H2
  26. 26. Numbers Use statistics to tell the story.
  27. 27. SATURDAY MARCH 19, 2011 Coming Monday Online $175 million flop FIVE YEARS OF TWITTER SO WHAT’S HAPPENING? Disney’s ‘Mars’ ailing at box office ,D3 A guide for the uninitiated D Dispatch.com/weekender First Person is a weekly forum for personal musings and reflections from readers. FIRST PERSON $131 Projected average residential gas bill for February 49 Days with a snow depth of at least 1 inch — or the fifth most on record (No. 1: 1977-78, with 74 days) WINTER RECAP 6,300 Lane miles of roads that would be plowed to remove snow from every street in Columbus (versus 3,000 lane miles in the much-snowier Cleveland) 18 Longest stretch of days (Dec. 12-29) with an average temperature below 32 degrees For those who despair the season of snow, 2010-11 could have been worse. Perhaps these numbers will provide a measure of comfort. By Joe Blundo | THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH A t long last, spring will arrive at 7:21 p.m. Sunday. Winter has seemingly lasted forever, keeping us shivering. Yet the numbers say the season hasn’t been that cold, that snowy or that calamitous. Central Ohio recorded one minor snowfall record: The 2.9 inches that fell on Dec. 12 was the most ever for that date. Compare that with New York (snowiest January: 36 inches); Hartford, Conn. (snowiest month: 57 inches); or even Huntsville, Ala. (most consecutive days with snow on the ground: eight). The most memorable weather event here was the ice storm of Feb. 1-2, which knocked out power to 180,000 American Electric Power customers in Ohio and left Columbus littered with broken branches. With help from the cities of Columbus and Chardon; Columbus schools; Columbia Gas; the Ohio Department of Transportation; the National Weather Service; and Keith Heidorn, a Canadian scientist who calls himself “the Weather Doctor,” we offer a statistical snapshot of the winter of 2010-11. 166 Additional minutes of daylight that Columbus will receive today compared with Dec. 21, the first day of winter Chardon -2 Lowest temperature this winter in Columbus, as recorded on Jan. 22 -22 Lowest temperature in Columbus history, as recorded on Jan. 19, 1994 30.1 inches $83.7 million Snowfall record for February, as set in 2010 (compared with 4.8 inches in February 2011) Estimated cost, through Monday, of plowing and treating state-maintained roads in Ohio 148 inches Total snowfall in Chardon, traditionally the snowiest place in the state, through Friday — or about 120 inches more than the total in Columbus 3 Calamity days used by most Columbus schools (while a few have taken four and Chardon has used six) 32,379 Weight of salt (in tons) used by Columbus as of Friday — or, at $59 a ton, about $1.9 million worth 10 million Approximate weight (in tons) of 5.7 inches of snow (about what fell on Jan. 20) if spread uniformly throughout the 227 square miles of Columbus (with the actual weight depending on the water content of the snow — which varies widely, according to Heidorn) CHARLIE ZIMKUS See FIRST PERSON Page D2 TELEVISION SPEAKING VOLUMES Upstart talent show springs forth Once a month, we check in on the supply and demand at the Columbus Metropolitan Library: THE WASHINGTON POST Christina Aguilera, who will serve as a coach and judge on the NBC competition The Voice Pop diva Christina Aguilera, hip-hop artist Cee Lo Green, Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine and country crooner Blake Shelton were trotted out this week at a media junket in Los Angeles to plug The Voice, a new challenger to American Idol. To refresh fading memories: Late last year, amid swirling talk about the upcoming battle between the Fox series American Idol and The X Factor with Simon Cowell, NBC pulled a fast one, announcing that it had landed the U.S. broadcast rights to a hot new Dutch singing competition called The Voice of Holland. So a war for the hearts and minds of America suddenly looms between The X Factor and The Voice. In the Netherlands, the original version of The Voice has displaced not only The X Factor but also Idol and become the most-watched TV talent show in Dutch history, NBC noted gleefully. The network has developed the show so fast that The Voice will premiere April 26. On the other hand, Cowell — who has done The X Factor for years abroad — announced By Lisa de Moraes TOP BUYS FOR APRIL 1. I’ll Walk Alone, Mary Higgins Clark 2. The Fifth Witness: A Lincoln Lawyer Novel, Michael Connelly 3. Save Me, Lisa Scottoline 4. Treason at Lisson Grove, Anne Perry 5. The Sixth Man, David Baldacci DISPATCH I read the obituaries. Even when I travel, I buy a newspaper wherever I stop or stay and immediately turn to the obits to read about people I’ve never known. The habit began when I had to write my mother’s obituary in 2000. The director of the funeral home where the hospital had sent her body told me that he’d prepare it. I said no — that I would sit with him and help. For almost an JEF hour, I reBENEDETTI counted the identities that I thought should be included: member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots in World War II, longtime Realtor, retired Nevada State Employment Service employee and beloved mother. From then on, I started reading the obits daily — at first out of curiosity. It’s amazing what you learn about people from their obits. Many newspapers today rely on funeral directors — instead of novice reporters — to collect the data and submit them. I’ve written a few obits in my time — including one about Wendy’s founder Dave Thomas for a business newspaper. One day, I got the idea to place my hand on the obit page and say a small prayer: “Receive them please, Lord.” I instantly felt better, but the practice has turned into something of an obsession. Now, I must read at least one newspaper a day. It must be in my hands — online doesn’t seem to make it — and I must recite the prayer, with one recitation for each page. Most days, I say it two or three times. On Memorial and Veterans days, I might say it five times or more. The habit has led me to some interesting circumstances. I once saw the obit of a woman who was survived by, among others, a son who bore the name of a man I know professionally: central Ohio developer Larry Canini. I like the guy, so I decided to go to the visitation. After arriving, I didn’t see him, so I asked the man at the door where I could find him. “I’m Larry Canini,” the man said. I had gone to the wake of a woman who’d borne a son with the same name, but I didn’t know the man. Embarrassed, I shook his hand, gave my condolences and left. Another man and fellow golfer Family’s Century of Art and Loss, Edmund de Waal RESERVES ON THE RISE MEMOIRS AND BIOGRAPHIES 1. Before I Fall, Lauren Oliver 2. Secret Historian: The Life and Times of Samuel Steward, Professor, Tattoo Artist, and Sexual Renegade, Justin Spring 3. The Neighbors Are Watching, Debra Ginsberg 4. The Nomination, William G. Tapply 5. The Hare With Amber Eyes: A 1. And Furthermore, Judi Dench 2. Untied: A Memoir of Family, Fame, and Floundering, Meredith Baxter 3. The Pioneer Woman: Black Heels to Tractor Wheels — A Love Story, Ree Drummond 4. Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, Patton Oswalt 5. A Widow’s Story, Joyce Carol Oates 03-19-2011 See TALENT Page D2 PAGE D1 ASSOCIATED PRESS Rank for 2010-11 among the coldest heating seasons in the Columbia Gas service area (No. 1: 1976-77); or 28th among average winter temperatures in Columbus DAMIAN DOVARGANES 15th Obituaries a devotion daily since Mom’s death
  28. 28. Photo essay Photo essays are self-contained presentations that tell the story visually. You need text to set up the premise and captions for the photos, but the point is to let the pictures tell the story.
  29. 29. Process Shows how something happens. Combines elements of a timeline with diagrams.
  30. 30. QA Answers readers questions at a glance, simply and effectively.
  31. 31. QAs, continued Let the subject or subjects of the story speak for themselves. This format allows readers to scan more easily for the information they want.
  32. 32. Quiz Fun, interactive way to inform readers.
  33. 33. LIFEARTS Coming Monday SATURDAY JANUARY 21, 2012 Sweet ‘Revenge’ BICENTENNIAL ARTWORK Several displays to come D Online SO WHAT’S HAPPENING? Dispatch.com/events Actor loving nighttime soap ,D6 Tom Selleck Geraldo Rivera Burt Reynolds Dr. Phil Selleck, who stars in the police drama Blue Bloods, possesses perhaps the best-known mustache on television. It’s so highly regarded, the New York Post reports, that he had a personal mustache groomer who rushed to comb it between takes while filming in that city. Rivera, 68, has told interviewers that his face was last hairless when he was 25. “My mustache is older than my wife,” he once said. As iconic lip hair goes, his might rival Selleck’s. It’s so well-known that the miniseries I Love the ’70s had a recurring segment dedicated to the Reynolds ’stache. In 2010, he made national news when he allowed Oprah Winfrey to shave off his mustache on her show. Evidently, he didn’t like the results. The ’stache is back. Mario William Howard Taft Archie Griffin Michael B. Coleman The jumping plumber from the video games sports a bushy, upturned mustache that makes him instantly recognizable. One of the theories behind his popularity is that his humble looks make it easy for players to identify with his adventures. Ohio leads the nation in presidents with facial hair. Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes and James A. Garfield all sported luxuriant growth. But one of the best mustaches in presidential history might have belonged to Ohioan Taft. The former Ohio State football star has rarely been without a mustache since high school, but he recently shaved it off. He was tired of mustache maintenance, he said. But the ’stache could reappear. He likes to “change it up a little,” he said. The mayor’s neatly trimmed lip adornment is the first mustache of Columbus. Coleman, who first grew a ’stache in high school as a rebellious act, said he has shaved it off only once (about 10 years ago) and didn’t like the results. He won’t make that mistake again: “I don’t foresee a time ever in life where I would shave my mustache.” STASH ’STACHES OF By Joe Blundo | THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH ulk Hogan without a mustache? Unthinkable. Yet the former professional wrestler recently told TMZ.com that he is going to shave it off. Apparently, it’s a career move: Hogan said he has some movie auditions planned. He didn’t explain why that means the mustache must go. The revelation prompted the president of the semi-serious American Mustache Institute to fire off an instant protest. “We do hope that Mr. Hogan, for whom we have great reverence, reconsiders shaving his upper-lip shading device, as millions of those he has inspired would be greatly let down, leading to mass chaos and deep bouts of depression in the mustached American community,” said Aaron Perlut of St. Louis. Whatever happens to Hogan’s hair, the world will still have plenty of signature ’staches, not to mention the memory of distinguished facial hair of the past. Here’s a sampling of the mustaches that matter — including one that recently disappeared. H Clean-faced Hulk Hogan would shave only a little off top of club jblundo@dispatch.com Identify the upper lip a. Mark Twain b. Neighbor Ned Flanders c. Salvador Dali d. Groucho Marx e. Mike Ditka f. Theodore Roosevelt ANSWERS: Can you identify the person just by seeing the mustache? Here are six ’staches. Match them with their owners below: 1 3 5 2 4 6 First Person is a weekly forum for personal musings and reflections from readers. FIRST PERSON By hand, wide-open spaces made new Cement, sand, aggregate and water. Though largely unnoticed in daily life, these ingredients — when correctly combined to form concrete — help shape history. I’m in the concreteconstruction business — the part that actually installs the material. My family has been in this line RALPH V. of work since my POLLETTA grandfather immigrated to the United States in 1920. That’s a lot of concrete flowing down a chute (or out of a dumptruck tailgate). I started working with concrete in 1976, when, as a highschool sophomore, I took a summer job with the company that employed my father. The company built the infrastructure for subdivisions: storm sewers, waterlines, curbs and pavement. I spent summers during high school and college in the middle of what I thought was nowhere — the vast land north of I-270, east of Brice Road and west of Norton Road. That “nowhere,” of course, eventually became somewhere. We’d pull onto a site consisting of only survey stakes and a dirt field; and, by week’s end, a street would be born. The routine continued as the suburbs of central Ohio were built. I served my country in the military for three years and returned to the industry in 1987. My father and I started a business, again placing and finishing concrete throughout Franklin County and beyond: in the Brewery District, at Otterbein College in Westerville, at Donatos pizza shops and at uncounted residential and commercial sites. The work took us to a new strip mall in Upper Arlington, an old supermarket on W. Broad Street, mechanical pads on the roof of Mount Carmel Medical Center and everywhere in between. There, we poured concrete — adding to the hard, gray history of central Ohio. Central High School became COSI Columbus, an open area near the Ohio State University Medical Center became the Spirit of Women Park, and land on the East Side became Easton Town Center — all projects blending old and new. On the western edge of the Arena District, where my grandfather and father had contributed to street-maintenance 1. b; 2. e; 3. d; 4. a; 5. c; 6. f See FIRST PERSON Page D2 ETTA JAMES 1938-2012 THE BICENTENNIAL CHALLENGE Singer made ‘At Last’ her own Test yourself on city history Today we continue the Bicentennial Challenge, a yearlong series of quick quizzes about Columbus history — in honor of the city’s 200th birthday. Each Saturday, Life Arts offers - Answers a quiz (along from last with the answers week ,D3 from the previous week). The first reader to email Joe Blundo at jblundo@dispatch. com with the correct answers is declared the weekly winner. At the end of each quarter, the person with the most victories receives $25. (In the event of a tie, a drawing determines the winner.) a Cotton Club chorus girl, and I wanted to be obvious as the most flamboyant hooker on the ASSOCIATED PRESS street. I just wanted to be.” James died yesterday of comLOS ANGELES — Etta James’ plications from leukemia at performance of the classic At Riverside Community Hospital Last was the embodiment of in Los Angeles. She was 73. refined soul: Angelic-sounding Despite the reputation she strings announced the arrival of cultivated, she would always be her passionate yet measured remembered best for At Last. vocals as she sang tenderly Her soulful rendition of the tune about a love finally realized after FILE PHOTO introduced in a 1942 Glenn a long and patient wait. Miller movie became the song In real life, little about James Etta James performing in 2009 that would define her as a legwas as genteel as that song. The in Columbus endary singer. platinum blonde’s first hit, The Jamesette Hawkins was born In other words, she was one of Wallflower, was a saucy 1955 in Los Angeles to a mother RB number about sex. She was music’s original bad girls. “The bad girls . . . had the look whom she described as a scam known as a hell-raiser who had artist, a substance abuser and a tempestuous relationships with that I liked,” she wrote in her fleeting presence during her 1995 autobiography. “I wanted her family, men and the music to be rare, I wanted to be industry. Then she spent years noticed, I wanted to be exotic as See JAMES Page D2 battling drugs. By Nekesa Mumbi Moody and Robert Jablon Challenge No. 3 In column 1 are six parks named for prominent Columbus residents of the past. Match the parks with the first names and occupations of the people for whom they were named (columns 2 and 3). COLUMN 1 Berliner Goodale Dodge Sensenbrenner Antrim Portman COLUMN 2 Lincoln Melvin John Maury M.E. “Jack” Lou COLUMN 3 Quarry owner Parks director Sports writer Doctor, merchant Mayor City councilman 01-21-2012 PAGE D1
  34. 34. Quote When what is said is the story. Present the topic for the quotes in an introduction and then let the speakers tell the story.
  35. 35. Reality check A quick way to verify the truthfulness of statements. Our Ad Watch feature is a perfect example.
  36. 36. Reminder Used to tell readers in a new way something they should already know, such as how to steer out of a tailspin or the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning.
  37. 37. Report card Usually less is more, but when comes to reporting Proficiency Test scores for area schools, more is more. Each reader is looking for information that is relevant to him or her, and if it’s not there, this story is worthless.
  38. 38. Story so far Use for continuing stories to catch readers up to speed. Ideally no more than 20-30 words. Could use subheads such as Story so far, What happened, and What’s next.
  39. 39. Talk to reader Break out information into talking points to help guide readers through a subject and answer their questions quickly. Look for visuals that can help tell the story.
  40. 40. Team comparison Break down the information into main categories and compare two teams. This format is similar to a grid.
  41. 41. Timeline Use when the sequence of events is important in telling the story. They help readers follow the big-picture part of the story, while freeing the reporter from having to include all the background information in the article
  42. 42. Tips Give readers advice, keeping the tips short and relevant. Having the tips come from an expert gives the package authority.
  43. 43. Vignettes Short, anecdotal tales that are useful when telling a story through multiple people. Can be used with news as well as features.
  44. 44. HOMEGARDEN Coming next Sunday A PLACE OF HER OWN H Online Rare Western visitor Woman finds new home SUNDAY DECEMBER 18, 2011 Rufous hummingbird makes appearance ,H6 FIGHTING HUNGER Dispatch.com/video Basking in warmth of holiday memories By Jim Weiker | THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH ( hile chestnuts should have been roasting on open fires, Emmy Camp’s family huddled around candles for a holiday meal of Wendy’s hamburgers. ¶ Her memorable Christmas tale is among several “home for the holidays” stories submitted by readers. ¶ Below are recollections of the Santa who fell into the coal chute, the lumpy gravy that turned out to be something else, the holiday dinner shared in an icy Indiana ditch and a surprise phone call from Santa. ¶ The tales offer holiday home adventures — or adventures on the journey home. W ) Readers recall stories that hold special place •••• CHARLIE ZIMKUS Cooking up burgers Two days before Christmas in 2004, Emmy and Bill Camp were waiting for their son, Brian, to arrive from FlorEmmy ida when an ice Camp storm knocked out power to their Gahanna neighborhood. Late in the evening, eight hours late, Brian finally landed with some guests: a pair of cockatiels; Rocco, the dog; and Tabitha, the cat, who promptly peed in a planter. Unable to take all the animals to a hotel, the family spent the next few days in coats and gloves, sleeping on lounge chairs around the fireplace. Power was still out when the Camps’ daughter, Lisa, arrived with her family on Christmas Day. Lisa’s husband, who worked at Wendy’s corporate headquarters, packed along dinner: frozen Wendy’s hamburgers. DISPATCH ILLUSTRATIONS Bill Camp cooked the hamburgers on a camp stove. “That was our Christmas dinner,” Emmy Camp, 77, said. “We still laugh about that today.” Hearing from Santa « On Christmas Eve 14 years ago, 5-yearold Christopher Balch was outdoors with the family when an airplane Christopher descended over the family’s Bexley Balch house toward Port Columbus International Airport. It was too dark to make out the shape of the plane, but the blinking lights were plainly visible. “We told him that was Santa’s sleigh, landing,” said his father, J. Randolph Balch, 59. “His ON THE HOUSE Thefts show open houses as risky The couple visited the open houses claiming to be in search of a new home. He was big, in his early 50s, sporting a chef’s coat. She was in her late 30s and heavily tattooed. The woman was shopping for a home in the wake of her mother’s death, they told realestate agents. Then they went separate JIM ways in the home. While the WEIKER man occupied the agent’s attention, the woman vanished into a bedroom. And that, officials say, is when things went wrong. According to the Franklin County prosecutor’s office, the couple stole more than $12,000 in jewelry, cash and camera equipment from half a dozen homes they visited during August open houses. “The gentleman immediately came into the family room,” said Annette Marble, an agent with Columbus Realty Professionals in Plain City who was listing a Hilliard home that the couple visited. “She took off right upstairs, and he kept me at bay in the family room. I would head toward the foyer and the stairs, and he would block me from going there. Finally, I was getting ready to go upstairs, and she came out of the bedroom and shut the door. . . . “They seemed somewhat normal, but after she shut the door, I had a weird gut feeling. When they left and my sellers came home, I asked them if they were missing anything of value.” They discovered rings were missing. Once the agents realized what was happening, they contacted the Columbus Board of Realtors, whose alert caught the attention of other victims. Lynne Elledge, a Real Living HER agent, became suspicious when a woman spent an unusually long time on the second floor of a home that Elledge was showing on the Northwest Side. After police compared notes, Michael Shipley, 53, of the West Side, and Crystal Galloway, 37, of Richwood in Union County, were arrested. Each has been arraigned on six counts of burglary and four counts of theft. Both have pleaded not guilty. The thefts have understandably alarmed real-estate agents. Elledge, for instance, plans to post a sign on her open houses proclaiming that the home is under surveillance. Marble would rather not hold open houses again — at least alone. “I love doing open houses, but I don’t like doing them anymore,” Marble said. “It just kind of put a bad taste in my mouth.” If nothing else, agents can find comfort that such incidents See MEMORIES Page H2 See WEIKER Page H2 More bottle trees are sprouting in Northern yards STAR TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS) Bottle trees are whimsical yard decorations, popular in the South, that use colored-glass bottles on a framework. Looking for a gift for the gardener who has everything? How about a bottle tree? The decorative “trees” — with colored glass bottles for “branches” — are a tradition in the rural South and the Caribbean. But now they’re becoming a popular garden ornament in the North, as well as the subject of a forthcoming book. “Bottle trees are the modern pink flamingo,” garden author Felder Rushing recently told The Wall Street Journal. Gardener Maggie McDonald, who lives in Wisconsin Dells, Wis., had been pining for one since she first saw a homemade version at a friend’s place. “I’ve wanted a bottle tree for so long,” she said. She looked without success until her husband located a bottle-tree artist just an hour’s drive away. McDonald bought her “tree,” trimmed with cobalt-blue bottles, in June and displays it near a steppingstone embedded with matching blue glass. “It’s so pretty!” she said. “When the black-eyed Susans are in bloom, it really looks sharp.” Jerry Swanson, the Princeton, Wis., By Kim Palmer “It’s so pretty! When the black-eyed Susans are in bloom, it really looks sharp.” MAGGIE MCDONALD Wisconsin gardener See BOTTLE TREES Page H3 12-18-2011 TOM WALLACE PAGE H1 STAR TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS)
  45. 45. Vocabulary lists Helps readers understand terms that might be used throughout a story or series of stories, or can be a collection of jargon.
  46. 46. How do we use more ASFs? » Think about the package, not just our part » Open our minds » Think like readers » Plan ahead » Collaborate
  47. 47. Effective collaboration Former Poynter Institute fellow Monica Moses offers tips: What story should be planned? » Any story that readers should not miss. Usually the lead or centerpiece on each section front. Who needs to be involved? » No more than six people. 1. reporter 2. editor 3. photo and/or graphics rep. 4. designer 5. copy editor One must have authority to green light the group’s plans.
  48. 48. When is the right time to talk? » Before writing or visual work is begun, but after the reporter has a good idea of the scope and thrust of the story. » The more focused the story idea, the better the headlines and visuals can be. » Rule of thumb: If the story can not be summed up in 20 words or fewer, you are not ready to plan the presentation.
  49. 49. Questions to ask yourselves » What is the point of the story? » Why will readers care about it? » What form should the story take? (One long narrative? Intro with nuggets and graphic?) » How can the story best be illustrated? (Photo, graphic or illustration? Numbers? Infobox?) » What is the working headline? (Whoever is doing the visual work needs this headline to produce good, journalistic, contentdriven photos, illustrations or graphics.)
  50. 50. How long should these meetings last? » No longer than 10 to 15 minutes. » The more you do, the better and faster you become What is the tone of these conversations? » They should be as fun, democratic, creative and freewheeling as possible. » They can generate excitement. » Many photographers, artists and designers get new visual ideas from talking to reporters. » Many reporters say they see their stories in a new light after talking with people from other departments.
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