Extreme makeover cte standards edition acsa nov 2013 compressed
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Information on the revised CTE Model Curriculum Standards with a focus on the Standards for Career Ready Practices.

Information on the revised CTE Model Curriculum Standards with a focus on the Standards for Career Ready Practices.

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  • Welcome audienceQuick survey of who the audience is (Teachers, Site Administrators, Counselors, COE or District Superintendents)Acknowledge any CDE staff in room and any members of the CCSESA CTE Workgroup
  • The Career Technical Education (CTE) Model Curriculum Standards are designed to assist teachers in developing high-quality curriculum and instruction to ensure students are both career and college ready and prepare them for their future careers.The revised CTE/MCS help to prepare students for the 21st century. The standards, as you will learn, have been designed to promote integration among programs and to increase relevance and rigor.Industry Sectors and Pathways: referenced on Page 7 of the CTE Model Curriculum Standards Executive Summary.
  • When the state board adopted the common core state standards, the need arose to align the CTE standards with the new common core. Therefore, the new model CTE standards were developed with deliberate parallels to Common Core State Standards.Say something like, “The new standards are fewer clearer and deeper similar to common core, based on research, and aligned with postsecondary and work expectations. They are measurable because college and career readiness demands that career readiness be measured.”
  • The Beyond Knowledge Construct and Verbs on the next slide: reference page 3 of the CTE Model Curriculum Standards Executive Summary. Anderson and Krathwohl (2001) revised Bloom's original taxonomy in their book, A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, by combining both the cognitive processes and knowledge dimensions.The Beyond Knowledge Construct, developed by the CDE, builds upon these research models to provide a visual interpretation for developing the new pathway standards. Depth of Knowledge (DOK) model is employed to analyze the cognitive expectation demanded by standards, curricular activities and assessment tasks (Webb, 1997). Depth of knowledge increases as the learning expectations move from lower left to upper rightUpper right corner is the highest level of Knowledge and Performance “create solutions to real world, non-routine, complex problems using multiple steps and metacognitive to form a coherent whole”
  • What Are Depth of Knowledge (DOK )Levels? The DOK level describes the kind of thinking involved in the task, not whether it will be completed correctly. A greater DOK level requires greater conceptual understanding and cognitive processing by the students. Therefore, on average, students who reach greater DOK levels more regularly will have increased student achievement. Level 1 involves recall and the response is automatic. Students either know the answer or not. Level 1 activities require students to demonstrate a rote response, follow a set of procedures, or perform simple calculations. Level 2 activities are more complex and require students to engage in mental processing and reasoning beyond a habitual response. These activities make students decide how to approach the problem, involving interpreting and developing relationships among concepts.Level 3 activities necessitate higher cognitive demands than the previous two levels. At Level 3 students are providing evidentiary support and reasoning for conclusions they draw. In most instances, having students explain and justify their thinking is at a Level 3. Typically, Level 3 activities have more than one correct response or approach to the problem.Level 4 includes those tasks in which students must demonstrate reasoning, planning, and developing connections within and beyond a content area. The new Smarter Balanced assessments will include questions from the higher levels of Depth of Knowledge. These tasks should be incorporated into the curriculum since it is this type of thinking we want to encourage from all of our students. Most of the new Smarter Balanced Assessment will be level 3 & 4 questions.
  • Lets take a look at the structure of the new CTE Model Curriculum Standards
  • Note – two areas will be circled. The bottom three levels of the pyramid will be circled first. Give the information for these three levels before clicking to animate the next circle comprised of the top two levels of the pyramid.First level at the bottom of the pyramid: The standards for career ready practice are what all high school students need to be employable and college ready.Second level of the pyramid: The industry sector anchor standards (also known in the CDE document as Knowledge and Performance Anchor Standards) are common across the entire industry sector and are what students in that sector need to understand and apply. They are aligned to the ELA common core state standards as all forms of literacy are critical in every industry sector.Third level of the pyramid: The pathway standards are the next level above the anchor and these are specific to a pathway within that industry sector that leads to a student being career ready.Click to animate the circle for the top two levelsThe industry specific standards are standards not covered in our document but are specific to industry that might require certification An employer may require additional training beyond the industry certificate.
  • The Career Technical Education (CTE) Model Curriculum Standards are designed to assist in developing high quality curriculum and instruction to help ensure students are career and college ready. The new Common Core State Standards require academic teachers to include real world applications in their curriculum. Who better to support them than CTE teachers who have always included real world relevance in their curriculum? The result: better prepared studentsThe standards offer clear guidelines for course content development and expectations for student achievement. Standards are rigorous, research-based, evidence-based, relevant, and reasonable in scope. Building on their format, the revised CTE Model Curriculum Standards expands the research base used in writing the standards. The additional research includes the Wisconsin Center of Educational Research Depth of Knowledge Levels, the Rigor/Relevance Framework from the International Center for Leadership in Education, and A Model of Learning Objectives based on A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives from the Iowa State University Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching.
  • The Standards for Career Ready Practice are adapted from the National Common Career Technical Core; over 42 states were involved in the development of these practices. The twelve Standards for Career Ready Practice reflect the expectations from business and industry, labor, community, and education representatives from over 40 participating states and align with the CTE anchor standards. These new Standards for Career Ready Practice were adopted for California and based on the “Career Ready Practices” adopted by the Common Career Technical (CCTC). The CCTC practices are posted at: http://www.careertech.org/These were derived from the Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) Report first published in the 1990’s.
  • The Standards for Career Ready Practice can be integrated with a course or incorporated into several courses over multiple school years (grades seven through twelve). The practices are expectations for all students, whether they are enrolled in a CTE program or following a more generalized course sequence. It is expected that all students who exit high school will be proficient in these practices.
  • Standards for Career Ready Practice (much of this is addressed in the Common Core which was taken from the College and Career Readiness standards)The twelve Career Ready Practices reflect the expectations from business and industry, labor, community, and education representatives from over 40 participating states and align with the CTE anchor standards. “Career Ready Practices describe the career-ready skills that educators should seek to develop in their students. These practices are not exclusive to a Career Pathway, program of study, discipline or level of education. Career Ready Practices can be taught and reinforced in all career exploration and preparation programs with increasingly higher levels of complexity and expectation as a student advances through a program of study.” (NASDCTEc Common Career Technical Core, 2012)The career ready practices can be integrated in a course or incorporated into several courses over multiple school years. The practices are expectations for all students whether enrolled in a CTE program or a more generalized academic course sequence. It is expected that all students upon exiting high school will be proficient in these practices.CDE is working to integrate these Standards for Career Ready Practice into all CCSS documents in California. These are to be shared with academic teachers as well as CTE teachers.
  • Standards for Career Ready Practice: reference pages 11 & 12 of the CTE Model Curriculum Standards Executive Summary.Cue audience to pull out/ or pass out Handout module 1-#4: Standards for Career Ready Practice These are for ALL students, not just CTE students!This is the foundation that all students need to be ready for careers AND college. We will take a closer look at these in Module 2.
  • They are adapted from the National Common Career Technical Core and funded by the National Association of State Directors of CTE Consortium; over 42 states were involved in the development of these practices. This was a national effort to make certain ALL students get this information. These are the updated version of the 21st SCANS skills. Discuss these standards in depth.
  • The Standards for Career Ready Practice are adapted from the National Common Career Technical Core; over 42 states were involved in the development of these practices. The twelve Standards for Career Ready Practice reflect the expectations from business and industry, labor, community, and education representatives from over 40 participating states and align with the CTE anchor standards. They can be integrated with a course or incorporated into several courses over multiple school years (grades seven through twelve). The practices are expectations for all students, whether they are enrolled in a CTE program or following a more generalized course sequence. It is expected that all students who exit high school will be proficient in these practices.These new Standards for Career Ready Practice were adopted for California and based on the “Career Ready Practices” adopted by the Common Career Technical Core (CCTC). The CCTC practices are posted at: http://www.careertech.org/These were derived from the Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) Report first published in the 1990’s.
  • See Resource Sheet National Collaboration on Workforce and Disability has background Also George Washington University’s Freshman Transition Initiative
  • Many existing relevant resources not well understood outside of those already with strong CTE/Pathways Starting place is to have a “map” of where and how career development relates to education.
  • PRESENTERS CAN DO THIS ACTIVITY IF THEY HAVE TIMEPresenter ask someone to read the first paragraph of page 11 in the Introduction which explains the SCRP. This can be in booklet form, or printed from www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.aspPresenter, then says: “Put a check mark next to each standard you are already doing in your course.” Allow time to complete this.“Circle the number next to the standard that you COULD integrate” (example circle #2) Allow time to complete this.“Place an exclamation mark next to those that surprise you, for whatever reason.” Allow time to complete this.“Write a question mark next to those you might have questions about or need help with to integrate into your curriculum” Allow time to complete this.It is helpful if you have teachers sitting together by Industry sector and/or pathway to discuss what they see and share ideas.
  • Modeling best practices:Think, Pair ShareMention that this strategy can prepare kids for a reading assignment, or research.Think: Pose the question and allow participants to think to themselves, or write a response to the prompt.Pair: Choose a person next to you. This can be done with “numbered heads”, Person A/B, Left/Right, or any way the presenter wants to partner people. Share: Decide who will go first/second and share your thoughts (presenter may choose to have person A share first, etc.)This process is helpful to engage teachers in sharing ideas and discussing the fact that ALL teachers should be addressing these Standards for Career Ready Practices, not just CTE teachers.
  • Let’s instead look at outcomes in terms of what happens to students related to their educational experience.Two years ago the US Dept. of Ed rolled up national outcome data and it looked like this for 100 students starting the 9th grade.The 50 % - 75% - 50% 25% split has remained remarkably consistent over the last 40 years. Recent gains in grad rates and disadvantaged students aspiring to college have been dampened by the falling career and employment prospects of all educational cohorts, and twin hardships of rising college costs and soaring debt levels.We have a long way to go to meet our twin goals of college (or other postsecondary) and career for all. Some have proposed a more accurate “framing” of what are schools are or need to be and that we would be much better able to improve outcomes if we saw schools as resting on a three legged stoolResources, Organization, ManagementInstruction, Curriculum, AssessmentsStudent Learning Experience (attitudes and beliefs, barriers and supports, identification with learning experience, school climate, etc.) Recent CA history – budget cuts, “flexed” programs Student - Counselors 1,016 to 1 (last)Record youth un and underemployment, falling wages, overeducated job seekers for the jobs that are being created, etc.
  • The industry sector anchor standards (also known in the CDE document as Knowledge and Performance Anchor Standards) are common across the entire industry sector and are what students in that sector need to understand and apply. 2.0 to 10.0 are directly aligned to the ELA common core state standards.
  • This screen shot was taken from page6 of the Executive Summary to show deliberate alignment to Common Core StandardsThe anchor standards are the basis for each of the pathways within each sector. The standards are designed to assist with the development of course curricula and instructional lesson plans. The standards describe what is to be taught and measured. The teacher most often determines the sequence and strategies to be used to meet the needs of the student population to be served.  Anchor Standard 1: Academics, guides users to the sector specific Academic standards related to each industry sector, which are listed in the Alignment Matrix located at the end of each sector section. Using the Academic Alignment Matrix as a resource, academic and CTE teachers can see where enhancements and support for both sets of standards can be initiated. CTE teachers can quickly identify academic standards that have a substantial relationship to their instruction. Likewise, academic teachers can specify individual academic standards and quickly identify related CTE standards, to assist them in incorporating application and technology in their curricula and lessonsAnchor standards 2-10 are deliberately aligned to one of the Common Core English Language Arts standards, using similar language demonstrating the natural connections between the two subjects (See College and Career Readiness Standards handout). Anchor Standard 11: Demonstration and Application, highlights classroom, laboratory and workplace learning specific to the individual sector and pathways.CTE Anchor Standards – Common Core English Language Arts Alignment: reference page 6 of the CTE Model Curriculum Standards Executive Summary. These are the former Foundation Standards.The 11 anchor standards build on the standards for career ready practice and are common across the 15 industry sectors They have direct alignment to ELA CCSS. Anchor Standards 1.0 is identified as Academics …….. these are directly aligned by sector pathways here…..1.0 is specific to the industry sector and include core academic standards2.0-10.0 are aligned to the ELA common core anchor standards11.0 are application standards
  • Direct participants to find the copy of their Industry Sector Knowledge and Performance Anchor Standards.These should be printed in advance and are available online at: www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.aspThe eleven Knowledge and Performance Anchor Standards build on the Standards for Career Ready Practice and are common across the 15 industry sectors. Each Anchor standard is the same across all industry sectors (1.0, 2.0, 3.0, etc.)BUT Performance Indicators are directly correlated to the Industry Sector, so may vary slightly. (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, etc.)
  • Participants locate the Knowledge & Performance Anchor Standards from their Sector. These should be printed in advance and are available online at: www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.aspThe performance indicators that follow each standard offer guidance for both course design and student assessment. They are intended to guide coursework as it is developed. The pathways organize the standards with a career focus but are not designed to be offered as a course. Rather the standards from each pathway are collected and organized into a sequence of learning. Standards can be collected from more than one sector to create the course meeting local demands of industry and particular student populations.Performance indicators provide guidance for curriculum design and standards measurement. The industry sector anchor standards are customized with selected additions to better reflect the special conditions and needs of a particular industry sector.
  • Ask participants to take out their copy of the College & Career Readiness Standards. Tell them that these were used as the basis the Knowledge & Performance Anchor Standards.
  • Old standard only expect the student to understand safety policies while the new standard requires the student to actually demonstrate the ability be safe in the workplace.The new standard also has a direct relationship to Common Core English Language Arts Standard which I will demonstrate in greater detail later.
  • The pathway standards are the next level above the anchor and these are specific to a pathway within that industry sector that leads to a student being career ready.
  • Pathways are NOT coursesIn notes on Pathway standards – make sure you reference the last section – build from simple to complex – this is where we can refer to vocabulary and Beyond Knowledge Construct
  • Trainer of trainers – the following 6 slides will discuss how the CTE Standards integrate with the Common Core State Standards including the 12 Standards for Career Ready Practice that ALL students (not just CTE students) should know.The former Foundation standards which are now called the Anchor Standards are common across ALL industry sectors and the Pathway Standards which are specific to each industry.(See notes under each slide for additional information)
  • After the development of the pathway standards, curriculum experts were asked to assist in aligning the CTE standards to the common core, Next Generation Science, and current social studies standards. They were asked to identify substantial or nature alignment from which an alignment matrix was developed for each industry sector. That was on year ago during Ed for Careers. They looked at these……
  • Academic Alignment Matrix: reference page 9 of the CTE Model Curriculum Standards Executive Summary. Each sector includes an academic alignment matrix that displays where a natural, obvious alignment occurs. On the left are industry-specific academic standards – on the right are the pathway standards which align with the academic standard. Compiled by five teams of academic content experts in collaboration with industry-sector consultants, teachers, and other advisers, the alignment was selected if it was determined that the pathway standard would enhance, reinforce, or provide an application for a specific academic subject standard. WE WILL SEE THESE AGAIN IN MODULE 2
  • Academic Alignment MatrixEach sector includes an academic alignment matrix that displays where a natural, obvious alignment occurs. Compiled by five teams of academic content experts in collaboration with industry-sector consultants, teachers, and other advisers, the alignment was selected if it was determined that the pathway standard would enhance, reinforce, or provide an application for a specific academic subject standard. The alignment matrices include the subjects of Common Core English language arts and mathematics standards, history/social studies standards, and Next Generation Science Core Ideas. To assist with further review and implementation, each academic alignment is notated with specific pathway standards codes
  • The matrix at the end of the industry sector standards show alignment between the MCS and CCSS.Allow time for participants to look through and understand how this matrix is structured.NOTE: this will help CTE teachers collaborate with Academic teachers. These connected were viewed and vetted by dozens of academic teachers across the state. This matrix should be shared with Academic teachers so they can begin to integrate CTE into their courses.
  • Next I would like to share with you examples of CTE and academic standard alignment.
  • Say: What follows are two assessment examples. One is an actual assessment from a current Learning Construction Trades textbook published by Cengage. The other is an actual test question from the new Smarter Balanced Assessment.
  • These are the levels for much of our reading for CTESource: Aligning the Journey with the Destination, by Gary Williamson, Ph.D.; 2006Comment in trainer – reinforce that some teachers are already doing the reading required for the higherlexile level s– celebrate what you are already doing – but now doing in a more intentional way.What kinds of reading, how do you help students read?
  • Unlike current CST assessments, the new CCSS assessments will be computer-based and be adaptive. Adaptive means that the questions will adjust in difficulty level as the student answers. This will prevent frustration and burnout as students take the test—and thus give a more accurate read of their proficiency levels.CTE teachers who typically work in a computer lab setting should begin talking with their administrators about how they may be impacted by this new assessment system.
  • Presenter hint: All of these assessment questions are taken directly from current CTE textbooks. (But don’t mention this until after slide 40 when participants are asked which is a current assessment and which is a new SBAC assessment question.)Other sample questions that can be used:A carpenter needs to make 45 right triangles that have a height of 48" and a base measuring 48". How many 4' x 8' sheets of plywood are required for this job?Explain why symbols are used on construction drawings.Explain when elevations are not labeled according to compass directions.Explain why measuring a drawing with an architect's scale is a poor practice.
  • CTE teachers already use the kinds of assessments found in the new Smarter Balanced Assessments. Now core academics will be assessed the same way CTE courses have always been assessed. CTE teachers will be the ones supporting this type of shift in assessment. It is no longer “multiple choice” it is about explaining the answerPresenterhint:This is a Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Assessment question- item #43057 (But don’t mention this until after slide 40 when participants are asked which is a current assessment and which is a new SBAC assessment question.)
  • For first question, poll the room.Depending upon your audience choose one or more of the following questions for discussion (or ask your own question)Talk with a neighbor: What advantages will CTE students have in the new assessment? What professional development opportunities arise from these examples?IMPORTANT: Module 2 will address integrating core academics and Module 3 will have teaching strategies.
  • Lets take a look at the structure of the new CTE Model Curriculum Standards
  • Note that this is a quick “reflection strategy”
  • Speaker should emphasize the convenience of the linked resource online, which takes viewers directly to Industry Sectors. QR code takes smartphone users, tablets, etc. directly to the webpage.Announce that the MCS Introduction is available online

Transcript

  • 1. Presented by Russell Weikle, Director Carolyn Zachry, Ed.D., Education Programs Consultant Career and College Transition Division California Department of Education 1
  • 2. 2
  • 3.  Fewer, clearer, deeper  Research and evidence based  Reasonable in scope  Essential, rigorous, clear, specific and coherent  Aligned with postsecondary and work expectations  Measurable 3
  • 4.  Foster the Career Readiness of all students.  Support mastery of essential employability skills and rigorous academic content  Develop a highly skilled and educated workforce which contributes to economic prosperity  Support a seamless transition to postsecondary education and/or career entry  Improve student achievement  Put knowledge into practice
  • 5. Research  Bloom’s Taxonomy (Revised)  Rigor and Relevance Framework – Bill Daggett  Knowledge Dimension - Anderson, Lorin and David Krathwohl  Depth of Knowledge - Norman L. Webb 5
  • 6. Beyond Knowledge Construct Knowledge DOK 4 Metacognitive form a coherent whole DOK 3 Procedural How parts relate, find coherence DOK 2 Conceptual clarify, give examples Factual recognize, recall, Locate DOK 1 Use Performance 6 One-step process to solve a routine problem Apply Multi-step process to solve routine problems Solve Non-routine problems using multiple steps Create Solutions to real world nonroutine, complex problems using multiple steps
  • 7. Factual Access Define Describe Find Identify Label List Locate Match Name Recall Recite Recognize Remember Retrieve Select State 13 Conceptual Adhere Apply Classify Communicate Compare Demonstrate Develop Discriminate Employ Explain Implement Infer Interpret Maintain Organize Participate Practice Promote Summarize Transfer Understand Use Procedural Analyze Assess Comply Compare Contrast Deconstruct Deduce Defend Detect Diagram Differentiate Discern Distinguish Enhance Evaluate Experiment Explore Illustrate Integrate Research Solve Test Metacognitive Advocate Build Compile Compose Construct Create Design Devise Formulate Invent Plan Predict Produce Reconstruct Reorganize Synthesize
  • 8. Beyond Knowledge Construct Develop a wind- resistant solar carport for the student parking lot and DOK Explain the convince the school 4 board advantages and to fund it. Knowledge Metacognitive form a coherent whole disadvantages of DOK using recycled Construct a 1/8th building scale model of3 materials a Procedural How parts relate, find coherence Conceptual clarify, give examples Factual recognize, recall, Locate garage using DOK only recycled List 15 building2 materials products and find a DOK “green” alternative to each one 1 Use Performance 8 One-step process to solve a routine problem Apply Multi-step process to solve routine problems Solve Non-routine problems using multiple steps Create Solutions to real world nonroutine, complex problems using multiple steps
  • 9. 9
  • 10. Employer Industry Specific Pathway Standards Industry Sector Anchors (Knowledge and Performance Anchor Standards) Standards for Career Ready Practice 10
  • 11. 11
  • 12. What will our high school graduating students need to know and be able to do in order to be successful in college or entering into the work force? 12
  • 13.   Thirty-two statements regarding reading, writing, speaking and listening and the proper use of language were crafted. These statements became the ANCHORS for the English Language Arts standards. 13
  • 14. The standards are designed from College and Career, Life-Long Transfer Goals, called Anchor Standards, and backwards mapped all the way down to kindergarten. 14
  • 15. Solve challenging and complex problems. Design student tasks that rigorous and relevant. 15 Clearer, fewer, higher aligned to college and career expectations.
  • 16. CA-97 Isolated Skills CCSS/ CTE Skills Organized Around Big Ideas Source: Tools for the Common Core (http://commoncoretools.me/2012/02/16/the-structure-is-the-standards/) 16
  • 17. 17
  • 18. 18
  • 19.  CCSS/ CTE standards focus on ◦ rigorous and relevant curriculum, ◦ application of knowledge and skills, and ◦ interdisciplinary activities. 19
  • 20. Industry & Pathway Updates CCSS Alignment Matrices 20 Anchor StandardsCCSS Relationship Career Ready Practices
  • 21. Career Technical Education Continuum Standards Employer • Intended as a goal Industry students either: for ALL Specific licensure and Incidental alignment • Prior to entering a Career Technical Education certifications with Common Core, NGSS, and pathway Pathway What pathway students need in a Career Technical to know and perform. State History/Soc. Studies • Integrated Education pathway Industry Sector Anchor Deliberate alignment with Common Core ELA students need • IntegratedWhat CTE and perform. to knowin preparation into other coursework to meetStandardsand college readiness Adapted from the career for Career Ready Practice What ALL students need to know and understand. Common Career Technical Education Core
  • 22.  Adapted from the National Career Technical Common Core  Align with Skills for the 21st Century  Describe the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to be ready for careers AND college  Adapted from the National Common Career Technical Core  Not exclusive to a career pathway, CTE program of study, a particular discipline, or grade level 22
  • 23.  Increase in complexity and expectation as student advance through a program of study  Are taught and reinforced in all career exploration or career preparation programs, or integrated into core curriculum  For ALL students, not just CTE students 23
  • 24. 24
  • 25. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Apply appropriate technical skills and academic knowledge Communicate clearly, effectively, and with reason Develop an education and career plan aligned to personal goals Apply technology to enhance productivity Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them Practice personal health and understand financial literacy 25
  • 26. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Act as a responsible citizen in the workplace and the community Model integrity, ethical leadership, and effective management Work productively in teams while using cultural/global competence Demonstrate creativity and innovation Employ valid and reliable research strategies Understand the environmental, social, and economic impacts of decisions 26
  • 27. 27
  • 28. Standards for Career Ready Practice Example 3. Develop an education and career plan aligned to personal goals. Career-ready individuals take personal ownership of their own educational and career goals and manage their individual plan to attain these goals. They recognize the value of each step in the educational and experiential process, and that nearly all career paths require ongoing education and experience to adapt to practices, procedures, and expectations of an ever changing work environment. They seek counselors, mentors, and other experts to assist in the planning and execution of education and career plans. 28
  • 29. When Implemented Well……. ◦ Addresses Career, Postsecondary, and Life Goals ◦ Informed by Career and Self Exploration prior to High School ◦ Motivates all students to “own their own learning” ◦ Can increase engagement of students, teachers, support personnel, parents, and community when implemented well ◦ Positive impact on school climate ◦ Improve academic performance, attendance, graduation rates ◦ Optional modes of delivery: extra-curricular, classbased, “advisory”/school counselor 29
  • 30. 30
  • 31.  ! ? 31 1. What you are already doing. 2. What you could integrate? 3. What surprises you? 4. What standards might you need help with?
  • 32. Think, Pair, Share Standards for Career Ready Practice How can all teachers integrate the Standards for Career Ready Practice in their core subjects? 30 seconds 32
  • 33.  100 Students Start 9th grade: ◦ 51 are on a “college prep” track ◦ 75 graduate from high school ◦ 51 enter college  38 need remediation ◦ 26 graduate college College Completion Toolkit U. S. Department of Education, March 2011 33
  • 34. 3 2 34
  • 35.   California has not, to date, adopted a statewide definition of “career readiness.” In Building Blocks for Change: What it Means to be Career Ready (2012), the Career Readiness Partner Council, a national coalition of leaders from national education and workforce organizations, defined a “career-ready person” as one who “effectively navigates pathways that connect education and employment to achieve a fulfilling, financiallysecure, and successful career.” 35
  • 36. Career Education in California 82% of LEAs serving students in grades 9–12 received Perkins funding in the 2011–12 school year. 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 Number of LEAs serving grades 9–12 Number of LEAs Receiving Perkins Funding 36
  • 37. ‹#›
  • 38. ‹#›
  • 39. Career Education in California 900,000 800,000 700,000 600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 39
  • 40. Continuum Standards • Drawn from Employer • Preparing Students for the 21st Century Economy (American Industry Association of Colleges of Teacher Education and Partnership for the Specific licensure and 21st Century) certifications Pathway • Skills and Assessments: What Business Wants (American Association of Colleges and Universities and Peter D. Hart Research What pathway students Associates, Inc.) need to know and perform. • Importance of Skills and Knowledge for College and Career Readiness Industry Sector Anchor (MetLife Survey of The American Teacher) What CTE students need to know • Are They Really Ready to and perform. Work? (Employers’ Perspectives on the Basic Knowledge and Applied Skills Ready Practice to the 21st Standards for Career of New Entrants Century U.S. Workforce) What ALL students need to know and understand.
  • 41. 41
  • 42. • Build on the Standards for Career Ready Practice • Common across the 15 industry sectors • Apply to all pathways within a specific industry sector • Anchor Standard 1: Academics, guides users to the sector specific core academic standards related to each industry sector, which are listed in the Alignment Matrix located at the end of each sector section. • Anchor standards 2-10 are deliberately aligned to one of the Common Core English Language Arts standards • Anchor Standard 11: Demonstration and Application, highlights classroom, laboratory and workplace learning specific to the individual sector and pathways. 42
  • 43. 1. ACADEMICS 2. COMMUNICATIONS 3. 4. 5. 6. 43 7. CAREER PLANNING & MANAGEMENT 8. TECHNOLOGY 9. PROBLEM SOLVING & CRITICAL THINKING 10. HEALTH & SAFETY 11. RESPONSIBILITY & FLEXIBILITY ETHICS & LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES LEADERSHIP & TEAMWORK TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS DEMONSTRATION & APPLICATION
  • 44. What all CTE students need to know and perform Standard is bolded text (5.0) Performance Indicators are sub text (5.1) 44
  • 45. Performance Anchor Indicator 2.1,Standard . . . 2.2, 2.3 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 . . . 45
  • 46. 2.0 Communications Acquire and use accurately, Agriculture and Natural Resources sector terminology and protocols at the career and college readiness level for communicating effectively in oral, written, and multimedia formats. 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 46 Recognize the elements of communication using a sender–receiver model. Identify barriers to accurate and appropriate communication. Interpret verbal & nonverbal communications and respond appropriately. Demonstrate elements of written and electronic communication, such as accurate spelling, grammar and format. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. Advocate and practice, safe, legal and responsible use of digital media information and communication technologies.
  • 47. College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards 3 2
  • 48. Agriculture and Natural Resources Former Foundation Standard: Communications Students understand the principles of effective oral, written, and multimedia communications. ELA Common Core Standard: Listening & Speaking Acquire and use accurately general academic and domainspecific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the career and college readiness level (LS 11-12.6) New Anchor Standard 2: Communications Acquire and use accurately, Agriculture and Natural Resources sector terminology and protocols at the career and college readiness level for communicating effectively in oral, written, and multimedia formats. (Deliberate Alignment) 48
  • 49. Energy, Environment, and Utilities ELA Common Core Standard: Writing Standard Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback including new arguments and information CTE Anchor Standard 5: Problem Solving and Critical Thinking Use existing and emerging technology to investigate, research, and produce products and services, including new information, as required in the Engineering and Architecture sector workplace environment. (Direct alignment to WS 11-12.6) 49
  • 50. Former Standard in Building Trades and Construction Students understand health and safety policies, procedures, regulations, and practices, including the use of equipment and handling of hazardous materials. New Standard in Building and Construction Trades Demonstrate health and safety procedures, regulations, and personal health practices and determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and domain-specific words and phrases as related to the Building and Construction Trades sector workplace environment. (Direct alignment with RSTS 9-10, 11-12.4)
  • 51. Career Ready Practice Develop an education and career plan aligned to personal goals. Industry Sector Anchor Standard Career Planning and Management: Integrate multiple sources of career information from diverse formats to make informed career decisions and manage personal career plans. Identify personal interests, aptitudes, information, and skills necessary for informed career Aligns with English Language Arts Standard decision-making.  Evaluate personal character traits, such as trust, respect, and responsibility, and understand the impact they can have on career success.  Explore how information and communication technologies are used in career planning and decision making.  Integrate and evaluate opportunities availableof information presented in Research the scope of career multiple sources and the requirements for education training, certification, and differentcareer plan that licensure. well as in words in and postsecondary options. media or formats as interests, pathways, order to address a  Develop a reflects career  Reading Standards for Informational Text: question or solve a problem. (RSIT 11-12.7) 51
  • 52.  Vocabulary is comprised of three parts: ◦ Academic Vocabulary ◦ Technical Vocabulary ◦ Common Verbiage
  • 53.    Words “which are used across content areas, have abstract definitions, and are a challenge to master” (Townsend, 2009). “Lexical items [that] occur frequently and uniformly across a wide range of academic material” (Coxhead, 2000). Does not include the list of the 2000 most common words
  • 54.    If we struggled at all to determine which words constitute academic vocabulary, how can we help students master vocabulary? Can we know which words will be a problem for all students? Will they struggle with the same words?
  • 55.    Students need a strategy so they can direct their own learning. We cannot know what words they will need help with. We cannot teach all the important words of a lesson at the beginning. ◦ For a student with limited vocabulary background, this would be akin to memorizing the dictionary.
  • 56.   Personal dictionary/word wall Includes ◦ Word ◦ What the word appears to mean in context  If we must use the word guess, let’s call it an educated guess ◦ Dictionary definition of the word ◦ Rewrite the definition in own words 56
  • 57.   “Words that don’t have exact synonyms or [have] different meanings in other contexts” (Mudraya, 2006). “Closely related to the topic and not likely to be known in general language with the same meaning” (Nation, 2001, 2003).
  • 58.     The limits of context With 24” on-center construction, the truss must sit on the top plate directly over a stud. What does the word mean in context? Context will simply not work here. We must rely on a technical definition.
  • 59.   Personal dictionary/word wall Includes ◦ Word ◦ Definition/Accurate Description ◦ Picture 59
  • 60.   Now that students have seen the word (just in time), they get to see it with their problemsolving in the shop.
  • 61.   Remember that all vocabulary words serve as gatekeepers for knowledge, BUT the two types require slightly different approaches and our recognition.
  • 62.  Remember that technical vocabulary words do not possess synonyms. ◦ The word resistance in electricity might seem similar to the academic version of the word, but the academic definition will not help students with the technical knowledge or skills they need.
  • 63.  Vocabulary instruction, like all instruction, must be authentic. This means students should learn words they need when they need them. ◦ Just-in-time Instruction
  • 64.    Working by yourself, think of technical vocabulary from a CTE field. Try to define the word without using additional technical vocabulary. Is this easier than drawing a picture?
  • 65.  “Background knowledge manifests itself as vocabulary knowledge; therefore, teaching vocabulary is synonymous with teaching background knowledge.” (Marzano)
  • 66. Continuum Standards Employer • Unique within an industryIndustry sector Specific • Organized by careers within the industry sector of similar licensure and functions, services, and certifications work environments Pathway • Describe what students should know and be able to do What pathway students once the standards content is achieved need to know and perform. • Build from simple to complex knowledge and performance Industry Sector Anchor What CTE students need Standards • Incidental Alignment with Academic to know and perform. Standards for Career Ready Practice What ALL students need to know and understand.
  • 67. Has an occupational focus Consistent in size and scope Comprised of similar functions Inclusive of all aspects of the industry Includes 8-12 pathway specific standards Demonstrates sequence potential Lead to high skill, high wage, or high demand jobs ◦ Reasonable and appropriate for high school ◦ Sustainable and viable over next 10 years ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ 67
  • 68. Unique to industry sector Describes what students should know and be able to do Builds from simple to complex knowledge and performance 68
  • 69. C4.0 Perform and document maintenance procedures in accordance with the recommendations of the manufacturer. C4.1 Communicate the procedures and practices of various manufacturers regarding service, repair and maintenance schedules. C4.2 Demonstrate how to properly document maintenance and repair procedures in accordance with applicable rules, laws, and regulations (e.g., Bureau of Auto Repair [BAR], Occupational Health and Safety Administration [OSHA], and the California Air Resources Board [CARB]). C4.3 Use reference books, technical service bulletins, and other documents and materials related to the service industry available in print and through electronic retrieval systems to accurately diagnose and repair systems, equipment, and vehicles. C4.4 Complete a work order, including customer information, description of repairs, and billing information, in accordance with applicable rules, laws, and regulations. 69
  • 70. 70
  • 71.  Identify pathway standards that have a substantial and natural alignment to a core curriculum standard  Determine if the pathway standard will enhance, reinforce or apply a specific core subject standard  Developed an alignment matrix at end of each Industry Sector 71
  • 72. 72 72
  • 73. CCSS Pathway Standards
  • 74. 74
  • 75. PATHWAYS TRANSPORTATION A. Operations B. Structural Repair and Refinishing C. Systems Diagnostics and Service 11-12.3 Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text. A6.0 B1.0, B2.0, B3.0, B4.0, B6.0, B7.0, B8.0, B9.0 C1.0, C2.0, C5.0 11-12.10 By the end of grade 12 read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 11-12 text complexity band independently and proficiently. A1.0, A2.0, A3.0, A4.0, A5.0, A6.0, A7.0 B1.0, B2.0, B3.0, B4.0, B5.0, B6.0, B7.0, B8.0, B9.0 C1.0, C2.0, C3.0, C4.0, C5.0, C6.0, C7.0, C8.0 11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. A5.0 B5.0 C5.0 11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. A7.0 B5.0 C5.0 11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. A3.0, A4.0, B5.0 C4.0 11-12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information. A1.0,A3.0 A4.0 B2.0, B3.0, B5.0, B6.0, B8.0, B9.0 C6.0, C7.0 11-12.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. A1.0, A2.0 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects - RLST (Standard Area, Grade Level, Standard #) Writing Standards - WS (Standard Area, Grade Level, Standard #) 11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. A1.0 C8.0 B5.0 C4.0
  • 76. Literacy in Science & Technical Subjects Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.(11-12.RSTS.3) CTE Application: Patient Care B8.0 Demonstrate the principles of body mechanics as they apply to the positioning, transferring, and transporting of patients. B8.1 Explain the principles of body mechanics. B8.2 Determine appropriate equipment for transportation and transfer, including the modification of equipment and techniques to accommodate the health status of the patient. B8.5 Integrate proper body mechanics, ergonomics, safety equipment, and techniques to prevent personal injury to patients and clients. 76
  • 77. Similarity, Right Triangles and Trigonometry Use trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve right triangles in applied problems. (HS G-STR 8) CTE Application: Residential and Commercial Construction D2.0 Apply the appropriate mathematical calculations used in the construction trades. D2.2 Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to calculate pipe offsets, roof slope, and check for square. D4.0 Demonstrate techniques for proper site preparation. D4.4 Check site layout for square using the diagonal method. 77
  • 78. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits (LS3) Inheritance of Traits (LS3.A) Variation of Traits (LS3.B) CTE Application: Animal Science Discuss animal inheritance and selection principles, including the structure and role of DNA (A & NR D5.0) 5.1 Evaluate a group of animals for desired qualities and discern among them for breeding selection. 5.4 Predict phenotypic and genotypic results of a dominant and recessive gene pair. 5.5 Research the role of mutations, both naturally occurring and artificially induced, & hybrids in animal genetics 78
  • 79. Anchor Standard Standards for Career Ready Practice Pathway Standards Career and College Ready 79
  • 80. Business and Finance Business & Finance Anchor Standard Pathway: Business Management Alignment 5.0 Problem Solving and Critical Thinking A1.0, A2.0, A3.0, A4.0, A5.0, A6.0, A7.0, A8.0, A9.0 Pathway: Financial Services B1.0, B2.0, B3.0, B4.0, B5.0, B6.0, B7.0, B8.0, B9.0, B10.0 Pathway: International Business C1.0, C2.0, C3.0, C4.0, C5.0, C6.0, C7.0 , C8.0 80
  • 81. Business and Finance Business & Finance Alignment Anchor Standard None Pathway: Business Management None Pathway: Financial Services B1.0, B3.0, B4.0, B5.0, B6.0, B7.0, B8.0, B10.0 Pathway: International Business C3.0, C4.0, C6.0, C7.0, C8.0 81
  • 82. 82
  • 83. Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%) Text Lexile Measure (L) 1600 1400 OUR MISSION 1200 1000 800 600 High School Literature College Literature High College School Textbooks Textbooks * Source of National Test Data: MetaMetrics Military Personal Entry-Level Occupations Use SAT 1, ACT, AP*
  • 84. Law and Public Safety 1420 – 1740L Agriculture/Natural Resources 1270 – 1510L Education and Training 1320 – 1370L Transportation, Distribution and Logistics 1170 – 1350L Architecture/Construction 1210 – 1340L Business and Administration 1210 – 1310L Health Science 1260 – 1300L Hospitality and Tourism 1230 – 1260L Scientific Research/Engineering 1190 – 1250L Arts/AV Technology/Communications 1100 – 1190L Source: Aligning the Journey with the Destination, by Gary Williamson, 84
  • 85.  Assessments will include: ◦ Performance Assessments (interim & summative)  Selected Response  Constructed Response  Extended Performance Assessments ◦ Re-take option (summative) 85
  • 86. A job requires 45 brackets as shown. What is the fewest number of 4 x 8 sheets of plywood required? 86
  • 87. A construction worker is using wooden beams to reinforce the back wall of a room. Determine the height, in feet, of the beam that ends at point G. Explain how you found your answer. 87
  • 88.   88 One of these is an assessment in one of our CTE classes. The other is from the new Smarter Balanced Assessment. Can you tell which is which? How do we shift an entire system away from multiple choice “right answers” to deeper, critical thinking, 21st century skills that employers want?
  • 89. 89
  • 90. 1. 2. 3. 4. 90 Consider what you have just seen. In light of this information, what thoughts might you have regarding your position and the role that you play in preparing students to be become college and career ready. Take a moment to jot thoughts on a post-it note. When everyone is ready, share your thoughts with the table group.
  • 91. Directions: 1. In like subject area groups, review your pathway standards (10-15 minutes) 2. Identify your ah-ha’s 3. Discuss at least 2 strategies for integrating standards into your course/instruction 4. Report out 91
  • 92. “Success seems to be connected with action. Successful people keep moving. They make mistakes, but they don't quit.” Conrad Hilton, Hilton Hotels 92
  • 93. 93 The new model curriculum standards are available online at: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp
  • 94.  Career Technical Education Model Curriculum Standards: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp  Common Career Technical Education Core: http://www.careertech.org/careertechnical-education/cctc/  Information about the common core: http://www.corestandards.org/  Full text of the Common Core State Standards: http://www.scoe.net/castandards/index.html  Information about the common core including implementation timelines:http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/cc/  SBAC information: http://www.smarterbalanced.org/  Achieve: http://www.achieve.org/  Curriculum development and model lessons CTE Online: http://www.cteonline.org  California Career Resource Network (CalCRN): http://www.californiacareers.info 94
  • 95. Russell Weikle, Director 916-445-2652 rweikle@cde.ca.gov Carolyn Zachry, Education Programs Consultant 916-323-5042 czachry@cde.ca.gov Career and College Transition Division 95